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Search results for: Grand-Canyon

USA-HIGHWIRE/GRANDCANYON
RTX10YP0
June 24, 2013
Daredevil Nik Wallenda walks on a two-inch (5-cm) diameter steel cable rigged 1,400 feet (426.7 metres)...
LITTLE COLORADO RIVER, UNITED STATES
Daredevil Wallenda walks on a steel cable rigged across more than a quarter-mile deep remote section...
Daredevil Nik Wallenda walks on a two-inch (5-cm) diameter steel cable rigged 1,400 feet (426.7 metres) across more than a quarter-mile deep remote section of the Grand Canyon near Little Colorado River, Arizona June 23, 2013.
REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
USA-HIGHWIRE/GRANDCANYON
RTX10YOU
June 24, 2013
Daredevil Nik Wallenda gestures during a news conference after completing a high-wire walk on a two-inch...
multiple cities, UNITED STATES
Daredevil Wallenda gestures during a news conference after completing a high-wire walk across more than...
Daredevil Nik Wallenda gestures during a news conference after completing a high-wire walk on a two-inch (5-cm) diameter steel cable rigged 1,400 feet (426.7 metres) across more than a quarter-mile deep remote section of the Grand Canyon near Little Colorado River, Arizona June 23, 2013. REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
USA-HIGHWIRE/GRANDCANYON
RTX10YOP
June 24, 2013
Daredevil Nik Wallenda pauses as he walks on a two-inch (5-cm) diameter steel cable rigged 1,400 feet...
LITTLE COLORADO RIVER, UNITED STATES
Daredevil Wallenda pauses as he walks on a steel cable rigged across more than a quarter-mile deep remote...
Daredevil Nik Wallenda pauses as he walks on a two-inch (5-cm) diameter steel cable rigged 1,400 feet (426.7 metres) across more than a quarter-mile deep remote section of the Grand Canyon near Little Colorado River, Arizona June 23, 2013.
REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
USA-HIGHWIRE/GRANDCANYON
RTX10YOI
June 24, 2013
Daredevil Nik Wallenda (C) arrives for a news conference after completing a high-wire walk on a two-inch...
multiple cities, UNITED STATES
Daredevil Wallenda arrives for a news conference after completing a high-wire walk across more than a...
Daredevil Nik Wallenda (C) arrives for a news conference after completing a high-wire walk on a two-inch (5-cm) diameter steel cable rigged 1,400 feet (426.7 metres) across more than a quarter-mile deep remote section of the Grand Canyon near Little Colorado River, Arizona June 23, 2013.
REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
USA-HIGHWIRE/GRANDCANYON
RTX10YOC
June 24, 2013
Daredevil Nik Wallenda smiles during a news conference after completing a high-wire walk on a two-inch...
multiple cities, UNITED STATES
Daredevil Wallenda smiles during a news conference after completing a high-wire walk across more than...
Daredevil Nik Wallenda smiles during a news conference after completing a high-wire walk on a two-inch (5-cm) diameter steel cable rigged 1,400 feet (426.7 metres) across more than a quarter-mile deep remote section of the Grand Canyon near Little Colorado River, Arizona June 23, 2013.
REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT PROFILE)
USA-HIGHWIRE/GRANDCANYON
RTX10YOB
June 24, 2013
Daredevil Nik Wallenda walks on a two-inch (5-cm) diameter steel cable rigged 1,400 feet (426.7 metres)...
LITTLE COLORADO RIVER, UNITED STATES
Daredevil Wallenda walks on a steel cable rigged across more than a quarter-mile deep remote section...
Daredevil Nik Wallenda walks on a two-inch (5-cm) diameter steel cable rigged 1,400 feet (426.7 metres) across more than a quarter-mile deep remote section of the Grand Canyon near Little Colorado River, Arizona June 23, 2013.
REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
USA-HIGHWIRE/GRANDCANYON
RTX10YO5
June 24, 2013
The chasm of the Grand Canyon is pictured in Arizona June 23, 2013. Daredevil Nik Wallenda completed...
LITTLE COLORADO RIVER, UNITED STATES
The chasm of the Grand Canyon is pictured in Arizona
The chasm of the Grand Canyon is pictured in Arizona June 23, 2013. Daredevil Nik Wallenda completed a historic high-wire walk over a section of the Grand Canyon on Sunday, greeted with wild cheers after finishing his journey over the yawning chasm on a 2-inch (5-cm) steel cable. REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT TRAVEL)
USA-HIGHWIRE/GRANDCANYON
RTX10YO4
June 24, 2013
Daredevil Nik Wallenda walks on a two-inch (5-cm) diameter steel cable rigged 1,400 feet (426.7 metres)...
LITTLE COLORADO RIVER, UNITED STATES
Daredevil Wallenda walks on a steel cable rigged across more than a quarter-mile deep remote section...
Daredevil Nik Wallenda walks on a two-inch (5-cm) diameter steel cable rigged 1,400 feet (426.7 metres) across more than a quarter-mile deep remote section of the Grand Canyon near Little Colorado River, Arizona June 23, 2013.
REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
USA-HIGHWIRE/GRANDCANYON
RTX10YO3
June 24, 2013
Daredevil Nik Wallenda pauses as he walks on a two-inch (5-cm) diameter steel cable rigged 1,400 feet...
LITTLE COLORADO RIVER, UNITED STATES
Daredevil Wallenda pauses as he walks on a steel cable rigged across more than a quarter-mile deep remote...
Daredevil Nik Wallenda pauses as he walks on a two-inch (5-cm) diameter steel cable rigged 1,400 feet (426.7 metres) across more than a quarter-mile deep remote section of the Grand Canyon near Little Colorado River, Arizona June 23, 2013.
REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
USA-HIGHWIRE/GRANDCANYON
RTX10YO2
June 24, 2013
Daredevil Nik Wallenda gives a thumbs-up sign as he nears the end, after walking on a two-inch (5-cm)...
LITTLE COLORADO RIVER, UNITED STATES
Daredevil Wallenda gives a thumbs-up sign as he nears the end of a steel cable rigged across more than...
Daredevil Nik Wallenda gives a thumbs-up sign as he nears the end, after walking on a two-inch (5-cm) diameter steel cable rigged 1,400 feet (426.7 metres) across more than a quarter-mile deep remote section of the Grand Canyon near Little Colorado River, Arizona June 23, 2013.
REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
USA-HIGHWIRE/GRANDCANYON
RTX10YO1
June 24, 2013
Daredevil Nik Wallenda walks on a two-inch (5-cm) diameter steel cable rigged 1,400 feet (426.7 metres)...
LITTLE COLORADO RIVER, UNITED STATES
Daredevil Wallenda walks on a steel cable rigged across more than a quarter-mile deep remote section...
Daredevil Nik Wallenda walks on a two-inch (5-cm) diameter steel cable rigged 1,400 feet (426.7 metres) across more than a quarter-mile deep remote section of the Grand Canyon near Little Colorado River, Arizona June 23, 2013.
REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
USA-HIGHWIRE/GRANDCANYON
RTX10YO0
June 24, 2013
Daredevil Nik Wallenda walks on a two-inch (5-cm) diameter steel cable rigged 1,400 feet (426.7 metres)...
LITTLE COLORADO RIVER, UNITED STATES
Daredevil Wallenda walks on a steel cable rigged across more than a quarter-mile deep remote section...
Daredevil Nik Wallenda walks on a two-inch (5-cm) diameter steel cable rigged 1,400 feet (426.7 metres) across more than a quarter-mile deep remote section of the Grand Canyon near Little Colorado River, Arizona June 23, 2013.
REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
USA-HIGHWIRE/GRANDCANYON
RTX10YNW
June 24, 2013
Daredevil Nik Wallenda walks on a two-inch (5-cm) diameter steel cable rigged 1,400 feet (426.7 metres)...
LITTLE COLORADO RIVER, UNITED STATES
Daredevil Wallenda walks on a steel cable rigged across more than a quarter-mile deep remote section...
Daredevil Nik Wallenda walks on a two-inch (5-cm) diameter steel cable rigged 1,400 feet (426.7 metres) across more than a quarter-mile deep remote section of the Grand Canyon near Little Colorado River, Arizona June 23, 2013.
REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
USA-HIGHWIRE/GRANDCANYON
RTX10YNV
June 24, 2013
Daredevil Nik Wallenda walks on a two-inch (5-cm) diameter steel cable rigged 1,400 feet (426.7 metres)...
LITTLE COLORADO RIVER, UNITED STATES
Daredevil Wallenda walks on a steel cable rigged across more than a quarter-mile deep remote section...
Daredevil Nik Wallenda walks on a two-inch (5-cm) diameter steel cable rigged 1,400 feet (426.7 metres) across more than a quarter-mile deep remote section of the Grand Canyon near Little Colorado River, Arizona June 23, 2013.
REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
USA-HIGHWIRE/GRANDCANYON
RTX10YNT
June 24, 2013
Daredevil Nik Wallenda walks on a two-inch (5-cm) diameter steel cable rigged 1,400 feet (426.7 metres)...
LITTLE COLORADO RIVER, UNITED STATES
Daredevil Wallenda walks on a steel cable rigged across more than a quarter-mile deep remote section...
Daredevil Nik Wallenda walks on a two-inch (5-cm) diameter steel cable rigged 1,400 feet (426.7 metres) across more than a quarter-mile deep remote section of the Grand Canyon near Little Colorado River, Arizona June 23, 2013.
REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
USA-HIGHWIRE/GRANDCANYON
RTX10YNS
June 24, 2013
Daredevil Nik Wallenda walks on a two-inch (5-cm) diameter steel cable rigged 1,400 feet (426.7 metres)...
multiple cities, UNITED STATES
Daredevil Wallenda walks on a steel cable rigged across more than a quarter-mile deep remote section...
Daredevil Nik Wallenda walks on a two-inch (5-cm) diameter steel cable rigged 1,400 feet (426.7 metres) across more than a quarter-mile deep remote section of the Grand Canyon near Little Colorado River, Arizona June 23, 2013.
REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
USA-HIGHWIRE/GRANDCANYON
RTX10YN3
June 24, 2013
The chasm of the Grand Canyon is shown with the Little Colorado River more than a quarter-mile below...
LITTLE COLORADO RIVER, UNITED STATES
The chasm of the Grand Canyon is shown with the Little Colorado River below in Arizona
The chasm of the Grand Canyon is shown with the Little Colorado River more than a quarter-mile below in Arizona June 23, 2013. Daredevil Nik Wallenda will attempt to walk a 2-inch diameter steel cable stretched over the chasm in a death-defying crossing that will be broadcast live around the world. REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ENTERTAINMENT)
ARIZONA-GRANDCANYON/DISPUTE
RTR2ZJYH
March 16, 2012
Historic U.S. Route 66 runs through the Hualapai Indian Reservation in Peach Springs, Arizona February...
PEACH SPRINGS, UNITED STATES
Historic U.S. Route 66 runs through the Hualapai Indian Reservation in Peach Springs, Arizona
Historic U.S. Route 66 runs through the Hualapai Indian Reservation in Peach Springs, Arizona February 28, 2012. The tiny Hualapai nation, in a bold move that could serve as a test of the limits of the sovereign power of Native American tribes over non-members, exercised its right of eminent domain last month to take over the management of the site and kick out the non-Indian developer. The dispute over the potentially lucrative Skywalk -- which all agree could draw up to 3,000 visitors a day -- pits the tribe's sovereign rights over a site it sees as its economic lifeblood against a developer's contractual right to manage the attraction for 25 years and share the profits. Picture taken February 28. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
ARIZONA-GRANDCANYON/DISPUTE
RTR2ZJYF
March 16, 2012
A wagon and well are shown on the Hualapai Indian Reservation, Arizona February 28, 2012. The tiny Hualapai...
HUALAPAI INDIAN RESERVATION, UNITED STATES
A wagon and well are shown on the Hualapai Indian Reservation, Arizona
A wagon and well are shown on the Hualapai Indian Reservation, Arizona February 28, 2012. The tiny Hualapai nation, in a bold move that could serve as a test of the limits of the sovereign power of Native American tribes over non-members, exercised its right of eminent domain last month to take over the management of the site and kick out the non-Indian developer. The dispute over the potentially lucrative Skywalk -- which all agree could draw up to 3,000 visitors a day -- pits the tribe's sovereign rights over a site it sees as its economic lifeblood against a developer's contractual right to manage the attraction for 25 years and share the profits. Picture taken February 28. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
ARIZONA-GRANDCANYON/DISPUTE
RTR2ZJYC
March 16, 2012
Piles of insulation are shown in the unfinished interior of a building housing a glass skywalk, overlooking...
HUALAPAI INDIAN RESERVATION, UNITED STATES
Piles of insulation are shown in the unfinished interior of a building housing a glass skywalk, overlooking...
Piles of insulation are shown in the unfinished interior of a building housing a glass skywalk, overlooking the Grand Canyon and the Colorado River below, on the Hualapai Indian Reservation, Arizona February 28, 2012. The tiny Hualapai nation, in a bold move that could serve as a test of the limits of the sovereign power of Native American tribes over non-members, exercised its right of eminent domain last month to take over the management of the site and kick out the non-Indian developer. The dispute over the potentially lucrative Skywalk -- which all agree could draw up to 3,000 visitors a day -- pits the tribe's sovereign rights over a site it sees as its economic lifeblood against a developer's contractual right to manage the attraction for 25 years and share the profits. Picture taken February 28. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
ARIZONA-GRANDCANYON/DISPUTE
RTR2ZJYA
March 16, 2012
Candida Hunter, Hualapai Tribe councilwoman, poses for a photograph near new buildings on the Hualapai...
PEACH SPRINGS, UNITED STATES
Candida Hunter, Hualapai Tribe councilwoman, poses for a photograph near new buildings on the Hualapai...
Candida Hunter, Hualapai Tribe councilwoman, poses for a photograph near new buildings on the Hualapai Indian Reservation in Peach Springs, Arizona February 28, 2012. The tiny Hualapai nation, in a bold move that could serve as a test of the limits of the sovereign power of Native American tribes over non-members, exercised its right of eminent domain last month to take over the management of the site and kick out the non-Indian developer. The dispute over the potentially lucrative Skywalk -- which all agree could draw up to 3,000 visitors a day -- pits the tribe's sovereign rights over a site it sees as its economic lifeblood against a developer's contractual right to manage the attraction for 25 years and share the profits. Picture taken February 28. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
ARIZONA-GRANDCANYON/DISPUTE
RTR2ZJY8
March 16, 2012
A member of the Hualapai Tribe listens during a gathering at the Hualapai Tribal Forestry Department...
PEACH SPRINGS, UNITED STATES
A member of the Hualapai Tribe listens during a gathering at the Hualapai Tribal Forestry Department...
A member of the Hualapai Tribe listens during a gathering at the Hualapai Tribal Forestry Department on the Hualapai Indian Reservation in Peach Springs, Arizona, February 28, 2012. The tiny Hualapai nation, in a bold move that could serve as a test of the limits of the sovereign power of Native American tribes over non-members, exercised its right of eminent domain last month to take over the management of the site and kick out the non-Indian developer. The dispute over the potentially lucrative Skywalk -- which all agree could draw up to 3,000 visitors a day -- pits the tribe's sovereign rights over a site it sees as its economic lifeblood against a developer's contractual right to manage the attraction for 25 years and share the profits. Picture taken February 28. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
ARIZONA-GRANDCANYON/DISPUTE
RTR2ZJY5
March 16, 2012
Charlie Vaughn laughs during a gathering at the Hualapai Tribal Forestry Department on the Hualapai Indian...
PEACH SPRINGS, UNITED STATES
Charlie Vaughn laughs during a gathering at the Hualapai Tribal Forestry Department on the Hualapai Indian...
Charlie Vaughn laughs during a gathering at the Hualapai Tribal Forestry Department on the Hualapai Indian Reservation in Peach Springs, Arizona February 28, 2012. The tiny Hualapai nation, in a bold move that could serve as a test of the limits of the sovereign power of Native American tribes over non-members, exercised its right of eminent domain last month to take over the management of the site and kick out the non-Indian developer. The dispute over the potentially lucrative Skywalk -- which all agree could draw up to 3,000 visitors a day -- pits the tribe's sovereign rights over a site it sees as its economic lifeblood against a developer's contractual right to manage the attraction for 25 years and share the profits. Picture taken February 28. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
ARIZONA-GRANDCANYON/DISPUTE
RTR2ZJY0
March 16, 2012
Children play in the yard of a home on the Hualapai Indian Reservation in Peach Springs, Arizona February...
HUALAPAI INDIAN RESERVATION, UNITED STATES
Children play in the yard of a home on the Hualapai Indian Reservation in Peach Springs, Arizona
Children play in the yard of a home on the Hualapai Indian Reservation in Peach Springs, Arizona February 28, 2012. The tiny Hualapai nation, in a bold move that could serve as a test of the limits of the sovereign power of Native American tribes over non-members, exercised its right of eminent domain last month to take over the management of the site and kick out the non-Indian developer. The dispute over the potentially lucrative Skywalk -- which all agree could draw up to 3,000 visitors a day -- pits the tribe's sovereign rights over a site it sees as its economic lifeblood against a developer's contractual right to manage the attraction for 25 years and share the profits. Picture taken February 28. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
ARIZONA-GRANDCANYON/DISPUTE
RTR2ZJXX
March 16, 2012
Children play in the yard of a home on the Hualapai Indian Reservation in Peach Springs, Arizona February...
HUALAPAI INDIAN RESERVATION, UNITED STATES
Children play in the yard of a home on the Hualapai Indian Reservation in Peach Springs, Arizona
Children play in the yard of a home on the Hualapai Indian Reservation in Peach Springs, Arizona February 28, 2012. The tiny Hualapai nation, in a bold move that could serve as a test of the limits of the sovereign power of Native American tribes over non-members, exercised its right of eminent domain last month to take over the management of the site and kick out the non-Indian developer. The dispute over the potentially lucrative Skywalk -- which all agree could draw up to 3,000 visitors a day -- pits the tribe's sovereign rights over a site it sees as its economic lifeblood against a developer's contractual right to manage the attraction for 25 years and share the profits. Picture taken February 28. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
ARIZONA-GRANDCANYON/DISPUTE
RTR2ZJWW
March 16, 2012
A young boy plays on a swing set in a park on the Hualapai Indian Reservation in Peach Springs, Arizona...
HUALAPAI INDIAN RESERVATION, UNITED STATES
A young boy plays on a swing set in a park on the Hualapai Indian Reservation in Peach Springs, Arizona...
A young boy plays on a swing set in a park on the Hualapai Indian Reservation in Peach Springs, Arizona February 28, 2012. The tiny Hualapai nation, in a bold move that could serve as a test of the limits of the sovereign power of Native American tribes over non-members, exercised its right of eminent domain last month to take over the management of the site and kick out the non-Indian developer. The dispute over the potentially lucrative Skywalk -- which all agree could draw up to 3,000 visitors a day -- pits the tribe's sovereign rights over a site it sees as its economic lifeblood against a developer's contractual right to manage the attraction for 25 years and share the profits. Picture taken February 28. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
ARIZONA-GRANDCANYON/DISPUTE
RTR2ZJWS
March 16, 2012
Waylon Honga, a member of the tribal council, and Candida Hunter Hualapai Tribe councilwoman, are pictured...
HUALAPAI INDIAN RESERVATION, UNITED STATES
Waylon Honga, a member of the tribal council, and Candida Hunter Hualapai Tribe councilwoman, are pictured...
Waylon Honga, a member of the tribal council, and Candida Hunter Hualapai Tribe councilwoman, are pictured at spot overlooking the Grand Canyon and Colorado River, on the Hualapai Indian Reservation, Arizona February 28, 2012. The tiny Hualapai nation, in a bold move that could serve as a test of the limits of the sovereign power of Native American tribes over non-members, exercised its right of eminent domain last month to take over the management of the site and kick out the non-Indian developer. The dispute over the potentially lucrative Skywalk -- which all agree could draw up to 3,000 visitors a day -- pits the tribe's sovereign rights over a site it sees as its economic lifeblood against a developer's contractual right to manage the attraction for 25 years and share the profits. Picture taken February 28. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
ARIZONA-GRANDCANYON/DISPUTE
RTR2ZJWR
March 16, 2012
A tourist peers over a ledge overlooking the Grand Canyon and the Colorado River below, on the Hualapai...
HUALAPAI INDIAN RESERVATION, UNITED STATES
A tourist peers over a ledge overlooking the Grand Canyon and the Colorado River below, on the Hualapai...
A tourist peers over a ledge overlooking the Grand Canyon and the Colorado River below, on the Hualapai Indian Reservation, Arizona February 28, 2012. The tiny Hualapai nation, in a bold move that could serve as a test of the limits of the sovereign power of Native American tribes over non-members, exercised its right of eminent domain last month to take over the management of the site and kick out the non-Indian developer. The dispute over the potentially lucrative Skywalk -- which all agree could draw up to 3,000 visitors a day -- pits the tribe's sovereign rights over a site it sees as its economic lifeblood against a developer's contractual right to manage the attraction for 25 years and share the profits. Picture taken February 28. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
ARIZONA-GRANDCANYON/DISPUTE
RTR2ZJWQ
March 16, 2012
Tourists snap pictures from a spot overlooking the Grand Canyon and the Colorado River below, on the...
HUALAPAI INDIAN RESERVATION, UNITED STATES
Tourists snap pictures from a spot overlooking the Grand Canyon and the Colorado River below, on the...
Tourists snap pictures from a spot overlooking the Grand Canyon and the Colorado River below, on the Hualapai Indian Reservation, Arizona February 28, 2012. The tiny Hualapai nation, in a bold move that could serve as a test of the limits of the sovereign power of Native American tribes over non-members, exercised its right of eminent domain last month to take over the management of the site and kick out the non-Indian developer. The dispute over the potentially lucrative Skywalk -- which all agree could draw up to 3,000 visitors a day -- pits the tribe's sovereign rights over a site it sees as its economic lifeblood against a developer's contractual right to manage the attraction for 25 years and share the profits. Picture taken February 28. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
ARIZONA-GRANDCANYON/DISPUTE
RTR2ZJWO
March 16, 2012
A tourists gestures near an unfinished building housing a glass skywalk, overlooking the Grand Canyon...
HUALAPAI INDIAN RESERVATION, UNITED STATES
A tourists gestures near an unfinished building housing a glass skywalk, overlooking the Grand Canyon...
A tourists gestures near an unfinished building housing a glass skywalk, overlooking the Grand Canyon and the Colorado River below, on the Hualapai Indian Reservation, Arizona February 28, 2012. The tiny Hualapai nation, in a bold move that could serve as a test of the limits of the sovereign power of Native American tribes over non-members, exercised its right of eminent domain last month to take over the management of the site and kick out the non-Indian developer. The dispute over the potentially lucrative Skywalk -- which all agree could draw up to 3,000 visitors a day -- pits the tribe's sovereign rights over a site it sees as its economic lifeblood against a developer's contractual right to manage the attraction for 25 years and share the profits. Picture taken February 28. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
ARIZONA-GRANDCANYON/DISPUTE
RTR2ZJWM
March 16, 2012
Tourists pose for pictures near an unfinished building housing a glass skywalk, overlooking the Grand...
HUALAPAI INDIAN RESERVATION, UNITED STATES
Tourists pose for pictures near an unfinished building housing a glass skywalk, overlooking the Grand...
Tourists pose for pictures near an unfinished building housing a glass skywalk, overlooking the Grand Canyon and the Colorado River below, on the Hualapai Indian Reservation, Arizona February 28, 2012. The tiny Hualapai nation, in a bold move that could serve as a test of the limits of the sovereign power of Native American tribes over non-members, exercised its right of eminent domain last month to take over the management of the site and kick out the non-Indian developer. The dispute over the potentially lucrative Skywalk -- which all agree could draw up to 3,000 visitors a day -- pits the tribe's sovereign rights over a site it sees as its economic lifeblood against a developer's contractual right to manage the attraction for 25 years and share the profits. Picture taken February 28. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
ARIZONA-GRANDCANYON/DISPUTE
RTR2ZJWJ
March 16, 2012
A visitor walks near an unfinished building housing a glass skywalk, overlooking the Grand Canyon and...
HUALAPAI INDIAN RESERVATION, UNITED STATES
A visitor walks near an unfinished building housing a glass skywalk, overlooking the Grand Canyon and...
A visitor walks near an unfinished building housing a glass skywalk, overlooking the Grand Canyon and the Colorado River below, on the Hualapai Indian Reservation, Arizona February 28, 2012. The tiny Hualapai nation, in a bold move that could serve as a test of the limits of the sovereign power of Native American tribes over non-members, exercised its right of eminent domain last month to take over the management of the site and kick out the non-Indian developer. The dispute over the potentially lucrative Skywalk -- which all agree could draw up to 3,000 visitors a day -- pits the tribe's sovereign rights over a site it sees as its economic lifeblood against a developer's contractual right to manage the attraction for 25 years and share the profits. Picture taken February 28. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
ARIZONA-GRANDCANYON/DISPUTE
RTR2ZJW9
March 16, 2012
A member of the Hualapai Indian tribe walks through the unfinished interior of a building housing a glass...
HUALAPAI INDIAN RESERVATION, UNITED STATES
A member of the Hualapai Indian tribe walks through the unfinished interior of a building housing a glass...
A member of the Hualapai Indian tribe walks through the unfinished interior of a building housing a glass skywalk, overlooking the Grand Canyon and the Colorado River below, on the Hualapai Indian Reservation, Arizona February 28, 2012. The tiny Hualapai nation, in a bold move that could serve as a test of the limits of the sovereign power of Native American tribes over non-members, exercised its right of eminent domain last month to take over the management of the site and kick out the non-Indian developer. The dispute over the potentially lucrative Skywalk -- which all agree could draw up to 3,000 visitors a day -- pits the tribe's sovereign rights over a site it sees as its economic lifeblood against a developer's contractual right to manage the attraction for 25 years and share the profits. Picture taken February 28. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
ARIZONA-GRANDCANYON/DISPUTE
RTR2ZJW6
March 16, 2012
A view of the Grand Canyon is seen from an unfinished walkway at a skywalk overlooking the Grand Canyon...
HUALAPAI INDIAN RESERVATION, UNITED STATES
A view of the Grand Canyon is seen from an unfinished walkway at a skywalk overlooking the Grand Canyon...
A view of the Grand Canyon is seen from an unfinished walkway at a skywalk overlooking the Grand Canyon and the Colorado River below, on the Hualapai Indian Reservation, Arizona February 28, 2012. The tiny Hualapai nation, in a bold move that could serve as a test of the limits of the sovereign power of Native American tribes over non-members, exercised its right of eminent domain last month to take over the management of the site and kick out the non-Indian developer. The dispute over the potentially lucrative Skywalk -- which all agree could draw up to 3,000 visitors a day -- pits the tribe's sovereign rights over a site it sees as its economic lifeblood against a developer's contractual right to manage the attraction for 25 years and share the profits. Picture taken February 28. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
ARIZONA-GRANDCANYON/DISPUTE
RTR2ZJW1
March 16, 2012
Visitors have a view to the Grand Canyon below from a glass skywalk overlooking the Grand Canyon and...
HUALAPAI INDIAN RESERVATION, UNITED STATES
Visitors have a view to the Grand Canyon below from a glass skywalk overlooking the Grand Canyon and...
Visitors have a view to the Grand Canyon below from a glass skywalk overlooking the Grand Canyon and the Colorado River, on the Hualapai Indian Reservation, Arizona February 28, 2012. The tiny Hualapai nation, in a bold move that could serve as a test of the limits of the sovereign power of Native American tribes over non-members, exercised its right of eminent domain last month to take over the management of the site and kick out the non-Indian developer. The dispute over the potentially lucrative Skywalk -- which all agree could draw up to 3,000 visitors a day -- pits the tribe's sovereign rights over a site it sees as its economic lifeblood against a developer's contractual right to manage the attraction for 25 years and share the profits. Picture taken February 28. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
ARIZONA-GRANDCANYON/DISPUTE
RTR2ZJVS
March 16, 2012
Visitors have a view to the Grand Canyon below from a glass skywalk overlooking the Grand Canyon and...
HUALAPAI INDIAN RESERVATION, UNITED STATES
Visitors have a view to the Grand Canyon below from a glass skywalk overlooking the Grand Canyon and...
Visitors have a view to the Grand Canyon below from a glass skywalk overlooking the Grand Canyon and the Colorado River, on the Hualapai Indian Reservation, Arizona February 28, 2012. The tiny Hualapai nation, in a bold move that could serve as a test of the limits of the sovereign power of Native American tribes over non-members, exercised its right of eminent domain last month to take over the management of the site and kick out the non-Indian developer. The dispute over the potentially lucrative Skywalk -- which all agree could draw up to 3,000 visitors a day -- pits the tribe's sovereign rights over a site it sees as its economic lifeblood against a developer's contractual right to manage the attraction for 25 years and share the profits. Picture taken February 28. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
ARIZONA-GRANDCANYON/DISPUTE
RTR2ZJVP
March 16, 2012
A view of the Grand Canyon is shown from an upper level of an incomplete building housing a skywalk,...
HUALAPAI INDIAN RESERVATION, UNITED STATES
A view of the Grand Canyon is shown from an upper level of an incomplete building housing a skywalk,...
A view of the Grand Canyon is shown from an upper level of an incomplete building housing a skywalk, on the Hualapai Indian Reservation, Arizona February 28, 2012. The tiny Hualapai nation, in a bold move that could serve as a test of the limits of the sovereign power of Native American tribes over non-members, exercised its right of eminent domain last month to take over the management of the site and kick out the non-Indian developer. The dispute over the potentially lucrative Skywalk -- which all agree could draw up to 3,000 visitors a day -- pits the tribe's sovereign rights over a site it sees as its economic lifeblood against a developer's contractual right to manage the attraction for 25 years and share the profits. Picture taken February 28. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
ARIZONA-GRANDCANYON/DISPUTE
RTR2ZJVM
March 16, 2012
Visitors have a view of the Grand Canyon and the Colorado River flowing below from a skywalk extending...
HUALAPAI INDIAN RESERVATION, UNITED STATES
Visitors have a view of the Grand Canyon and the Colorado River flowing below from a skywalk extending...
Visitors have a view of the Grand Canyon and the Colorado River flowing below from a skywalk extending out over the Grand Canyon and its incomplete building, on the Hualapai Indian Reservation, Arizona February 28, 2012. The tiny Hualapai nation, in a bold move that could serve as a test of the limits of the sovereign power of Native American tribes over non-members, exercised its right of eminent domain last month to take over the management of the site and kick out the non-Indian developer. The dispute over the potentially lucrative Skywalk -- which all agree could draw up to 3,000 visitors a day -- pits the tribe's sovereign rights over a site it sees as its economic lifeblood against a developer's contractual right to manage the attraction for 25 years and share the profits. Picture taken February 28. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
ARIZONA-GRANDCANYON/DISPUTE
RTR2ZJVK
March 16, 2012
Visitors have a view of the Grand Canyon and the Colorado River flowing below from a skywalk extending...
HUALAPAI INDIAN RESERVATION, UNITED STATES
Visitors have a view of the Grand Canyon and the Colorado River flowing below from a skywalk extending...
Visitors have a view of the Grand Canyon and the Colorado River flowing below from a skywalk extending out over the Grand Canyon and its incomplete building, on the Hualapai Indian Reservation, Arizona February 28, 2012. The tiny Hualapai nation, in a bold move that could serve as a test of the limits of the sovereign power of Native American tribes over non-members, exercised its right of eminent domain last month to take over the management of the site and kick out the non-Indian developer. The dispute over the potentially lucrative Skywalk -- which all agree could draw up to 3,000 visitors a day -- pits the tribe's sovereign rights over a site it sees as its economic lifeblood against a developer's contractual right to manage the attraction for 25 years and share the profits. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
ARIZONA-GRANDCANYON/DISPUTE
RTR2ZJVI
March 16, 2012
Waylon Honga, a member of the tribal council, is pictured at a skywalk extending out over the Grand Canyon...
HUALAPAI INDIAN RESERVATION, UNITED STATES
Waylon Honga, a member of the tribal council, is pictured at a skywalk extending out over the Grand Canyon...
Waylon Honga, a member of the tribal council, is pictured at a skywalk extending out over the Grand Canyon and its incomplete building, on the Hualapai Indian Reservation, Arizona February 28, 2012. The tiny Hualapai nation, in a bold move that could serve as a test of the limits of the sovereign power of Native American tribes over non-members, exercised its right of eminent domain last month to take over the management of the site and kick out the non-Indian developer. The dispute over the potentially lucrative Skywalk -- which all agree could draw up to 3,000 visitors a day -- pits the tribe's sovereign rights over a site it sees as its economic lifeblood against a developer's contractual right to manage the attraction for 25 years and share the profits. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
ARIZONA-GRANDCANYON/DISPUTE
RTR2ZJVF
March 16, 2012
Visitors stand on a skywalk extending out over the Grand Canyon in this view on the Hualapai Indian Reservation,...
HUALAPAI INDIAN RESERVATION, UNITED STATES
Visitors stand on a skywalk extending out over the Grand Canyon in this view on the Hualapai Indian Reservation...
Visitors stand on a skywalk extending out over the Grand Canyon in this view on the Hualapai Indian Reservation, Arizona February 28, 2012. The tiny Hualapai nation, in a bold move that could serve as a test of the limits of the sovereign power of Native American tribes over non-members, exercised its right of eminent domain last month to take over the management of the site and kick out the non-Indian developer. The dispute over the potentially lucrative Skywalk -- which all agree could draw up to 3,000 visitors a day -- pits the tribe's sovereign rights over a site it sees as its economic lifeblood against a developer's contractual right to manage the attraction for 25 years and share the profits. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
ARIZONA-GRANDCANYON/DISPUTE
RTR2ZJVD
March 16, 2012
A man polishes the glass on a skywalk extending out over the Grand Canyon in this view from the incomplete...
HUALAPAI INDIAN RESERVATION, UNITED STATES
A man polishes the glass on a skywalk extending out over the Grand Canyon in this view from the incomplete...
A man polishes the glass on a skywalk extending out over the Grand Canyon in this view from the incomplete building that houses the skywalk, on the Hualapai Indian Reservation, Arizona February 28, 2012. The tiny Hualapai nation, in a bold move that could serve as a test of the limits of the sovereign power of Native American tribes over non-members, exercised its right of eminent domain last month to take over the management of the site and kick out the non-Indian developer. The dispute over the potentially lucrative Skywalk -- which all agree could draw up to 3,000 visitors a day -- pits the tribe's sovereign rights over a site it sees as its economic lifeblood against a developer's contractual right to manage the attraction for 25 years and share the profits. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
ARIZONA-GRANDCANYON/DISPUTE
RTR2ZJVC
March 16, 2012
A skywalk extends out over the Grand Canyon in this view from the incomplete building that houses the...
HUALAPAI INDIAN RESERVATION, UNITED STATES
A skywalk extends out over the Grand Canyon in this view from the incomplete building that houses the...
A skywalk extends out over the Grand Canyon in this view from the incomplete building that houses the skywalk, on the Hualapai Indian Reservation, Arizona February 28, 2012. The tiny Hualapai nation, in a bold move that could serve as a test of the limits of the sovereign power of Native American tribes over non-members, exercised its right of eminent domain last month to take over the management of the site and kick out the non-Indian developer. The dispute over the potentially lucrative Skywalk -- which all agree could draw up to 3,000 visitors a day -- pits the tribe's sovereign rights over a site it sees as its economic lifeblood against a developer's contractual right to manage the attraction for 25 years and share the profits. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
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