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Search results for: Kharkhorin-(City)

MONGOLIA/
RTR2RDS0
September 16, 2011
A woman looks at the district centre of Kharkhorin in the Ovorkhangai province August 12, 2011. Picture...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
A woman looks at the district centre of Kharkhorin in the Ovorkhangai province
A woman looks at the district centre of Kharkhorin in the Ovorkhangai province August 12, 2011. Picture taken August 12, 2011. REUTERS/Laurence Tan (MONGOLIA - Tags: CITYSPACE ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)
MONGOLIA
RTR1GRG1
August 28, 2006
A man stands beside a completed 'ger' near Kharkhorin in Mongolia on August 22, 2006. 'Gers' can be erected...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
A man stands beside a completed ger near Kharkhorin
A man stands beside a completed 'ger' near Kharkhorin in Mongolia on August 22, 2006. 'Gers' can be erected in about an hour, are traditionally used by nomads and about half of all Mongolians live in one. The door always faces the south as a protection against the northern winds. The felt used to make the 'ger' is traditionally made by the herders themselves from the wool of their flocks. Picture taken August 22, 2006. REUTERS/Nicky Loh (MONGOLIA)
MONGOLIA
RTR1GRG0
August 28, 2006
Men throw a felt cover over the roof of a 'ger' near Kharkhorin in Mongolia on August 22, 2006. 'Gers'...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Men throw a felt cover over the roof of a ger near Kharkhorin
Men throw a felt cover over the roof of a 'ger' near Kharkhorin in Mongolia on August 22, 2006. 'Gers' can be erected in about an hour, are traditionally used by nomads and about half of all Mongolians live in one. The door always faces the south as a protection against the northern winds. The felt used to make the 'ger' is traditionally made by the herders themselves from the wool of their flocks. Picture taken August 22, 2006. REUTERS/Nicky Loh (MONGOLIA)
MONGOLIA
RTR1GRFZ
August 28, 2006
A man fixes the supporting structures of a 'ger' near Kharkhorin in Mongolia on August 22, 2006. 'Gers'...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
A man fixes the supporting structures of a ger near Kharkhorin
A man fixes the supporting structures of a 'ger' near Kharkhorin in Mongolia on August 22, 2006. 'Gers' can be erected in about an hour, are traditionally used by nomads and about half of all Mongolians live in one. The door always faces the south as a protection against the northern winds. The felt used to make the 'ger' is traditionally made by the herders themselves from the wool of their flocks. Picture taken August 22, 2006. REUTERS/Nicky Loh (MONGOLIA)
MONGOLIA
RTR1GRFW
August 28, 2006
A woman holds the supporting structure of a 'ger' near Kharkhorin in Mongolia on August 22, 2006. 'Gers'...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
A woman holds the supporting structure of a ger near Kharkhorin
A woman holds the supporting structure of a 'ger' near Kharkhorin in Mongolia on August 22, 2006. 'Gers' can be erected in about an hour, are traditionally used by nomads and about half of all Mongolians live in one. The door always faces the south as a protection against the northern winds. The felt used to make the 'ger' is traditionally made by the herders themselves from the wool of their flocks. Picture taken August 22, 2006. REUTERS/Nicky Loh (MONGOLIA)
MONGOLIA
RTR1GRFV
August 28, 2006
Monglians build a 'ger' near Kharkhorin in Mongolia on August 22, 2006. 'Gers' can be erected in about...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Monglians build a ger near Kharkhorin
Monglians build a 'ger' near Kharkhorin in Mongolia on August 22, 2006. 'Gers' can be erected in about an hour, are traditionally used by nomads and about half of all Mongolians live in one. The door always faces the south as a protection against the northern winds. The felt used to make the 'ger' is traditionally made by the herders themselves from the wool of their flocks. Picture taken August 22, 2006. REUTERS/Nicky Loh (MONGOLIA)
MONGOLIA
RTR1GRFU
August 28, 2006
A man fixes the door of a 'ger' near Kharkhorin in Mongolia on August 22, 2006. 'Gers' can be erected...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
A man fixes the door of a ger near Kharkhorin
A man fixes the door of a 'ger' near Kharkhorin in Mongolia on August 22, 2006. 'Gers' can be erected in about an hour, are traditionally used by nomads and about half of all Mongolians live in one. The door always faces the south as a protection against the northern winds. The felt used to make the 'ger' is traditionally made by the herders themselves from the wool of their flocks. Picture taken August 22, 2006. REUTERS/Nicky Loh (MONGOLIA)
MONGOLIA
RTR1GRFT
August 28, 2006
Monglians build a 'ger' near Kharkhorin in Mongolia on August 22, 2006. 'Gers' can be erected in about...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Monglians build a ger near Kharkhorin
Monglians build a 'ger' near Kharkhorin in Mongolia on August 22, 2006. 'Gers' can be erected in about an hour, are traditionally used by nomads and about half of all Mongolians live in one. The door always faces the south as a protection against the northern winds. The felt used to make the 'ger' is traditionally made by the herders themselves from the wool of their flocks. Picture taken August 22, 2006. REUTERS/Nicky Loh (MONGOLIA)
MONGOLIA
RTR1GRFS
August 28, 2006
A man builds a 'ger' near Kharkhorin in Mongolia on August 22, 2006. 'Gers' can be erected in about an...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
A man builds a ger near Kharkhorin in Mongolia
A man builds a 'ger' near Kharkhorin in Mongolia on August 22, 2006. 'Gers' can be erected in about an hour, are traditionally used by nomads and about half of all Mongolians live in one. The door always faces the south as a protection against the northern winds. The felt used to make the 'ger' is traditionally made by the herders themselves from the wool of their flocks. Picture taken August 22, 2006. REUTERS/Nicky Loh (MONGOLIA)
MONGOLIA
RTXOU77
July 18, 2006
-FILE PHOTO 08JUL06-A Buddhist monk talks on his mobile phone at the courtyard of the Erdene Zuu monastery,...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
-FILE PHOTO 08JUL06-A Buddhist monk talks on his mobile phone at the courtyard of the Erdene Zuu mon.....
-FILE PHOTO 08JUL06-A Buddhist monk talks on his mobile phone at the courtyard of the Erdene Zuu monastery, in the grasslands on the edge of the ancient capital of Kharkhorin, some 370 km (230 miles) southwest of [Ulan Bator], in this July 8, 2006 file photo. [Monastic life, which took hold in Mongolia in the 1500s, was nearly wiped out within 15 years of communist rule, mostly during Stalinist purges in the 1930s when an estimated 17,000 lamas were executed. But since the country emerged from decades of Soviet dominance, the Yellow Hat sect of Buddhism -- also practised in Tibet -- is making a comeback. ]
MONGOLIA
RTXOU76
July 18, 2006
-FILE PHOTO 08JUL06- Buddhist monks perform their morning prayer at the Erdene Zuu monastery, in the...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
-FILE PHOTO 08JUL06- Buddhist monks perform their morning prayer at the Erdene Zuu monastery, in the.....
-FILE PHOTO 08JUL06- Buddhist monks perform their morning prayer at the Erdene Zuu monastery, in the grasslands on the edge of the ancient capital of Kharkhorin, some 370 km (230 miles) southwest of [Ulan Bator], in this July 8, 2006 file photo. [Monastic life, which took hold in Mongolia in the 1500s, was nearly wiped out within 15 years of communist rule, mostly during Stalinist purges in the 1930s when an estimated 17,000 lamas were executed. But since the country emerged from decades of Soviet dominance, the Yellow Hat sect of Buddhism -- also practised in Tibet -- is making a comeback. ]
MONGOLIA
RTXOU75
July 18, 2006
-FILE PHOTO 08JUL06- A Mongolian Buddhist monk walks around the courtyard of the Erdene Zuu monastery,...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
-FILE PHOTO 08JUL06- A Mongolian Buddhist monk walks around the courtyard of the Erdene Zuu monaster.....
-FILE PHOTO 08JUL06- A Mongolian Buddhist monk walks around the courtyard of the Erdene Zuu monastery, in the grasslands on the edge of the ancient capital of Kharkhorin, some 370 km (230 miles) southwest of [Ulan Bator], in this July 8, 2006 file photo. [Monastic life, which took hold in Mongolia in the 1500s, was nearly wiped out within 15 years of communist rule, mostly during Stalinist purges in the 1930s when an estimated 17,000 lamas were executed. But since the country emerged from decades of Soviet dominance, the Yellow Hat sect of Buddhism -- also practised in Tibet -- is making a comeback. ]
MONGOLIA
RTXNICC
May 29, 2005
Mongolian nomads walk outside their traditional tent homes called ger (nomadic tent) at Orkhon Valley...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Mongolian nomads walk outside their traditional tent homes called ger (nomadic tent) at Orkhon Valle.....
Mongolian nomads walk outside their traditional tent homes called ger (nomadic tent) at Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads living in traditional round felt tents called ger to suit their mobile and pastoral way of life. A ger is assembled and disassembled easily, and all of the components needed to build one can be easily transported, thus increasing the nomads' mobility. Picture taken May 26, 2005.
MONGOLIA
RTXNICB
May 29, 2005
A Mongolian woman prepares food as her husband and child wait inside their tent home known as a 'ger'...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
A Mongolian woman prepares food as her husband and child wait inside their tent home known as a 'ger.....
A Mongolian woman prepares food as her husband and child wait inside their tent home known as a 'ger' (nomadic tent) near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads living in traditional round felt tents called ger to suit their mobile and pastoral way of life. A ger is assembled and disassembled easily, and all of the components needed to build one can be easily transported, thus increasing the nomads' mobility. Picture taken May 26, 2005.
MONGOLIA
RTXNICA
May 29, 2005
A Mongolian worker sets up a smoke stack through the roof window inside a ger (nomadic tent) restaurant...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
A Mongolian worker sets up a smoke stack through the roof window inside a ger (nomadic tent) restaur.....
A Mongolian worker sets up a smoke stack through the roof window inside a ger (nomadic tent) restaurant in Khujirt near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads living in traditional round felt tents called ger to suit their mobile and pastoral way of life. A ger is assembled and disassembled easily, and all of the components needed to build one can be easily transported, thus increasing the nomads' mobility. Picture taken May 26, 2005.
MONGOLIA
RTXNIC9
May 29, 2005
Mongolian nomads erect a ger (nomadic tent) at Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles)...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Mongolian nomads erect a ger (nomadic tent) at Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles.....
Mongolian nomads erect a ger (nomadic tent) at Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads living in traditional round felt tents called ger to suit their mobile and pastoral way of life. A ger is assembled and disassembled easily, and all of the components needed to build one can be easily transported, thus increasing the nomads' mobility. Picture taken May 26, 2005.
MONGOLIA
RTXNIC8
May 29, 2005
Mongolian nomads erect a ger (nomadic tent) at Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles)...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Mongolian nomads erect a ger (nomadic tent) at Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles.....
Mongolian nomads erect a ger (nomadic tent) at Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads living in traditional round felt tents called ger to suit their mobile and pastoral way of life. A ger is assembled and disassembled easily, and all of the components needed to build one can be easily transported, thus increasing the nomads' mobility. Picture taken May 26, 2005.
MONGOLIA
RTXNIC7
May 29, 2005
A Mongolian worker applies varnish to a tonoo, a wheel shaped roof frame for a ger (nomadic tent) at...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
A Mongolian worker applies varnish to a tonoo, a wheel shaped roof frame for a ger (nomadic tent) at.....
A Mongolian worker applies varnish to a tonoo, a wheel shaped roof frame for a ger (nomadic tent) at a factory in Khujirt near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west of the capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads living in traditional round felt tents called ger to suit their mobile and pastoral way of life. A ger is assembled and disassembled easily, and all of the components needed to build one can be easily transported, thus increasing the nomads' mobility. Picture taken May 26, 2005.
MONGOLIA
RTXNIB0
May 29, 2005
A Mongolian father attends to his son inside their tent home called ger (nomadic tent) near Kharkorin,...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
A Mongolian father attends to his son inside their tent home called ger (nomadic tent) near Kharkori.....
A Mongolian father attends to his son inside their tent home called ger (nomadic tent) near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads living in traditional round felt tents called ger to suit their mobile and pastoral way of life. A ger is assembled and disassembled easily, and all of the components needed to build one can be easily transported, thus increasing the nomads' mobility. Picture taken May 26, 2005.
MONGOLIA
RTXNIAZ
May 29, 2005
Visitors sit inside a ger (nomadic tent) restaurant in Khujirt near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles)...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Visitors sit inside a ger (nomadic tent) restaurant in Khujirt near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 mil.....
Visitors sit inside a ger (nomadic tent) restaurant in Khujirt near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads living in traditional round felt tents called ger to suit their mobile and pastoral way of life. A ger is assembled and disassembled easily, and all of the components needed to build one can be easily transported, thus increasing the nomads' mobility. Picture taken May 26, 2005.
MONGOLIA
RTXNIAY
May 29, 2005
Mongolian nomads erect a ger (nomadic tent) at Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles)...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Mongolian nomads erect a ger (nomadic tent) at Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles.....
Mongolian nomads erect a ger (nomadic tent) at Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads living in traditional round felt tents called ger to suit their mobile and pastoral way of life. A ger is assembled and disassembled easily, and all of the components needed to build one can be easily transported, thus increasing the nomads' mobility. Picture taken May 26, 2005.
MONGOLIA
RTXNIAX
May 29, 2005
A Mongolian worker paints design to a 'tonoo', a wheel-shaped roof frame of a ger (nomadic tent) at a...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
A Mongolian worker paints design to a 'tonoo', a wheel-shaped roof frame of a ger (nomadic tent) at .....
A Mongolian worker paints design to a 'tonoo', a wheel-shaped roof frame of a ger (nomadic tent) at a factory in Khujirt near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads living in traditional round felt tents called ger to suit their mobile and pastoral way of life. A ger is assembled and disassembled easily, and all of the components needed to build one can be easily transported, thus increasing the nomads' mobility. Picture taken May 26, 2005.
MONGOLIA
RTXNIAW
May 29, 2005
Mongolian workers assemble parts for a ger (nomadic tent), at a factory in Khujirt near Kharkorin, about...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Mongolian workers assemble parts for a ger (nomadic tent), at a factory in Khujirt near Kharkorin, a.....
Mongolian workers assemble parts for a ger (nomadic tent), at a factory in Khujirt near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads living in traditional round felt tents called ger to suit their mobile and pastoral way of life. A ger is assembled and disassembled easily, and all of the components needed to build one can be easily transported, thus increasing the nomads' mobility. Picture taken May 26, 2005.
MONGOLIA
RTXNJ2K
May 28, 2005
Mongolian nomads ride motorbikes at a steppe in Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles)...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Mongolian nomads ride motorbikes at a steppe in Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 mile.....
Mongolian nomads ride motorbikes at a steppe in Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads rely on horses for their mobile and pastoral way of life. Picture taken May 26, 2005.
MONGOLIA
RTXNJ2J
May 28, 2005
Mongolian horseman carry snares to catch wild horse at a steppe in Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Mongolian horseman carry snares to catch wild horse at a steppe in Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, abo.....
Mongolian horseman carry snares to catch wild horse at a steppe in Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads rely on horses for their mobile and pastoral way of life. Picture taken May 26, 2005.
MONGOLIA
RTXNJ2I
May 28, 2005
A Mongolian horseman tends wild horses at a steppe in Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
A Mongolian horseman tends wild horses at a steppe in Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (19.....
A Mongolian horseman tends wild horses at a steppe in Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads rely on horses for their mobile and pastoral way of life Picture taken May 26, 2005.
MONGOLIA
RTXNJ2H
May 28, 2005
A Mongolian horseman snares a wild horse at a steppe in Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
A Mongolian horseman snares a wild horse at a steppe in Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (.....
A Mongolian horseman snares a wild horse at a steppe in Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads rely on horses for their mobile and pastoral way of life. Picture taken May 26, 2005.
MONGOLIA
RTXNJ2G
May 28, 2005
A Mongolian youth walks at an auto transport stop outside Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. Transport system remains...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
A Mongolian youth walks at an auto transport stop outside Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. Transport system .....
A Mongolian youth walks at an auto transport stop outside Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. Transport system remains rudimentary in Mongolia where a third of its 2.5 million people still live below the poverty line.
MONGOLIA
RTXNJ2F
May 28, 2005
Two Mongolian horsemen ride at a steppe in Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Two Mongolian horsemen ride at a steppe in Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) we.....
Two Mongolian horsemen ride at a steppe in Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads rely on horses for their mobile and pastoral way of life. Picture taken May 26, 2005.
MONGOLIA
RTXNJ2E
May 28, 2005
Wild Mongolian horses graze at a steppe in Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Wild Mongolian horses graze at a steppe in Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) we.....
Wild Mongolian horses graze at a steppe in Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads rely on horses for their mobile and pastoral way of life Picture taken May 26, 2005.
MONGOLIA
RTXNJ2D
May 28, 2005
Mongolian horsemen tend wild horses at a steppe in Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310km (192 miles)...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Mongolian horsemen tend wild horses at a steppe in Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310km (192 mi.....
Mongolian horsemen tend wild horses at a steppe in Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310km (192 miles) west of Mongolia's capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads rely on horses for their mobile and pastoral way of life. Picture taken May 26, 2005.
MONGOLIA
RTXNJ2C
May 28, 2005
Mongolian horsemen ride past a row of traditional felt tents called 'ger' at a steppe in Orkhon Valley...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Mongolian horsemen ride past a row of traditional felt tents called 'ger' at a steppe in Orkhon Vall.....
Mongolian horsemen ride past a row of traditional felt tents called 'ger' at a steppe in Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310km (192 miles) west of Mongolia's capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads rely on horses for their mobile and pastoral way of life. Picture taken May 26, 2005.
MONGOLIA
RTXNJ0B
May 27, 2005
An elderly Mongolian nomad enters her traditional tent called "ger" as sheep and goats pass near Kharkhorin,...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
An elderly Mongolian nomad enters her traditional tent called "ger" as sheep and goats pass near Kha.....
An elderly Mongolian nomad enters her traditional tent called "ger" as sheep and goats pass near Kharkhorin, about 310 km (193 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. Of Mongolia's 2.5 million people about one third of whom are nomads. Many Mongolians are herders raising different livestocks including sheep, goats, cattle, horses, camels and yaks. Picture taken May 26, 2005.
MONGOLIA
RTXNJ0A
May 27, 2005
Young Mongolians play computer games at a video game shop in Kharkhorin, about 310 km (193 miles) west...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Young Mongolians play computer games at a video game shop in Kharkhorin, about 310 km (193 miles) we.....
Young Mongolians play computer games at a video game shop in Kharkhorin, about 310 km (193 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. Internet infrastructure in Mongolia is still underdeveloped and not available in many parts of the country.
MONGOLIA
RTXNJ09
May 27, 2005
Mongolian youths play billiard at an open market in Kharkhorin, about 310 km (193 miles) west of capital...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Mongolian youths play billiard at an open market in Kharkhorin, about 310 km (193 miles) west of cap.....
Mongolian youths play billiard at an open market in Kharkhorin, about 310 km (193 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. Billiard is a popular form of entertainment played around the country and is commonly seen in markets and the countryside. Picture taken May 26, 2005.
MONGOLIA
RTXNJ08
May 27, 2005
A Mongolian resident walks past at a food store shop named "Simba" in Kharkhorin, about 310 km (193 miles)...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
A Mongolian resident walks past at a food store shop named "Simba" in Kharkhorin, about 310 km (193 .....
A Mongolian resident walks past at a food store shop named "Simba" in Kharkhorin, about 310 km (193 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. Public transportation remains difficult in Kharkhorin, the ancient capital of Mongolia, where horses, carts and a few old Russian vehicles are still used. Picture taken May 26, 2005.
MONGOLIA
RTXNJ07
May 27, 2005
A young Mongolian nomad carries two baby goats from his tent house called 'ger' near Kharkhorin, about...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
A young Mongolian nomad carries two baby goats from his tent house called 'ger' near Kharkhorin, abo.....
A young Mongolian nomad carries two baby goats from his tent house called 'ger' near Kharkhorin, about 310 km (193 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. Of Mongolia's 2.5 million people about one third of whom are nomads. [Many Mongolians are herders raising different livestocks including sheep, goats, cattle, horses, camels and yaks.] Picture taken May 26, 2005.
MONGOLIA
RTXNIZ0
May 27, 2005
Mongolian residents riding in a cart pass a Soviet-era building in Kharkhorin, about 310 km (193 miles)...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Mongolian residents riding in a cart pass a Soviet-era building in Kharkhorin, about 310 km (193 mil.....
Mongolian residents riding in a cart pass a Soviet-era building in Kharkhorin, about 310 km (193 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. Public transportation remains difficult in Kharkhorin, the ancient capital of Mongolia, where horses, carts and a few old Russian vehicles are still used. Picture taken May 26, 2005.
MONGOLIA
RTR18HOQ
May 26, 2005
Mongolian horsemen tend wild horses at a steppe in Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 kilometers...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
QUALITY REPEAT Mongolian horsemen tend wild horses at a steppe in Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin
Mongolian horsemen tend wild horses at a steppe in Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 kilometers west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. Mongolia, known as "the land of the horse", have over 200 words to describe horse coloring. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads which rely on horses for their mobile and pastoral way of life. Mongolians have a reputation to be among the best horsemen on the planet. Picture taken May 26,2005. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV
MONGOLIA
RTRVLW6
May 26, 2005
Mongolian nomads take a break during a polo practice match in Orkhon Valley near Kharkhorin, about 310km...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Mongolian nomads take a break during polo practice in Orkhon Valley near Kharkhorin.
Mongolian nomads take a break during a polo practice match in Orkhon Valley near Kharkhorin, about 310km (193 miles) west of the capital Ulan Bator, May 26, 2005. Polo is the oldest of all equestrian sports and was said to have been played by Mongolian conqueror Genghis Khan's cavalry to train and hone their riding and archery skills. German filmmaker and businessman Christoph Giercke and friends reintroduced the sport in 1998 during an adventure trip in Orkhon. Picture taken May 26, 2005. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV CC/CCK
MONGOLIA
RTRVLW0
May 26, 2005
Mongolian nomads chase the ball during a polo practice match in Orkhon Valley near Kharkhorin, about...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Mongolian nomads chase the ball during polo practice in Orkhon Valley near Kharkhorin.
Mongolian nomads chase the ball during a polo practice match in Orkhon Valley near Kharkhorin, about 310km (193 miles) west of the capital Ulan Bator, May 26, 2005. Polo is the oldest of all equestrian sports and was said to have been played by Mongolian conqueror Genghis Khan's cavalry to train and hone their riding and archery skills. German filmmaker and businessman Christoph Giercke and friends reintroduced the sport in 1998 during an adventure trip in Orkhon. Picture taken May 26, 2005. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV CC/CCK
MONGOLIA
RTRVLVK
May 26, 2005
Two Mongolian nomads chase the ball during a polo practice match in Orkhon Valley near Kharkhorin, about...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Two Mongolian nomads chase the ball during polo practice in Orkhon Valley near Kharkhorin.
Two Mongolian nomads chase the ball during a polo practice match in Orkhon Valley near Kharkhorin, about 310km (193 miles) west of the capital Ulan Bator, May 26, 2005. Polo is the oldest of all equestrian sports and was said to have been played by Mongolian conqueror Genghis Khan's cavalry to train and hone their riding and archery skills. German filmmaker and businessman Christoph Giercke and friends reintroduced the sport in 1998 during an adventure trip in Orkhon. Picture taken May 26, 2005. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV CC/CCK
MONGOLIA
RTRVLV8
May 26, 2005
A Mongolian nomad riding a small native horse tries to hit the ball during a polo practice match in Orkhon...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
A Mongolian nomad rides a small native horse during polo practice in Orkhon Valley near Kharkhorin.
A Mongolian nomad riding a small native horse tries to hit the ball during a polo practice match in Orkhon Valley near Kharkhorin, about 310km (193 miles) west of the capital Ulan Bator, May 26, 2005. Polo is the oldest of all equestrian sports and was said to have been played by Mongolian conqueror Genghis Khan's cavalry to train and hone their riding and archery skills. German filmmaker and businessman Christoph Giercke and friends reintroduced the sport in 1998 during an adventure trip in Orkhon. Picture taken May 26, 2005. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV CC/CCK
MONGOLIA
RTRVLV2
May 26, 2005
Mongolian nomads watch a polo practice match at Orkhon Valley near Kharkhorin, about 310 km (193 miles)...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Mongolian nomads watch a polo practice match at Orkhon Valley near Kharkhorin.
Mongolian nomads watch a polo practice match at Orkhon Valley near Kharkhorin, about 310 km (193 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. Polo is the oldest of all equestrian sports and was said to have been played by Mongolian conqueror Genghis Khan's cavalry to train and hone their riding and archery skills. German film-maker and businessman Christoph Giercke and friends reintroduced the sport in 1998 during an adventure trip in Orkhon. Picture taken May 26, 2005. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV CC/CN
MONGOLIA
RTRVLUV
May 26, 2005
Two Mongolian nomads, clutching mallets, chase the ball during a polo practice match in Orkhon Valley...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Mongolian nomads chase the ball during polo practice in Orkhon Valley near Kharkhorin.
Two Mongolian nomads, clutching mallets, chase the ball during a polo practice match in Orkhon Valley near Kharkhorin, about 310km (193 miles) west of the capital Ulan Bator, May 26, 2005. Polo is the oldest of all equestrian sports and was said to have been played by Mongolian conqueror Genghis Khan's cavalry to train and hone their riding and archery skills. German filmmaker and businessman Christoph Giercke and friends reintroduced the sport in 1998 during an adventure trip in Orkhon. Picture taken May 26, 2005. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV CC/CCK
MONGOLIA
RTRVLUN
May 26, 2005
A trainer gives instructions to Mongolian nomads during a polo practice match at Orkhon Valley near Kharkhorin,...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
A trainer gives instructions during a polo practice at Orkhon Valley near Kharkhorin.
A trainer gives instructions to Mongolian nomads during a polo practice match at Orkhon Valley near Kharkhorin, about 310 km (193 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. Polo is the oldest of all equestrian sports and was said to have been played by Mongolian conqueror Genghis Khan's cavalry to train and hone their riding and archery skills. German film-maker and businessman Christoph Giercke and friends reintroduced the sport in 1998 during an adventure trip in Orkhon. Picture taken May 26,2005. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV CC/CN
MONGOLIA
RTRVLUG
May 26, 2005
Mongolian nomads clutching mallets ride their horses during a polo match practice in Orkhon Valley near...
multiple cities, Mongolia
Mongolian nomads clutching mallets play polo in Orkhon Valley near Kharkhorin.
Mongolian nomads clutching mallets ride their horses during a polo match practice in Orkhon Valley near Kharkhorin, about 310km (193 miles) west of the capital Ulan Bator, May 26, 2005. Polo is the oldest of all equestrian sports and was said to have been played by Mongolian conqueror Genghis Khan's cavalry to train and hone their riding and archery skills. German film-maker and businessman Christoph Giercke and friends reintroduced the sport in 1998 during an adventure trip in Orkhon. Picture taken May 26, 2005. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV Pictures of the month May 2005 CC/CCK
MONGOLIA
RTRVLU9
May 26, 2005
Mongolian nomads, riding small native horses, play polo during a practice match in Orkhon Valley near...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Mongolian nomads, riding small native horses, play polo in Orkhon Valley near Kharkhorin.
Mongolian nomads, riding small native horses, play polo during a practice match in Orkhon Valley near Kharkhorin, about 310km (193 miles) west of the capital Ulan Bator, May 26, 2005. Polo is the oldest of all equestrian sports and was said to have been played by Mongolian conqueror Genghis Khan's cavalry to train and hone their riding and archery skills. German filmmaker and businessman Christoph Giercke and friends reintroduced the sport in 1998 during an adventure trip in Orkhon. Picture taken May 26, 2005. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV CC/CCK
MONGOLIA
RTRVLU1
May 26, 2005
A Mongolian nomad distributes mallets to players during a polo practice match in Orkhon Valley near Kharkhorin,...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
A Mongolian nomad distributes mallets to players in Orkhon Valley near Kharkhorin.
A Mongolian nomad distributes mallets to players during a polo practice match in Orkhon Valley near Kharkhorin, about 310km (193 miles) west of the capital Ulan Bator, May 26, 2005. Polo is the oldest of all equestrian sports and was said to have been played by Mongolian conqueror Genghis Khan's cavalry to train and hone their riding and archery skills. German filmmaker and businessman Christoph Giercke and friends reintroduced the sport in 1998 during an adventure trip in Orkhon. Picture taken May 26, 2005. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV CC/CCK
MONGOLIA
RTRVLTS
May 26, 2005
Mongolian nomads clutching mallets chase the ball during a polo practice match at Orkhon Valley near...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Mongolian nomads play polo at Orkhon Valley near Kharkhorin.
Mongolian nomads clutching mallets chase the ball during a polo practice match at Orkhon Valley near Kharkhorin, about 310 km (193 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. Polo is the oldest of all equestrian sports and was said to have been played by Mongolian conqueror Genghis Khan's cavalry to train and hone their riding and archery skills. German film-maker and businessman Christoph Giercke and friends reintroduced the sport in 1998 during an adventure trip in Orkhon. Picture taken May 26, 2005. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV CC/CN
MONGOLIA
RTRCR63
May 26, 2005
A Mongolian father attends to his son inside their tent home called ger (nomadic tent) near Kharkorin,...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
A Mongolian father attends to his son inside a ger near Kharkorin.
A Mongolian father attends to his son inside their tent home called ger (nomadic tent) near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads living in traditional round felt tents called ger to suit their mobile and pastoral way of life. A ger is assembled and disassembled easily, and all of the components needed to build one can be easily transported, thus increasing the nomads' mobility. Picture taken May 26,2005. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV CC/KS
MONGOLIA
RTRCR5T
May 26, 2005
Visitors sit inside a ger (nomadic tent) restaurant in Khujirt near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles)...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Visitors sit inside a ger restaurant in Khujirt near Kharkorin.
Visitors sit inside a ger (nomadic tent) restaurant in Khujirt near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads living in traditional round felt tents called ger to suit their mobile and pastoral way of life. A ger is assembled and disassembled easily, and all of the components needed to build one can be easily transported, thus increasing the nomads' mobility. Picture taken May 26,2005. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV CC/KS
MONGOLIA
RTRCR5J
May 26, 2005
Mongolian nomads erect a ger (nomadic tent) at Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles)...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Mongolian nomads erect a ger at Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin.
Mongolian nomads erect a ger (nomadic tent) at Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads living in traditional round felt tents called ger to suit their mobile and pastoral way of life. A ger is assembled and disassembled easily, and all of the components needed to build one can be easily transported, thus increasing the nomads' mobility. Picture taken May 26,2005. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV CC/KS
MONGOLIA
RTRCR5E
May 26, 2005
A Mongolian worker paints design to a 'tonoo', a wheel-shaped roof frame of a ger (nomadic tent) at a...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
A Mongolian worker paints design to a 'tonoo' at a ger factory near Kharkorin.
A Mongolian worker paints design to a 'tonoo', a wheel-shaped roof frame of a ger (nomadic tent) at a factory in Khujirt near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads living in traditional round felt tents called ger to suit their mobile and pastoral way of life. A ger is assembled and disassembled easily, and all of the components needed to build one can be easily transported, thus increasing the nomads' mobility. Picture taken May 26,2005. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV CC/KS
MONGOLIA
RTRCR54
May 26, 2005
A Mongolian worker prepares to paint colourful design to a 'tonoo', a wheel-shaped roof frame of a ger...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
A Mongolian worker prepares to paint a 'tonoo' at a ger factory near Kharkorin.
A Mongolian worker prepares to paint colourful design to a 'tonoo', a wheel-shaped roof frame of a ger (nomadic tent), at a factory in Khujirt near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads living in traditional round felt tents called ger to suit their mobile and pastoral way of life. A ger is assembled and disassembled easily, and all of the components needed to build one can be easily transported, thus increasing the nomads' mobility. Picture taken May 26,2005. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV CC/KS
MONGOLIA
RTRCR4X
May 26, 2005
Mongolian workers assemble parts for a ger (nomadic tent), at a factory in Khujirt near Kharkorin, about...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Mongolian workers assemble parts for a nomadic tent.
Mongolian workers assemble parts for a ger (nomadic tent), at a factory in Khujirt near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads living in traditional round felt tents called ger to suit their mobile and pastoral way of life. A ger is assembled and disassembled easily, and all of the components needed to build one can be easily transported, thus increasing the nomads' mobility. Picture taken May 26,2005. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV CC/KS
MONGOLIA
RTRCR4F
May 26, 2005
Mongolian nomads walk outside their traditional tent homes called ger (nomadic tent) at Orkhon Valley...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Mongolian nomads walk outside their traditional tent homes near Kharkorin.
Mongolian nomads walk outside their traditional tent homes called ger (nomadic tent) at Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads living in traditional round felt tents called ger to suit their mobile and pastoral way of life. A ger is assembled and disassembled easily, and all of the components needed to build one can be easily transported, thus increasing the nomads' mobility. Picture taken May 26,2005. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV CC/KS
MONGOLIA
RTRCR3Y
May 26, 2005
A Mongolian woman prepares food as her husband and child wait inside their tent home known as a 'ger'...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
A Mongolian woman prepares food as husband and child wait near Kharkorin.
A Mongolian woman prepares food as her husband and child wait inside their tent home known as a 'ger' (nomadic tent) near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads living in traditional round felt tents called ger to suit their mobile and pastoral way of life. A ger is assembled and disassembled easily, and all of the components needed to build one can be easily transported, thus increasing the nomads' mobility. Picture taken May 26,2005. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV CC/KS
MONGOLIA
RTRCR3S
May 26, 2005
A Mongolian worker sets up a smoke stack through the roof window inside a ger (nomadic tent) restaurant...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Mongolian worker sets up a smoke stack inside a ger restaurant near Kharkorin.
A Mongolian worker sets up a smoke stack through the roof window inside a ger (nomadic tent) restaurant in Khujirt near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads living in traditional round felt tents called ger to suit their mobile and pastoral way of life. A ger is assembled and disassembled easily, and all of the components needed to build one can be easily transported, thus increasing the nomads' mobility. Picture taken May 26,2005. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV CC/KS
MONGOLIA
RTRCR3I
May 26, 2005
Mongolian nomads erect a ger (nomadic tent) at Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles)...
Kharkhorin, Mongolia
Mongolian nomads erect a ger at Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin.
Mongolian nomads erect a ger (nomadic tent) at Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads living in traditional round felt tents called ger to suit their mobile and pastoral way of life. A ger is assembled and disassembled easily, and all of the components needed to build one can be easily transported, thus increasing the nomads' mobility. Picture taken May 26,2005. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV CC/KS
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