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Search results for: Last-orders

FRANCE-CORDIER/
RTX8C3RG
November 26, 2020
Hubert Germain, a WWII resistance fighter and the last Compagnon de la Liberation, attends a national...
Paris, France
National ceremony to pay tribute to late veteran Daniel Cordier
Hubert Germain, a WWII resistance fighter and the last Compagnon de la Liberation, attends a national ceremony to pay tribute to late Daniel Cordier, Jean Moulin's secretary, former French resistance member, and veteran with the medaille des Compagnons de la Liberation (Order of the Liberation Companion), at the Hotel National des Invalides in Paris, France, November 26, 2020. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes
FRANCE-CORDIER/
RTX8C3PW
November 26, 2020
Hubert Germain, a WWII resistance fighter and the last Compagnon de la Liberation, attends a national...
Paris, France
National ceremony to pay tribute to late veteran Daniel Cordier
Hubert Germain, a WWII resistance fighter and the last Compagnon de la Liberation, attends a national ceremony to pay tribute to late Daniel Cordier, Jean Moulin's secretary, former French resistance member, and veteran with the medaille des Compagnons de la Liberation (Order of the Liberation Companion), at the Hotel National des Invalides in Paris, France, November 26, 2020. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes
FRANCE-CORDIER/
RTX8C3MZ
November 26, 2020
Hubert Germain, a WWII resistance fighter and the last Compagnon de la Liberation, attends a national...
Paris, France
National ceremony to pay tribute to late veteran Daniel Cordier
Hubert Germain, a WWII resistance fighter and the last Compagnon de la Liberation, attends a national ceremony to pay tribute to late Daniel Cordier, Jean Moulin's secretary, former French resistance member, and veteran with the medaille des Compagnons de la Liberation (Order of the Liberation Companion), at the Hotel National des Invalides in Paris, France, November 26, 2020. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes
CHILE-JOBS/INFORMAL
RTX83FQ0
October 19, 2020
Pedro Campos, who lost his job last year when the restaurant where he worked closed after riots in Santiago...
Santiago, Chile
Pedro Campos bakes and sells homemade bread to his neighbours at Puente Alto area in the outskirt of...
Pedro Campos, who lost his job last year when the restaurant where he worked closed after riots in Santiago broke out over social injustice and entrenched inequality, prepares to bake and sell homemade bread to his neighbours as his daughter Amelia uses their mobile phone to receive home orders, at their house at Puente Alto area, on the outskirts of Santiago, Chile October 6, 2020. Picture taken October 6, 2020. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BELGIUM-RESTAURANTS
RTX83CEC
October 18, 2020
The owner of a restaurant closes the door at the end of the last evening of opening as restaurants were...
Brussels, Belgium
The spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) near Brussels
The owner of a restaurant closes the door at the end of the last evening of opening as restaurants were forced to close for four weeks, after a Belgian federal government decision in order to tackle a surging second wave of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in the country, near Brussels, Belgium October 19, 2020. REUTERS/Yves Herman
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BELGIUM-RESTAURANTS
RTX83CEB
October 18, 2020
The owner of a restaurant closes the door after the last evening of opening as restaurants were forced...
Brussels, Belgium
The spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) near Brussels
The owner of a restaurant closes the door after the last evening of opening as restaurants were forced to close for four weeks, after a Belgian federal government decision in order to tackle a surging second wave of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in the country, near Brussels, Belgium October 19, 2020. REUTERS/Yves Herman
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BELGIUM-RESTAURANTS
RTX83BXB
October 18, 2020
A waiter cleans the last table in a restaurant before closing as restaurants were forced to close for...
Brussels, Belgium
The spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) near Brussels
A waiter cleans the last table in a restaurant before closing as restaurants were forced to close for four weeks, after a Belgian federal government decision in order to tackle a surging second wave of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in the country, near Brussels, Belgium October 18, 2020. REUTERS/Yves Herman
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BELGIUM-RESTAURANTS
RTX83BWT
October 18, 2020
A waiter cleans the last table in a restaurant before closing as restaurants were forced to close for...
Brussels, Belgium
The spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) near Brussels
A waiter cleans the last table in a restaurant before closing as restaurants were forced to close for four weeks, after a Belgian federal government decision in order to tackle a surging second wave of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in the country, near Brussels, Belgium October 18, 2020. REUTERS/Yves Herman
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E9B
October 15, 2020
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E9A
October 15, 2020
Cravats and bow ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Cravats and bow ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Cravats and bow ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E99
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E98
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury looks at silk ties displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury looks at silk ties displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury looks at silk ties displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E97
October 15, 2020
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
London, United Kingdom
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E96
October 15, 2020
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E95
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E94
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E92
October 15, 2020
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E91
October 15, 2020
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E90
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8Z
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury holds a bespoke tailcoat in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row,...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury holds a bespoke tailcoat in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row,...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury holds a bespoke tailcoat in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8Y
October 15, 2020
Bunches of swatches are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Bunches of swatches are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Bunches of swatches are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8X
October 15, 2020
Handkerchiefs are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Handkerchiefs are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Handkerchiefs are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8W
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8P
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8M
October 15, 2020
A general view of Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak,...
London, United Kingdom
General view of Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak,...
A general view of Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8L
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN
RTX822NC
October 13, 2020
An employee packs up chairs after the last orders at The Bridewell pub, amid the outbreak of the coronavirus...
Liverpool, United Kingdom
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Liverpool
An employee packs up chairs after the last orders at The Bridewell pub, amid the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Liverpool, Britain October 13, 2020. REUTERS/Molly Darlington
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN
RTX822MZ
October 13, 2020
Drinking glasses and a towel over the beer taps are seen after the last orders at The Bridewell pub,...
Liverpool, United Kingdom
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Liverpool
Drinking glasses and a towel over the beer taps are seen after the last orders at The Bridewell pub, amid the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Liverpool, Britain October 13, 2020. REUTERS/Molly Darlington
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN
RTX822HS
October 13, 2020
An employee brings over a tray of empty drinkware after last orders at The Bridewell pub, amid the outbreak...
Liverpool, United Kingdom
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Liverpool
An employee brings over a tray of empty drinkware after last orders at The Bridewell pub, amid the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Liverpool, Britain October 13, 2020. REUTERS/Molly Darlington
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN
RTX821ZS
October 13, 2020
Dominic Hornsby, owner of the Bridewell pub, calls for last orders amid the outbreak of the coronavirus...
Liverpool, United Kingdom
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Liverpool
Dominic Hornsby, owner of the Bridewell pub, calls for last orders amid the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Liverpool, Britain October 13, 2020. REUTERS/Molly Darlington
In the Headlines
In the Headlines
China seizes U.S. consulate in Chengdu, retaliating for Houston
22 PICTURES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/RUSSIA-CHURCH
RTS3KBQ5
July 17, 2020
Father Sergiy Romanov, a coronavirus-denying priest suspended by the Russian Orthodox Church for disobeying...
Yekaterinburg, Russia
Father Sergiy and his followers take part in a ceremony honouring the memory of the last Russian tsar...
Father Sergiy Romanov, a coronavirus-denying priest suspended by the Russian Orthodox Church for disobeying orders, addresses his followers during a ceremony honouring the memory of the last Russian tsar Nicholas II, his wife Alexandra and their children, who were executed by Bolsheviks in 1918, at the Sredneuralsk convent near Yekaterinburg, Russia July 17, 2020. The mass ceremony was held in Sverdlovsk Region amid remaining restrictions, including the usage of protective face masks in public places and social distancing rules compliance, which were imposed by local authorities to halt the coronavirus disease (COVID-19). REUTERS/Alexey Malgavko
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/RUSSIA-CHURCH
RTS3KBPX
July 17, 2020
Father Sergiy Romanov, a coronavirus-denying priest suspended by the Russian Orthodox Church for disobeying...
Yekaterinburg, Russia
Father Sergiy and his followers take part in a ceremony honouring the memory of the last Russian tsar...
Father Sergiy Romanov, a coronavirus-denying priest suspended by the Russian Orthodox Church for disobeying orders, and his followers take part in a ceremony honouring the memory of the last Russian tsar Nicholas II, his wife Alexandra and their children, who were executed by Bolsheviks in 1918, at the Sredneuralsk convent near Yekaterinburg, Russia July 17, 2020. The mass ceremony was held in Sverdlovsk Region amid remaining restrictions, including the usage of protective face masks in public places and social distancing rules compliance, which were imposed by local authorities to halt the coronavirus disease (COVID-19). REUTERS/Alexey Malgavko
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/RUSSIA-CHURCH
RTS3KBPE
July 17, 2020
Father Sergiy Romanov, a coronavirus-denying priest suspended by the Russian Orthodox Church for disobeying...
Yekaterinburg, Russia
Father Sergiy and his followers take part in a ceremony honouring the memory of the last Russian tsar...
Father Sergiy Romanov, a coronavirus-denying priest suspended by the Russian Orthodox Church for disobeying orders, addresses his followers during a ceremony honouring the memory of the last Russian tsar Nicholas II, his wife Alexandra and their children, who were executed by Bolsheviks in 1918, at the Sredneuralsk convent near Yekaterinburg, Russia July 17, 2020. The mass ceremony was held in Sverdlovsk Region amid remaining restrictions, including the usage of protective face masks in public places and social distancing rules compliance, which were imposed by local authorities to halt the coronavirus disease (COVID-19). REUTERS/Alexey Malgavko
USA-PULITZER/
RTX7HDXG
May 05, 2020
The young woman is pressed to the ground next to a riot police shield. Detained by Hong Kong authorities,...
Hong Kong, China
Award Winner: Reuters Pulitzer team captures Hong Kong?s descent into chaos
The young woman is pressed to the ground next to a riot police shield. Detained by Hong Kong authorities, she screams her name out to friends so they can call a lawyer to help. The picture, taken on Sept. 2 last year in the midst of huge and violent protests that rocked Hong Kong for more than six months, was part of a series of images by a team of Reuters photographers that won a Pulitzer Prize this week for breaking news photography. The photographs range from sweeping bird's eye views of boulevards packed with tens of thousands of demonstrators to close-ups of pitched battles between anti-China protesters and police seeking to restore order. REUTERS/ SEARCH "PULITZER REUTERS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: USA-PULITZER/
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/WUHAN-AFTER
RTS38JOS
April 09, 2020
Tentative signs of normal life are returning to Wuhan, the Chinese city where the coronavirus epidemic...
Wuhan, China
The Wider Image: Before and After: life is slowly reemerging in Wuhan
Tentative signs of normal life are returning to Wuhan, the Chinese city where the coronavirus epidemic was first documented, after a 76-day lockdown that turned it into a virtual ghost town. Authorities in the city of 11 million on Wednesday lifted the draconian curbs they put in place in January, allowing residents to leave the city by car, rail and plane, taxis to resume operations and more non-essential businesses to re-open. Shoppers on Thursday streamed into Wuhan's main shopping belt, Chu River and Han Street, where international brands including Nike and Lego have stores and which was virtually deserted last month as the shops were shut. People also took advantage of warm weather to head to the banks of the freshwater East Lake, filling up its parking lots, while cars returned to the road leading to Wuhan's reopened Hankou Railway station. But traffic levels remained far below the close-to-gridlock levels that used to plague the city, as national government recommendations that people to refrain from going out unnecessarily remain in place. During the lockdown, public transport was shut down, roads were blocked and people ordered to stay at home to stay home to try and stem the spread of the coronavirus. Even so, more than 50,000 people became infected in Wuhan, and more than 2,500 of them died, about 80% of all fatalities in China, according to official figures. The tough restrictions are credited with helping to bring about a sharp drop in the numbers of locally transmitted cases in Wuhan and China at a time when the virus has evolved into a global pandemic. REUTERS/Aly Song SEARCH "WUHAN REEMERGING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/WUHAN-AFTER
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/TUNISIA
RTS36VO4
March 22, 2020
General view of Tunisian theater closed in downtown Tunis, virtually deserted on the first day of a general...
Tunis, Tunisia
General view of Tunisian theater closed in downtown Tunis, virtually deserted on the first day of a general...
General view of Tunisian theater closed in downtown Tunis, virtually deserted on the first day of a general lockdown to stop the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) ordered by Tunisia's president last Friday, in Tunis, Tunisia, March 22, 2020. REUTERS / Zoubeir Souissi
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/TUNISIA
RTS36VNA
March 22, 2020
A general view of Habib Bourguiba Avenue in downtown Tunis, virtually deserted on the first day of a...
Tunis, Tunisia
A general view of Habib Bourguiba Avenue in downtown Tunis, virtually deserted on the first day of a...
A general view of Habib Bourguiba Avenue in downtown Tunis, virtually deserted on the first day of a general lockdown to stop the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) ordered by Tunisia's president last Friday, in Tunis, Tunisia, March 22, 2020. REUTERS / Zoubeir Souissi
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/TUNISIA
RTS36VN9
March 22, 2020
A general view of Habib Bourguiba Avenue in downtown Tunis, virtually deserted on the first day of a...
Tunis, Tunisia
A general view of Habib Bourguiba Avenue in downtown Tunis, virtually deserted on the first day of a...
A general view of Habib Bourguiba Avenue in downtown Tunis, virtually deserted on the first day of a general lockdown to stop the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) ordered by Tunisia's president last Friday, in Tunis, Tunisia, March 22, 2020. REUTERS / Zoubeir Souissi
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/TUNISIA
RTS36VN7
March 22, 2020
General view of empty streets in downtown Tunis, virtually deserted on the first day of a general lockdown...
Tunis, Tunisia
General view of empty streets in downtown Tunis, virtually deserted on the first day of a general lockdown...
General view of empty streets in downtown Tunis, virtually deserted on the first day of a general lockdown to stop the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) ordered by Tunisia's president last Friday, in Tunis, Tunisia, March 22, 2020. REUTERS / Zoubeir Souissi
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/TUNISIA
RTS36VN6
March 22, 2020
A general view of Habib Bourguiba Avenue in downtown Tunis, virtually deserted on the first day of a...
Tunis, Tunisia
A general view of Habib Bourguiba Avenue in downtown Tunis, virtually deserted on the first day of a...
A general view of Habib Bourguiba Avenue in downtown Tunis, virtually deserted on the first day of a general lockdown to stop the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) ordered by Tunisia's president last Friday, in Tunis, Tunisia, March 22, 2020. REUTERS / Zoubeir Souissi
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/TUNISIA
RTS36VN5
March 22, 2020
A general view of Habib Bourguiba Avenue in downtown Tunis, virtually deserted on the first day of a...
Tunis, Tunisia
A general view of Habib Bourguiba Avenue in downtown Tunis, virtually deserted on the first day of a...
A general view of Habib Bourguiba Avenue in downtown Tunis, virtually deserted on the first day of a general lockdown to stop the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) ordered by Tunisia's president last Friday, in Tunis, Tunisia, March 22, 2020. REUTERS / Zoubeir Souissi
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/TUNISIA
RTS36VN4
March 22, 2020
A general view of Habib Bourguiba Avenue in downtown Tunis, virtually deserted on the first day of a...
Tunis, Tunisia
A general view of Habib Bourguiba Avenue in downtown Tunis, virtually deserted on the first day of a...
A general view of Habib Bourguiba Avenue in downtown Tunis, virtually deserted on the first day of a general lockdown to stop the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) ordered by Tunisia's president last Friday, in Tunis, Tunisia, March 22, 2020. REUTERS / Zoubeir Souissi
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/TUNISIA
RTS36VN3
March 22, 2020
A general view of Habib Bourguiba Avenue in downtown Tunis, virtually deserted on the first day of a...
Tunis, Tunisia
A general view of Habib Bourguiba Avenue in downtown Tunis, virtually deserted on the first day of a...
A general view of Habib Bourguiba Avenue in downtown Tunis, virtually deserted on the first day of a general lockdown to stop the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) ordered by Tunisia's president last Friday, in Tunis, Tunisia, March 22, 2020. REUTERS / Zoubeir Souissi
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/FLORIDA
RTS36O3V
March 19, 2020
Tourist and locals enjoy their last day on the beach as Miami-Dade County restricts access to public...
Miami, UNITED STATES
Tourist and locals enjoy their last day on the beach as Miami-Dade County restricts access to public...
Tourist and locals enjoy their last day on the beach as Miami-Dade County restricts access to public beaches in order to prevent the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Miami, Florida, U.S. March 19, 2020. REUTERS/Maria Alejandra Cardona??
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SPAIN-FRANCE
RTS36EJV
March 17, 2020
A border police officer wears a protective face mask at the last toll gate entering Spain from France,...
LA JONQUERA, Spain
Controls at the Spanish-French border in La Jonquera
A border police officer wears a protective face mask at the last toll gate entering Spain from France, following an order from the Spanish government to set up controls at its land borders over coronavirus, in La Jonquera, Spain March 17, 2020. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SPAIN-FRANCE
RTS36E9A
March 17, 2020
A border police officer wears a protective face mask at the last toll gate entering Spain from France,...
LA JONQUERA, Spain
Controls at the Spanish-French border in La Jonquera
A border police officer wears a protective face mask at the last toll gate entering Spain from France, following an order from the Spanish government to set up controls at its land borders over coronavirus, in La Jonquera, Spain March 17, 2020. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SPAIN-FRANCE
RTS36DYJ
March 17, 2020
A border police officer wearing a protective face mask is reflected in a car window at the last toll...
LA JONQUERA, Spain
Controls at the Spanish-French border in La Jonquera
A border police officer wearing a protective face mask is reflected in a car window at the last toll gate entering Spain from France, following an order from the Spanish government to set up controls at its land borders over coronavirus, in La Jonquera, Spain March 17, 2020. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SPAIN-FRANCE
RTS36DKX
March 17, 2020
A border police officer checks a vehicle at the last toll gate entering Spain from France, following...
LA JONQUERA, Spain
Controls at the Spanish-French border in La Jonquera
A border police officer checks a vehicle at the last toll gate entering Spain from France, following an order from the Spanish government to set up controls at its land borders over coronavirus, in La Jonquera, Spain March 17, 2020. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SPAIN-FRANCE
RTS36DDG
March 17, 2020
A border police officer checks a vehicle at the last toll gate entering Spain from France, following...
LA JONQUERA, Spain
Controls at the Spanish-French border in La Jonquera
A border police officer checks a vehicle at the last toll gate entering Spain from France, following an order from the Spanish government to set up controls at its land borders over coronavirus, in La Jonquera, Spain March 17, 2020. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SPAIN-FRANCE
RTS36DB1
March 17, 2020
A border police officer checks vehicles at the last toll gate entering Spain from France, following an...
LA JONQUERA, Spain
Controls at the Spanish-French border in La Jonquera
A border police officer checks vehicles at the last toll gate entering Spain from France, following an order from the Spanish government to set up controls at its land borders over coronavirus, in La Jonquera, Spain March 17, 2020. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SPAIN-FRANCE
RTS36DAZ
March 17, 2020
A border police officer gestures as they check vehicles at the last toll gate entering Spain from France,...
LA JONQUERA, Spain
Controls at the Spanish-French border in La Jonquera
A border police officer gestures as they check vehicles at the last toll gate entering Spain from France, following an order from the Spanish government to set up controls at its land borders over coronavirus, in La Jonquera, Spain March 17, 2020. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SPAIN-FRANCE
RTS36DAJ
March 17, 2020
Border police officers wait to check vehicles at the last toll gate entering Spain from France, following...
LA JONQUERA, Spain
Controls at the Spanish-French border in La Jonquera
Border police officers wait to check vehicles at the last toll gate entering Spain from France, following an order from the Spanish government to set up controls at its land borders over coronavirus, in La Jonquera, Spain March 17, 2020. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SPAIN-FRANCE
RTS36D8Z
March 17, 2020
A member of the media talks with a driver as border police officers check vehicles at the last toll gate...
LA JONQUERA, Spain
Controls at the Spanish-French border in La Jonquera
A member of the media talks with a driver as border police officers check vehicles at the last toll gate entering Spain from France, following an order from the Spanish government to set up controls at its land borders over coronavirus, in La Jonquera, Spain March 17, 2020. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SPAIN-FRANCE
RTS36D6C
March 17, 2020
Border police officers wait to check vehicles at the last toll gate entering Spain from France, following...
LA JONQUERA, Spain
Controls at the Spanish-French border in La Jonquera
Border police officers wait to check vehicles at the last toll gate entering Spain from France, following an order from the Spanish government to set up controls at its land borders over coronavirus, in La Jonquera, Spain March 17, 2020. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SPAIN-FRANCE
RTS36D5V
March 17, 2020
Border police officers wait to check vehicles at the last toll gate entering Spain from France, following...
LA JONQUERA, Spain
Controls at the Spanish-French border in La Jonquera
Border police officers wait to check vehicles at the last toll gate entering Spain from France, following an order from the Spanish government to set up controls at its land borders over coronavirus, in La Jonquera, Spain March 17, 2020. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SPAIN-FRANCE
RTS36D5P
March 17, 2020
Border police officer checks vehicles at the last toll gate entering Spain from France, following an...
LA JONQUERA, Spain
Controls at the Spanish-French border in La Jonquera
Border police officer checks vehicles at the last toll gate entering Spain from France, following an order from the Spanish government to set up controls at its land borders over coronavirus, in La Jonquera, Spain March 17, 2020. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SPAIN-FRANCE
RTS36CCD
March 17, 2020
Border police officers check vehicles at the last toll gate entering Spain from France, following an...
LA JONQUERA, Spain
Controls at the Spanish-French border in La Jonquera
Border police officers check vehicles at the last toll gate entering Spain from France, following an order from the Spanish government to set up controls at its land borders over coronavirus, in La Jonquera, Spain March 17, 2020. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SPAIN-FRANCE
RTS36CC2
March 17, 2020
A border police officer directs a car driver at the last toll gate entering Spain from France, following...
LA JONQUERA, Spain
Controls at the Spanish-French border in La Jonquera
A border police officer directs a car driver at the last toll gate entering Spain from France, following an order from the Spanish government to set up controls at its land borders over coronavirus, in La Jonquera, Spain March 17, 2020. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SPAIN-FRANCE
RTS36CBX
March 17, 2020
Border police officers check vehicles at the last toll gate entering Spain from France, following an...
LA JONQUERA, Spain
Controls at the Spanish-French border in La Jonquera
Border police officers check vehicles at the last toll gate entering Spain from France, following an order from the Spanish government to set up controls at its land borders over coronavirus, in La Jonquera, Spain March 17, 2020. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
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