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Search results for: Launceston-(City)

AUSTRALIA-WEATHER/AGRICULTURE
RTST7HF
November 25, 2016
A bird flies above a paddock that has been ploughed on a farm located on the outskirts of the Tasmanian...
Launceston, Australia
A bird flies above a paddock that has been ploughed on a farm located on the outskirts of the Tasmanian...
A bird flies above a paddock that has been ploughed on a farm located on the outskirts of the Tasmanian capital city of Launceston, Australia, November 17, 2016. Picture taken November 17, 2016. REUTERS/David Gray TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
COLUMN-RUSSELL/COMMODITIES-AUSTRALIA
RTST202
November 24, 2016
An old rusted tin sits on the site of the old Cleveland tin mine, which stopped operating 30 years ago...
Launceston, Australia
An old rusted tin sits on the site of the old Cleveland tin mine located in the northwest of Australia's...
An old rusted tin sits on the site of the old Cleveland tin mine, which stopped operating 30 years ago and as a result much of the prior infrastructure is overgrown by the surrounding temperate rainforest, located in the northwest of Australia's southern island state of Tasmania, November 17, 2016. Picture taken November 17, 2016. REUTERS/David Gray
COLUMN-RUSSELL/COMMODITIES-AUSTRALIA
RTST201
November 24, 2016
Robin "Shorty" Halfacre looks towards the area containing the old Cleveland tin mine, which stopped operating...
Launceston, Australia
Halfacre looks towards the area containing the old Cleveland tin mine located in the northwest of Australia's...
Robin "Shorty" Halfacre looks towards the area containing the old Cleveland tin mine, which stopped operating 30 years ago and as a result much of the prior infrastructure is overgrown by the surrounding temperate rainforest, located in the northwest of Australia's southern island state of Tasmania, November 17, 2016. Picture taken November 17, 2016. REUTERS/David Gray
COLUMN-RUSSELL/COMMODITIES-AUSTRALIA
RTST200
November 24, 2016
Robin "Shorty" Halfacre walks along a creek near the site of the old Cleveland tin mine, which stopped...
Launceston, Australia
Halfacre walks along a creek near the site of the old Cleveland tin mine located in the northwest of...
Robin "Shorty" Halfacre walks along a creek near the site of the old Cleveland tin mine, which stopped operating 30 years ago and as a result much of the prior infrastructure is overgrown by the surrounding temperate rainforest, located in the northwest of Australia's southern island state of Tasmania, November 17, 2016. Picture taken November 17, 2016. REUTERS/David Gray
AUSTRALIA-WEATHER/AGRICULTURE
RTST1X4
November 24, 2016
A bird flies above a paddock that has been ploughed on a farm located on the outskirts of the Tasmanian...
Launceston, Australia
A bird flies above a paddock that has been ploughed on a farm located on the outskirts of the Tasmanian...
A bird flies above a paddock that has been ploughed on a farm located on the outskirts of the Tasmanian capital city of Launceston, Australia, November 17, 2016. Picture taken November 17, 2016. REUTERS/David Gray
AUSTRALIA-WEATHER/AGRICULTURE
RTST1X3
November 24, 2016
Dams filled with water can be seen on farmland near the town of Tomahawk, located northeast of the Tasmanian...
Launceston, Australia
Dams filled with water can be seen on farmland near the town of Tomahawk
Dams filled with water can be seen on farmland near the town of Tomahawk, located northeast of the Tasmanian city of Launceston in Australia, November 19, 2016. Picture taken November 19, 2016. REUTERS/David Gray
TECH-COMMUNICATIONS/LORA
RTSKXUK
August 03, 2016
Mike Cruse, CEO of Definium Technologies, poses with LoRa equipment he designed and built in his laboratory...
Launceston, Australia
Mike Cruse, CEO of Definium Technologies, poses with LoRa equipment he designed and built in his laboratory...
Mike Cruse, CEO of Definium Technologies, poses with LoRa equipment he designed and built in his laboratory in Launceston, Australia July 27, 2016. Picture taken July 27, 2016. REUTERS/Dean Yates
TECH-COMMUNICATIONS/LORA
RTSKXUI
August 03, 2016
Mike Cruse, CEO of Definium Technologies, poses with LoRa equipment he designed and built in his laboratory...
Launceston, Australia
Mike Cruse, CEO of Definium Technologies, poses with LoRa equipment he designed and built in his laboratory...
Mike Cruse, CEO of Definium Technologies, poses with LoRa equipment he designed and built in his laboratory in Launceston, Australia July 22, 2016. Picture taken July 22, 2016. REUTERS/Dean Yates TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
AUSTRALIA-GMO/NICHE
RTR3Z501
July 18, 2014
Distiller Dean Jackson (L) and co-worker Phil Fitzpatrick check the color of a batch of whiskey in the...
Launceston, Australia
Distiller Jackson and co-worker Fitzpatrick check the color of a batch of whiskey in the barrel storage...
Distiller Dean Jackson (L) and co-worker Phil Fitzpatrick check the color of a batch of whiskey in the barrel storage shed at Redlands Distillery, located on the outskirts of Hobart in Tasmania June 3, 2014. The rapidly growing whisky industry is one of a number of niche producers in Tasmania taking advantage of the export gold star afforded by the state's genetically modified organism free status. From a standing start just over two decades ago, there are now eight distilleries across the island, with one earlier this year, Sullivans Cove distillery, being named best single malt at the prestigious World Whisky Awards in London, a prize that has been dominated by Scottish and Japanese distilleries. Picture taken June 3, 2014. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS)
AUSTRALIA-GMO/NICHE
RTR3Z500
July 18, 2014
Nicky Noonan from Tasmanian Saffron Pty Ltd holds a saffron bulb on her farm located on the outskirts...
Launceston, Australia
Noonan from Tasmanian Saffron Pty Ltd holds a saffron bulb on her farm located on the outskirts of Hobart...
Nicky Noonan from Tasmanian Saffron Pty Ltd holds a saffron bulb on her farm located on the outskirts of Hobart in Tasmania June 3, 2014. Tasmanian Saffron Pty Ltd is building up a following in Asia for exports of the most expensive spice, gram by gram, in the world. Picture taken June 3, 2014. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS AGRICULTURE)
AUSTRALIA-GMO/NICHE
RTR3Z4ZX
July 18, 2014
Distiller Dean Jackson checks the color of a batch of whiskey in the barrel storage shed at Redlands...
Launceston, Australia
Distiller Jackson checks the color of a batch of whiskey in the barrel storage shed at Redlands Distillery,...
Distiller Dean Jackson checks the color of a batch of whiskey in the barrel storage shed at Redlands Distillery, located on the outskirts of Hobart in Tasmania June 3, 2014. The rapidly growing whisky industry is one of a number of niche producers in Tasmania taking advantage of the export gold star afforded by the state's genetically modified organism free status. From a standing start just over two decades ago, there are now eight distilleries across the island, with one earlier this year, Sullivans Cove distillery, being named best single malt at the prestigious World Whisky Awards in London, a prize that has been dominated by Scottish and Japanese distilleries. Picture taken June 3, 2014. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS)
AUSTRALIA-GMO/NICHE
RTR3Z4ZV
July 18, 2014
Distiller Dean Jackson checks the color of a batch of whiskey using the light from a window in the barrel...
Launceston, Australia
Distiller Jackson checks the color of a batch of whiskey using the light from a window in the barrel...
Distiller Dean Jackson checks the color of a batch of whiskey using the light from a window in the barrel storage shed at Redlands Distillery, located on the outskirts of Hobart in Tasmania June 3, 2014. The rapidly growing whisky industry is one of a number of niche producers in Tasmania taking advantage of the export gold star afforded by the state's genetically modified organism free status. From a standing start just over two decades ago, there are now eight distilleries across the island, with one earlier this year, Sullivans Cove distillery, being named best single malt at the prestigious World Whisky Awards in London, a prize that has been dominated by Scottish and Japanese distilleries. Picture taken June 3, 2014. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS)
AUSTRALIA-GMO/NICHE
RTR3Z4ZU
July 18, 2014
Distiller Dean Jackson (R) and co-worker Phil Fitzpatrick check the color of a batch of whiskey in the...
Launceston, Australia
Distiller Jackson and co-worker Fitzpatrick check the color of a batch of whiskey in the barrel storage...
Distiller Dean Jackson (R) and co-worker Phil Fitzpatrick check the color of a batch of whiskey in the barrel storage shed at Redlands Distillery, located on the outskirts of Hobart in Tasmania June 3, 2014. The rapidly growing whisky industry is one of a number of niche producers in Tasmania taking advantage of the export gold star afforded by the state's genetically modified organism free status. From a standing start just over two decades ago, there are now eight distilleries across the island, with one earlier this year, Sullivans Cove distillery, being named best single malt at the prestigious World Whisky Awards in London, a prize that has been dominated by Scottish and Japanese distilleries. Picture taken June 3, 2014. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS)
AUSTRALIA-GMO/NICHE
RTR3Z4ZT
July 18, 2014
Nicky Noonan from Tasmanian Saffron Pty Ltd walks through rows of saffron at sunset on her farm located...
Launceston, Australia
Noonan from Tasmanian Saffron Pty Ltd walks through rows of saffron at sunset on her farm located on...
Nicky Noonan from Tasmanian Saffron Pty Ltd walks through rows of saffron at sunset on her farm located on the outskirts of Hobart in Tasmania June 3, 2014. Tasmanian Saffron Pty Ltd is building up a following in Asia for exports of the most expensive spice, gram by gram, in the world. Picture taken June 3, 2014. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY AGRICULTURE)
AUSTRALIA-GMO/NICHE
RTR3Z4ZK
July 18, 2014
Distiller Dean Jackson checks the color of a batch of whiskey in the barrel storage shed at Redlands...
Launceston, Australia
Distiller Jackson checks the color of a batch of whiskey in the barrel storage shed at Redlands Distillery,...
Distiller Dean Jackson checks the color of a batch of whiskey in the barrel storage shed at Redlands Distillery, located on the outskirts of Hobart in Tasmania June 3, 2014. The rapidly growing whisky industry is one of a number of niche producers in Tasmania taking advantage of the export gold star afforded by the state's genetically modified organism free status. From a standing start just over two decades ago, there are now eight distilleries across the island, with one earlier this year, Sullivans Cove distillery, being named best single malt at the prestigious World Whisky Awards in London, a prize that has been dominated by Scottish and Japanese distilleries. Picture taken June 3, 2014. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS)
AUSTRALIA-GMO/NICHE
RTR3Z4ZI
July 18, 2014
Clouds can be seen above farmland in Tasmania's northwest on the outskirts of Launceston June 4, 2014....
Launceston, Australia
Clouds can be seen above farmland in Tasmania's northwest on the outskirts of Launceston
Clouds can be seen above farmland in Tasmania's northwest on the outskirts of Launceston June 4, 2014. Tasmania's presently holds the status as the only Australian state that bans genetically modified food crops and animal feed. Once a dumping ground for the British Empire's convicts, Tasmania's isolation, wilderness and low population of just over half a million people has meant that it is one of the cleanest places on earth. But with fewer and fewer places in the world that are free from genetically modified farming and the innovations it brings, the pristine environment is under threat. Picture taken June 4, 2014. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS AGRICULTURE)
AUSTRALIA-GMO/NICHE
RTR3Z4ZH
July 18, 2014
Rows of "Bobbie Bear", a lavender and wheat stuffed soft toy, sit on a table at the headquarters of Tasmania's...
Launceston, Australia
Rows of "Bobbie Bear", a lavender and wheat stuffed soft toy, sit on a table at the headquarters of Tasmania's...
Rows of "Bobbie Bear", a lavender and wheat stuffed soft toy, sit on a table at the headquarters of Tasmania's Bridestowe Lavender located near the town of Nabowla, on the outskirts of Launceston June 4, 2014. Half a dozen older ladies, all kitted out in lilac shirts, chat affably away as they rhythmically stuff and sew up the cuddly purple-coloured bears, cups of tea littering their workspace. It could easily be a women's club gathering anywhere in middle Australia, but these women are producing a teddy bear that has become a craze in China after actress and model Zhang Xinyu said it was her favourite bedtime companion. Bridestowe Lavender is one of a number of niche producers in Tasmania taking advantage of the export gold star afforded by the state's genetically modified organism free status. Picture taken June 4, 2014 REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS)
AUSTRALIA-GMO/NICHE
RTR3Z4ZG
July 18, 2014
Rows of lavender that are used to produce "Bobbie Bear", a lavender and wheat stuffed soft toy, are pictured...
Launceston, Australia
Rows of lavender that are used to produce "Bobbie Bear", a lavender and wheat stuffed soft toy, are pictured...
Rows of lavender that are used to produce "Bobbie Bear", a lavender and wheat stuffed soft toy, are pictured at the headquarters of Tasmania's Bridestowe Lavender located near the town of Nabowla, on the outskirts of Launceston June 4, 2014. Half a dozen older ladies, all kitted out in lilac shirts, chat affably away as they rhythmically stuff and sew up the cuddly purple-coloured bears, cups of tea littering their workspace. It could easily be a women's club gathering anywhere in middle Australia, but these women are producing a teddy bear that has become a craze in China after actress and model Zhang Xinyu said it was her favourite bedtime companion. Bridestowe Lavender is one of a number of niche producers in Tasmania taking advantage of the export gold star afforded by the state's genetically modified organism free status. Picture taken June 4, 2014. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS AGRICULTURE)
AUSTRALIA-GMO/NICHE
RTR3Z4ZE
July 18, 2014
A woman sews the back of a "Bobbie Bear", a lavender and wheat stuffed soft toy, at the headquarters...
Launceston, Australia
Woman sews back of "Bobbie Bear", a lavender and wheat stuffed soft toy, at the headquarters of Tasmania's...
A woman sews the back of a "Bobbie Bear", a lavender and wheat stuffed soft toy, at the headquarters of Tasmania's Bridestowe Lavender located near the town of Nabowla, on the outskirts of Launceston June 4, 2014. Half a dozen older ladies, all kitted out in lilac shirts, chat affably away as they rhythmically stuff and sew up the cuddly purple-coloured bears, cups of tea littering their workspace. It could easily be a women's club gathering anywhere in middle Australia, but these women are producing a teddy bear that has become a craze in China after actress and model Zhang Xinyu said it was her favourite bedtime companion. Bridestowe Lavender is one of a number of niche producers in Tasmania taking advantage of the export gold star afforded by the state's genetically modified organism free status. Picture taken June 4, 2014. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS)
AUSTRALIA-GMO/NICHE
RTR3Z4ZD
July 18, 2014
A woman uses a funnel to pour lavender into the back of a "Bobbie Bear", a lavender and wheat stuffed...
Launceston, Australia
Woman uses funnel to pour lavender into the back of a "Bobbie Bear", a lavender and wheat stuffed soft...
A woman uses a funnel to pour lavender into the back of a "Bobbie Bear", a lavender and wheat stuffed soft toy, at the headquarters of Tasmania's Bridestowe Lavender located near the town of Nabowla, on the outskirts of Launceston June 4, 2014. Half a dozen older ladies, all kitted out in lilac shirts, chat affably away as they rhythmically stuff and sew up the cuddly purple-coloured bears, cups of tea littering their workspace. It could easily be a women's club gathering anywhere in middle Australia, but these women are producing a teddy bear that has become a craze in China after actress and model Zhang Xinyu said it was her favourite bedtime companion. Bridestowe Lavender is one of a number of niche producers in Tasmania taking advantage of the export gold star afforded by the state's genetically modified organism free status. Picture taken June 4, 2014. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS)
AUSTRALIA-GMO/NICHE
RTR3Z4Z7
July 18, 2014
A woman uses a funnel to pour lavender into the back of a "Bobbie Bear", a lavender and wheat stuffed...
Launceston, Australia
Woman uses a funnel to pour lavender into back of "Bobbie Bear", a lavender and wheat stuffed soft toy,...
A woman uses a funnel to pour lavender into the back of a "Bobbie Bear", a lavender and wheat stuffed soft toy, at the headquarters of Tasmania's Bridestowe Lavender located near the town of Nabowla, on the outskirts of Launceston June 4, 2014. Half a dozen older ladies, all kitted out in lilac shirts, chat affably away as they rhythmically stuff and sew up the cuddly purple-coloured bears, cups of tea littering their workspace. It could easily be a women's club gathering anywhere in middle Australia, but these women are producing a teddy bear that has become a craze in China after actress and model Zhang Xinyu said it was her favourite bedtime companion. Bridestowe Lavender is one of a number of niche producers in Tasmania taking advantage of the export gold star afforded by the state's genetically modified organism free status. Picture taken June 4, 2014. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS)
AUSTRALIA-GMO/NICHE
RTR3Z4Z5
July 18, 2014
A woman sews the back of a "Bobbie Bear", a lavender and wheat stuffed soft toy, at the headquarters...
Launceston, Australia
Woman sews back of a "Bobbie Bear", a lavender and wheat stuffed soft toy, at the headquarters of Tasmania's...
A woman sews the back of a "Bobbie Bear", a lavender and wheat stuffed soft toy, at the headquarters of Tasmania's Bridestowe Lavender located near the town of Nabowla, on the outskirts of Launceston June 4, 2014. Half a dozen older ladies, all kitted out in lilac shirts, chat affably away as they rhythmically stuff and sew up the cuddly purple-coloured bears, cups of tea littering their workspace. It could easily be a women's club gathering anywhere in middle Australia, but these women are producing a teddy bear that has become a craze in China after actress and model Zhang Xinyu said it was her favourite bedtime companion. Bridestowe Lavender is one of a number of niche producers in Tasmania taking advantage of the export gold star afforded by the state's genetically modified organism free status. Picture taken June 4, 2014. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS)
AUSTRALIA-GMO/
RTR3Z4Y1
July 18, 2014
Black Angus bulls feed at Tasmania's largest cattle feedlot located at Powranna on the outskirts of Launceston...
Launceston, Australia
Black Angus bulls feed at Tasmania's largest cattle feedlot located at Powranna on the outskirts of Launceston...
Black Angus bulls feed at Tasmania's largest cattle feedlot located at Powranna on the outskirts of Launceston June 5, 2014. The feedlot, owned by Japan's Aeon Co Ltd, book an even higher premium thanks to Tasmania's status as the only Australian state that bans genetically modified food crops and animal feed. That moratorium has made Tasmania - an island the size of Ireland separated from Australia's mainland by 250 km (150 miles) of Bass Strait waters - a model of high-end, value-added agriculture production. Once a dumping ground for the British Empire's convicts, Tasmania's isolation, wilderness and low population of just over half a million people has meant that it is one of the cleanest places on earth. But with fewer and fewer places in the world that are free from genetically modified farming and the innovations it brings, the pristine environment is under threat. Picture taken June 5, 2014. To match FEATURE AUSTRALIA-GMO/ REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY ANIMALS BUSINESS)
AUSTRALIA-GMO/
RTR3Z4Y0
July 18, 2014
Black Angus bulls are pictured at Tasmania's largest cattle feedlot located at Powranna on the outskirts...
Launceston, Australia
Black Angus bulls are pictured at Tasmania's largest cattle feedlot located at Powranna on the outskirts...
Black Angus bulls are pictured at Tasmania's largest cattle feedlot located at Powranna on the outskirts of Launceston June 5, 2014. The feedlot, owned by Japan's Aeon Co Ltd, book an even higher premium thanks to Tasmania's status as the only Australian state that bans genetically modified food crops and animal feed. That moratorium has made Tasmania - an island the size of Ireland separated from Australia's mainland by 250 km (150 miles) of Bass Strait waters - a model of high-end, value-added agriculture production. Once a dumping ground for the British Empire's convicts, Tasmania's isolation, wilderness and low population of just over half a million people has meant that it is one of the cleanest places on earth. But with fewer and fewer places in the world that are free from genetically modified farming and the innovations it brings, the pristine environment is under threat. Picture taken June 5, 2014. To match FEATURE AUSTRALIA-GMO/ REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY ANIMALS BUSINESS)
AUSTRALIA-GMO/
RTR3Z4XZ
July 18, 2014
Black Angus bulls are pictured at Tasmania's largest cattle feedlot located at Powranna on the outskirts...
Launceston, Australia
Black Angus bulls are pictured at Tasmania's largest cattle feedlot located at Powranna on the outskirts...
Black Angus bulls are pictured at Tasmania's largest cattle feedlot located at Powranna on the outskirts of Launceston June 5, 2014. The feedlot, owned by Japan's Aeon Co Ltd, book an even higher premium thanks to Tasmania's status as the only Australian state that bans genetically modified food crops and animal feed. That moratorium has made Tasmania - an island the size of Ireland separated from Australia's mainland by 250 km (150 miles) of Bass Strait waters - a model of high-end, value-added agriculture production. Once a dumping ground for the British Empire's convicts, Tasmania's isolation, wilderness and low population of just over half a million people has meant that it is one of the cleanest places on earth. But with fewer and fewer places in the world that are free from genetically modified farming and the innovations it brings, the pristine environment is under threat. Picture taken June 5, 2014. To match FEATURE AUSTRALIA-GMO/ REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY ANIMALS BUSINESS)
AUSTRALIA-GMO/
RTR3Z4XY
July 18, 2014
Black Angus bulls are pictured eating at Tasmania's largest cattle feedlot located at Powranna on the...
Launceston, Australia
Black Angus bulls are pictured eating at Tasmania's largest cattle feedlot located at Powranna on the...
Black Angus bulls are pictured eating at Tasmania's largest cattle feedlot located at Powranna on the outskirts of Launceston June 5, 2014. The feedlot, owned by Japan's Aeon Co Ltd, book an even higher premium thanks to Tasmania's status as the only Australian state that bans genetically modified food crops and animal feed. That moratorium has made Tasmania - an island the size of Ireland separated from Australia's mainland by 250 km (150 miles) of Bass Strait waters - a model of high-end, value-added agriculture production. Once a dumping ground for the British Empire's convicts, Tasmania's isolation, wilderness and low population of just over half a million people has meant that it is one of the cleanest places on earth. But with fewer and fewer places in the world that are free from genetically modified farming and the innovations it brings, the pristine environment is under threat. Picture taken June 5, 2014. To match FEATURE AUSTRALIA-GMO/ REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY ANIMALS BUSINESS)
AUSTRALIA-GMO/
RTR3Z4XW
July 18, 2014
Black Angus bulls are pictured at Tasmania's largest cattle feedlot located at Powranna on the outskirts...
Launceston, Australia
Black Angus bulls are pictured at Tasmania's largest cattle feedlot located at Powranna on the outskirts...
Black Angus bulls are pictured at Tasmania's largest cattle feedlot located at Powranna on the outskirts of Launceston June 5, 2014. The feedlot, owned by Japan's Aeon Co Ltd, book an even higher premium thanks to Tasmania's status as the only Australian state that bans genetically modified food crops and animal feed. That moratorium has made Tasmania - an island the size of Ireland separated from Australia's mainland by 250 km (150 miles) of Bass Strait waters - a model of high-end, value-added agriculture production. Once a dumping ground for the British Empire's convicts, Tasmania's isolation, wilderness and low population of just over half a million people has meant that it is one of the cleanest places on earth. But with fewer and fewer places in the world that are free from genetically modified farming and the innovations it brings, the pristine environment is under threat. Picture taken June 5, 2014. To match FEATURE AUSTRALIA-GMO/ REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY ANIMALS BUSINESS)
AUSTRALIA-GMO/
RTR3Z4XV
July 18, 2014
Black Angus bulls are pictured at Tasmania's largest cattle feedlot located at Powranna on the outskirts...
Launceston, Australia
Black Angus bulls are pictured at Tasmania's largest cattle feedlot located at Powranna on the outskirts...
Black Angus bulls are pictured at Tasmania's largest cattle feedlot located at Powranna on the outskirts of Launceston June 5, 2014. The feedlot, owned by Japan's Aeon Co Ltd, book an even higher premium thanks to Tasmania's status as the only Australian state that bans genetically modified food crops and animal feed. That moratorium has made Tasmania - an island the size of Ireland separated from Australia's mainland by 250 km (150 miles) of Bass Strait waters - a model of high-end, value-added agriculture production. Once a dumping ground for the British Empire's convicts, Tasmania's isolation, wilderness and low population of just over half a million people has meant that it is one of the cleanest places on earth. But with fewer and fewer places in the world that are free from genetically modified farming and the innovations it brings, the pristine environment is under threat. Picture taken June 5, 2014. To match FEATURE AUSTRALIA-GMO/ REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY ANIMALS BUSINESS)
AUSTRALIA-GMO/
RTR3Z4XR
July 18, 2014
A worker stands next to a crushing machine in a warehouse at Tasmanian Alkaloids, a Johnson & Johnson...
Launceston, Australia
Worker stands next to crushing machine in warehouse at Tasmanian Alkaloids, in Tasmania's northwest on...
A worker stands next to a crushing machine in a warehouse at Tasmanian Alkaloids, a Johnson & Johnson subsidiary which processes around 80 percent of the world's thebaine poppies, the main ingredient in slow-release pain medication, located in Tasmania's northwest on the outskirts of Launceston June 4, 2014. Tasmania presently holds the status as the only Australian state that bans genetically modified food crops and animal feed. Once a dumping ground for the British Empire's convicts, Tasmania's isolation, wilderness and low population of just over half a million people has meant that it is one of the cleanest places on earth. But with fewer and fewer places in the world that are free from genetically modified farming and the innovations it brings, the pristine environment is under threat. Picture taken June 4, 2014. To match FEATURE AUSTRALIA-GMO/ REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS)
AUSTRALIA-GMO/
RTR3Z4XQ
July 18, 2014
Dried poppies can be seen at the Tasmanian Alkaloids factory, a Johnson & Johnson subsidiary which processes...
Launceston, Australia
Dried poppies can be seen at the Tasmanian Alkaloids factory, a Johnson & Johnson subsidiary which processes...
Dried poppies can be seen at the Tasmanian Alkaloids factory, a Johnson & Johnson subsidiary which processes around 80 percent of the world's thebaine poppies, the main ingredient in slow-release pain medication, located in Tasmania's northwest on the outskirts of Launceston June 4, 2014. Tasmania's presently holds the status as the only Australian state that bans genetically modified food crops and animal feed. Once a dumping ground for the British Empire's convicts, Tasmania's isolation, wilderness and low population of just over half a million people has meant that it is one of the cleanest places on earth. But with fewer and fewer places in the world that are free from genetically modified farming and the innovations it brings, the pristine environment is under threat. Picture taken June 4, 2014. To match FEATURE AUSTRALIA-GMO/ REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS)
AUSTRALIA-GMO/
RTR3Z4XL
July 18, 2014
A stretch of coastline can be seen on Tasmania's northwest on the outskirts of Launceston June 4, 2014....
Launceston, Australia
A stretch of coastline can be seen on Tasmania's northwest on the outskirts of Launceston
A stretch of coastline can be seen on Tasmania's northwest on the outskirts of Launceston June 4, 2014. Tasmania presently holds the status as the only Australian state that bans genetically modified food crops and animal feed. Once a dumping ground for the British Empire's convicts, Tasmania's isolation, wilderness and low population of just over half a million people has meant that it is one of the cleanest places on earth. But with fewer and fewer places in the world that are free from genetically modified farming and the innovations it brings, the pristine environment is under threat. Picture taken June 4, 2014. To match FEATURE AUSTRALIA-GMO/ REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS)
AUSTRALIA-GMO/
RTR3Z4XJ
July 18, 2014
A worker wears clothing bearing the emblem of Tasmanian Alkaloids, a Johnson & Johnson subsidiary, which...
Launceston, Australia
Worker wears clothing bearing the emblem of Tasmanian Alkaloids, in Tasmania's northwest on the outskirts...
A worker wears clothing bearing the emblem of Tasmanian Alkaloids, a Johnson & Johnson subsidiary, which processes around 80 percent of the world's thebaine poppies, the main ingredient in slow-release pain medication, in Tasmania's northwest on the outskirts of Launceston June 4, 2014. Tasmania presently holds the status as the only Australian state that bans genetically modified food crops and animal feed. Once a dumping ground for the British Empire's convicts, Tasmania's isolation, wilderness and low population of just over half a million people has meant that it is one of the cleanest places on earth. But with fewer and fewer places in the world that are free from genetically modified farming and the innovations it brings, the pristine environment is under threat. Picture taken June 4, 2014. To match FEATURE AUSTRALIA-GMO/ REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS LOGO)
AUSTRALIA-GMO/
RTR3Z4XE
July 18, 2014
Clouds are pictured above farmland in Tasmania's northwest on the outskirts of Launceston June 4, 2014....
Launceston, Australia
Clouds are pictured above farmland in Tasmania's northwest on the outskirts of Launceston
Clouds are pictured above farmland in Tasmania's northwest on the outskirts of Launceston June 4, 2014. Tasmania presently holds the status as the only Australian state that bans genetically modified food crops and animal feed. Once a dumping ground for the British Empire's convicts, Tasmania's isolation, wilderness and low population of just over half a million people has meant that it is one of the cleanest places on earth. But with fewer and fewer places in the world that are free from genetically modified farming and the innovations it brings, the pristine environment is under threat. Picture taken June 4, 2014. To match FEATURE AUSTRALIA-GMO/ REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS)
SPORT RACING RACING BROCK
RTR1H3LX
September 08, 2006
Australia's Peter Brock (L) takes part in a race in near Launceston, Tasmania in this April 26, 2006...
Launceston, Australia
File photo of Australia's Peter Brock racing in Tasmania
Australia's Peter Brock (L) takes part in a race in near Launceston, Tasmania in this April 26, 2006 file photo. Brock, one of Australia's most famous motor racing drivers, was killed in a rallying accident on September 8, 2006, motoring officials said. REUTERS/Mark Horsburgh/Files
BRITAIN
RTR1EGA6
June 14, 2006
Britain's Prince Charles pulls a pint at the Plume of Feathers pub during a visit to Princetown in the...
Launceston, United Kingdom
Britain's Prince Charles pulls a pint at Plume of Feathers pub in Dartmoor
Britain's Prince Charles pulls a pint at the Plume of Feathers pub during a visit to Princetown in the centre of Dartmoor, southwest England June 14, 2006. REUTERS/Chris Ison/PA/WPA Pool (BRITAIN)
BRITAIN
RTR1EGA1
June 14, 2006
Britain's Prince Charles (R) enjoys a drink with the locals at the Plume of Feathers pub during a visit...
Launceston, United Kingdom
Britain's Prince Charles enjoys a drink with locals at Plume of Feathers pub in Dartmoor
Britain's Prince Charles (R) enjoys a drink with the locals at the Plume of Feathers pub during a visit to Princetown in the centre of Dartmoor, southwest England June 14, 2006. REUTERS/Chris Ison/PA/WPA Pool (BRITAIN)
BRITAIN
RTR1EG9W
June 14, 2006
Britain's Prince Charles samples a beer from the Ring 'O' Bells Brewery during a visit to Showcase Launceston...
Launceston, United Kingdom
Britain's Prince Charles samples beer from Ring 'O' Bells Brewery during visit to Launceston Castle in...
Britain's Prince Charles samples a beer from the Ring 'O' Bells Brewery during a visit to Showcase Launceston at Launceston Castle, Cornwall, southwest England, June 14, 2006. REUTERS/Chris Ison/PA/WPA Pool (BRITAIN)
SPORT RUGBY UNION WORLD
RTRQ6VA
October 30, 2003
NAMIBIA'S VAN VUUREN PASSES ALONG BACKLINE DURING MATCH AGAINST ROMANIA
IN RUGBY WORLD CUP MATCH IN...
Launceston
NAMIBIA'S VAN VUUREN PASSES ALONG BACKLINE DURING MATCH AGAINST ROMANIA
IN RUGBY WORLD CUP MATCH ......
NAMIBIA'S VAN VUUREN PASSES ALONG BACKLINE DURING MATCH AGAINST ROMANIA
IN RUGBY WORLD CUP MATCH IN LAUNCESTON.
SPORT RUGBY UNION WORLD
RTRQ6Q3
October 30, 2003
Namibia's Rudi van Vuuren shows his disappointment after losing to
Romania in their pool A match of...
Launceston
NAMIBIA'S VAN VUUREN DEJECTED AFTER LOSS TO ROMANIA IN RUGBY WORLD CUP
MATCH IN LAUNCESTON.
Namibia's Rudi van Vuuren shows his disappointment after losing to
Romania in their pool A match of the Rugby World Cup 2003 at York Park
in Launceston October 30, 2003. Romania won 37-7. REUTERS/Simon Baker

SB/CRB
SPORT RUGBY UNION WORLD
RTRQ6PW
October 30, 2003
Romania's Cristian Sauan (L) is hugged by Romeo Gontineac after scoring
a try as Namibia's Deon Mouter...
Launceston
ROMANIA'S SAUAN IS HUGGED AFTER SCORING TRY AGAINST NAMIBIA DURING
RUGBY WORLD CUP MATCH IN LAUNCESTON....
Romania's Cristian Sauan (L) is hugged by Romeo Gontineac after scoring
a try as Namibia's Deon Mouter (R) shows his disappointment during
their pool A match of the Rugby World Cup 2003 against Namibia at York
Park in Launceston October 30, 2003. Romania won 37-7. REUTERS/Simon
Baker

SB/CRB
SPORT RUGBY UNION WORLD
RTRQ6P7
October 30, 2003
Namibia's Du Preez Grobler is picked up in the tackle of Romania's
Ionut Tofan with help (from left)...
Launceston
NAMIBIA'S GROBLER IS PICKED UP IN THE TACKLE DURING RUGBY WORLD CUP
MATCH IN LAUNCESTON.
Namibia's Du Preez Grobler is picked up in the tackle of Romania's
Ionut Tofan with help (from left) Romeo Gontineac, Ovidiu Tonita and
George Chirac during their pool A match of the Rugby World Cup 2003
against Namibia at York Park in Launceston October 30, 2003.In support
is Namibia's Wolfie Duvenhage (R). Romania won 37-7. REUTERS/Simon
Baker

SB
SPORT RUGBY UNION WORLD
RTRQ6OV
October 30, 2003
Romania's Iulian Andrei and Ovidiu Tonita (R) run around York Park to
thank the fans for their support...
Launceston
ROMANIA'S ANDREI AND TONITA THANK FANS AFTER RUGBY WORLD CUP MATCH IN
LAUNCESTON.
Romania's Iulian Andrei and Ovidiu Tonita (R) run around York Park to
thank the fans for their support after their pool A match of the Rugby
World Cup 2003 against Namibia at York Park in Launceston October 30,
2003. Romania won 37-7. REUTERS/Simon Baker

SB/CRB
SPORT RUGBY UNION WORLD
RTRQ6ON
October 30, 2003
Namibia's Emile Wessels leaps over Romania's Marian Tudori (19) with
Cristian Petre (L) and Augustin...
Launceston
NAMIBIA'S WESSELS LEAPS OVER RUCK DURING RUGBY WORLD CUP MATCH IN
LAUNCESTON.
Namibia's Emile Wessels leaps over Romania's Marian Tudori (19) with
Cristian Petre (L) and Augustin Petricheri (2nd R) attempting the tackle
during their pool A match of the Rugby World Cup 2003 at York Park in
Launceston October 30, 2003. Looking on is Namibia's Corne Powell (R).
Romania won 37-7. REUTERS/Simon Baker PP03110005

SB
SPORT RUGBY UNION WORLD
RTRQ6OE
October 30, 2003
Romania's Ioan Teodorescu dives over to score with Namibia's Ronaldo
Pedro on his shoulders during their...
Launceston
ROMANIA'S TEODORESCU DIVES OVER TO SCORE DURING RUGBY WORLD CUP MATCH
IN LAUNCESTON.
Romania's Ioan Teodorescu dives over to score with Namibia's Ronaldo
Pedro on his shoulders during their pool A match of the Rugby World Cup
2003 at York Park in Launceston October 30, 2003. REUTERS/Simon Baker

SB/GB
SPORT RUGBY UNION WORLD
RTRQ6O5
October 30, 2003
Sisters Nicole (L) painted with Namibia colours and Kelcy Tudor with Romania
colours show their support...
Launceston, Australia
SISTERS SHOW PAINTED FACES BEFORE WORLD CUP MATCH BETWEEN ROMANIA
AND NAMIBIA IN LAUNCESTON.
Sisters Nicole (L) painted with Namibia colours and Kelcy Tudor with Romania
colours show their support for the teams in the pool A match of the Rugby
World Cup 2003 between Namibia and Romania at York Park in Launceston
October 30, 2003. REUTERS/Simon Baker PP03110005

SB/CRB
ROYALS
RTXJPLU
March 29, 2000
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II (L) smiles as she accepts flowers and gifts from flag waving children as...
Launceston, Australia
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II (L) smiles as she accepts flowers and gifts from flag waving children a.....
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II (L) smiles as she accepts flowers and gifts from flag waving children as she arrives at Launceston March 29. [A tomato was thrown towards Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip on Wednesday while they were on a walkabout in the Australian city of Launceston, witnesses said.]
ROYALS
RTXJNOJ
March 29, 2000
Britain's Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, (2nd L) points into the crowd in the direction of a thrown...
Launceston, Australia
Britain's Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, (2nd L) points into the crowd in the direction of a .....
Britain's Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, (2nd L) points into the crowd in the direction of a thrown tomato during a walk about as he arrives at Launceston March 29.
AUSTRALIA-QUEEN
RTR2OOQ
March 29, 2000
Britain's Queen Elizabeth (R) smiles as she accepts flowers from children as Prince Philip (C background),...
Launceston, Australia
QUEEN ELIZABETH AND DUKE WALK THROUGH WELL-WISHERS.
Britain's Queen Elizabeth (R) smiles as she accepts flowers from children as Prince Philip (C background), meets the crowds of well-wishers she at Launceston March 29. A tomato was thrown towards Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip on Wednesday while they were on a walkabout in the Australian city of Launceston, witnesses said.

RUS/DL
AUSTRALIA-QUEEN
RTR2OJH
March 29, 2000
Britain's Queen Elizabeth (L) smiles as she accepts flowers and gifts from flag waving children as she...
Launceston, Australia
QUEEN ELIZABETH WALKS THROUGH WELL-WISHERS.
Britain's Queen Elizabeth (L) smiles as she accepts flowers and gifts from flag waving children as she arrives at Launceston March 29. A tomato was thrown towards Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip on Wednesday while they were on a walkabout in the Australian city of Launceston, witnesses said.

RUS/DL
AUSTRALIA QUEEN
RTR2OJC
March 29, 2000
Britain's Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, (2nd L) points into the crowd in the direction of a thrown...
Launceston, Australia
THE DUKE OF EDINBURGH POINTS INTO THE CROWD.
Britain's Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, (2nd L) points into the crowd in the direction of a thrown tomato during a walk about as he arrives at Launceston March 29. Neither the the Duke or Queen Elizabeth were hit.

RUS/DL
AUSTRALIA-QUEEN
RTR2OJL
March 28, 2000
Britain's Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, sips from a glass of Boag beer as he visits the brewery...
Launceston, Australia
THE DUKE OF EDINBURGH SIPS SOME BOAG BEER.
Britain's Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, sips from a glass of Boag beer as he visits the brewery in Launceston March 29. Earliar a tomato was thrown towards Britain's Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip on Wednesday while they were on a walkabout in the Australian city of Launceston, witnesses said.

RUS/DL
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