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Search results for: Lab-coat

HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA
RTX7JH50
May 18, 2020
A worker delivers protective lab coats to the headquarters of Moderna Therapeutics, which is developing...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Moderna Therapeutics seen during COVID-19 in Massachusetts
A worker delivers protective lab coats to the headquarters of Moderna Therapeutics, which is developing a vaccine against the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S., May 18, 2020. REUTERS/Brian Snyder TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HEALTH-AIDS/SINOUSSI
RTS3O8S
October 09, 2015
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Paris, France
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division (Unite de Regulation des Infections Retrovirales) at the Institut Pasteur, reacts during an interview with Reuters in Paris, France, October 1, 2015. More than 30 years after she identified one of the most pernicious viruses to infect humankind, Sinoussi, who shared a Nobel prize for discovering HIV, is hanging up her lab coat and retiring. Picture taken October 1, 2015. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
HEALTH-AIDS/SINOUSSI
RTS3O8R
October 09, 2015
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Paris, France
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division (Unite de Regulation des Infections Retrovirales) at the Institut Pasteur, poses during an interview with Reuters, in Paris, France, October 1, 2015. More than 30 years after she identified one of the most pernicious viruses to infect humankind, Sinoussi, who shared a Nobel prize for discovering HIV, is hanging up her lab coat and retiring. Picture taken October 1, 2015. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
HEALTH-AIDS/SINOUSSI
RTS3O8N
October 09, 2015
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Paris, France
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division (Unite de Regulation des Infections Retrovirales) at the Institut Pasteur, poses during an interview with Reuters, in Paris, France, October 1, 2015. More than 30 years after she identified one of the most pernicious viruses to infect humankind, Sinoussi, who shared a Nobel prize for discovering HIV, is hanging up her lab coat and retiring. Picture taken October 1, 2015. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
HEALTH-AIDS/SINOUSSI
RTS3O8M
October 09, 2015
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Paris, France
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division (Unite de Regulation des Infections Retrovirales) at the Institut Pasteur, speaks during an interview with Reuters, in Paris, France, October 1, 2015. More than 30 years after she identified one of the most pernicious viruses to infect humankind, Sinoussi, who shared a Nobel prize for discovering HIV, is hanging up her lab coat and retiring. Picture taken October 1, 2015. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
HEALTH-AIDS/SINOUSSI
RTS3O8L
October 09, 2015
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Paris, France
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division (Unite de Regulation des Infections Retrovirales) at the Institut Pasteur, speaks during an interview with Reuters, in Paris, France, October 1, 2015. More than 30 years after she identified one of the most pernicious viruses to infect humankind, Sinoussi, who shared a Nobel prize for discovering HIV, is hanging up her lab coat and retiring. Picture taken October 1, 2015. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
HEALTH-AIDS/SINOUSSI
RTS3O8K
October 09, 2015
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Paris, France
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division (Unite de Regulation des Infections Retrovirales) at the Institut Pasteur, speaks during an interview with Reuters in Paris, France, October 1, 2015. More than 30 years after she identified one of the most pernicious viruses to infect humankind, Sinoussi, who shared a Nobel prize for discovering HIV, is hanging up her lab coat and retiring. Picture taken October 1, 2015. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
HEALTH-AIDS/SINOUSSI
RTS3O8C
October 09, 2015
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Paris, France
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division (Unite de Regulation des Infections Retrovirales) at the Institut Pasteur, poses during an interview with Reuters, in Paris, France, October 1, 2015. More than 30 years after she identified one of the most pernicious viruses to infect humankind, Sinoussi, who shared a Nobel prize for discovering HIV, is hanging up her lab coat and retiring. Picture taken October 1, 2015. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
HEALTH-AIDS/SINOUSSI
RTS3O8A
October 09, 2015
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Paris, France
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division (Unite de Regulation des Infections Retrovirales) at the Institut Pasteur, speaks during an interview with Reuters, in Paris, France, October 1, 2015. More than 30 years after she identified one of the most pernicious viruses to infect humankind, Sinoussi, who shared a Nobel prize for discovering HIV, is hanging up her lab coat and retiring. Picture taken October 1, 2015. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
HEALTH-AIDS/SINOUSSI
RTS3O89
October 09, 2015
French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division (Unite de Regulation...
Paris, France
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi speaks with team leader Asier Saez-Cirion following an interview with Reuters...
French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division (Unite de Regulation des Infections Retrovirales) at the Institut Pasteur in Paris Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (R) speaks with team leader Asier Saez-Cirion following an interview with Reuters in Paris October 1, 2015. More than 30 years after she identified one of the most pernicious viruses to infect humankind, Sinoussi, who shared a Nobel prize for discovering HIV, is hanging up her lab coat and retiring. Picture taken October 1, 2015. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
HEALTH-AIDS/SINOUSSI
RTS3O88
October 09, 2015
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Paris, France
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division...
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division (Unite de Regulation des Infections Retrovirales) at the Institut Pasteur, gestures during an interview with Reuters, in Paris, France, October 1, 2015. More than 30 years after she identified one of the most pernicious viruses to infect humankind, Sinoussi, who shared a Nobel prize for discovering HIV, is hanging up her lab coat and retiring. Picture taken October 1, 2015. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
HEALTH-AIDS/SINOUSSI
RTS3O87
October 09, 2015
French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division (Unite de Regulation...
Paris, France
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi speaks with Michaela Muller-Trutwin following an interview with Reuters, in...
French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division (Unite de Regulation des Infections Retrovirales) at the Institut Pasteur in Paris Francoise Barre-Sinoussi (R) speaks with associate professor HIV, Head Virology Department Michaela Muller-Trutwin following an interview with Reuters, in Paris, France, October 1, 2015. More than 30 years after she identified one of the most pernicious viruses to infect humankind, Sinoussi, who shared a Nobel prize for discovering HIV, is hanging up her lab coat and retiring. Picture taken October 1, 2015. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer
FRANCE-MEDECINE/
RTR4OCXQ
February 05, 2015
A photo illustration shows a French general practitioner with a stethoscope in a doctor's office in Bordeaux...
Bordeaux, France
A photo illustration shows a French general practitioner with a stethoscope in a doctor's office in Bordeaux...
A photo illustration shows a French general practitioner with a stethoscope in a doctor's office in Bordeaux January 7, 2015. French physicians protest against a new health reform bill that would introduce a third party payment system. Picture taken January 7, 2015. REUTERS/Regis Duvignau (FRANCE - Tags: HEALTH POLITICS)
BRITAIN
RTX14F26
October 17, 2013
Britain's Prince Harry wears a lab coat personalised with HRH as he opens the Royal British Legion Centre...
London, United Kingdom
Britain's Prince Harry wears a lab coat personalised with HRH as he opens the Royal British Legion Centre...
Britain's Prince Harry wears a lab coat personalised with HRH as he opens the Royal British Legion Centre for Blast Injury Studies at Imperial College London October 17, 2013. REUTERS/Eddie Mulholland/pool (BRITAIN - Tags: HEALTH ROYALS EDUCATION MILITARY CONFLICT)
CANCER-DRUGS/
RTX1405G
September 26, 2013
A scientist wears a lab coat at the Institute of Cancer Research in Sutton, July 15, 2013. Picture taken...
Sutton, United Kingdom
Scientist wears a lab coat at the Institute of Cancer Research in Sutton
A scientist wears a lab coat at the Institute of Cancer Research in Sutton, July 15, 2013. Picture taken July 15, 2013. To match Insight CANCER-DRUGS/ REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth (BRITAIN - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
GERMANY/
RTX11PGM
July 17, 2013
The logo of the virology institute of the Faculty of Medicine of the Bonn university are seen on lab...
Bonn, Germany
The logo of the virology institute of the Faculty of Medicine of the Bonn university are seen on lab...
The logo of the virology institute of the Faculty of Medicine of the Bonn university are seen on lab coats outside a biosafety level three (BSL-3) in the western German city of Bonn. The virology institute of the Bonn university researches on viruses with the help of bat and human cell culture models and reverse genetic systems for corona viruses (SARS-Coronavirus, HCoV-NL63) to characterize and compare the functions of homologous viral proteins from newly identified viruses. Picture taken May 31, 2013. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay (GERMANY - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH)
GERMANY/
RTX11PGL
July 17, 2013
The logo of the virology institute of the Faculty of Medicine of the Bonn university are seen on lab...
Bonn, Germany
The logo of the virology institute of the Faculty of Medicine of the Bonn university are seen on lab...
The logo of the virology institute of the Faculty of Medicine of the Bonn university are seen on lab coats outside a biosafety level three (BSL-3) in the western German city of Bonn May 31, 2013. The virology institute of the Bonn university researches on viruses with the help of bat and human cell culture models and reverse genetic systems for corona viruses (SARS-Coronavirus, HCoV-NL63) to characterize and compare the functions of homologous viral proteins from newly identified viruses. Picture taken May 31, 2013. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay (GERMANY - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH)
TECH-SCREENS/BENDABLE
RTXYKWM
April 14, 2013

A Cima NanoTech employee demonstrates the flexibility of a piece of SANTE Film in their lab in Singapore...
Singapore, Singapore
A Cima NanoTech employee demonstrates the flexibility of a piece of SANTE Film in their lab in Singapore...

A Cima NanoTech employee demonstrates the flexibility of a piece of SANTE Film in their lab in Singapore in this April 12, 2013 picture. Their proprietary film is coated with SANTE Technology, a self-assembling silver nanoparticle network that enables electrical conductivity at high transparency and flexibility. REUTERS/Edgar Su (SINGAPORE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS)
TECH-SCREENS/BENDABLE
RTXYKWL
April 14, 2013

A Cima NanoTech employee shows a piece of SANTE Film in their lab in Singapore in this April 12, 2013...
Singapore, Singapore
A Cima NanoTech employee shows a piece of SANTE Film in their lab in Singapore

A Cima NanoTech employee shows a piece of SANTE Film in their lab in Singapore in this April 12, 2013 picture. Their proprietary film is coated with SANTE Technology, a self-assembling silver nanoparticle network that enables electrical conductivity at high transparency and flexibility. REUTERS/Edgar Su (SINGAPORE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS)
TECH-SCREENS/BENDABLE
RTXYKWH
April 14, 2013
A Cima NanoTech employee tests the conductivity of a piece of folded SANTE Film in their lab in Singapore...
Singapore, Singapore
A Cima NanoTech employee tests the conductivity of a piece of folded SANTE Film in their lab in Singapore...
A Cima NanoTech employee tests the conductivity of a piece of folded SANTE Film in their lab in Singapore in this April 12, 2013 picture. Their proprietary film is coated with SANTE Technology, a self-assembling silver nanoparticle network that enables electrical conductivity at high transparency and flexibility. REUTERS/Edgar Su (SINGAPORE - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS)
FRANCE-FASHION/
RTR3D43B
January 29, 2013
Two seamstresses look at the show cards in the backstage of fashion house Valentino's Haute Couture Spring-Summer...
Paris, France
Two seamstresses look at the show cards in the backstage of fashion house Valentino's Haute Couture Spring-Summer...
Two seamstresses look at the show cards in the backstage of fashion house Valentino's Haute Couture Spring-Summer 2013 show,in Paris, January 23, 2013. Deleeuw, originally from Valenciennes northern France, was 18 when she first stepped down a catwalk - opening the first ready-to-wear show of the September 2012 season in New York. Now, ahead of the four-week marathon of shows, she is aware that in modelling your body is your instrument and plans to "rest the most I can, take vitamins, and do everything possible to not fall ill". Picture taken January 23, 2013 REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer (FRANCE - Tags: FASHION)
EUROPE-SME
RTR36FHX
August 08, 2012
A worker puts on his lab coat as he enters the colour quality control area at Unidesa Odi dental pieces...
TIELMES, Spain
A worker puts on his lab coat as he enters the colour quality control area at Unidesa Odi dental pieces...
A worker puts on his lab coat as he enters the colour quality control area at Unidesa Odi dental pieces factory in Tielmes, near Madrid, July 4, 2012. Unidesa-Odi, the only manufacturer of artificial teeth in Spain, has been through crisis before in its 60-year history. Eleven years ago, its distribution arm had over-reached itself and was making losses that threatened the future of the business, so it retrenched to its manufacturing base, closing stores and slashing its staff from 250 to just 52 today. Picture taken July 4, 2012. To match story EUROPE-SME/ REUTERS/Andrea Comas (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH)
SPAIN/
RTR328P9
May 17, 2012
A lab coat and a stethoscope are seen on the floor during a protest of doctors and nurses outside the...
Palma De Mallorca, Spain
A lab coat and a stethoscope are seen on the floor during a protest of doctors and nurses in Palma de...
A lab coat and a stethoscope are seen on the floor during a protest of doctors and nurses outside the Balearic government headquarters in Palma de Mallorca, May 17, 2012. The written message reads: "Fewer consultants and more public health. Don't you have slightest decency?". REUTERS/Enrique Calvo (SPAIN - Tags: HEALTH CIVIL UNREST)
USA-COURT/HEALTHCARE
RTR2ZWK8
March 26, 2012
Doctor Vivek Murthy stands among other bystanders during the first day of legal arguments over the Affordable...
Washington, UNITED STATES
Doctor Murthy stands outside the Supreme Court during legal arguments over the Affordable Care Act in...
Doctor Vivek Murthy stands among other bystanders during the first day of legal arguments over the Affordable Care Act outside the Supreme Court in Washington March 26, 2012. U.S. President Barack Obama's sweeping healthcare overhaul on Monday went before the U.S. Supreme Court where the nine justices began hearing arguments in a historic test of the law's validity under the U.S. Constitution. REUTERS/Jason Reed (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS HEALTH CIVIL UNREST)
GERMANY/
RTR2K2EJ
March 18, 2011
German Chancellor Angela Merkel wears a lab coat and shoe protectors as she visits the IDT Biologika,...
Dessau, Germany
German Chancellor Merkel visits IDT Biologika manufacturing facilitiy in Dessau
German Chancellor Angela Merkel wears a lab coat and shoe protectors as she visits the IDT Biologika, a biological, pharmaceutical development and manufacturing facility in Dessau, March 18, 2011. REUTERS/Thomas Peter (GERMANY - Tags: POLITICS SCI TECH)
PHARMACEUTICALS
RTR2F8O8
June 16, 2010
Racks of samples are seen after purification in a laboratory at Imperial College in London, May 28, 2010....
London, United Kingdom
To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/
Racks of samples are seen after purification in a laboratory at Imperial College in London, May 28, 2010. Across the western world, Big Pharma is cutting back on the number of scientists it employs in its labs and the money it spends on research and development. The hunt for new drugs continues, but the men and women in white coats - traditionally viewed as the lifeblood of the industry - are not as untouchable as they once were. Tucked neatly behind London's famous Science Museum, which pays homage to the groundbreaking advances that made modern medicine what it is, the chemistry labs at Imperial College offer one last refuge from the realities of the marketplace. Picture taken May 28, 2010. To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/ REUTERS/Paul Hackett/Files (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS)
PHARMACEUTICALS
RTR2F8NT
June 16, 2010
A computer screen is seen reflected in the glasses of Dr Nick Brooks as he works in a laboratory at Imperial...
London, United Kingdom
To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS
A computer screen is seen reflected in the glasses of Dr Nick Brooks as he works in a laboratory at Imperial College in London, May 28, 2010. Across the western world, Big Pharma is cutting back on the number of scientists it employs in its labs and the money it spends on research and development. The hunt for new drugs continues, but the men and women in white coats - traditionally viewed as the lifeblood of the industry - are not as untouchable as they once were. Tucked neatly behind London's famous Science Museum, which pays homage to the groundbreaking advances that made modern medicine what it is, the chemistry labs at Imperial College offer one last refuge from the realities of the marketplace. Picture taken May 28, 2010. To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/ REUTERS/Paul Hackett/Files (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS)
PHARMACEUTICALS
RTR2F8NG
June 16, 2010
Dr Nick Brooks (L) and PhD student Duncan Casey work in a laboratory at Imperial College in London, May...
London, United Kingdom
To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS
Dr Nick Brooks (L) and PhD student Duncan Casey work in a laboratory at Imperial College in London, May 28, 2010. Across the western world, Big Pharma is cutting back on the number of scientists it employs in its labs and the money it spends on research and development. The hunt for new drugs continues, but the men and women in white coats - traditionally viewed as the lifeblood of the industry - are not as untouchable as they once were. Tucked neatly behind London's famous Science Museum, which pays homage to the groundbreaking advances that made modern medicine what it is, the chemistry labs at Imperial College offer one last refuge from the realities of the marketplace. Picture taken May 28, 2010. To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS REUTERS/Paul Hackett/Files (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS)
PHARMACEUTICALS
RTR2F8N6
June 16, 2010
A computer screen is seen reflected in the glasses of Dr Nick Brooks as he works in a laboratory at Imperial...
London, United Kingdom
To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS
A computer screen is seen reflected in the glasses of Dr Nick Brooks as he works in a laboratory at Imperial College in London, May 28, 2010. Across the western world, Big Pharma is cutting back on the number of scientists it employs in its labs and the money it spends on research and development. The hunt for new drugs continues, but the men and women in white coats - traditionally viewed as the lifeblood of the industry - are not as untouchable as they once were. Tucked neatly behind London's famous Science Museum, which pays homage to the groundbreaking advances that made modern medicine what it is, the chemistry labs at Imperial College offer one last refuge from the realities of the marketplace. Picture taken May 28, 2010. To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS REUTERS/Paul Hackett/Files (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS)
PHARMACEUTICALS
RTR2F8MI
June 16, 2010
A scientist works in a laboratory at Imperial College in London, May 28, 2010. From Italy to the United...
London, United Kingdom
To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS
A scientist works in a laboratory at Imperial College in London, May 28, 2010. From Italy to the United States, Britain to Sweden, Big Pharma is cutting back on the number of scientists it employs in its labs and the money it spends on research and development. The hunt for new drugs continues, but the men and women in white coats - traditionally viewed as the lifeblood of the industry - are not as untouchable as they once were. Tucked neatly behind London's famous Science Museum, which pays homage to the groundbreaking advances that made modern medicine what it is, the chemistry labs at Imperial College offer one last refuge from the realities of the marketplace. Picture taken May 28, 2010. To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/ REUTERS/Paul Hackett/Files (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY SCI TECH HEALTH EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS)
PHARMACEUTICALS
RTR2F8MA
June 16, 2010
People leave a building at Imperial College in London, May 28, 2010. Across the western world, Big Pharma...
London, United Kingdom
To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS
People leave a building at Imperial College in London, May 28, 2010. Across the western world, Big Pharma is cutting back on the number of scientists it employs in its labs and the money it spends on research and development. The hunt for new drugs continues, but the men and women in white coats - traditionally viewed as the lifeblood of the industry - are not as untouchable as they once were. Tucked neatly behind London's famous Science Museum, which pays homage to the groundbreaking advances that made modern medicine what it is, the chemistry labs at Imperial College offer one last refuge from the realities of the marketplace. Picture taken May 28, 2010. To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/ REUTERS/Paul Hackett/Files (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS)
PHARMACEUTICALS
RTR2F8LY
June 16, 2010
PhD student Duncan Casey looks at a 3D graphic of the interaction between cell membrane and drug molecules...
London, United Kingdom
To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS
PhD student Duncan Casey looks at a 3D graphic of the interaction between cell membrane and drug molecules at a laboratory at Imperial College in London, May 28, 2010. Across the western world, Big Pharma is cutting back on the number of scientists it employs in its labs and the money it spends on research and development. The hunt for new drugs continues, but the men and women in white coats - traditionally viewed as the lifeblood of the industry - are not as untouchable as they once were. Tucked neatly behind London's famous Science Museum, which pays homage to the groundbreaking advances that made modern medicine what it is, the chemistry labs at Imperial College offer one last refuge from the realities of the marketplace. Picture taken May 28, 2010. To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/ REUTERS/Paul Hackett/Files (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY SCI TECH HEALTH EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS)
PHARMACEUTICALS
RTR2F8LJ
June 16, 2010
Calculations are seen on a white board in a laboratory at Imperial College in London, May 28, 2010. Across...
London, United Kingdom
To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/
Calculations are seen on a white board in a laboratory at Imperial College in London, May 28, 2010. Across the western world, Big Pharma is cutting back on the number of scientists it employs in its labs and the money it spends on research and development. The hunt for new drugs continues, but the men and women in white coats - traditionally viewed as the lifeblood of the industry - are not as untouchable as they once were. Tucked neatly behind London's famous Science Museum, which pays homage to the groundbreaking advances that made modern medicine what it is, the chemistry labs at Imperial College offer one last refuge from the realities of the marketplace. Picture taken May 28, 2010. To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/ REUTERS/Paul Hackett/Files (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS)
PHARMACEUTICALS
RTR2F8L0
June 16, 2010
Calculations are seen on a white board in a laboratory at Imperial College in London, May 28, 2010. Across...
London, United Kingdom
To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS
Calculations are seen on a white board in a laboratory at Imperial College in London, May 28, 2010. Across the western world, Big Pharma is cutting back on the number of scientists it employs in its labs and the money it spends on research and development. The hunt for new drugs continues, but the men and women in white coats - traditionally viewed as the lifeblood of the industry - are not as untouchable as they once were. Tucked neatly behind London's famous Science Museum, which pays homage to the groundbreaking advances that made modern medicine what it is, the chemistry labs at Imperial College offer one last refuge from the realities of the marketplace. Picture taken May 28, 2010. To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/ REUTERS/Paul Hackett/Files (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS)
PHARMACEUTICALS
RTR2F8KC
June 16, 2010
Equipment is seen in a laboratory at Imperial College in London, May 28, 2010. Across the western world,...
London, United Kingdom
To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/
Equipment is seen in a laboratory at Imperial College in London, May 28, 2010. Across the western world, Big Pharma is cutting back on the number of scientists it employs in its labs and the money it spends on research and development. The hunt for new drugs continues, but the men and women in white coats - traditionally viewed as the lifeblood of the industry - are not as untouchable as they once were. Tucked neatly behind London's famous Science Museum, which pays homage to the groundbreaking advances that made modern medicine what it is, the chemistry labs at Imperial College offer one last refuge from the realities of the marketplace. Picture taken May 28, 2010. To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/ REUTERS/Paul Hackett/Files (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY SCI TECH HEALTH EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS)
PHARMACEUTICALS
RTR2F8K6
June 16, 2010
German exchange student Sascha Rousefi (C) works in a laboratory at Imperial College in London, May 28,...
London, United Kingdom
To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/
German exchange student Sascha Rousefi (C) works in a laboratory at Imperial College in London, May 28, 2010. Across the western world, Big Pharma is cutting back on the number of scientists it employs in its labs and the money it spends on research and development. The hunt for new drugs continues, but the men and women in white coats - traditionally viewed as the lifeblood of the industry - are not as untouchable as they once were. Tucked neatly behind London's famous Science Museum, which pays homage to the groundbreaking advances that made modern medicine what it is, the chemistry labs at Imperial College offer one last refuge from the realities of the marketplace. Picture taken May 28, 2010. To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/ REUTERS/Paul Hackett/Files (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH SCI TECH EDUCATION EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS)
PHARMACEUTICALS
RTR2F8JR
June 16, 2010
Racks of samples are seen after purification in a laboratory at Imperial College in London, May 28, 2010....
London, United Kingdom
To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/
Racks of samples are seen after purification in a laboratory at Imperial College in London, May 28, 2010. Across the western world, Big Pharma is cutting back on the number of scientists it employs in its labs and the money it spends on research and development. The hunt for new drugs continues, but the men and women in white coats - traditionally viewed as the lifeblood of the industry - are not as untouchable as they once were. Tucked neatly behind London's famous Science Museum, which pays homage to the groundbreaking advances that made modern medicine what it is, the chemistry labs at Imperial College offer one last refuge from the realities of the marketplace. Picture taken May 28, 2010. To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/ REUTERS/Paul Hackett/Files (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY SCI TECH HEALTH EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS)
PHARMACEUTICALS
RTR2F8JJ
June 16, 2010
A computer screen is seen reflected in the glasses of Dr Nick Brooks as he works in a laboratory at Imperial...
London, United Kingdom
To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/
A computer screen is seen reflected in the glasses of Dr Nick Brooks as he works in a laboratory at Imperial College in London, May 28, 2010. Across the western world, Big Pharma is cutting back on the number of scientists it employs in its labs and the money it spends on research and development. The hunt for new drugs continues, but the men and women in white coats - traditionally viewed as the lifeblood of the industry - are not as untouchable as they once were. Tucked neatly behind London's famous Science Museum, which pays homage to the groundbreaking advances that made modern medicine what it is, the chemistry labs at Imperial College offer one last refuge from the realities of the marketplace. Picture taken May 28, 2010. To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/ REUTERS/Paul Hackett/Files (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY SCI TECH HEALTH EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS)
PHARMACEUTICALS
RTR2F8J7
June 16, 2010
Dr Nick Brooks loads a capillary tube into a X-ray diffraction machine in a laboratory at Imperial College...
London, United Kingdom
To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/
Dr Nick Brooks loads a capillary tube into a X-ray diffraction machine in a laboratory at Imperial College in London, May 28, 2010. Across the western world, Big Pharma is cutting back on the number of scientists it employs in its labs and the money it spends on research and development. The hunt for new drugs continues, but the men and women in white coats - traditionally viewed as the lifeblood of the industry - are not as untouchable as they once were. Tucked neatly behind London's famous Science Museum, which pays homage to the groundbreaking advances that made modern medicine what it is, the chemistry labs at Imperial College offer one last refuge from the realities of the marketplace. Picture taken May 28, 2010. To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/ REUTERS/Paul Hackett/Files (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SCI TECH)
PHARMACEUTICALS
RTR2F8J0
June 16, 2010
Dr Nick Brooks loads a powder sample into an x-ray capillary tube in a laboratory at Imperial College...
London, United Kingdom
To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/
Dr Nick Brooks loads a powder sample into an x-ray capillary tube in a laboratory at Imperial College in London, May 28, 2010. Across the western world, Big Pharma is cutting back on the number of scientists it employs in its labs and the money it spends on research and development. The hunt for new drugs continues, but the men and women in white coats - traditionally viewed as the lifeblood of the industry - are not as untouchable as they once were. Tucked neatly behind London's famous Science Museum, which pays homage to the groundbreaking advances that made modern medicine what it is, the chemistry labs at Imperial College offer one last refuge from the realities of the marketplace. Picture taken May 28, 2010. To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/ REUTERS/Paul Hackett/Files (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY SCI TECH HEALTH EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS)
PHARMACEUTICALS
RTR2F8IX
June 16, 2010
Students gather during lunch on the grounds of Imperial College in London May 28, 2010. Across the western...
London, United Kingdom
To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/
Students gather during lunch on the grounds of Imperial College in London May 28, 2010. Across the western world, Big Pharma is cutting back on the number of scientists it employs in its labs and the money it spends on research and development. The hunt for new drugs continues, but the men and women in white coats - traditionally viewed as the lifeblood of the industry - are not as untouchable as they once were. Tucked neatly behind London's famous Science Museum, which pays homage to the groundbreaking advances that made modern medicine what it is, the chemistry labs at Imperial College offer one last refuge from the realities of the marketplace. Picture taken May 28, 2010. To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/ REUTERS/Paul Hackett/Files (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY EDUCATION HEALTH EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS)
PHARMACEUTICALS
RTR2F8IS
June 16, 2010
PhD student Duncan Casey looks at a 3D graphic of the interaction between cell membrane and drug molecules...
London, United Kingdom
To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/
PhD student Duncan Casey looks at a 3D graphic of the interaction between cell membrane and drug molecules at a laboratory at Imperial College in London, May 28, 2010. Across the western world, Big Pharma is cutting back on the number of scientists it employs in its labs and the money it spends on research and development. The hunt for new drugs continues, but the men and women in white coats - traditionally viewed as the lifeblood of the industry - are not as untouchable as they once were. Tucked neatly behind London's famous Science Museum, which pays homage to the groundbreaking advances that made modern medicine what it is, the chemistry labs at Imperial College offer one last refuge from the realities of the marketplace. Picture taken May 28, 2010. To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/ REUTERS/Paul Hackett/Files (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SCI TECH)
PHARMACEUTICALS
RTR2F8IN
June 16, 2010
Glass NMR tubes filled with samples are seen ready for analysis in a laboratory at Imperial College in...
London, United Kingdom
To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/
Glass NMR tubes filled with samples are seen ready for analysis in a laboratory at Imperial College in London May 28, 2010. Across the western world, Big Pharma is cutting back on the number of scientists it employs in its labs and the money it spends on research and development. The hunt for new drugs continues, but the men and women in white coats - traditionally viewed as the lifeblood of the industry - are not as untouchable as they once were. Tucked neatly behind London's famous Science Museum, which pays homage to the groundbreaking advances that made modern medicine what it is, the chemistry labs at Imperial College offer one last refuge from the realities of the marketplace. Picture taken May 28, 2010. To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/ REUTERS/Paul Hackett/Files (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SCI TECH)
PHARMACEUTICALS/
RTR2F8IF
June 16, 2010
PhD student Maija Maskuninty works in a laboratory at Imperial College in London, May 28, 2010. Across...
London, United Kingdom
To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/
PhD student Maija Maskuninty works in a laboratory at Imperial College in London, May 28, 2010. Across the western world, Big Pharma is cutting back on the number of scientists it employs in its labs and the money it spends on research and development. The hunt for new drugs continues, but the men and women in white coats - traditionally viewed as the lifeblood of the industry - are not as untouchable as they once were. Tucked neatly behind London's famous Science Museum, which pays homage to the groundbreaking advances that made modern medicine what it is, the chemistry labs at Imperial College offer one last refuge from the realities of the marketplace. Picture taken May 28, 2010. To match Special Report PHARMACEUTICALS/ REUTERS/Paul Hackett/Files (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS EDUCATION)
AFGHANISTAN/
RTXQNPQ
November 12, 2009
An Afghan employee works on a mould for an artificial leg at the ICRC Ali Abad Orthopaedic centre in...
Kabul, Afghanistan
An Afghan employee works on a mould for an artificial leg at the ICRC Ali Abad Orthopaedic centre in...
An Afghan employee works on a mould for an artificial leg at the ICRC Ali Abad Orthopaedic centre in Kabul November 12, 2009. The centre, which is run mostly by disabled people, aims to educate and rehabilitate landmine victims and other people with any kind of disabilities, to help them integrate effectively into society. They also provide the patients with a 18-months interest free $600 micro credit loan. REUTERS/Jerry Lampen (AFGHANISTAN HEALTH SOCIETY)
USA-HEALTHCARE/
RTXQEGS
November 05, 2009
A doctor puts his hand over his chest during a "House call" rally against proposed healthcare reform...
Washington, UNITED STATES
A doctor puts his hand over his chest during a "House call" rally against proposed healthcare reform...
A doctor puts his hand over his chest during a "House call" rally against proposed healthcare reform legislation at the Capitol in Washington November 5, 2009. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES POLITICS HEALTH CONFLICT)
GERMANY/
RTXP7BL
October 02, 2009
A technician prepares swabs in test tubes for testing against pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus in the...
Berlin, Germany
A technician prepares swabs in test tubes for testing against pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus in a...
A technician prepares swabs in test tubes for testing against pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus in the national reference laboratory at the Robert Koch scientific institute in Berlin, October 2, 2009. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch (GERMANY HEALTH SCI TECH)
PITTSBURGH-GREEN
RTR2821V
September 20, 2009
Plextronics device technician Jared Schillinger works in one of Plextronics' labs, testing ink that is...
Pittsburgh, UNITED STATES
To match feature PITTSBURGH-GREEN/
Plextronics device technician Jared Schillinger works in one of Plextronics' labs, testing ink that is used to coat solar panels, in Pittsburgh September 16, 2009. The lights in the lab are yellow because the inks are sensitive to blue light. Climate change and tackling high unemployment are other issues on the G20 agenda, tying into Obama's vision for a green economy and why Pittsburgh is hosting the summit. But hopes for millions of new green jobs in the U.S. economy may prove more ambitious than many advocates and investors dream of. Photo taken on September 16, 2009. To match feature PITTSBURGH-GREEN/ REUTERS/Jason Cohn (UNITED STATES BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT)
PITTSBURGH-GREEN
RTR2821R
September 20, 2009


Mark Bower, a formulator at Pittsburgh-based Plextronics, experiments with ink that will be used to...
Pittsburgh, UNITED STATES
To match feature PITTSBURGH-GREEN/


Mark Bower, a formulator at Pittsburgh-based Plextronics, experiments with ink that will be used to coat solar panels in one of Plextronics' labs, in Pittsburgh September 16, 2009. Climate change and tackling high unemployment are other issues on the G20 agenda, tying into Obama's vision for a green economy and why Pittsburgh is hosting the summit. But hopes for millions of new green jobs in the U.S. economy may prove more ambitious than many advocates and investors dream of. Photo taken on September 16, 2009. To match feature PITTSBURGH-GREEN/ REUTERS/Jason Cohn (UNITED STATES BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT)
FLU-FRANCE/
RTR26GDN
August 06, 2009
The contents of a H1N1 influenza medical swab kit are presented at the CHRU Hospital in Lille, northern...
Lille, France
The contents of a H1N1 influenza medical swab kit are presented at the CHRU Hospital in Lille
The contents of a H1N1 influenza medical swab kit are presented at the CHRU Hospital in Lille, northern France August 6, 2009. The kit contains protective face masks, gloves, glasses, swab, lab coat, alcoholic hand gel and administrative forma that the French SAMU emergency ambulance vehicles will use. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol (FRANCE HEALTH SOCIETY)
FLU-FRANCE/
RTR26GDI
August 06, 2009
The contents of a H1N1 influenza medical swab kit are presented at the CHRU Hospital in Lille, northern...
Lille, France
The contents of a H1N1 influenza medical swab kit are presented at the CHRU Hospital in Lille
The contents of a H1N1 influenza medical swab kit are presented at the CHRU Hospital in Lille, northern France August 6, 2009. The kit contains protective face masks, gloves, glasses, swab, lab coat, alcoholic hand gel and administrative forma that the French SAMU emergency ambulance vehicles will use. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol (FRANCE HEALTH SOCIETY)
FRANCE/
RTR2361T
January 08, 2009
A French high school student wears a lab coat that reads "Mummy, what's that, School ?" as he demonstrates...
Bordeaux, France
French high school student wears a lab coat that reads "Mummy, what's that, School ?" as he takes part...
A French high school student wears a lab coat that reads "Mummy, what's that, School ?" as he demonstrates in Bordeaux, southwestern France, January 8, 2009. France's Education Minister Xavier Darcos announced in December 2008 he would indefinitely delay a reform of the secondary school curriculum. REUTERS/Regis Duvignau (FRANCE)
FRANCE/
RTR2361L
January 08, 2009
French high school student wears a lab coat that reads "Mummy, what's that, School ?" as he demonstrates...
Bordeaux, France
French high school student wears a lab coat that reads "Mummy, what's that, School ?" as he takes part...
French high school student wears a lab coat that reads "Mummy, what's that, School ?" as he demonstrates in Bordeaux, southwestern France, January 8, 2009. France's Education Minister Xavier Darcos announced in December 2008 he would indefinitely delay a reform of the secondary school curriculum. REUTERS/Regis Duvignau (FRANCE)
SWITZERLAND/
RTX9SNE
October 22, 2008
A cheesemaker controls a Swiss cave-aged Emmentaler cheese in a cave in Kaltbach, near Lucerne October...
KALTBACH, Switzerland
A cheesemaker controls a Swiss cave-aged Emmentaler cheese in a cave in Kaltbach, near Lucerne
A cheesemaker controls a Swiss cave-aged Emmentaler cheese in a cave in Kaltbach, near Lucerne October 22, 2008. The Swiss Kaltbach Gruyere and Emmentaler cheese mature for about 9 months in a sandstone cave which has a constant climate all year around with a humidity of 94 percent and 10 degrees Celsius. REUTERS/Michael Buholzer (SWITZERLAND)
SWITZERLAND/
RTX9SN7
October 22, 2008
A cheesemaker controls a Swiss cave-aged Emmentaler cheese in a cave in Kaltbach, near Lucerne October...
KALTBACH, Switzerland
A cheesemaker controls a Swiss cave-aged Emmentaler cheese in a cave in Kaltbach, near Lucerne
A cheesemaker controls a Swiss cave-aged Emmentaler cheese in a cave in Kaltbach, near Lucerne October 22, 2008. The Swiss Kaltbach Gruyere and Emmentaler cheese mature for about 9 months in a sandstone cave which has a constant climate all year around with a humidity of 94 percent and 10 degrees Celsius. REUTERS/Michael Buholzer (SWITZERLAND)
USA/
RTR21XEF
September 15, 2008
Stanford University doctoral students Peter Abbeel (L) and Adam Coates (R) are joined by computer science...
Stanford, UNITED STATES
Stanford University doctoral students Peter Abbeel and Adam Coates are joined by computer science professor...
Stanford University doctoral students Peter Abbeel (L) and Adam Coates (R) are joined by computer science professor Andrew Ng prior to an air-show of robotic helicopters on the Stanford campus in Palo Alto, California September 15, 2008. The airshow, which involves helicopters that have taught themselves to fly by watching other helicopters, is a demonstration of an "apprenticeship learning algorithm" developed by computer science professor Andrew Ng and other students at the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Lab, where robots learn by observing an expert, rather than by having software engineers attempt to write instructions from scratch. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES)
PORTUGAL/
RTX5S76
May 16, 2008
Worker shows a finished leg of ham at the drying room in Barrancos on the southern Portuguese province...
Barrancos, Portugal
Worker shows a finished ham at the drying room in Barrancos
Worker shows a finished leg of ham at the drying room in Barrancos on the southern Portuguese province of Alentejo April 23, 2008. The descendents of Mediterranean wild boars, these full-blooded Alentejo pigs pasture between the cork trees and holm oaks of the Alentejo plains. Ham made from these wild boars, which are produced after going through a special drying process that takes over 30 months, have a value of over 50 euros a kilo. Picture taken April 23, 2008. REUTERS/Jose Manuel Ribeiro (PORTUGAL)
CHINA/
RTR1XXZC
March 06, 2008
A doctor inserts a camera into the mouth of a sea turtle to check its stomach at a hospital in Hangzhou,...
Hangzhou, China
A doctor inserts a camera into the mouth of a sea turtle to check its stomach at a hospital in Hangzhou...
A doctor inserts a camera into the mouth of a sea turtle to check its stomach at a hospital in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province March 5, 2008. The turtle was accidentally fed a piece of metal, 4-cm (1.57-inches) by 3-cm (1.18 inches), at a local oceanarium. The object was removed after an hour-long operation, local media reported. Picture taken March 5, 2008. REUTERS/Steven Shi (CHINA)
CANADA-NUCLEAR/
RTX4VXI
December 19, 2007
Canada's Health Minister Tony Clement speaks during a news conference at the Atomic Energy Canada Limited...
CHALK RIVER, Canada
Canada's Health Minister Clement speaks during news conference at AECL Chalk River nuclear facility
Canada's Health Minister Tony Clement speaks during a news conference at the Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL) Chalk River nuclear facility in Chalk River, Ontario, December 19, 2007 REUETRS/Chris Wattie (CANADA)
IRAQ/KERBALA
RTR1VHD3
October 30, 2007
Iraqi medical students attend laboratory lessons in the College of Medicine in Kerbala University, 110...
Kerbala, Iraq
Iraqi medical students attend laboratory lessons in College of Medicine in Kerbala University
Iraqi medical students attend laboratory lessons in the College of Medicine in Kerbala University, 110 km (68 miles) south of Baghdad October 30, 2007. REUTERS/Mushtaq Muhammad (IRAQ)
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