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Search results for: KORNBERG-Roger-

SWEDEN/NOBEL
RTR1KAZC
December 11, 2006
Nobel Chemistry laureate Roger D. Kornberg (R), of Stanford University in California, arrives for the...
Stockholm, Sweden
Nobel Chemistry laureate Kornberg arrives for the Nobel dinner with his wife Yahli Lorch at the Royal...
Nobel Chemistry laureate Roger D. Kornberg (R), of Stanford University in California, arrives for the Nobel dinner with his wife Yahli Lorch at the Royal Palace in Stockholm December 10, 2006. SWEDEN OUT NORWAY OUT DENMARK OUT NO THIRD PARTY SALES REUTERS/Janerik Henriksson/Scanpix
NOBEL/SWEDEN
RTR1K9L4
December 10, 2006
Sweden's Prime Minister Fredrik Reinfeldt (front, L) escorts Viviana Phelps, wife of Nobel laureate in...
Stockholm, Sweden
Sweden's Prime Minister Reinfeldt arrives with Nobel laureates to the Nobel Banquet in Stockholm
Sweden's Prime Minister Fredrik Reinfeldt (front, L) escorts Viviana Phelps, wife of Nobel laureate in Economics Edmund Phelps, as they arrive at the Nobel Banquet in Stockholm December 10, 2006. Behind Reinfeldt is chemistry laureate Roger Kornberg, escorted by Christine Skube, and in the last row is physics laureate John Mather, escorted by Yahli Lorch. REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN)
NOBEL-CHEMISTRY/
RTR1K99L
December 10, 2006
Roger Kornberg from the United States receives the 2006 Nobel Prize in Chemistry from Swedish King Carl...
Stockholm, Sweden
Roger Kornberg from the United States receives the 2006 Nobel Prize in Chemistry from Swedish King Carl...
Roger Kornberg from the United States receives the 2006 Nobel Prize in Chemistry from Swedish King Carl Gustaf (R) at the Concert Hall in Stockholm December 10, 2006. Kornberg won the prize for his studies of the molecular basis of eukaryotic transcription. REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN)
NOBEL/
RTR1K98C
December 10, 2006
The 2006 Nobel Prize laureates (L-R) John Mather, George Smoot III, Roger Kornberg, Andrew Fire, Craig...
Stockholm, Sweden
The 2006 Nobel Prize laureates attend ceremony at the Concert Hall in Stockholm
The 2006 Nobel Prize laureates (L-R) John Mather, George Smoot III, Roger Kornberg, Andrew Fire, Craig Mello, Orhan Pamuk and Edmund Phelps attend the awards ceremony at the Concert Hall in Stockholm December 10, 2006. The Nobel Prize is the first international award given yearly since 1901 for achievements in physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature and peace. In 1968, the Sveriges Riksbank (Bank of Sweden) instituted the Prize in Economic Sciences in memory of Alfred Nobel, founder of the Nobel Prize. Each prize consists of a medal, personal diploma, and prize amount. REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN)
SWEDEN-NOBEL/
RTR1K4ZH
December 07, 2006
(L-R) John Mather and George Smoot, joint winners of the Nobel Prize in Physics, Roger Kornberg, winner...
Stockholm, Sweden
Nobel laureates in Physics, Chemistry and Economics attend news conference in Stockholm
(L-R) John Mather and George Smoot, joint winners of the Nobel Prize in Physics, Roger Kornberg, winner of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, and Edmund Phelps, winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics attend a news conference in Stockholm, December 7, 2006. REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN)
SWEDEN-NOBEL/
RTR1K4ZB
December 07, 2006
Roger Kornberg (R) of the U.S., winner of the 2006 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, speaks at a news conference...
Stockholm, Sweden
Nobel laureate in Chemistry speaks at a news conference in Stockholm
Roger Kornberg (R) of the U.S., winner of the 2006 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, speaks at a news conference in Stockholm, December 7, 2006. Sitting next to Kornberg are the joint winners of the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics, John Mather (L) and George Smoot, both from the United States. REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN)
SWEDEN-NOBEL/
RTR1K4Z7
December 07, 2006
Edmund Phelps (R) of the U.S., winner of the 2006 Nobel Prize in Economics, speaks at a news conference...
Stockholm, Sweden
Nobel laureate in Economics speaks at a news conference in Stockholm
Edmund Phelps (R) of the U.S., winner of the 2006 Nobel Prize in Economics, speaks at a news conference in Stockholm, December 7, 2006. Sitting next to Phelps is Roger Kornberg, winner of the 2006 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN)
SWEDEN-NOBEL/
RTR1K4Z4
December 07, 2006
Roger Kornberg of the U.S., winner of the 2006 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, speaks at a news conference...
Stockholm, Sweden
Nobel laureate in Chemistry speaks at a news conference in Stockholm
Roger Kornberg of the U.S., winner of the 2006 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, speaks at a news conference in Stockholm, December 7, 2006. REUTERS/Bob Strong (SWEDEN)
USA-NOBEL/
RTR1JVIZ
November 30, 2006
U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney (3rd R) poses with 2006 Nobel Laureates (L-R) Dr. Andrew Fire (Medicine),...
Washington, UNITED STATES
U.S. Vice President Cheney poses with 2006 Nobel Laureates in the Roosevelt Room at White House in Washington...
U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney (3rd R) poses with 2006 Nobel Laureates (L-R) Dr. Andrew Fire (Medicine), Dr. George Smoot (Physics), Dr. Roger Kornberg (Chemistry), Dr. Craig Mello (Medicine) and John Mather (Physics) in the Roosevelt Room at the White House in Washington November 30, 2006. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES)
MIDEAST
RTR1ICME
October 15, 2006
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg, the winner of the 2006 Nobel chemistry prize, attends a...
Jerusalem, Israel
Stanford University professor Kornberg, the winner of the 2006 Nobel prize, attends a reception in Jerusalem...
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg, the winner of the 2006 Nobel chemistry prize, attends a reception in his honor at Hebrew University in Jerusalem October 15, 2006. Kornberg won the 2006 Nobel chemistry prize for showing how genes are copied, a process essential to how cells develop and to life itself. REUTERS/Yonathan Weitzman (ISRAEL)
MIDEAST
RTR1ICMA
October 15, 2006
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg, the winner of the 2006 Nobel chemistry prize, attends a...
Jerusalem, Israel
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg, the winner of the 2006 Nobel prize, attends a reception...
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg, the winner of the 2006 Nobel chemistry prize, attends a reception in his honour at Hebrew University in Jerusalem October 15, 2006. Kornberg won the 2006 Nobel chemistry prize for showing how genes are copied, a process essential to how cells develop and to life itself. REUTERS/Yonathan Weitzman (ISRAEL)
MIDEAST
RTR1ICM8
October 15, 2006
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg, the winner of the 2006 Nobel chemistry prize, attends a...
Jerusalem, Israel
Stanford University professor Kornberg, the winner of the 2006 Nobel prize, attends a reception in Jerusalem...
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg, the winner of the 2006 Nobel chemistry prize, attends a reception in his honor at Hebrew University in Jerusalem October 15, 2006. Kornberg won the 2006 Nobel chemistry prize for showing how genes are copied, a process essential to how cells develop and to life itself. REUTERS/Yonathan Weitzman (ISRAEL)
NOBEL CHEMISTRY
RTR1I0F3
October 04, 2006
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg holds a phone interview in his office after learning of...
Stanford, UNITED STATES
Stanford University professor Kornberg holds phone interview in his office after learning of his 2006...
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg holds a phone interview in his office after learning of his 2006 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for work in the field of gene expression at Stanford, California, October 4, 2006. Kornberg won the prize on Wednesday for showing how genes are copied, a process essential to how cells develop and to life itself. Kornberg's prize came 47 years after he watched his father accept the medicine Nobel in Stockholm for gene work. It also crowned a week of success for U.S. scientists, who have swept all the 2006 Nobel science awards so far. REUTERS/Dino Vournas (UNITED STATES)
NOBEL CHEMISTRY
RTR1I0EW
October 04, 2006
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg (L) smiles next to his father Arthur and Dean of the Medical...
Stanford, UNITED STATES
Stanford University professor Kornberg smiles next to his father and Dean of Medical School Pizzo at...
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg (L) smiles next to his father Arthur and Dean of the Medical School Philip Pizzo as they celebrate his 2006 Nobel chemistry prize win for work in the field of gene expression, at Stanford, California October 4, 2006. Roger Kornberg won the prize on Wednesday for showing how genes are copied, a process essential to how cells develop and to life itself. Kornberg's prize came 47 years after he watched his father accept the medicine Nobel in Stockholm for gene work. It also crowned a week of success for U.S. scientists, who have swept all the 2006 Nobel science awards so far. REUTERS/Dino Vournas (UNITED STATES)
NOBEL CHEMISTRY
RTR1I0EO
October 04, 2006
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg (L) sits next to the Dean of the Medical School Philip Pizzo...
Stanford, UNITED STATES
Stanford University professor Kornberg sits next to the Dean of the Medical School Pizzo during news...
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg (L) sits next to the Dean of the Medical School Philip Pizzo after his 2006 Nobel chemistry prize win for work in the field of gene expression, during a news conference at Stanford, California October 4, 2006. Kornberg won the prize on Wednesday for showing how genes are copied, a process essential to how cells develop and to life itself. Kornberg's prize came 47 years after he watched his father Arthur accept the medicine Nobel in Stockholm for gene work. It also crowned a week of success for U.S. scientists, who have swept all the 2006 Nobel science awards so far. REUTERS/Dino Vournas (UNITED STATES)
NOBEL CHEMISTRY
RTR1I0EH
October 04, 2006
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg is hugged by a colleague, as his father Arthur (R) watches,...
Stanford, UNITED STATES
Stanford University professor Kornberg is hugged by a colleague for his Nobel Prize in Chemistry for...
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg is hugged by a colleague, as his father Arthur (R) watches, for his Nobel Prize in Chemistry for work in the field of gene expression at Stanford, California, October 4, 2006. Kornberg won the prize on Wednesday for showing how genes are copied, a process essential to how cells develop and to life itself. Kornberg's prize came 47 years after he watched his father Arthur accept the medicine Nobel in Stockholm for gene work. It also crowned a week of success for U.S. scientists, who have swept all the 2006 Nobel science awards so far. REUTERS/Dino Vournas (UNITED STATES)
NOBEL CHEMISTRY
RTR1I0E0
October 04, 2006
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg gestures after his 2006 Nobel chemistry prize win for work...
Stanford, UNITED STATES
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg gestures during news conference at Stanford
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg gestures after his 2006 Nobel chemistry prize win for work in the field of gene expression, during a news conference at Stanford, California October 4, 2006. Kornberg won the prize on Wednesday for showing how genes are copied, a process essential to how cells develop and to life itself. Kornberg's prize came 47 years after he watched his father Arthur accept the medicine Nobel in Stockholm for gene work. It also crowned a week of success for U.S. scientists, who have swept all the 2006 Nobel science awards so far. REUTERS/Dino Vournas (UNITED STATES)
NOBEL CHEMISTRY
RTR1I0DY
October 04, 2006
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg (L) poses with his father Arthur after his 2006 Nobel chemistry...
Stanford, UNITED STATES
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg poses with father Arthur during news conference at Stanford...
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg (L) poses with his father Arthur after his 2006 Nobel chemistry prize win for work in the field of gene expression, during a news conference at Stanford, California October 4, 2006. Roger Kornberg won the prize on Wednesday for showing how genes are copied, a process essential to how cells develop and to life itself. Kornberg's prize came 47 years after he watched his father Arthur accept the medicine Nobel in Stockholm for gene work. It also crowned a week of success for U.S. scientists, who have swept all the 2006 Nobel science awards so far. REUTERS/Dino Vournas (UNITED STATES)
NOBEL CHEMISTRY
RTR1I0DW
October 04, 2006
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg (L) is congratulated by his father Arthur (C) after his...
Stanford, UNITED STATES
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg is congratulated by father Arthur during news conference...
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg (L) is congratulated by his father Arthur (C) after his 2006 Nobel chemistry prize win for work in the field of gene expression, during a news conference at Stanford, California October 4, 2006. Also present was 2006 Nobel medicine prize winner Andrew Fire (R). Roger Kornberg won the prize on Wednesday for showing how genes are copied, a process essential to how cells develop and to life itself. Kornberg's prize came 47 years after he watched his father Arthur accept the medicine Nobel in Stockholm for gene work. It also crowned a week of success for U.S. scientists, who have swept all the 2006 Nobel science awards so far. REUTERS/Dino Vournas (UNITED STATES)
NOBEL CHEMISTRY
RTR1I0DO
October 04, 2006
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg (L) is congratulated by his father Arthur after his 2006...
Stanford, UNITED STATES
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg is congratulated by father Arthur during news conference...
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg (L) is congratulated by his father Arthur after his 2006 Nobel chemistry prize win for work in the field of gene expression, during a news conference at Stanford, California October 4, 2006. Roger Kornberg won the prize on Wednesday for showing how genes are copied, a process essential to how cells develop and to life itself. Kornberg's prize came 47 years after he watched his father Arthur accept the medicine Nobel in Stockholm for gene work. It also crowned a week of success for U.S. scientists, who have swept all the 2006 Nobel science awards so far. REUTERS/Dino Vournas (UNITED STATES)
NOBEL CHEMISTRY
RTR1I0DF
October 04, 2006
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg puts on a lab coat in his office before celebrating with...
Stanford, UNITED STATES
Stanford University professor Kornberg prepares to celebrate Nobel prize win at Stanford
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg puts on a lab coat in his office before celebrating with his staff his 2006 Nobel chemistry prize for his work in the field of gene expression at Stanford, California October 4, 2006. Kornberg, the son of a Nobel laureate, won the prize on Wednesday for showing how genes are copied, a process essential to how cells develop and to life itself. Kornberg's prize came 47 years after he watched his father Arthur accept the medicine Nobel in Stockholm for gene work. It also crowned a week of success for U.S. scientists, who have swept all the 2006 Nobel science awards so far. REUTERS/Dino Vournas (UNITED STATES)
NOBEL CHEMISTRY
RTR1I0DC
October 04, 2006
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg (2nd R) holds a model of a protein machine and jokes around...
Stanford, UNITED STATES
Professor Roger Kornberg celebrates Nobel chemistry prize in Stanford
Stanford University professor Roger Kornberg (2nd R) holds a model of a protein machine and jokes around with his staff, as he celebrates winning the 2006 Nobel chemistry prize for his work in the field of gene expression, at Stanford, California October 4, 2006. Kornberg, the son of a Nobel laureate, won the prize on Wednesday for showing how genes are copied, a process essential to how cells develop and to life itself. Kornberg's prize came 47 years after he watched his father Arthur accept the medicine Nobel in Stockholm for gene work. It also crowned a week of success for U.S. scientists, who have swept all the 2006 Nobel science awards so far. REUTERS/Dino Vournas (UNITED STATES)
NOBEL CHEMISTRY
RTR1HZXP
October 04, 2006
American Arthur Kornberg (R) is seen receiving the Nobel Prize in medicine from King Gustaf VI Adolf...
Stockholm, Sweden
File photo of American Kornberg seen receiving Nobel Prize in medicine from King Gustaf VI Adolf of Sweden...
American Arthur Kornberg (R) is seen receiving the Nobel Prize in medicine from King Gustaf VI Adolf of Sweden in this December 10, 1959 file photo. Kornberg's son, Roger Kornberg, won the 2006 Nobel prize for chemistry on Wednesday for describing gene copying in cells, which can give insight into illnesses such as cancer and heart disease. DENMARK OUT NORWAY OUT SWEDEN OUT REUTERS/Scanpix/File (SWEDEN)
NOBEL CHEMISTRY
RTR1HZX1
October 04, 2006
Nobel prize winner for chemistry American Roger Kornberg is shown on an overhead presentation screen...
Stockholm, Sweden
Nobel prize winner for chemistry American Kornberg is shown on overhead presentation screen in Stockholm...
Nobel prize winner for chemistry American Roger Kornberg is shown on an overhead presentation screen when the Royal Academy of Science announced his win in Stockholm October 4, 2006. Kornberg, the son of a Nobel laureate, won the 2006 Nobel prize for chemistry on Wednesday for describing gene copying in cells, which can give insight into illnesses such as cancer and heart disease. DENMARK OUT NORWAY OUT SWEDEN OUT REUTERS/Bertil Ericson/Scanpix (SWEDEN)
NOBEL CHEMISTRY
RTR1HZWY
October 04, 2006
Gunnar Oquist, permanent secretary of the Royal Academy of Sience (L) and Professor Lars Thelander announce...
Stockholm, Sweden
Oquist, permanent secretary of Royal Academy of Sience and Professor Thelander announce Nobel prize winner...
Gunnar Oquist, permanent secretary of the Royal Academy of Sience (L) and Professor Lars Thelander announce the Nobel prize winner for chemistry in Stockholm October 4, 2006. American Roger Kornberg, the son of a Nobel laureate, won the 2006 Nobel prize for chemistry on Wednesday for describing gene copying in cells, which can give insight into illnesses such as cancer and heart disease. DENMARK OUT NORWAY OUT SWEDEN OUT REUTERS/Bertil Ericson/Scanpix (SWEDEN)
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