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Search results for: Laser-printer

HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GULF-MANUFACTURING
RTS37OEV
March 31, 2020
Fahmi Al-Shawwa, CEO of Immensa Technology Labs, uses a 3D laser printer to produce components for face...
Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Manufacturing turns local in Gulf countries as COVID-19 disrupts supply chains in Dubai
Fahmi Al-Shawwa, CEO of Immensa Technology Labs, uses a 3D laser printer to produce components for face shields, following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, March 30, 2020. Picture taken March 30, 2020. REUTERS/Christopher Pike
BOEING-SPACE/
RTX2ZHAJ
February 03, 2017
Machine Technician Jesus Conde looks into an EOS 3-D printer unit as it builds thermoplastic parts from...
SOUTH WINDSOR, UNITED STATES
Machine Technician Jesus Conde looks into an EOS 3-D printer unit as it builds thermoplastic parts from...
Machine Technician Jesus Conde looks into an EOS 3-D printer unit as it builds thermoplastic parts from "OXPEKK" material in the Laser Melting Room at Oxford Performance Materials Inc., the maker of more than 600 parts to be used on Boeing's new Starliner manned spacecraft, in South Windsor, Connecticut, U.S., January 31, 2017. Picture taken January 31,2017. REUTERS/Mike Segar
BOEING-SPACE/
RTX2ZHAG
February 03, 2017
Machine technician James Stewart loads "OXPEKK" material into an EOS 3-D printer unit used to build thermoplastic...
SOUTH WINDSOR, UNITED STATES
Machine technician James Stewart loads "OXPEKK" material into an EOS 3-D printer unit used to build thermoplastic...
Machine technician James Stewart loads "OXPEKK" material into an EOS 3-D printer unit used to build thermoplastic parts in the Laser Melting Room at Oxford Performance Materials Inc., the maker of more than 600 parts to be used on Boeing's new Starliner manned spacecraft, in South Windsor, Connecticut, U.S., January 31, 2017. Picture taken January 31,2017. REUTERS/Mike Segar
BOEING-SPACE/
RTX2ZHAE
February 03, 2017
A technician uses a laser scanner to inspect a 3-D printed thrust reverser cascade printed by an EOS...
SOUTH WINDSOR, UNITED STATES
A technician uses a laser scanner to inspect a 3-D printed thrust reverser cascade printed by an EOS...
A technician uses a laser scanner to inspect a 3-D printed thrust reverser cascade printed by an EOS 3-D printer and made of "OXPEKK" material at Oxford Performance Materials Inc., the maker of more than 600 parts to be used on Boeing's manned Starliner spacecraft in South Windsor, Connecticut, U.S., January 31, 2017. Picture taken January 31,2017. REUTERS/Mike Segar
BOEING-SPACE/
RTX2ZHAB
February 03, 2017
A laser scanner casts red light as it inspects a 3-D printed thrust reverser cascade printed by an EOS...
SOUTH WINDSOR, UNITED STATES
A laser scanner casts red light as it inspects a 3-D printed thrust reverser cascade printed by an EOS...
A laser scanner casts red light as it inspects a 3-D printed thrust reverser cascade printed by an EOS 3-D printer and made of "OXPEKK" material at Oxford Performance Materials Inc., the maker of more than 600 parts to be used on Boeing's manned Starliner spacecraft in South Windsor, Connecticut, U.S., January 31, 2017. Picture taken January 31,2017. REUTERS/Mike Segar
BOEING-SPACE/
RTX2ZHA5
February 03, 2017
Machine Technician Jesus Conde looks into an EOS 3-D printer unit as it builds thermoplastic parts from...
SOUTH WINDSOR, UNITED STATES
Machine Technician Jesus Conde looks into an EOS 3-D printer unit as it builds thermoplastic parts from...
Machine Technician Jesus Conde looks into an EOS 3-D printer unit as it builds thermoplastic parts from "OXPEKK" material in the Laser Melting Room at Oxford Performance Materials Inc., the maker of more than 600 parts to be used on Boeing's new Starliner manned spacecraft, in South Windsor, Connecticut, U.S., January 31, 2017. Picture taken January 31,2017. REUTERS/Mike Segar
BOEING-SPACE/
RTX2ZHA2
February 03, 2017
Machine Technician Jesus Conde looks into an EOS 3-D printer unit as it builds thermoplastic parts from...
SOUTH WINDSOR, UNITED STATES
Machine Technician Jesus Conde looks into an EOS 3-D printer unit as it builds thermoplastic parts from...
Machine Technician Jesus Conde looks into an EOS 3-D printer unit as it builds thermoplastic parts from "OXPEKK" material in the Laser Melting Room at Oxford Performance Materials Inc., the maker of more than 600 parts to be used on Boeing's new Starliner manned spacecraft, in South Windsor, Connecticut, U.S., January 31, 2017. Picture taken January 31,2017. REUTERS/Mike Segar
BOEING-SPACE/
RTX2ZH9H
February 03, 2017
Machine Technician Jesus Conde looks into an EOS 3-D printer unit as it builds thermoplastic parts from...
SOUTH WINDSOR, UNITED STATES
Machine Technician Jesus Conde looks into an EOS 3-D printer unit as it builds thermoplastic parts from...
Machine Technician Jesus Conde looks into an EOS 3-D printer unit as it builds thermoplastic parts from "OXPEKK" material in the Laser Melting Room at Oxford Performance Materials Inc., the maker of more than 600 parts to be used on Boeing's new Starliner manned spacecraft, in South Windsor, Connecticut, U.S., January 31, 2017. Picture taken January 31,2017. REUTERS/Mike Segar
BOEING-SPACE/
RTX2ZH8S
February 03, 2017
Machine technicians work with EOS 3-D printer units as they build thermoplastic parts from "OXPEKK" material...
SOUTH WINDSOR, UNITED STATES
Machine technicians work with EOS 3-D printer units as they build thermoplastic parts from "OXPEKK" material...
Machine technicians work with EOS 3-D printer units as they build thermoplastic parts from "OXPEKK" material in the Laser Melting Room at Oxford Performance Materials Inc., the maker of more than 600 parts to be used on Boeing's new Starliner manned spacecraft, in South Windsor, Connecticut, U.S., January 31, 2017. Picture taken January 31,2017. REUTERS/Mike Segar
EUROPE-STARTUPS/MAKERS
RTR46Y32
September 19, 2014
A man works next to a selective laser sintering SLS 3D printer inside the Shapeways 3D printing office...
New York, UNITED STATES
Man works next to a selective laser sintering SLS 3D printer inside the Shapeways 3D printing office...
A man works next to a selective laser sintering SLS 3D printer inside the Shapeways 3D printing office in the borough of Queens in New York, September 17, 2014. Shapeways is a young Dutch 3D printing firm that has two factories, one in Eindhoven in the Netherlands and one in New York, that let anyone - from haute-couture designers to cat-lovers - print what they want. CEO Peter Weijmarshausen moved the firm's headquarters to New York in 2010 to be close to tis main market and attract talent and investment.
To match Insight EUROPE-STARTUPS/MAKERS
Picture taken September 17, 2014. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
EUROPE-STARTUPS/MAKERS
RTR46Y2S
September 19, 2014
A selective laser sintering SLS 3D printer is seen inside the Shapeways 3D printing office in the borough...
New York, UNITED STATES
Selective laser sintering SLS 3D printer is seen inside the Shapeways 3D printing office in the borough...
A selective laser sintering SLS 3D printer is seen inside the Shapeways 3D printing office in the borough of Queens in New York, September 17, 2014. Shapeways is a young Dutch 3D printing firm that has two factories, one in Eindhoven in the Netherlands and one in New York, that let anyone - from haute-couture designers to cat-lovers - print what they want. CEO Peter Weijmarshausen moved the firm's headquarters to New York in 2010 to be close to tis main market and attract talent and investment.
To match Insight EUROPE-STARTUPS/MAKERS
Picture taken September 17, 2014.
REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
3D-PRINTING/
RTR3ENAJ
March 06, 2013
A technician at Belgian company Materialise, the biggest 3D printer in Europe, operates a laser sintering...
Leuven, Belgium
A technician at Materialise operates laser sintering machine that uses high-powered lasers to fuse particles...
A technician at Belgian company Materialise, the biggest 3D printer in Europe, operates a laser sintering machine that uses high-powered lasers to fuse particles of plastic, layer by layer, to create 3D objects, at the company's headquarters in Leuven January 24, 2013. 3D printing has already changed the game for manufacturing specialized products such as medical devices but the real revolution will come when designers start to rethink the shapes of objects. 3D printing removes the limitations of the manufacturing process from the equation, which means whatever can be designed on a computer can be turned into an object, specialists say. Picture taken on January 24, 2013. To match Feature 3D-PRINTING/ REUTERS/Yves Herman (BELGIUM - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
AUSTRIA/
RTR303HF
March 30, 2012
General view of Vienna University of Technology in Vienna March 29, 2012. Researchers from the Vienna...
Vienna, Austria
General view of Vienna University of Technology
General view of Vienna University of Technology in Vienna March 29, 2012. Researchers from the Vienna University of Technology have set a new world speed record for creating 3D nano objects. The University team create their grain of sand-size structures in just four minutes, a fraction of the time that other items have previously been printed. Previously making complex large 3D structures would take hours or even days but with the newly developed 3D laser printer the scientists can speed that up by a factor of 500 or in some cases 1,000 times. The process called ?two-photon lithography? involves using a focused laser beam to harden liquid resin in order to create micro objects of solid polymer. The scientists said the technique could be developed to make small biomedical parts to be used by doctors. Picture taken March 29. REUTERS//Vienna University of Technology (AUSTRIA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY CITYSPACE)
AUSTRIA/
RTR303GF
March 30, 2012
Dissertation student Jan Torgersen of Vienna University of Technology puts on safety goggles in front...
Vienna, Austria
Torgersen of Vienna University of Technology puts on safety goggles in front of newly developed 3D nano-printer...
Dissertation student Jan Torgersen of Vienna University of Technology puts on safety goggles in front of a newly developed 3D laser printer, in Vienna March 29, 2012. Torgersen and colleagues have set a new world speed record for creating 3D nano objects. The University team create their grain of sand-size structures in just four minutes, a fraction of the time that other items have previously been printed. Previously making complex large 3D structures would take hours or even days but with the newly developed 3D laser printer the scientists can speed that up by a factor of 500 or in some cases 1,000 times. The process called ?two-photon lithography? involves using a focused laser beam to harden liquid resin in order to create micro objects of solid polymer. The scientists said the technique could be developed to make small biomedical parts to be used by doctors. Picture taken March 29. REUTERS/Herwig Prammer (AUSTRIA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
AUSTRIA/
RTR303HB
March 29, 2012
Dissertation student Jan Torgersen of Vienna University of Technology wears safety goggles in front of...
Vienna, Austria
Torgersen of Vienna University of Technology wears safety goggles in front of newly developed 3D nano-printer...
Dissertation student Jan Torgersen of Vienna University of Technology wears safety goggles in front of a newly developed 3D laser printer, in Vienna March 29, 2012. Torgersen and colleagues have set a new world speed record for creating 3D nano objects. The University team create their grain of sand-size structures in just four minutes, a fraction of the time that other items have previously been printed. Previously making complex large 3D structures would take hours or even days but with the newly developed 3D laser printer the scientists can speed that up by a factor of 500 or in some cases 1,000 times. The process called ?two-photon lithography? involves using a focused laser beam to harden liquid resin in order to create micro objects of solid polymer. The scientists said the technique could be developed to make small biomedical parts to be used by doctors. Picture taken March 29. REUTERS/Herwig Prammer (AUSTRIA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEADSHOT)
AUSTRIA/
RTR303GZ
March 29, 2012
Dissertation student Jan Torgersen of Vienna University of Technology looks at a video screen with a...
Vienna, Austria
Torgersen of Vienna University of Technology operatesf newly developed 3D nano-printer in Vienna
Dissertation student Jan Torgersen of Vienna University of Technology looks at a video screen with a microscope picture of nano-structures as he operates a newly developed 3D laser printer, in Vienna March 29, 2012. Torgersen and colleagues have set a new world speed record for creating 3D nano objects. The University team create their grain of sand-size structures in just four minutes, a fraction of the time that other items have previously been printed. Previously making complex large 3D structures would take hours or even days but with the newly developed 3D laser printer the scientists can speed that up by a factor of 500 or in some cases 1,000 times. The process called ?two-photon lithography? involves using a focused laser beam to harden liquid resin in order to create micro objects of solid polymer. The scientists said the technique could be developed to make small biomedical parts to be used by doctors. Picture taken March 29. REUTERS/Herwig Prammer (AUSTRIA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
AUSTRIA/
RTR303GV
March 29, 2012
Dissertation student Jan Torgersen of Vienna University of Technology operates a newly developed 3D laser...
Vienna, Austria
Torgersen of Vienna University of Technology operates newly developed 3D nano-printer in Vienna
Dissertation student Jan Torgersen of Vienna University of Technology operates a newly developed 3D laser printer, in Vienna March 29, 2012. Torgersen and colleagues have set a new world speed record for creating 3D nano objects. The University team create their grain of sand-size structures in just four minutes, a fraction of the time that other items have previously been printed. Previously making complex large 3D structures would take hours or even days but with the newly developed 3D laser printer the scientists can speed that up by a factor of 500 or in some cases 1,000 times. The process called ?two-photon lithography? involves using a focused laser beam to harden liquid resin in order to create micro objects of solid polymer. The scientists said the technique could be developed to make small biomedical parts to be used by doctors. Picture taken March 29. REUTERS/Herwig Prammer (AUSTRIA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
AUSTRIA/
RTR303GU
March 29, 2012
Dissertation student Jan Torgersen of Vienna University of Technology tries to make a laser beam visible...
Vienna, Austria
Torgersen of Vienna University of Technology tries to make a laser beam visible on a newly developed...
Dissertation student Jan Torgersen of Vienna University of Technology tries to make a laser beam visible on a newly developed 3D laser printer, in Vienna March 29, 2012. Torgersen and colleagues have set a new world speed record for creating 3D nano objects. The University team create their grain of sand-size structures in just four minutes, a fraction of the time that other items have previously been printed. Previously making complex large 3D structures would take hours or even days but with the newly developed 3D laser printer the scientists can speed that up by a factor of 500 or in some cases 1,000 times. The process called ?two-photon lithography? involves using a focused laser beam to harden liquid resin in order to create micro objects of solid polymer. The scientists said the technique could be developed to make small biomedical parts to be used by doctors. Picture taken March 29. REUTERS/Herwig Prammer (AUSTRIA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
AUSTRIA/
RTR303GR
March 29, 2012
Dissertation student Jan Torgersen of Vienna University of Technology operates a newly developed 3D laser...
Vienna, Austria
Torgersen of Vienna University of Technology operatesf newly developed 3D nano-printer in Vienna
Dissertation student Jan Torgersen of Vienna University of Technology operates a newly developed 3D laser printer, in Vienna March 29, 2012. Torgersen and colleagues have set a new world speed record for creating 3D nano objects. The University team create their grain of sand-size structures in just four minutes, a fraction of the time that other items have previously been printed. Previously making complex large 3D structures would take hours or even days but with the newly developed 3D laser printer the scientists can speed that up by a factor of 500 or in some cases 1,000 times. The process called ?two-photon lithography? involves using a focused laser beam to harden liquid resin in order to create micro objects of solid polymer. The scientists said the technique could be developed to make small biomedical parts to be used by doctors. Picture taken March 29. REUTERS/Herwig Prammer (AUSTRIA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
YASUKAWA
RTXM8KP
October 09, 2003
Seiko Epson Corp's CEO and Chairman Hideaki Yasukawa speaks during an interview in Tokyo October 9, 2003....
Tokyo, Japan
Seiko Epson Corp's CEO and Chairman Hideaki Yasukawa speaks during an interview in Tokyo October 9, .....
Seiko Epson Corp's CEO and Chairman Hideaki Yasukawa speaks during an interview in Tokyo October 9, 2003. The chief executive of Seiko Epson, the world's largest home printer maker, said on Thursday that it may move some laser printer and projector production to Europe from Asia to curb the impact of a strong yen.
TECH JAPAN SEIKOEPSON
RTR4KE1
October 09, 2003
Seiko Epson Corp's CEO and Chairman Hideaki Yasukawa speaks during an
interview in Tokyo October 9,...
Tokyo, Japan
SEIKO EPSON CEO AND CHAIRMAN HIDEAKI YASUKAWA SPEAKS DURING INTERVIEW
TOKYO.
Seiko Epson Corp's CEO and Chairman Hideaki Yasukawa speaks during an
interview in Tokyo October 9, 2003. The chief executive of Seiko Epson,
the world's largest home printer maker, said on Thursday that it may
move some laser printer and projector production to Europe from Asia to
curb the impact of a strong yen. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao

YN/FA
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