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Search results for: JAYASURIYA-Sanath

CRICKET-TEST-LKA-IND/
RTS1BB5J
August 11, 2017
Cricket - Sri Lanka v India - Pre match press conference - Pallekele, Sri Lanka - August 11, 2017 - Sri...
PALLEKELE, Sri Lanka
Cricket - Sri Lanka v India
Cricket - Sri Lanka v India - Pre match press conference - Pallekele, Sri Lanka - August 11, 2017 - Sri Lanka's cricket team captain Dinesh Chandimal and chairman of selection committee Sanath Jayasuriya inspect the pitch ahead of their final test match against India. REUTERS/Dinuka Liyanawatte
CRICKET-TEST-ENG-LKA/PREVIEW/
RTSGKUE
June 08, 2016
Britain Cricket - Sri Lanka Nets - Lord's - 8/6/16
Sri Lanka's chief selector Sanath Jayasuriya
Action...
United Kingdom
Sri Lanka Nets
Britain Cricket - Sri Lanka Nets - Lord's - 8/6/16
Sri Lanka's chief selector Sanath Jayasuriya
Action Images via Reuters / Andrew Boyers
Livepic
EDITORIAL USE ONLY.
CRICKET-SRI LANKA/
RTS6IHB
November 11, 2015
Sri Lanka's Shehan Jayasuriya (L) dives to complete his run as West Indies' Dwayne Bravo fails to run...
Colombo, Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka's Jayasuriya dives to complete his run as West Indies' Bravo fails to run him out during their...
Sri Lanka's Shehan Jayasuriya (L) dives to complete his run as West Indies' Dwayne Bravo fails to run him out during their second Twenty 20 International cricket match in Colombo November 11, 2015. REUTERS/Dinuka Liyanawatte TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
CRICKET/
RTX12M9W
August 15, 2013
Former England cricket player Ian Botham (R) and former Sri Lankan cricketer and chief selector Sanath...
Colombo, Sri Lanka
Botham Jayasuriya share a moment during a news conference about Botham's charity walk in Sri Lanka
Former England cricket player Ian Botham (R) and former Sri Lankan cricketer and chief selector Sanath Jayasuriya share a moment during a news conference about Botham's charity walk in Sri Lanka August 15, 2013. Ian Botham is in Colombo to announce details of his epic walk for charity across Sri Lanka, from Mankulum in the north to Seenigama in the south. REUTERS/Dinuka Liyanawatte (SRI LANKA - Tags: SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET-LANKA
RTR3EJXK
March 04, 2013
Chief selector Sanath Jayasuriya looks at his documents as he arrives at Sri Lanka Cricket (SLC) board...
Colombo, Sri Lanka
Chief selector Sanath Jayasuriya looks at his documents as he arrives at SLC board headquarters in Colombo...
Chief selector Sanath Jayasuriya looks at his documents as he arrives at Sri Lanka Cricket (SLC) board headquarters in Colombo March 4, 2013. A pay dispute between SLC and its 23 centrally contracted players ended on Monday with the cricketers signing new contracts and making themselves available for the two-test series against Bangladesh starting on Friday. REUTERS/Dinuka Liyanawatte (SRI LANKA - Tags: SPORT CRICKET BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
CRICKET-LANKA
RTR3EJXF
March 04, 2013
Chief selector Sanath Jayasuriya smiles as he arrives at Sri Lanka Cricket (SLC) board headquarters...
Colombo, Sri Lanka
Chief selector Sanath Jayasuriya smiles as he arrives at SLC board headquarters in Colombo
Chief selector Sanath Jayasuriya smiles as he arrives at Sri Lanka Cricket (SLC) board headquarters in Colombo March 4, 2013. A pay dispute between SLC and its 23 centrally contracted players ended on Monday with the cricketers signing new contracts and making themselves available for the two-test series against Bangladesh starting on Friday. REUTERS/Dinuka Liyanawatte (SRI LANKA - Tags: SPORT CRICKET BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
CRICKET-LANKA/JAYASURIYA
RTR3D5I3
January 30, 2013
Former Sri Lanka cricketer turned politician Sanath Jayasuriya speaks during a news conference at the...
Colombo, Sri Lanka
Former Sri Lanka cricketer turned politician Sanath Jayasuriya speaks during a news conference at the...
Former Sri Lanka cricketer turned politician Sanath Jayasuriya speaks during a news conference at the cricket board headquarters in Colombo January 30, 2013. Jayasuriya was appointed chairman of selectors in a new-look five-member committee named by sports minister Mahindananda Aluthgamage on Monday. REUTERS/Dinuka Liyanawatte (SRI LANKA - Tags: SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET-PAKISTAN/
RTR39EM7
October 21, 2012
World XI skipper Sanath Jayasuriya (2nd R) waves to spectators with other team players before the start...
Karachi, Pakistan
World XI skipper Sanath Jayasuriya waves to spectators with other team players before start their Twenty20...
World XI skipper Sanath Jayasuriya (2nd R) waves to spectators with other team players before the start of their Twenty20 exhibition match with Pakistan All Star XI at the National stadium in Karachi October 21, 2012. Top-level security involving more than 5000 police and paramilitary officials was in place on Saturday as cricket-starved fans in Pakistan finally got to see some live international action for the first time in more than three years. REUTERS/Athar Hussain (PAKISTAN - Tags: POLITICS SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET-PAKISTAN/
RTR39DMJ
October 20, 2012
Pakistani security officials escort World XI skipper Sanath Jayasuriya (L) as he arrives to play in the...
Karachi, Pakistan
Pakistani security officials escort World XI skipper Jayasuriya as he arrives to play in the Twenty20...
Pakistani security officials escort World XI skipper Sanath Jayasuriya (L) as he arrives to play in the first Twenty20 cricket exhibition match between Pakistan All Star XI and International World XI at the National Stadium in Karachi October 20, 2012. Top-level security involving more than 5000 police and para-military officials was in place on Saturday as cricket-starved fans in Pakistan finally got to see some live international action for the first time in more than three years. REUTERS/Athar Hussain (PAKISTAN - Tags: POLITICS SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET-ENGLAND/
RTR2O7SK
June 28, 2011
Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya waves his bat as he leaves the field after being dismissed during the first...
London, United Kingdom
Sri Lanka's Jayasuriya waves his bat as he leaves the field after being dismissed during the first one-day...
Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya waves his bat as he leaves the field after being dismissed during the first one-day international cricket match against England at the Oval in London, June 28, 2011. REUTERS/Philip Brown (BRITAIN - Tags: SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET-ENGLAND/
RTR2O7S7
June 28, 2011
Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya is tapped by teammate Mahela Jayawardene (R) after Jayasuriya was dismissed...
London, United Kingdom
Sri Lanka's Jayasuriya is tapped by teammate Jayawardene after he was dismissed during the first one-day...
Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya is tapped by teammate Mahela Jayawardene (R) after Jayasuriya was dismissed during the first one-day international cricket match against England at the Oval in London, June 28, 2011. REUTERS/Philip Brown (BRITAIN - Tags: SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET-ENGLAND/
RTR2O7QM
June 28, 2011
Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya celebrates after dismissing England's Ian Bell during the first one-day...
London, United Kingdom
Sri Lanka's Jayasuriya celebrates after dismissing England's Ian Bell during the first one-day international...
Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya celebrates after dismissing England's Ian Bell during the first one-day international cricket match at the Oval in London, England June 28, 2011. REUTERS/Philip Brown (BRITAIN - Tags: SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET-LANKA/
RTR2O73Z
June 28, 2011
Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya looks on in the field during the first one-day international cricket match...
London, United Kingdom
Sri Lanka's Jayasuriya looks on in the field during the first one-day international cricket match against...
Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya looks on in the field during the first one-day international cricket match against England at the Oval in London, England June 28, 2011. REUTERS/Philip Brown (BRITAIN - Tags: SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET-ENGLAND/
RTR2O3G4
June 25, 2011
England's captain Stuart Broad reacts after an lbw appeal against Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya (not...
Bristol, United Kingdom
England's captain Broad reacts after an lbw appeal against Sri Lanka's Jayasuriya is turned down during...
England's captain Stuart Broad reacts after an lbw appeal against Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya (not in picture) is turned down as Mahela Jayawardene (R) looks down during the T20 international cricket match at the County Ground in Bristol, England June 25, 2011. REUTERS/Philip Brown (BRITAIN - Tags: SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET-ENGLAND/
RTR2O3FE
June 25, 2011
England's captain Stuart Broad reacts after an lbw appeal against Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya (not...
Bristol, United Kingdom
England's captain Broad reacts after an lbw appeal against Sri Lanka's Jayasuriya is turned down during...
England's captain Stuart Broad reacts after an lbw appeal against Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya (not pictured) is turned down during the T20 international cricket match at the County Ground in Bristol, England June 25, 2011. REUTERS/Philip Brown (BRITAIN - Tags: SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET-ENGLAND/
RTR2O3FC
June 25, 2011
England's captain Stuart Broad reacts after an lbw appeal against Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya (not...
Bristol, United Kingdom
England's captain Broad reacts after an lbw appeal against Sri Lanka's Jayasuriya is turned down during...
England's captain Stuart Broad reacts after an lbw appeal against Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya (not pictured) is turned down as Mahela Jayawardene (R) looks on during the T20 international cricket match at the County Ground in Bristol, England June 25, 2011. REUTERS/Philip Brown (BRITAIN - Tags: SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET-ENGLAND/
RTR2O3F3
June 25, 2011
England's captain Stuart Broad reacts after an lbw appeal against Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya is turned...
Bristol, United Kingdom
England's Broad reacts after an lbw appeal is turned down during the T20 international cricket match...
England's captain Stuart Broad reacts after an lbw appeal against Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya is turned down during the T20 international cricket match at the County Ground in Bristol, England June 25, 2011. REUTERS/Philip Brown (BRITAIN - Tags: SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET-ENGLAND/
RTR2O3EM
June 25, 2011
England's captain Stuart Broad reacts after an lbw appeal against Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya is turned...
Bristol, United Kingdom
England's Broad reacts after an lbw appeal is turned down during the T20 international cricket match...
England's captain Stuart Broad reacts after an lbw appeal against Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya is turned down during the T20 international cricket match at the County Ground in Bristol, England June 25, 2011. REUTERS/Philip Brown (BRITAIN - Tags: SPORT CRICKET)
SRI LANKA/
RTR2NIKE
June 10, 2011
Sri Lanka's cricketer Sanath Jayasuriya tosses a ball during a practice session ahead of the T20 tour...
Colombo, Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka's cricketer Jayasuriya tosses a ball during a practice session ahead of the T20 tour of England,...
Sri Lanka's cricketer Sanath Jayasuriya tosses a ball during a practice session ahead of the T20 tour of England, in Colombo June 10, 2011. Sri Lanka's opening batsman Sanath Jayasuriya will retire from all forms of international cricket after the first one-day match of their England tour later this month, he said on Thursday. REUTERS/Dinuka Liyanawatte (SRI LANKA - Tags: SPORT CRICKET)
SRI LANKA
RTR2NIKC
June 10, 2011
Sri Lanka's cricketer Sanath Jayasuriya reacts as he arrives at a practice session ahead of the T20 tour...
Colombo, Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka's cricketer Sanath Jayasuriya reacts as he arrives at a practice session ahead of the T20 tour...
Sri Lanka's cricketer Sanath Jayasuriya reacts as he arrives at a practice session ahead of the T20 tour of England, in Colombo June 10, 2011. Sri Lanka's opening batsman Jayasuriya will retire from all forms of international cricket after the first one-day match of their England tour later this month, he said on Thursday. REUTERS/Dinuka Liyanawatte (SRI LANKA - Tags: SPORT CRICKET)
SRI LANKA/
RTR2NHI1
June 09, 2011
Sri Lanka's cricketer Sanath Jayasuriya attends a media conference about his retirement from international...
Colombo, Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka's cricketer Jayasuriya attends a media conference about his retirement from international cricket,...
Sri Lanka's cricketer Sanath Jayasuriya attends a media conference about his retirement from international cricket, in Colombo June 9, 2011. Sri Lanka's opening batsman Jayasuriya will retire from all forms of international cricket after the first one-day match of their England tour later this month, he said on Thursday. REUTERS/Dinuka Liyanawatte (SRI LANKA - Tags: SPORT CRICKET)
SRI LANKA/
RTR2NHHV
June 09, 2011
Sri Lanka's cricketer Sanath Jayasuriya reacts as he speaks to reporters during a media conference about...
Colombo, Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka's cricketer Jayasuriya reacts as he speaks to reporters during a media conference about his...
Sri Lanka's cricketer Sanath Jayasuriya reacts as he speaks to reporters during a media conference about his retirement from international cricket, in Colombo June 9, 2011. Sri Lanka's opening batsman Jayasuriya will retire from all forms of international cricket after the first one-day match of their England tour later this month, he said on Thursday. REUTERS/Dinuka Liyanawatte (SRI LANKA - Tags: SPORT CRICKET)
SRI LANKA/
RTR2NHHT
June 09, 2011
Sri Lanka's cricketer Sanath Jayasuriya reacts as he speaks to reporters during a media conference about...
Colombo, Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka's cricketer Jayasuriya reacts as he speaks to reporters during a media conference about his...
Sri Lanka's cricketer Sanath Jayasuriya reacts as he speaks to reporters during a media conference about his retirement from international cricket, in Colombo June 9, 2011. Sri Lanka's opening batsman Jayasuriya will retire from all forms of international cricket after the first one-day match of their England tour later this month, he said on Thursday. REUTERS/Dinuka Liyanawatte (SRI LANKA - Tags: SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK9L
February 07, 2011
A worker packs cricket bats before they are dispatched for sale at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles)...
Meerut, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
A worker packs cricket bats before they are dispatched for sale at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 31, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. The company produces an average of 150,000 bats and 220,000 balls every year, using willow from England and India's northern Kashmir region. Ten percent of its products are exported, mainly to the cricketing heartlands of the UK, Australia and neighbours Pakistan and Bangladesh. Picture taken January 31, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK9K
February 07, 2011
A worker adjusts the grip on the handle of a cricket bat at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast...
Meerut, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
A worker adjusts the grip on the handle of a cricket bat at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 31, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. The company produces an average of 150,000 bats and 220,000 balls every year, using willow from England and India's northern Kashmir region. Ten percent of its products are exported, mainly to the cricketing heartlands of the UK, Australia and neighbours Pakistan and Bangladesh. Picture taken January 31, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK9J
February 07, 2011
A worker packs bats into cardboard boxes at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi,...
Meerut, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
A worker packs bats into cardboard boxes at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 28, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. The company produces an average of 150,000 bats and 220,000 balls every year, using willow from England and India's northern Kashmir region. Ten percent of its products are exported, mainly to the cricketing heartlands of the UK, Australia and neighbours Pakistan and Bangladesh. Picture taken January 28, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK9I
February 07, 2011
A worker carries cricket bats after their edges were filed to a smooth finish at a factory in Meerut,...
None, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
A worker carries cricket bats after their edges were filed to a smooth finish at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 28, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. The company produces an average of 150,000 bats and 220,000 balls every year, using willow from England and India's northern Kashmir region. Ten percent of its products are exported, mainly to the cricketing heartlands of the UK, Australia and neighbours Pakistan and Bangladesh. Picture taken January 28, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SPORT CRICKET BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK9H
February 07, 2011
A worker wraps a cloth on the cane handle of a bat after its edges were filed to a smooth finish at a...
None, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
A worker wraps a cloth on the cane handle of a bat after its edges were filed to a smooth finish at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 31, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. The company produces an average of 150,000 bats and 220,000 balls every year, using willow from England and India's northern Kashmir region. Ten percent of its products are exported, mainly to the cricketing heartlands of the UK, Australia and neighbours Pakistan and Bangladesh. Picture taken January 31, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SPORT CRICKET BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK9G
February 07, 2011
Worker file the edges of cricket bats to a smooth finish at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast...
None, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
Worker file the edges of cricket bats to a smooth finish at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 31, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. The company produces an average of 150,000 bats and 220,000 balls every year, using willow from England and India's northern Kashmir region. Ten percent of its products are exported, mainly to the cricketing heartlands of the UK, Australia and neighbours Pakistan and Bangladesh. Picture taken January 31, 2011. Picture taken January 31, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SPORT CRICKET BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK9E
February 07, 2011
A worker files the edges of a cricket bat to a smooth finish at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles)...
None, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
A worker files the edges of a cricket bat to a smooth finish at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 28, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. The company produces an average of 150,000 bats and 220,000 balls every year, using willow from England and India's northern Kashmir region. Ten percent of its products are exported, mainly to the cricketing heartlands of the UK, Australia and neighbours Pakistan and Bangladesh. Picture taken January 28, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SPORT CRICKET BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK9D
February 07, 2011
A worker files the edges of a cricket bat to a smooth finish at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles)...
None, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
A worker files the edges of a cricket bat to a smooth finish at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 31, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. The company produces an average of 150,000 bats and 220,000 balls every year, using willow from England and India's northern Kashmir region. Ten percent of its products are exported, mainly to the cricketing heartlands of the UK, Australia and neighbours Pakistan and Bangladesh. Picture taken January 31, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SPORT CRICKET BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK9C
February 07, 2011
Workers file the edges of a cricket bat to a smooth finish at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast...
None, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
Workers file the edges of a cricket bat to a smooth finish at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 31, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. The company produces an average of 150,000 bats and 220,000 balls every year, using willow from England and India's northern Kashmir region. Ten percent of its products are exported, mainly to the cricketing heartlands of the UK, Australia and neighbours Pakistan and Bangladesh. Picture taken January 31, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SPORT CRICKET SOCIETY BUSINESS)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK9B
February 07, 2011
A worker files the edges of a cricket bat to a smooth finish at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles)...
None, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
A worker files the edges of a cricket bat to a smooth finish at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 28, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. The company produces an average of 150,000 bats and 220,000 balls every year, using willow from England and India's northern Kashmir region. Ten percent of its products are exported, mainly to the cricketing heartlands of the UK, Australia and neighbours Pakistan and Bangladesh. Picture taken January 28, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SPORT CRICKET BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK9A
February 07, 2011
A worker files the edges of a cricket bat to a smooth finish at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles)...
None, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
A worker files the edges of a cricket bat to a smooth finish at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 31, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. The company produces an average of 150,000 bats and 220,000 balls every year, using willow from England and India's northern Kashmir region. Ten percent of its products are exported, mainly to the cricketing heartlands of the UK, Australia and neighbours Pakistan and Bangladesh. Picture taken January 31, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SPORT CRICKET BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK99
February 07, 2011
Workers file the edges of cricket bats to a smooth finish and fit cane sticks onto the handles at a factory...
Meerut, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
Workers file the edges of cricket bats to a smooth finish and fit cane sticks onto the handles at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 28, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. The company produces an average of 150,000 bats and 220,000 balls every year, using willow from England and India's northern Kashmir region. Ten percent of its products are exported, mainly to the cricketing heartlands of the UK, Australia and neighbours Pakistan and Bangladesh. Picture taken January 28, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK91
February 07, 2011
Workers file the edges of cricket bats to a smooth finish and fit cane sticks onto the handles at a factory...
Meerut, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
Workers file the edges of cricket bats to a smooth finish and fit cane sticks onto the handles at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 28, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. The company produces an average of 150,000 bats and 220,000 balls every year, using willow from England and India's northern Kashmir region. Ten percent of its products are exported, mainly to the cricketing heartlands of the UK, Australia and neighbours Pakistan and Bangladesh. Picture taken January 28, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK90
February 07, 2011
Workers file the edges of cricket bats to a smooth finish and fit cane sticks onto the handles at a factory...
Meerut, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
Workers file the edges of cricket bats to a smooth finish and fit cane sticks onto the handles at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 28, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. The company produces an average of 150,000 bats and 220,000 balls every year, using willow from England and India's northern Kashmir region. Ten percent of its products are exported, mainly to the cricketing heartlands of the UK, Australia and neighbours Pakistan and Bangladesh. Picture taken January 28, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8Z
February 07, 2011
Workers file the edges of cane sticks to form handles for cricket bats at a factory in Meerut, 80 km...
Meerut, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
Workers file the edges of cane sticks to form handles for cricket bats at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 31, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. The company produces an average of 150,000 bats and 220,000 balls every year, using willow from England and India's northern Kashmir region. Ten percent of its products are exported, mainly to the cricketing heartlands of the UK, Australia and neighbours Pakistan and Bangladesh. Picture taken January 31, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8T
February 07, 2011
A worker cuts a pice of willow to make a bat at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi,...
Meerut, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
A worker cuts a pice of willow to make a bat at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 31, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. The company produces an average of 150,000 bats and 220,000 balls every year, using willow from England and India's northern Kashmir region. Ten percent of its products are exported, mainly to the cricketing heartlands of the UK, Australia and neighbours Pakistan and Bangladesh. Picture taken January 31, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8S
February 07, 2011
A worker carves pieces of willow to make cricket bats at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast...
Meerut, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
A worker carves pieces of willow to make cricket bats at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 31, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. The company produces an average of 150,000 bats and 220,000 balls every year, using willow from England and India's northern Kashmir region. Ten percent of its products are exported, mainly to the cricketing heartlands of the UK, Australia and neighbours Pakistan and Bangladesh. Picture taken January 31, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SPORT CRICKET SOCIETY BUSINESS)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8L
February 07, 2011
A string-wrapped spherical core and two leather halves are weighed before they are made into a cricket...
Meerut, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
A string-wrapped spherical core and two leather halves are weighed before they are made into a cricket ball at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, February 3, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The cricket balls weigh between 155 and 163 gm (0.3 and 0.4 pounds). The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken January 31, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8K
February 07, 2011
A worker wraps strings around a cork as part of the cricket ball making process at a factory in Meerut,...
Meerut, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
A worker wraps strings around a cork as part of the cricket ball making process at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, February 3, 2011 as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken February 3, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8J
February 07, 2011
A worker cuts a piece of tanned leather which will be used to make cricket balls at a factory in Meerut,...
Meerut, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
A worker cuts a piece of tanned leather which will be used to make cricket balls at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, February 3, 2011 as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken February 3, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8I
February 07, 2011
A worker uses a hammer to shape a cork wrapped in strings into a spherical core as part of the cricket...
Meerut, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
A worker uses a hammer to shape a cork wrapped in strings into a spherical core as part of the cricket ball making process at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, February 3, 2011 as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken February 3, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8H
February 07, 2011
A worker stitches two leather halves together as part of the cricket ball making process at a factory...
Meerut, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
A worker stitches two leather halves together as part of the cricket ball making process at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, February 3, 2011 as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken February 3, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8G
February 07, 2011
A worker colours pieces of leather which will be used to make cricket balls at a factory in Meerut, 80...
Meerut, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
A worker colours pieces of leather which will be used to make cricket balls at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 31, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken January 31, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8F
February 07, 2011
Workers carry cricket balls to be packed at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi,...
Meerut, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
Workers carry cricket balls to be packed at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 31, 2011 as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken January 31, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8E
February 07, 2011
A worker shines cricket balls before packing them at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast...
Meerut, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
A worker shines cricket balls before packing them at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 31, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken January 31, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8D
February 07, 2011
Workers pack cricket balls at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 31, 2011...
Meerut, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
Workers pack cricket balls at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 31, 2011 as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken January 31, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8C
February 07, 2011
A worker stamps balls before they are packed at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi,...
Meerut, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
A worker stamps balls before they are packed at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 31, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken January 31, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8B
February 07, 2011
A worker shines cricket balls before packing them at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast...
Meerut, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
A worker shines cricket balls before packing them at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 31, 2011 as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken January 31, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8A
February 07, 2011
A worker stitches two leather halves together as part of the cricket ball making process at a factory...
Meerut, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
A worker stitches two leather halves together as part of the cricket ball making process at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 28, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken January 28, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK89
February 07, 2011
A worker stitches two leather halves together with a spherical core inside the leather halves as part...
Meerut, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
A worker stitches two leather halves together with a spherical core inside the leather halves as part of a cricket ball making process at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 28, 2011 as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken January 28, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK88
February 07, 2011
A worker uses a hammer to shape a cork wrapped with strings into a spherical core to make a cricket ball...
Meerut, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
A worker uses a hammer to shape a cork wrapped with strings into a spherical core to make a cricket ball at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 28, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket world Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken January 28, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK87
February 07, 2011
A worker works on leather pieces which will be used to make cricket balls at a factory in Meerut, 80...
Meerut, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
A worker works on leather pieces which will be used to make cricket balls at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 28, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken January 28, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK86
February 07, 2011
A worker sits behind bunches of cork core that are left on the ground to dry before being used to make...
Meerut, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
A worker sits behind bunches of cork core that are left on the ground to dry before being used to make cricket balls at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 28, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken January 28, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK85
February 07, 2011
A worker stitches two leather halves together with a spherical core inside to form a cricket ball at...
Meerut, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
A worker stitches two leather halves together with a spherical core inside to form a cricket ball at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 28, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken January 28, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK83
February 07, 2011
A worker tans pieces of leather which will be used to make cricket balls at a factory in Meerut, 80 km...
Meerut, India
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/
A worker tans pieces of leather which will be used to make cricket balls at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 28, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken January 28, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET)
CRiCKET
RTXWBZJ
January 08, 2011
Sri Lanka's national cricket team captain Kumar Sangakkara speaks during a news conference on team selection...
Colombo, Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka's national cricket team captain Kumar Sangakkara speaks during a news conference on team selection...
Sri Lanka's national cricket team captain Kumar Sangakkara speaks during a news conference on team selection ahead of the 2011 Cricket World Cup in Colombo January 8, 2011. Sri Lanka left out 1996 World Cup winners Sanath Jayasuriya and Chaminda Vass from their final 15-man squad for the 2011 World Cup. REUTERS/Dinuka Liyanawatte (SRI LANKA - Tags: SPORT CRICKET)
CRICKET
RTXWBZ7
January 08, 2011
Sri Lanka's national cricket team selection committee chairman Aravinda de Silva (L) and captain Kumar...
Colombo, Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka's national cricket team selection committee chairman Silva and captain Sangakkara smile during...
Sri Lanka's national cricket team selection committee chairman Aravinda de Silva (L) and captain Kumar Sangakkara smile during a news conference on team selection ahead of the 2011 Cricket World Cup in Colombo January 8, 2011. Sri Lanka left out 1996 World Cup winners Sanath Jayasuriya and Chaminda Vass from their final 15-man squad ahead of the 2011 World Cup. REUTERS/Dinuka Liyanawatte (SRI LANKA - Tags: SPORT CRICKET)
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