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Search results for: Kalahari-Desert

BOTSWANA-BUSHMEN/
RTR1KD80
December 13, 2006
A member of the Bushmen community celebrates outside the court in Lobatse, Botswana, December 13, 2006....
LOBATSE, Botswana
A member of the Bushmen community celebrates outside the court in Lobatse Botswana
A member of the Bushmen community celebrates outside the court in Lobatse, Botswana, December 13, 2006. Botswana's High Court ruled on Wednesday that hundreds of Bushmen had been wrongly evicted from ancestral hunting grounds in the Kalahari desert and should be allowed to return. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko (BOTSWANA)
BOTSWANA-BUSHMEN/
RTR1KD7V
December 13, 2006
A member of the Bushmen community follows proceedings inside the court in Lobatse, Botswana, December...
LOBATSE, Botswana
A member of the Bushmen community follows proceedings inside the court in Lobatse Botswana
A member of the Bushmen community follows proceedings inside the court in Lobatse, Botswana, December 13, 2006. Botswana's High Court ruled on Wednesday that hundreds of Bushmen had been wrongly evicted from ancestral hunting grounds in the Kalahari desert and should be allowed to return. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko (BOTSWANA)
BOTSWANA-BUSHMEN/
RTR1KD7P
December 13, 2006
Roy Sesana, leader of the Bushman community, celebrates outside the court in Lobatse, Botswana, December...
LOBATSE, Botswana
Roy Sesana, leader of the Bushman community, celebrates outside the court in Lobatse Botswana
Roy Sesana, leader of the Bushman community, celebrates outside the court in Lobatse, Botswana, December 13, 2006. Botswana's High Court ruled on Wednesday that hundreds of Bushmen had been wrongly evicted from ancestral hunting grounds in the Kalahari desert and should be allowed to return. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko (BOTSWANA)
BOTSWANA-BUSHMEN/
RTR1KD5C
December 13, 2006
Members of the Bushman community celebrate outside the court in Lobatse, Botswana, December 13, 2006....
LOBATSE, Botswana
Members of the Bushman community celebrate outside the court in Lobatse Botswana
Members of the Bushman community celebrate outside the court in Lobatse, Botswana, December 13, 2006. Botswana's High Court ruled on Wednesday that hundreds of Bushmen had been wrongly evicted from ancestral hunting grounds in the Kalahari desert and should be allowed to return. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko (BOTSWANA)
BOTSWANA-BUSHMEN/
RTR1KD5A
December 13, 2006
A member of the Bushman community celebrates outside the court in Lobatse, Botswana, December 13, 2006....
LOBATSE, Botswana
A member of the Bushman community celebrates outside the court in Lobatse Botswana
A member of the Bushman community celebrates outside the court in Lobatse, Botswana, December 13, 2006. Botswana's High Court ruled on Wednesday that hundreds of Bushmen had been wrongly evicted from ancestral hunting grounds in the Kalahari desert and should be allowed to return. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko (BOTSWANA)
SOUTH AFRICA BUSHMEN
RTR1C9DG
April 06, 2006
Women dressed in beaded animal skins perform celebratory dances during the launch of SANDA Security services...
PLATFONTE, South Africa
To match feature South Africa-Bushmen
Women dressed in beaded animal skins perform celebratory dances during the launch of SANDA Security services in Platfonte in the Northern Cape, a Bushman community about 15 km (9 miles) outside the former diamond centre of Kimberley and the new headquarters of Sanda Security, in this picture taken on April 05, 2006. Cheers greeted this week's first class trained by Sanda Security, a new South African company that aims to preserve the Bushmen's ancient way of life by harnessing their legendary skills as wildlife trackers to provide security and stop stock theft at farms. The company is a novel attempt to forge a future for southern Africa's Bushmen, or San people, among the world's last true hunter-gatherers pushed to the brink of extinction by the relentless encroachment of the modern world. Now believed to number fewer than 85,000 in Kalahari desert areas of Botswana, Namibia, South Africa and Angola, the Bushmen have been hunted and persecuted for hundreds of years as their ancestral land has been swallowed by miners and ranchers. Picture taken April 5, 2006. To match feature Safrica-Bushmen. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko
SOUTH AFRICA BUSHMEN
RTR1C9D9
April 06, 2006
A member of the San community demonstrates his ancient hunting skills during the launch of SANDA Security...
PLATFONTE, South Africa
To match feature South Africa-Bushmen
A member of the San community demonstrates his ancient hunting skills during the launch of SANDA Security services in Platfonte in the Northern Cape, a Bushman community about 15 km (9 miles) outside the former diamond centre of Kimberley and the new headquarters of Sanda Security, in this picture taken on April 05, 2006. Cheers greeted this week's first class trained by Sanda Security, a new South African company that aims to preserve the Bushmen's ancient way of life by harnessing their legendary skills as wildlife trackers to provide security and stop stock theft at farms. The company is a novel attempt to forge a future for southern Africa's Bushmen, or San people, among the world's last true hunter-gatherers pushed to the brink of extinction by the relentless encroachment of the modern world. Now believed to number fewer than 85,000 in Kalahari desert areas of Botswana, Namibia, South Africa and Angola, the Bushmen have been hunted and persecuted for hundreds of years as their ancestral land has been swallowed by miners and ranchers. Picture taken April 5, 2006. To match feature Safrica-Bushmen. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE
SOUTH AFRICA BUSHMEN
RTR1C9D7
April 06, 2006
A member of the San community demonstrates his ancient hunting skills during the launch of SANDA Security...
PLATFONTE, South Africa
To accompany feature South Africa-Bushmen
A member of the San community demonstrates his ancient hunting skills during the launch of SANDA Security services in Platfonte in the Northern Cape, a Bushman community about 15 km (9 miles) outside the former diamond centre of Kimberley and the new headquarters of Sanda Security, in this picture taken on April 05, 2006. Cheers greeted this week's first class trained by Sanda Security, a new South African company that aims to preserve the Bushmen's ancient way of life by harnessing their legendary skills as wildlife trackers to provide security and stop stock theft at farms. The company is a novel attempt to forge a future for southern Africa's Bushmen, or San people, among the world's last true hunter-gatherers pushed to the brink of extinction by the relentless encroachment of the modern world. Now believed to number fewer than 85,000 in Kalahari desert areas of Botswana, Namibia, South Africa and Angola, the Bushmen have been hunted and persecuted for hundreds of years as their ancestral land has been swallowed by miners and ranchers. Picture taken April 5, 2006. To match feature Safrica-Bushmen. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko
SAFRICA BUSHMEN
RTR1C9BY
April 06, 2006
Dressed in crisp olive uniforms and shiny black boots, members of the squad of 40 South African Bushmen...
PLATFONTE, South Africa
To match feature Safrica-Bushmen
Dressed in crisp olive uniforms and shiny black boots, members of the squad of 40 South African Bushmen take up formation with military precision, the last hope of a vanishing people in Platfonte in the Northern Cape, a Bushman community about 15 km (9 miles) outside the former diamond centre of Kimberley and the new headquarters of Sanda Security, in this picture taken April 5, 2006. Cheers greeted this week's first class trained by Sanda Security, a new South African company that aims to preserve the Bushmen's ancient way of life by harnessing their legendary skills as wildlife trackers to provide security and stop stock theft at farms. The company is a novel attempt to forge a future for southern Africa's Bushmen, or San people, among the world's last true hunter-gatherers pushed to the brink of extinction by the relentless encroachment of the modern world. Now believed to number fewer than 85,000 in Kalahari desert areas of Botswana, Namibia, South Africa and Angola, the Bushmen have been hunted and persecuted for hundreds of years as their ancestral land has been swallowed by miners and ranchers. Picture taken April 5, 2006. To match feature Safrica-Bushmen. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko
BOSTWANA
RTXMSJJ
July 31, 2004
Tshokodiso Mosielwane (C) and Motsoko Ramahoko (L), members of Botswana's Bushmen tribe, stand with their...
Ghanzi, BOSTWANA
Tshokodiso Mosielwane (C) and Motsoko Ramahoko (L), members of Botswana's Bushmen tribe, stand with .....
Tshokodiso Mosielwane (C) and Motsoko Ramahoko (L), members of Botswana's Bushmen tribe, stand with their lawyer Glyn Williams (R) inside the court room in Ghanzi township, 750 km north of the capital Gaborone, July 29, 2004. A court bid by Botswana's Bushmen to appeal against their eviction from ancestral Kalahari desert lands was delayed on Friday after their lawyers said they needed time to raise more cash. Lawyers for the Bushmen, also known as the Basarwa, say the government violated the constitution when it ordered them out of the Central Kalahari Game Reserve in 2001, saying their lands were too vast to be reached by essential services. Picture taken July 29, 2004.]
BOSTWANA
RTXMSJI
July 31, 2004
A female members of Botswana's Bushmen tribe, also known as Basarwa, hangs laundry at their new settlement...
Gantsi, BOSTWANA
A female members of Botswana's Bushmen tribe, also known as Basarwa, hangs laundry at their new sett.....
A female members of Botswana's Bushmen tribe, also known as Basarwa, hangs laundry at their new settlement in Ghanzi township, 750 km north of the capital Gaborone, July 29, 2004. A court bid by Botswana's Bushmen to appeal against their eviction from ancestral Kalahari desert lands was delayed on Friday after their lawyers said they needed time to raise more cash. Lawyers for the Bushmen, also known as the Basarwa, say the government violated the constitution when it ordered them out of the Central Kalahari Game Reserve in 2001, saying their lands were too vast to be reached by essential services. Picture taken July 29, 2004.
BOSTWANA
RTXMSJH
July 31, 2004
Members of Botswana's Bushman (Basarwa) tribe sits and listens to a court case in the Ghanzi township...
Gantsi, BOSTWANA
Members of Botswana's Bushman (Basarwa) tribe sits and listens to a court case in the Ghanzi townsh.....
Members of Botswana's Bushman (Basarwa) tribe sits and listens to a court case in the Ghanzi township 750 km north of Gaborone, July 29, 2004. A bid by Botswana's Bushmen to appeal against their eviction from ancestral Kalahari desert lands was delayed on Friday after their lawyers said they needed time to raise more cash. Lawyers for the Bushmen, also known as the Basarwa, say the government violated the constitution when it ordered them out of the Central Kalahari Game Reserve in 2001, saying their lands were too vast to be reached by essential services. Picture taken July 29, 2004.
RAMAHOKO
RTXMSJG
July 31, 2004
Motsoko Ramahoko, a member of Botswana's Bushmen tribe sits in the witness box in Ghanzi township, 750...
Gantsi, BOSTWANA
Motsoko Ramahoko, a member of Botswana's Bushmen tribe sits in the witness box in Ghanzi township, 7.....
Motsoko Ramahoko, a member of Botswana's Bushmen tribe sits in the witness box in Ghanzi township, 750 km north of the capital Gaborone, July 29, 2004. A court bid by Botswana's Bushmen to appeal against their eviction from ancestral Kalahari desert lands was delayed on Friday after their lawyers said they needed time to raise more cash. Lawyers for the Bushmen, also known as the Basarwa, say the government violated the constitution when it ordered them out of the Central Kalahari Game Reserve in 2001, saying their lands were too vast to be reached by essential services. Picture taken July 29, 2004.
BOTSWANA BASARWA
RTR15A61
July 29, 2004
Members of Botswana's Bushmen tribe, also known as Basarwa, dance at their new settlement in Ghanzi township,...
Ghanzi, Botswana
BOTSWANA'S BUSHMAN DANCE AT THEIR NEW SETTLEMENT IN GHANZI.
Members of Botswana's Bushmen tribe, also known as Basarwa, dance at their new settlement in Ghanzi township, 750 km north of the capital Gaborone, July 29, 2004. A court bid by Botswana's Bushmen to appeal against their eviction from ancestral Kalahari desert lands was delayed on Friday after their lawyers said they needed time to raise more cash. Lawyers for the Bushmen, also known as the Basarwa, say the government violated the constitution when it ordered them out of the Central Kalahari Game Reserve in 2001, saying their lands were too vast to be reached by essential services. Picture taken July 29, 2004. REUTERS/Juda Ngwenya JN/CRB
BOTSWANA BASARWA
RTR7SUA
July 29, 2004
Female members of Botswana's Bushmen tribe, also known as Basarwa, hang laundry at their new settlement...
Gantsi, South Africa
Female member of Botswana's Bushmen hangs laundry at new settlement in Ghanzi.
Female members of Botswana's Bushmen tribe, also known as Basarwa, hang laundry at their new settlement in Ghanzi township, 750 km north of the capital Gaborone, July 29, 2004. A court bid by Botswana's Bushmen to appeal against their eviction from ancestral Kalahari desert lands was delayed on Friday after their lawyers said they needed time to raise more cash. Lawyers for the Bushmen, also known as the Basarwa, say the government violated the constitution when it ordered them out of the Central Kalahari Game Reserve in 2001, saying their lands were too vast to be reached by essential services. Picture taken July 29, 2004. REUTERS/Juda Ngwenya jn/SM
BOTSWANA BASARWA
RTR7SU3
July 29, 2004
Female member of Botswana's Bushmen tribe asks photographer for a cigarette at new settlement in Ghanzi....
Gantsi, South Africa
Female member of Botswana's Bushmen tribe asks photographer for a cigarette at new settlement ...
Female member of Botswana's Bushmen tribe asks photographer for a cigarette at new settlement in Ghanzi. A female members of Botswana's Bushmen tribe, also known as Basarwa, asks the photographer for a cigarette at their new settlement in Ghanzi township, 750 km north of the capital Gaborone, July 29, 2004. A court bid by Botswana's Bushmen to appeal against their eviction from ancestral Kalahari desert lands was delayed on Friday after their lawyers said they needed time to raise more cash. Lawyers for the Bushmen, also known as the Basarwa, say the government violated the constitution when it ordered them out of the Central Kalahari Game Reserve in 2001, saying their lands were too vast to be reached by essential services. Picture taken July 29, 2004. REUTERS/Juda Ngwenya
BOTSWANA BASARWA
RTR7SSX
July 29, 2004
Members of Botswana's Bushman Basarwa tribe sits and listens to a court case in the Ghanzi township 750...
Gantsi, Botswana
Members of Botswana's Bushman Basarwa tribe sits and listens to a court case in the Ghanzi ...
Members of Botswana's Bushman Basarwa tribe sits and listens to a court case in the Ghanzi township 750 km north of Gaborone. Members of Botswana's Bushman (Basarwa) tribe sits and listens to a court case in the Ghanzi township 750 km north of Gaborone, July 29, 2004. A bid by Botswana's Bushmen to appeal against their eviction from ancestral Kalahari desert lands was delayed on Friday after their lawyers said they needed time to raise more cash. Lawyers for the Bushmen, also known as the Basarwa, say the government violated the constitution when it ordered them out of the Central Kalahari Game Reserve in 2001, saying their lands were too vast to be reached by essential services. Picture taken July 29,2004. REUTERS/Juda Ngwenya
BOTSWANA BASARWA
RTR7PDA
July 29, 2004
Tshokodiso Mosielwane (C) and Motsoko Ramahoko (L), members of Botswana's Bushmen tribe, stand with their...
Ghanzi, Botswana
Members of Botswana's Bushmen tribe stand with their lawyer in court in Ghanzi township.
Tshokodiso Mosielwane (C) and Motsoko Ramahoko (L), members of Botswana's Bushmen tribe, stand with their lawyer Glyn Williams (R) inside the court room in Ghanzi township, 750 km north of the capital Gaborone, July 29, 2004. A court bid by Botswana's Bushmen to appeal against their eviction from ancestral Kalahari desert lands was delayed on Friday after their lawyers said they needed time to raise more cash. Lawyers for the Bushmen, also known as the Basarwa, say the government violated the constitution when it ordered them out of the Central Kalahari Game Reserve in 2001, saying their lands were too vast to be reached by essential services. Picture taken July 29, 2004. REUTERS/Juda Ngwenya JN/CRB
BOTSWANA BASARWA
RTR7PD1
July 29, 2004
Motsoko Ramahoko, a member of Botswana's Bushmen tribe sits in the witness box in Ghanzi township, 750...
Ghanzi, Botswana
A Member of Botswana's Bushmen tribe sits in the witness box in Ghanzi township.
Motsoko Ramahoko, a member of Botswana's Bushmen tribe sits in the witness box in Ghanzi township, 750 km north of the capital Gaborone, July 29, 2004. A court bid by Botswana's Bushmen to appeal against their eviction from ancestral Kalahari desert lands was delayed on Friday after their lawyers said they needed time to raise more cash. Lawyers for the Bushmen, also known as the Basarwa, say the government violated the constitution when it ordered them out of the Central Kalahari Game Reserve in 2001, saying their lands were too vast to be reached by essential services. Picture taken July 29, 2004. REUTERS/Juda Ngwenya JN/CRB
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