Ajax loader
By using our website, you agree to our use of cookies as described in Cookie Policy.

Can't find what you're looking for?

 

Be sure to Sign in to see all available content.

 

If you don't have an account, Register here.

Search results for: Kalasha

Religion
Religion
Pakistan's Kalash Under Pressure - 21 Oct 2011
15 PICTURES
PAKISTAN-KALASH/
RTR2SWC9
October 20, 2011
Kalash female students walk to class through the entrance of the Kalasha Dur and community centre in...
KALASH, Pakistan
To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/
Kalash female students walk to class through the entrance of the Kalasha Dur and community centre in Brun village, located in Bumboret Kalash valley October 14, 2011. Nestled among the valleys of Pakistan's mountainous northwest, the Kalash are a tiny religious community that claim descent from Alexander the Great's army, and say they are under increasing pressure to convert to Islam. The Kalash, who number about 3,500 in Pakistan's population of 180 million, are spread over three valleys along the border with Afghanistan and are known for their distinctive dress, vibrant religious festivals, and polytheism. To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/ Picture taken October 14, 2011. REUTERS/Rebecca Conway (PAKISTAN - Tags: EDUCATION SOCIETY)
PAKISTAN-KALASH/
RTR2SWBY
October 20, 2011
Girls from the Kalash community wash clothes in a river in the Rumbur Kalash valley October 12, 2011....
KALASH, Pakistan
To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/
Girls from the Kalash community wash clothes in a river in the Rumbur Kalash valley October 12, 2011. Nestled among the valleys of Pakistan's mountainous northwest, the Kalash are a tiny religious community that claim descent from Alexander the Great's army, and say they are under increasing pressure to convert to Islam. The Kalash, who number about 3,500 in Pakistan's population of 180 million, are spread over three valleys along the border with Afghanistan and are known for their distinctive dress, vibrant religious festivals, and polytheism. To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/ Picture taken on October 12, 2011. REUTERS/Rebecca Conway (PAKISTAN - Tags: SOCIETY)
PAKISTAN-KALASH/
RTR2SWBL
October 20, 2011
A girl attends a Kalasha language class at the Kalasha Dur school and community centre in Brun village,...
KALASH, Pakistan
To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/
A girl attends a Kalasha language class at the Kalasha Dur school and community centre in Brun village, located in Bumboret Kalash valley October 13, 2011. Nestled among the valleys of Pakistan's mountainous northwest, the Kalash are a tiny religious community that claim descent from Alexander the Great's army, and say they are under increasing pressure to convert to Islam. The Kalash, who number about 3,500 in Pakistan's population of 180 million, are spread over three valleys along the border with Afghanistan and are known for their distinctive dress, vibrant religious festivals, and polytheism. To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/ Picture taken October 13, 2011. REUTERS/Rebecca Conway (PAKISTAN - Tags: EDUCATION SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
PAKISTAN-KALASH/
RTR2SWBB
October 20, 2011
Gulistan Bibi, 20, cooks bread made from flour and corn at her house in Balanguru village, located in...
KALASH, Pakistan
To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/
Gulistan Bibi, 20, cooks bread made from flour and corn at her house in Balanguru village, located in Rumbur Kalash valley October 12, 2011. Nestled among the valleys of Pakistan's mountainous northwest, the Kalash are a tiny religious community that claim descent from Alexander the Great's army, and say they are under increasing pressure to convert to Islam. The Kalash, who number about 3,500 in Pakistan's population of 180 million, are spread over three valleys along the border with Afghanistan and are known for their distinctive dress, vibrant religious festivals, and polytheism. To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/ Picture taken October 12, 2011. REUTERS/Rebecca Conway (PAKISTAN - Tags: SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
PAKISTAN-KALASH/
RTR2SW8C
October 20, 2011
Kalash students walk to class through the entrance of the Kalasha Dur and community centre in Brun village,...
KALASH, Pakistan
To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/
Kalash students walk to class through the entrance of the Kalasha Dur and community centre in Brun village, located in Bumboret Kalash valley October 14, 2011. Nestled among the valleys of Pakistan's mountainous northwest, the Kalash are a tiny religious community that claim descent from Alexander the Great's army, and say they are under increasing pressure to convert to Islam. The Kalash, who number about 3,500 in Pakistan's population of 180 million, are spread over three valleys along the border with Afghanistan and are known for their distinctive dress, vibrant religious festivals, and polytheism. To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/ REUTERS/Rebecca Conway (PAKISTAN - Tags: SOCIETY)
PAKISTAN-KALASH/
RTR2SW84
October 20, 2011
Kalash students attend a class at the Kalasha Dur school and community centre in Brun village, located...
KALASH, Pakistan
To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/
Kalash students attend a class at the Kalasha Dur school and community centre in Brun village, located in Bumboret Kalash valley October 13, 2011. Nestled among the valleys of Pakistan's mountainous northwest, the Kalash are a tiny religious community that claim descent from Alexander the Great's army, and say they are under increasing pressure to convert to Islam. The Kalash, who number about 3,500 in Pakistan's population of 180 million, are spread over three valleys along the border with Afghanistan and are known for their distinctive dress, vibrant religious festivals, and polytheism. To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/ REUTERS/Rebecca Conway (PAKISTAN - Tags: SOCIETY)
PAKISTAN/
RTX119HL
October 13, 2011
Teacher Noorzia Khan, 16, writes letters from the Kalasha alphabet on a blackboard during a lesson at...
KALASH, Pakistan
Teacher Noorzia Khan writes letters from the Kalasha alphabet on a blackboard during a lesson at the...
Teacher Noorzia Khan, 16, writes letters from the Kalasha alphabet on a blackboard during a lesson at the Kalasha Dur school and community centre in Brun village, located in Bumboret Kalash valley October 13, 2011. Nestled among the valleys of Pakistan's mountainous northwest, the Kalash are a tiny religious community that claim descent from Alexander the Great's army, and say they are under increasing pressure to convert to Islam. The Kalash, who number about 3,500 in Pakistan's population of 180 million, are spread over three valleys along the border with Afghanistan and are known for their distinctive dress, vibrant religious festivals, and polytheism. To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/ REUTERS/Rebecca Conway (PAKISTAN - Tags: SOCIETY EDUCATION) BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE
PAKISTAN-KALASH/
RTR2SW7N
October 13, 2011
Teacher Noorzia Khan, 16, writes letters from the Kalasha alphabet on a blackboard during a lesson at...
KALASH, Pakistan
To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/
Teacher Noorzia Khan, 16, writes letters from the Kalasha alphabet on a blackboard during a lesson at the Kalasha Dur school and community centre in Brun village, located in Bumboret Kalash valley October 13, 2011. Nestled among the valleys of Pakistan's mountainous northwest, the Kalash are a tiny religious community that claim descent from Alexander the Great's army, and say they are under increasing pressure to convert to Islam. The Kalash, who number about 3,500 in Pakistan's population of 180 million, are spread over three valleys along the border with Afghanistan and are known for their distinctive dress, vibrant religious festivals, and polytheism. To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/ REUTERS/Rebecca Conway (PAKISTAN - Tags: SOCIETY EDUCATION TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) FOR BEST QUALITY IMAGE: ALSO SEE GM1E9720MFD01
PAKISTAN KALASHA
RTRCOF
July 07, 2003
An activist from nothern Pakistan's kalasha tribe speaks during an
interview in the town of Chitral...
Chitral, Pakistan - IslamicRepublicof
TO ACCOMPANY FEATURE PAKISTAN KALASHA.
An activist from nothern Pakistan's kalasha tribe speaks during an
interview in the town of Chitral July 7, 2003. The Kalasha are a tiny
non-Muslim tribe some believe descend from the ancient armies of
Alexander the Great. The tribe has clung to traditional ways of life in
the face of energetic attempts to convert them to Islam or
Christianity. Picture taken July 7, 2003. TO ACCOMPANY FEATURE PAKISTAN
KALASHA REUTERS/Rathavary Duong

MK/RCS
PAKISTAN KALASHA
RTRCOA
July 07, 2003
A young woman, from the Kalasha tribe in the northern valley of
Bumburet near Chitrall, shows her traditional...
Chitral, Pakistan - IslamicRepublicof
TO ACCOMPANY FEATURE PAKISTAN KALASHA.
A young woman, from the Kalasha tribe in the northern valley of
Bumburet near Chitrall, shows her traditional facial tattoos made using
mulberry juice on July 7, 2003. The Kalasha are a tiny non-Muslim tribe
some believe descend from the ancient armies of Alexander the Great.
The tribe has clung to traditional ways of life in the face of
energetic attempts to convert them to Islam or Christianity. Picture
taken July 7, 2003. TO ACCOMPANY FEATURE PAKISTAN KALASHA
REUTERS/Rathavary Duong

MK/TW
PAKISTAN KALASHA
RTR6JC
July 07, 2003
A woman from the Kalasha tribe washes a pot outside her home in a
remote valley near the northwestern...
Chitral, Pakistan - IslamicRepublicof
TO ACCOMPANY FEATURE PAKISTAN KALASHA.
A woman from the Kalasha tribe washes a pot outside her home in a
remote valley near the northwestern Pakistani town of Chitrall July 7,
2003.The Kalasha are a tiny non-Muslim tribe some believe descends from
the ancient armies of Alexender the Great. Activists say the Kalasha
are struggling for survival as a tibe in the face of energetic attempts
to convert them to Islam or Christianity. Picture taken July 7,2003. TO
ACCOMPANY FEATURE PAKISTAN KALASHA. REUTERS/Rathavary Duong

MK/TW
PAKISTAN
RTXKSLR
September 30, 2001
Kalasha women stand outside their house at the Kalash valleys of Rumbur, 350 kilometres north of Peshawar,...
Chitral, Pakistan
Kalasha women stand outside their house at the Kalash valleys of Rumbur, 350 kilometres north of Pes.....
Kalasha women stand outside their house at the Kalash valleys of Rumbur, 350 kilometres north of Peshawar, September 30, 2001. The Kalash valleys lie close the Afghan border, with a population of 10,000 inhabitants, of whom less than a third are Kalasha. These valleys are the last enclave to withstand conversion to Islam in the Afghanistan-Pakistan area.
PAKISTAN
RTXKSLN
September 30, 2001
A Kalasha woman smiles as she cleans her cooking utensils at a river behind her house at the Kalash valleys...
Chitral, Pakistan
A Kalasha woman smiles as she cleans her cooking utensils at a river behind her house at the Kalash .....
A Kalasha woman smiles as she cleans her cooking utensils at a river behind her house at the Kalash valleys of Rumbur, 350 kilometres north of Peshawar, September 30, 2001. The Kalash valleys lie close the Afghan border, with a population of 10,000 inhabitants, of whom less than a third are Kalasha. These valleys are the last enclave to withstand conversion to Islam in the Afghanistan-Pakistan area.
PAKISTAN
RTRNI52
September 30, 2001
A young Kalasha girl smiles as she poses for a photograph in the Kalash
valleys of Rumbur, 350 kilometres...
Peshawar, Pakistan
A YOUNG KALASHA GIRL SMILES AT THE KALASH VALLEYS.
A young Kalasha girl smiles as she poses for a photograph in the Kalash
valleys of Rumbur, 350 kilometres north of Peshawar, September 30,
2001. The Kalash valleys lie close the Afghan border, with a population
of 10,000 inhabitants, of whom less than a third are Kalasha. These
valleys are the last enclave to withstand conversion to Islam in the
Afghanistan-Pakistan area. REUTERS/Zainal Abd Halim

ZH
PAKISTAN
RTRNI48
September 30, 2001
A Kalasha woman smiles as she cleans her cooking utensils at a river
behind her house at the Kalash...
Chitral, Pakistan
A KALASHA WOMAN CLEANS HER COOKING UTENSILS AT THE KALASH VALLEYS.
A Kalasha woman smiles as she cleans her cooking utensils at a river
behind her house at the Kalash valleys of Rumbur, 350 kilometres north
of Peshawar, September 30, 2001. The Kalash valleys lie close the
Afghan border, with a population of 10,000 inhabitants, of whom less
than a third are Kalasha. These valleys are the last enclave to
withstand conversion to Islam in the Afghanistan-Pakistan area.
REUTERS/Zainal Abd Halim REUTERS

ZH
PAKISTAN
RTRNI3W
September 30, 2001
Kalasha women stand outside their house at the Kalash valleys of
Rumbur, 350 kilometres north of Peshawar,...
Chitral, Pakistan
KALASHA WOMEN AT THEIR HOUSE IN THE KALASH VALLEYS.
Kalasha women stand outside their house at the Kalash valleys of
Rumbur, 350 kilometres north of Peshawar, September 30, 2001. The
Kalash valleys lie close the Afghan border, with a population of 10,000
inhabitants, of whom less than a third are Kalasha. These valleys are
the last enclave to withstand conversion to Islam in the
Afghanistan-Pakistan area. REUTERS/Zainal Abd Halim REUTERS

ZH/FMS
Sort by
Display
Items per page
Page
of 1