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Search results for: Hormone

SPAIN-LGBT/
RTS2BOFP
January 22, 2019
A nurse prepares a hormone blocker for transgender teenager Gabriel Diaz de Tudanca, 16, at a health-care...
Madrid, Spain
The Wider Image: Gabriel's journey: a transgender Spaniard makes the change
A nurse prepares a hormone blocker for transgender teenager Gabriel Diaz de Tudanca, 16, at a health-care centre in Madrid, Spain, December 16, 2015. Diaz de Tudanca was three years old when he returned one day from school and told his mother he was a boy and he wanted to be called Oscar. No one made anything out of it until years later he came out as a transgender man, first to his inner circle of friends and then to his parents, who have been very supportive of his transition and have helped him face all the social, legal and medical challenges that have have come with his decision to be true to himself. REUTERS/Susana Vera SEARCH "VERA GABRIEL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. THE IMAGES SHOULD ONLY BE USED TOGETHER WITH THE STORY - NO STAND-ALONE USES
SPAIN-LGBT/
RTS2BOFG
January 22, 2019
Gabriel Diaz de Tudanca is a 19-year-old Spaniard who, although born a girl, identified as male from...
Madrid, Spain
The Wider Image: Gabriel's journey: a transgender Spaniard makes the change
Gabriel Diaz de Tudanca is a 19-year-old Spaniard who, although born a girl, identified as male from early childhood. "When I was three years old I came back from school and said to my mother that when I grew up I was going to be a man called Oscar," he says. Supported by his family and friends, he has undergone surgery and hormone treatments, changed his name and renewed his identity documents to reflect what he feels is his true gender. Reuters photographer Susana Vera accompanied him for three years through his process of change. REUTERS/Susana Vera SEARCH "VERA GABRIEL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: SPAIN-LGBT/ THE IMAGES SHOULD ONLY BE USED TOGETHER WITH THE STORY - NO STAND-ALONE USES
SPAIN-LGBT/
RTS2BOFB
January 22, 2019
Transgender teenager Gabriel Diaz de Tudanca, 16, is examined by plastic surgeon Jorge Planas as he searches...
Madrid, Spain
The Wider Image: Gabriel's journey: a transgender Spaniard makes the change
Transgender teenager Gabriel Diaz de Tudanca, 16, is examined by plastic surgeon Jorge Planas as he searches for a surgeon to carry out his female to male chest reconstruction surgery in Madrid, Spain, November 23, 2015. "Once I came out as a trans boy both socially and with my family, my main objective was to get started with the hormones and go through the chest reconstruction surgery. I really disliked that part of my body," Diaz de Tudanca said. REUTERS/Susana Vera SEARCH "VERA GABRIEL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. THE IMAGES SHOULD ONLY BE USED TOGETHER WITH THE STORY - NO STAND-ALONE USES
SPAIN-LGBT/
RTS2BOFA
January 22, 2019
Transgender teenager Gabriel Diaz de Tudanca, 17, shaves his face to grow more hair two months after...
Madrid, Spain
The Wider Image: Gabriel's journey: a transgender Spaniard makes the change
Transgender teenager Gabriel Diaz de Tudanca, 17, shaves his face to grow more hair two months after he started taking testosterone in Madrid, Spain, February 15, 2016. "I took hormone blockers for three months and was soon started on testosterone. My period stopped right away and that made me very happy, I really disliked it," Diaz de Tudanca said. REUTERS/Susana Vera SEARCH "VERA GABRIEL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. THE IMAGES SHOULD ONLY BE USED TOGETHER WITH THE STORY - NO STAND-ALONE USES
EGYPT-CULTURE/
RTSUDSN
December 02, 2016
Mohamed Hagras, 31, uses hormones of queen bees at his performance of the "Beard of Bee" before the upcoming...
Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt
Mohamed Hagras, 31, uses hormones of queen bees at his performance of the "Beard of Bee" before the upcoming...
Mohamed Hagras, 31, uses hormones of queen bees at his performance of the "Beard of Bee" before the upcoming Egyptian Agricultural Carnival of Beekeeping in his farm at Shebin El Kom city in the province of Al- Al-Monofyia, northeast of Cairo, Egypt November 30, 2016. Picture taken November 30, 2016. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
FLORIDA-SHOOTING/LGBT
RTX2GZ79
June 19, 2016
Thalia Ainsley, 67, who began hormone therapy last year to biologically transition to womanhood, at Orlando?s...
Orlando, UNITED STATES
Thalia Ainsley who began hormone therapy last year to biologically transition to womanhood at Orlando?s...
Thalia Ainsley, 67, who began hormone therapy last year to biologically transition to womanhood, at Orlando?s GLBT Community Center of Central Florida in Orlando, Florida, U.S. on June 17, 2016. REUTERS/Julia Harte
FLORIDA-SHOOTING/LGBT
RTX2GZ77
June 19, 2016
Thalia Ainsley, 67, who began hormone therapy last year to biologically transition to womanhood, at Orlando?s...
Orlando, UNITED STATES
Thalia Ainsley who began hormone therapy last year to biologically transition to womanhood at Orlando?s...
Thalia Ainsley, 67, who began hormone therapy last year to biologically transition to womanhood, at Orlando?s GLBT Community Center of Central Florida in Orlando, Florida, U.S. on June 17, 2016. REUTERS/Julia Harte
USA-LGBT/
RTX2GQ61
June 17, 2016
Estradiol, an oral Estrogen hormone, used by Kate Lynn Blatt, a transgender woman, is seen at her home...
POTTSVILLE, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: Fighting for transgender rights in the U.S.
Estradiol, an oral Estrogen hormone, used by Kate Lynn Blatt, a transgender woman, is seen at her home in Pottsville, Pennsylvania, United States, May 26, 2016. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton THE IMAGES SHOULD ONLY BE USED TOGETHER WITH THE STORY - NO STAND-ALONE USES. SEARCH "KATE LYNN BLATT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
EU COMMISSION/TRADE
RTR48HEQ
October 01, 2014
Pedestrians walk past environmental activists carrying a giant inflatable chicken during a demonstration...
Munich, Germany
Environmental activists carry a giant inflatable chicken near Oktoberfest grounds in Munich
Pedestrians walk past environmental activists carrying a giant inflatable chicken during a demonstration against 'chlorine chickens' near the Oktoberfest grounds in Munich October 1, 2014. The protest is against the planned Free Trade Agreements TTIP (Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership) and CETA (Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement) with the U.S. and Canada, which opponents fear will allow U.S. chlorine-washed chicken and hormone treated meat into the EU. The so-called chlorine chicken has become a symbol of the health risks opponents say the free trade agreements represent. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: FOOD POLITICS)
EU COMMISSION/TRADE
RTR48HCW
October 01, 2014
Environmental activists carry a giant inflatable chicken as the demonstrate against 'chlorine chickens'...
Munich, Germany
Environmental activists carry a giant inflatable chicken near Oktoberfest grounds in Munich
Environmental activists carry a giant inflatable chicken as the demonstrate against 'chlorine chickens' near the Oktoberfest grounds in Munich October 1, 2014. The protest is against the planned Free Trade Agreements TTIP (Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership) and CETA (Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement) with the U.S. and Canada, which opponents fear will allow U.S. chlorine-washed chicken and hormone treated meat into the EU. The so-called chlorine chicken has become a symbol of the health risks opponents say the free trade agreements represent. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: FOOD POLITICS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
EU COMMISSION/TRADE
RTR48HCT
October 01, 2014
Environmental activists carry a giant inflatable chicken as the demonstrate against 'chlorine chickens'...
Munich, Germany
Environmental activists carry a giant inflatable chicken near Oktoberfest grounds in Munich
Environmental activists carry a giant inflatable chicken as the demonstrate against 'chlorine chickens' near the Oktoberfest grounds in Munich October 1, 2014. The protest is against the planned Free Trade Agreements TTIP (Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership) and CETA (Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement) with the U.S. and Canada, which opponents fear will allow U.S. chlorine-washed chicken and hormone treated meat into the EU. The so-called chlorine chicken has become a symbol of the health risks opponents say the free trade agreements represent. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: FOOD POLITICS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
NETHERLANDS/
RTR3WO8K
July 01, 2014
Petra van Dijk, 51, walks along the Amstel after changing her officially registered gender from male...
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Petra van Dijk walks along the Amstel after changing her officially registered gender from male to female,...
Petra van Dijk, 51, walks along the Amstel after changing her officially registered gender from male to female at the City Hall, in Amsterdam July 1, 2014. Dijk is among the first to obtain new documents on Tuesday, when a new law came into effect, legalising the registration of a transgender person's preferred gender in official state documents, including identity cards and passports. It eliminates the previous law, which required hormonal treatment, surgery or sterilization before any change in gender registration is allowed. REUTERS/Cris Toala Olivares (NETHERLANDS - Tags: SOCIETY LAW)
NETHERLANDS/
RTR3WO8A
July 01, 2014
Damian Jackson (C), 51, shows family members his new documents after changing his officially registered...
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Damian Jackson shows family members his new documents after changing his officially registered gender...
Damian Jackson (C), 51, shows family members his new documents after changing his officially registered gender from female to male, in the City Hall in Amsterdam July 1, 2014. Jackson is among the first to obtain new documents on Tuesday, when a new law came into effect, legalising the registration of a transgender person's preferred gender in official state documents, including identity cards and passports. It eliminates the previous law, which required hormonal treatment, surgery or sterilization before any change in gender registration is allowed. REUTERS/Cris Toala Olivares (NETHERLANDS - Tags: SOCIETY LAW)
NETHERLANDS/
RTR3WO7Q
July 01, 2014
Petra van Dijk, 51, signs documents as she changes her officially registered gender from male to female,...
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Petra van Dijk signs documents as she changes her officially registered gender from male to female, in...
Petra van Dijk, 51, signs documents as she changes her officially registered gender from male to female, in the City Hall in Amsterdam July 1, 2014. Dijk is among the first to obtain new documents on Tuesday, when a new law came into effect, legalising the registration of a transgender person's preferred gender in official state documents, including identity cards and passports. It eliminates the previous law, which required hormonal treatment, surgery or sterilization before any change in gender registration is allowed. REUTERS/Cris Toala Olivares (NETHERLANDS - Tags: SOCIETY LAW)
NETHERLANDS/
RTR3WO77
July 01, 2014
Damian Jackson (L), 37, and Petra van Dijk (R), 51, enter the City Hall to change the gender section...
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Jackson and van Dijk enter the City Hall to change the gender section on their official documents, in...
Damian Jackson (L), 37, and Petra van Dijk (R), 51, enter the City Hall to change the gender section on their official documents, in Amsterdam July 1, 2014. Jackson changed his officially registered gender from female to male while Dijk changed hers from male to female. They are among the first to obtain new documents on Tuesday, when a new law came into effect, legalising the registration of a transgender person's preferred gender in official state documents, including identity cards and passports. It eliminates the previous law, which required hormonal treatment, surgery or sterilization before any change in gender registration is allowed. REUTERS/Cris Toala Olivares (NETHERLANDS - Tags: SOCIETY LAW)
NETHERLANDS/
RTR3WO6J
July 01, 2014
Damian Jackson (front L), 37, and Petra van Dijk (front R), enter the City Hall to change the gender...
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Jackson and van Dijk enter the City Hall to change the gender section on their official documents, in...
Damian Jackson (front L), 37, and Petra van Dijk (front R), enter the City Hall to change the gender section on their official documents, in Amsterdam July 1, 2014. Jackson changed his officially registered gender from female to male while Dijk changed hers from male to female. They are among the first to obtain new documents on Tuesday, when a new law came into effect, legalising the registration of a transgender person's preferred gender in official state documents, including identity cards and passports. It eliminates the previous law, which required hormonal treatment, surgery or sterilization before any change in gender registration is allowed. REUTERS/Cris Toala Olivares (NETHERLANDS - Tags: SOCIETY LAW)
NETHERLANDS/
RTR3WO4U
July 01, 2014
Petra van Dijk, 51, displays her new documents after changing her officially registered gender from male...
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Petra van Dijk, 51, displays her new documents after changing her officially registered gender from male...
Petra van Dijk, 51, displays her new documents after changing her officially registered gender from male to female, in the City Hall in Amsterdam July 1, 2014. Dijk is among the first to obtain new documents on Tuesday, when a new law came into effect, legalising the registration of a transgender person's preferred gender in official state documents, including identity cards and passports. It eliminates the previous law, which required hormonal treatment, surgery or sterilization before any change in gender registration is allowed. REUTERS/Cris Toala Olivares (NETHERLANDS - Tags: SOCIETY LAW)
US-NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX1436I
October 07, 2013
Randy Schekman, professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California at Berkeley,...
Berkeley, UNITED STATES
Prefessor Schekman arrives to a press conference after receiving Noble medicine prize in Berkeley
Randy Schekman, professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California at Berkeley, arrives for a press conference in Berkeley, California October 7, 2013. Americans Schekman and James Rothman and Germany's Thomas Suedhof won the 2013 Nobel medicine prize for their work on how hormones are transported within and outside cells, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. REUTERS/Stephen Lam (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH EDUCATION)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX14362
October 07, 2013
Nicholas B. Dirks, chancellor at the University of California at Berkeley, speaks during a news conference...
Berkeley, UNITED STATES
Dirks, chancellor at the University of California at Berkeley, speaks during a news conference for Nobel...
Nicholas B. Dirks, chancellor at the University of California at Berkeley, speaks during a news conference for Nobel medicine prize winner Randy Schekman in Berkeley, California October 7, 2013. Americans Schekman and James Rothman and Germany's Thomas Suedhof won the 2013 Nobel medicine prize for their work on how hormones are transported within and outside cells, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. REUTERS/Stephen Lam (UNITED STATES - Tags: EDUCATION SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH HEADSHOT)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX1432R
October 07, 2013
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, conducts...
New Haven, UNITED STATES
Yale University Professor Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, conducts...
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, conducts a lecture at Yale in New Haven, Connecticut October 7, 2013. Students also encircled Rothman's podium with trophies ahead of his arrival in celebration of the award. Rothman was one of three U.S.-based scientists who won the Nobel medicine prize on Monday for plotting how vital materials such as hormones and brain chemicals are transported within cells and secreted to act on the body, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. Americans Rothman, Randy Schekman, 64, and German-born Thomas Suedhof, 57, separately mapped out one of the body's critical networks that uses tiny bubbles known as vesicles to ferry chemicals such as insulin within cells. Medicine is the first of the Nobel prizes awarded each year. REUTERS/Michelle McLoughlin (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY PROFILE TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX1432P
October 07, 2013
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, takes...
New Haven, UNITED STATES
Yale University Professor Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, takes questions...
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, takes questions from students during to a class at Yale in New Haven, Connecticut October 7, 2013. Students also encircled Rothman's podium with trophies ahead of his arrival in celebration of the award. Rothman was one of three U.S.-based scientists who won the Nobel medicine prize on Monday for plotting how vital materials such as hormones and brain chemicals are transported within cells and secreted to act on the body, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. Americans Rothman, Randy Schekman, 64, and German-born Thomas Suedhof, 57, separately mapped out one of the body's critical networks that uses tiny bubbles known as vesicles to ferry chemicals such as insulin within cells. Medicine is the first of the Nobel prizes awarded each year. REUTERS/Michelle McLoughlin (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX1432M
October 07, 2013
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, pulls...
New Haven, UNITED STATES
Yale University Professor Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, pulls a medal...
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, pulls a medal over his head, which was given to him by his students, before speaking to a class at Yale in New Haven, Connecticut October 7, 2013. Students also encircled Rothman's podium with trophies ahead of his arrival in celebration of the award. Rothman was one of three U.S.-based scientists who won the Nobel medicine prize on Monday for plotting how vital materials such as hormones and brain chemicals are transported within cells and secreted to act on the body, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. Americans Rothman, Randy Schekman, 64, and German-born Thomas Suedhof, 57, separately mapped out one of the body's critical networks that uses tiny bubbles known as vesicles to ferry chemicals such as insulin within cells. Medicine is the first of the Nobel prizes awarded each year. REUTERS/Michelle McLoughlin (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX14327
October 07, 2013
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, gives...
New Haven, UNITED STATES
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, gives...
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, gives an interview after a press conference at Yale in New Haven, Connecticut October 7, 2013. Three U.S.-based scientists won the Nobel medicine prize on Monday for plotting how vital materials such as hormones and brain chemicals are transported within cells and secreted to act on the body, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. Americans James Rothman, 62, Randy Schekman, 64, and German-born Thomas Suedhof, 57, separately mapped out one of the body's critical networks that uses tiny bubbles known as vesicles to ferry chemicals such as insulin within cells. Medicine is the first of the Nobel prizes awarded each year. REUTERS/Michelle McLoughlin (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEADSHOT)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX14321
October 07, 2013
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, gives...
New Haven, UNITED STATES
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, gives...
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, gives an interview after a press conference at Yale in New Haven, Connecticut on October 7, 2013. Three U.S.-based scientists won the Nobel medicine prize on Monday for plotting how vital materials such as hormones and brain chemicals are transported within cells and secreted to act on the body, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. Americans James Rothman, 62, Randy Schekman, 64, and German-born Thomas Suedhof, 57, separately mapped out one of the body's critical networks that uses tiny bubbles known as vesicles to ferry chemicals such as insulin within cells. Medicine is the first of the Nobel prizes awarded each year. REUTERS/Michelle McLoughlin (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEADSHOT)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX1431Z
October 07, 2013
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, stands...
New Haven, UNITED STATES
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, stands...
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, stands next to wife Joy Hirsch after a press conference at Yale in New Haven, Connecticut October 7, 2013. Three U.S.-based scientists won the Nobel medicine prize on Monday for plotting how vital materials such as hormones and brain chemicals are transported within cells and secreted to act on the body, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. Americans James Rothman, 62, Randy Schekman, 64, and German-born Thomas Suedhof, 57, separately mapped out one of the body's critical networks that uses tiny bubbles known as vesicles to ferry chemicals such as insulin within cells. Medicine is the first of the Nobel prizes awarded each year. REUTERS/Michelle McLoughlin (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX1431W
October 07, 2013
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, gives...
New Haven, UNITED STATES
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, gives...
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, gives a lecture to students at Yale in New Haven, Connecticut on October 7, 2013. Students encircled Rothman's podium with trophies ahead of his arrival in celebration of the award. Three U.S.-based scientists won the Nobel medicine prize on Monday for plotting how vital materials such as hormones and brain chemicals are transported within cells and secreted to act on the body, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. Americans James Rothman, 62, Randy Schekman, 64, and German-born Thomas Suedhof, 57, separately mapped out one of the body's critical networks that uses tiny bubbles known as vesicles to ferry chemicals such as insulin within cells. Medicine is the first of the Nobel prizes awarded each year. REUTERS/Michelle McLoughlin (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX1431V
October 07, 2013
Randy Schekman, professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California at Berkeley,...
Berkeley, UNITED STATES
Schekman speaks on a phone after a news conference in Berkeley
Randy Schekman, professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California at Berkeley, speaks on a phone after a news conference in Berkeley, California October 7, 2013. Americans Schekman and James Rothman and Germany's Thomas Suedhof won the 2013 Nobel medicine prize for their work on how hormones are transported within and outside cells, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. REUTERS/Stephen Lam (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH EDUCATION)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX1431T
October 07, 2013
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, gives...
New Haven, UNITED STATES
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, gives...
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, gives a lecture to students at Yale in New Haven, Connecticut, October 7, 2013. Students encircled Rothman's podium with trophies ahead of his arrival in celebration of the award. Three U.S.-based scientists won the Nobel medicine prize on Monday for plotting how vital materials such as hormones and brain chemicals are transported within cells and secreted to act on the body, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. Americans James Rothman, 62, Randy Schekman, 64, and German-born Thomas Suedhof, 57, separately mapped out one of the body's critical networks that uses tiny bubbles known as vesicles to ferry chemicals such as insulin within cells. Medicine is the first of the Nobel prizes awarded each year. REUTERS/Michelle McLoughlin (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX1431Q
October 07, 2013
Randy Schekman, professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California at Berkeley,...
Berkeley, UNITED STATES
Schekman holds a parking permit for Nobel laureate after a news conference in Berkeley
Randy Schekman, professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California at Berkeley, holds a parking permit for Nobel laureate given by chancellor Nicholas B. Dirks after a news conference in Berkeley, California October 7, 2013. Americans Schekman and James Rothman and Germany's Thomas Suedhof won the 2013 Nobel medicine prize for their work on how hormones are transported within and outside cells, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. REUTERS/Stephen Lam (UNITED STATES - Tags: EDUCATION SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX1431N
October 07, 2013
Randy Schekman (L), professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California at Berkeley,...
Berkeley, UNITED STATES
Schekman holds a parking permit for Nobel laureate after a news conference in Berkeley
Randy Schekman (L), professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California at Berkeley, holds a parking permit for Nobel laureate given by chancellor Nicholas B. Dirks after a news conference in Berkeley, California October 7, 2013. Americans Schekman and James Rothman and Germany's Thomas Suedhof won the 2013 Nobel medicine prize for their work on how hormones are transported within and outside cells, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. REUTERS/Stephen Lam (UNITED STATES - Tags: EDUCATION SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX1431M
October 07, 2013
Randy Schekman, professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California at Berkeley,...
Berkeley, UNITED STATES
Prefessor Schekman speaks in press conference after receiving Noble medicine prize in Berkeley
Randy Schekman, professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California at Berkeley, speaks during a press conference in Berkeley, California October 7, 2013. Americans Schekman and James Rothman and Germany's Thomas Suedhof won the 2013 Nobel medicine prize for their work on how hormones are transported within and outside cells, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. REUTERS/Stephen Lam (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEADSHOT HEALTH EDUCATION TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX1431L
October 07, 2013
Randy Schekman, professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California at Berkeley,...
Berkeley, UNITED STATES
Prefessor Schekman speaks in press conference after receiving Noble medicine prize in Berkeley
Randy Schekman, professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California at Berkeley, speaks during a press conference in Berkeley, California October 7, 2013. Americans Schekman and James Rothman and Germany's Thomas Suedhof won the 2013 Nobel medicine prize for their work on how hormones are transported within and outside cells, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. REUTERS/Stephen Lam (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEADSHOT HEALTH EDUCATION)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX1431K
October 07, 2013
Randy Schekman, professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California at Berkeley,...
Berkeley, UNITED STATES
Schekman gestures while speaking at a news conference in Berkeley
Randy Schekman, professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California at Berkeley, gestures while speaking at a news conference in Berkeley, California October 7, 2013. Americans Schekman and James Rothman and Germany's Thomas Suedhof won the 2013 Nobel medicine prize for their work on how hormones are transported within and outside cells, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. REUTERS/Stephen Lam (UNITED STATES - Tags: EDUCATION HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX1431C
October 07, 2013
Randy Schekman, professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California at Berkeley,...
Berkeley, UNITED STATES
Schekman, professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California at Berkeley, speaks...
Randy Schekman, professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California at Berkeley, speaks during a news conference in Berkeley, California October 7, 2013. Americans Schekman and James Rothman and Germany's Thomas Suedhof won the 2013 Nobel medicine prize for their work on how hormones are transported within and outside cells, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. REUTERS/Stephen Lam (UNITED STATES - Tags: EDUCATION HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX14317
October 07, 2013
Randy Schekman (L), professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California at Berkeley,...
Berkeley, UNITED STATES
Schekman, professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California at Berkeley, speaks...
Randy Schekman (L), professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California at Berkeley, speaks with chancellor Nicholas B. Dirks after a news conference in Berkeley, California October 7, 2013. Americans Schekman and James Rothman and Germany's Thomas Suedhof won the 2013 Nobel medicine prize for their work on how hormones are transported within and outside cells, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. REUTERS/Stephen Lam (UNITED STATES - Tags: EDUCATION HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX14312
October 07, 2013
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, gives...
New Haven, UNITED STATES
Yale University Professor Rothman, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, gives a news...
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, gives a news conference at Yale in New Haven, Connecticut October 7, 2013. Three U.S.-based scientists won the Nobel medicine prize on Monday for plotting how vital materials such as hormones and brain chemicals are transported within cells and secreted to act on the body, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. Americans Rothman, Randy Schekman, 64, and German-born Thomas Suedhof, 57, separately mapped out one of the body's critical networks that uses tiny bubbles known as vesicles to ferry chemicals such as insulin within cells. Medicine is the first of the Nobel prizes awarded each year. REUTERS/Michelle McLoughlin (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX1430Z
October 07, 2013
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, sits...
New Haven, UNITED STATES
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, sits...
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, sits next to Yale University President Peter Salovey ahead of a press conference at Yale in New Haven, Connecticut October 7, 2013. Three U.S.-based scientists won the Nobel medicine prize on Monday for plotting how vital materials such as hormones and brain chemicals are transported within cells and secreted to act on the body, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. Americans Rothman, Randy Schekman, 64, and German-born Thomas Suedhof, 57, separately mapped out one of the body's critical networks that uses tiny bubbles known as vesicles to ferry chemicals such as insulin within cells. Medicine is the first of the Nobel prizes awarded each year. REUTERS/Michelle McLoughlin (UNITED STATES- Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX1430Q
October 07, 2013
Yale University Professor James Rothman (C), 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine,...
New Haven, UNITED STATES
Yale University Professor Rothman, the co-awardee of 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, stands next to Yale...
Yale University Professor James Rothman (C), 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, stands next to his wife Dr. Joy Hirsch (L) and Yale University President Peter Salovey ahead of a press conference at Yale in New Haven, Connecticut October 7, 2013. Three U.S.-based scientists won the Nobel medicine prize on Monday for plotting how vital materials such as hormones and brain chemicals are transported within cells and secreted to act on the body, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. Americans Rothman, Randy Schekman, 64, and German-born Thomas Suedhof, 57, separately mapped out one of the body's critical networks that uses tiny bubbles known as vesicles to ferry chemicals such as insulin within cells. Medicine is the first of the Nobel prizes awarded each year. REUTERS/Michelle McLoughlin (UNITED STATES - Tags: EDUCATION SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX1430O
October 07, 2013
Yale University Professor James Rothman (R), 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine,...
New Haven, UNITED STATES
Yale University Professor Rothman, the co-awardee of 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, smiles as he is greeted...
Yale University Professor James Rothman (R), 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, smiles as he is greeted by Yale University President Peter Salovey ahead of a press conference at Yale in New Haven, Connecticut on October 7, 2013. Standing next to Rothman is his wife Dr. Joy Hirsch. Three U.S.-based scientists won the Nobel medicine prize on Monday for plotting how vital materials such as hormones and brain chemicals are transported within cells and secreted to act on the body, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. Americans Rothman, Randy Schekman, 64, and German-born Thomas Suedhof, 57, separately mapped out one of the body's critical networks that uses tiny bubbles known as vesicles to ferry chemicals such as insulin within cells. Medicine is the first of the Nobel prizes awarded each year. REUTERS/Michelle McLoughlin (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH EDUCATION)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX14301
October 07, 2013
Randy Schekman (R), professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California at Berkeley,...
Berkeley, UNITED STATES
Prefessor Schekman speaks in press conference after receiving Noble medicine prize in Berkeley
Randy Schekman (R), professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California at Berkeley, kisses his wife Nancy Walls after a press conference in Berkeley, California October 7, 2013. Americans Schekman and James Rothman and Germany's Thomas Suedhof won the 2013 Nobel medicine prize for their work on how hormones are transported within and outside cells, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. REUTERS/Stephen Lam (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH EDUCATION)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX142ZJ
October 07, 2013
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, is...
New Haven, UNITED STATES
Yale University Professor Rothman, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, is photographed...
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, is photographed ahead of a news conference at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut October 7, 2013. Three U.S.-based scientists won the Nobel medicine prize on Monday for plotting how vital materials such as hormones and brain chemicals are transported within cells and secreted to act on the body, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. Americans Rothman, Randy Schekman, 64, and German-born Thomas Suedhof, 57, separately mapped out one of the body's critical networks that uses tiny bubbles known as vesicles to ferry chemicals such as insulin within cells. Medicine is the first of the Nobel prizes awarded each year. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES- Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX142ZC
October 07, 2013
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, speaks...
New Haven, UNITED STATES
Yale University Professor Rothman, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, speaks at a news...
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, speaks at a news conference at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut October 7, 2013. Three U.S.-based scientists won the Nobel medicine prize on Monday for plotting how vital materials such as hormones and brain chemicals are transported within cells and secreted to act on the body, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. Americans Rothman, Randy Schekman, 64, and German-born Thomas Suedhof, 57, separately mapped out one of the body's critical networks that uses tiny bubbles known as vesicles to ferry chemicals such as insulin within cells. Medicine is the first of the Nobel prizes awarded each year. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEADSHOT)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX142Z4
October 07, 2013
Yale University Professor James Rothman (L), 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine,...
New Haven, UNITED STATES
Yale University Professor Rothman, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, smiles while...
Yale University Professor James Rothman (L), 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, smiles while sitting next to Yale University President Peter Salovey ahead of a news conference at Yale in New Haven, Connecticut October 7, 2013. Three U.S.-based scientists won the Nobel medicine prize on Monday for plotting how vital materials such as hormones and brain chemicals are transported within cells and secreted to act on the body, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. Americans Rothman, Randy Schekman, 64, and German-born Thomas Suedhof, 57, separately mapped out one of the body's critical networks that uses tiny bubbles known as vesicles to ferry chemicals such as insulin within cells. Medicine is the first of the Nobel prizes awarded each year. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES- Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX142YX
October 07, 2013
Yale University Professor James Rothman (L), 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine,...
New Haven, UNITED STATES
Yale University Professor Rothman, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, is photographed...
Yale University Professor James Rothman (L), 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, is photographed as he is introduced during a news conference at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut October 7, 2013. Three U.S.-based scientists won the Nobel medicine prize on Monday for plotting how vital materials such as hormones and brain chemicals are transported within cells and secreted to act on the body, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. Americans Rothman, Randy Schekman, 64, and German-born Thomas Suedhof, 57, separately mapped out one of the body's critical networks that uses tiny bubbles known as vesicles to ferry chemicals such as insulin within cells. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX142YV
October 07, 2013
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, is...
New Haven, UNITED STATES
Yale University Professor Rothman, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, is photographed...
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, is photographed as he is introduced during a news conference at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut October 7, 2013. Three U.S.-based scientists won the Nobel medicine prize on Monday for plotting how vital materials such as hormones and brain chemicals are transported within cells and secreted to act on the body, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. Americans Rothman, Randy Schekman, 64, and German-born Thomas Suedhof, 57, separately mapped out one of the body's critical networks that uses tiny bubbles known as vesicles to ferry chemicals such as insulin within cells. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEADSHOT HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX142YI
October 07, 2013
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, arrives...
New Haven, UNITED STATES
Yale University Professor Rothman, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, arrives to a...
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, arrives to a standing ovation before attending a news conference at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut October 7, 2013. Three U.S.-based scientists won the Nobel medicine prize on Monday for plotting how vital materials such as hormones and brain chemicals are transported within cells and secreted to act on the body, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. Americans Rothman, Randy Schekman, 64, and German-born Thomas Suedhof, 57, separately mapped out one of the body's critical networks that uses tiny bubbles known as vesicles to ferry chemicals such as insulin within cells. Medicine is the first of the Nobel prizes awarded each year. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX142Y9
October 07, 2013
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, speaks...
New Haven, UNITED STATES
Yale University Professor Rothman, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, speaks at a news...
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, speaks at a news conference at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut October 7, 2013. Three U.S.-based scientists won the Nobel medicine prize on Monday for plotting how vital materials such as hormones and brain chemicals are transported within cells and secreted to act on the body, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. Americans Rothman, Randy Schekman, 64, and German-born Thomas Suedhof, 57, separately mapped out one of the body's critical networks that uses tiny bubbles known as vesicles to ferry chemicals such as insulin within cells. Medicine is the first of the Nobel prizes awarded each year. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX142Y3
October 07, 2013
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, speaks...
New Haven, UNITED STATES
Yale University Professor Rothman, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, speaks at a news...
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, speaks at a news conference at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut October 7, 2013. Three U.S.-based scientists won the Nobel medicine prize on Monday for plotting how vital materials such as hormones and brain chemicals are transported within cells and secreted to act on the body, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. Americans Rothman, Randy Schekman, 64, and German-born Thomas Suedhof, 57, separately mapped out one of the body's critical networks that uses tiny bubbles known as vesicles to ferry chemicals such as insulin within cells. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX142XX
October 07, 2013
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, speaks...
New Haven, UNITED STATES
Yale University Professor Rothman, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, speaks at a news...
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, speaks at a news conference at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut October 7, 2013. Three U.S.-based scientists won the Nobel medicine prize on Monday for plotting how vital materials such as hormones and brain chemicals are transported within cells and secreted to act on the body, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. Americans Rothman, Randy Schekman, 64, and German-born Thomas Suedhof, 57, separately mapped out one of the body's critical networks that uses tiny bubbles known as vesicles to ferry chemicals such as insulin within cells. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTX142XQ
October 07, 2013
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, arrives...
New Haven, UNITED STATES
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, arrives...
Yale University Professor James Rothman, 62, the co-awardee of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Medicine, arrives to a standing ovation before attending a press conference at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, October 7, 2013. Three U.S.-based scientists won the Nobel medicine prize on Monday for plotting how vital materials such as hormones and brain chemicals are transported within cells and secreted to act on the body, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. Americans James Rothman, 62, Randy Schekman, 64, and German-born Thomas Suedhof, 57, separately mapped out one of the body's critical networks that uses tiny bubbles known as vesicles to ferry chemicals such as insulin within cells. Medicine is the first of the Nobel prizes awarded each year. REUTERS/Adrees Latif (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTR3FOWH
October 07, 2013
Randy Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, speaks during an interview at...
EL CERRITO, UNITED STATES
Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, speaks during an interview in El Cerrito...
Randy Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, speaks during an interview at his home in El Cerrito, California October 7, 2013. Americans Schekman and James Rothman and Germany's Thomas Suedhof won the 2013 Nobel medicine prize for their work on how hormones are transported within and outside cells, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY PROFILE)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTR3FOWG
October 07, 2013
Randy Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, is pictured at his home in El...
EL CERRITO, UNITED STATES
Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, is pictured at his home in El Cerrito...
Randy Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, is pictured at his home in El Cerrito, California October 7, 2013. Americans Schekman and James Rothman and Germany's Thomas Suedhof won the 2013 Nobel medicine prize for their work on how hormones are transported within and outside cells, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH PROFILE)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTR3FOWF
October 07, 2013
Randy Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, gestures at his home in El Cerrito,...
EL CERRITO, UNITED STATES
Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, gestures at his home in El Cerrito...
Randy Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, gestures at his home in El Cerrito, California October 7, 2013. Americans Schekman and James Rothman and Germany's Thomas Suedhof won the 2013 Nobel medicine prize for their work on how hormones are transported within and outside cells, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH PROFILE)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTR3FOW9
October 07, 2013
Randy Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, is pictured at his home in El...
EL CERRITO, UNITED STATES
Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, is pictured at his home in El Cerrito...
Randy Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, is pictured at his home in El Cerrito, California October 7, 2013. Americans Schekman and James Rothman and Germany's Thomas Suedhof won the 2013 Nobel medicine prize for their work on how hormones are transported within and outside cells, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH PROFILE)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTR3FOW0
October 07, 2013
Randy Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, looks at his cell phone while...
EL CERRITO, UNITED STATES
Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, looks at his cell phone while taking...
Randy Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, looks at his cell phone while taking calls at his home in El Cerrito, California October 7, 2013. Americans Schekman and James Rothman and Germany's Thomas Suedhof won the 2013 Nobel medicine prize for their work on how hormones are transported within and outside cells, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH PROFILE)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTR3FOVX
October 07, 2013
Randy Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, attends an interview at his...
EL CERRITO, UNITED STATES
Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, attends an interview at his home in...
Randy Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, attends an interview at his home in El Cerrito, California October 7, 2013. Americans Schekman and James Rothman and Germany's Thomas Suedhof won the 2013 Nobel medicine prize for their work on how hormones are transported within and outside cells, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY PROFILE)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTR3FOVW
October 07, 2013
Randy Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, is pictured at his home in El...
EL CERRITO, UNITED STATES
Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, is pictured at his home in El Cerrito...
Randy Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, is pictured at his home in El Cerrito, California October 7, 2013. Americans Schekman and James Rothman and Germany's Thomas Suedhof won the 2013 Nobel medicine prize for their work on how hormones are transported within and outside cells, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH PROFILE)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTR3FOVV
October 07, 2013
Randy Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, handles two cell phones while...
EL CERRITO, UNITED STATES
Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, handles two cell phones while taking...
Randy Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, handles two cell phones while taking calls at his home in El Cerrito, California October 7, 2013. Americans Schekman and James Rothman and Germany's Thomas Suedhof won the 2013 Nobel medicine prize for their work on how hormones are transported within and outside cells, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEADSHOT PROFILE)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTR3FOVT
October 07, 2013
Randy Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, attends an interview at his...
EL CERRITO, UNITED STATES
Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, attends an interview at his home in...
Randy Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, attends an interview at his home in El Cerrito, California October 7, 2013. Americans Schekman and James Rothman and Germany's Thomas Suedhof won the 2013 Nobel medicine prize for their work on how hormones are transported within and outside cells, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY PROFILE)
NOBEL-MEDICINE/
RTR3FOVS
October 07, 2013
Randy Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, speaks during an interview at...
EL CERRITO, UNITED STATES
Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, speaks during an interview in El Cerrito...
Randy Schekman, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, speaks during an interview at his home in El Cerrito, California October 7, 2013. Americans Schekman and James Rothman and Germany's Thomas Suedhof won the 2013 Nobel medicine prize for their work on how hormones are transported within and outside cells, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEADSHOT HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY PROFILE)
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