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Search results for: Libya-uprising

PEOPLE-BEHRAKIS/
RTX6PDQT
March 02, 2019
FILE PHOTO: Civilians and rebels celebrate following Friday prayers in central Ajdabiyah, Libya, April...
Ajdabiyah, Libya
Yannis Behrakis, award-winning Reuters photographer, dies aged 58
FILE PHOTO: Civilians and rebels celebrate following Friday prayers in central Ajdabiyah, Libya, April 29, 2011. Some 2,000 people turned up for weekly Muslim prayers in Ajdabiyah's main square, including many residents who had fled after the uprising against Gaddafi began on Feb. 17. REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis/File photo SEARCH "YANNIS BEHRAKIS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
LIBYA-SECURITY/
RTS1J6DH
November 09, 2017
A plaque shows pictures of people who were killed during the 2011 uprising and afterwards, in the city...
BANI WALID, Libya
A plaque shows pictures of people who were killed during the 2011 uprising and afterwards, in the city...
A plaque shows pictures of people who were killed during the 2011 uprising and afterwards, in the city of Bani Walid, Libya October 29, 2017. Picture taken October 29, 2017. REUTERS/Ulf Laessing
LIBYA-SECURITY/
RTSJB4K
July 23, 2016
"When everyone shouts 'Allahu Akbar' (God is Great) I know that a tank or a cannon will fire." So says...
Sirte, Libya
A Picture and Its Story: Sirte: A battle against Islamic State fighters
"When everyone shouts 'Allahu Akbar' (God is Great) I know that a tank or a cannon will fire." So says Reuters photographer Goran Tomasevic, who has been travelling to Libya since the 2011 revolution, seeking to capture the pain and politics of a country at war with itself. Since early May, Libyan fighters have been waging a stop-start battle to recapture Sirte from Islamic State. After advancing rapidly to the edge of the town, for the past few weeks they have been struggling to break down the resistance of militants encircled in the city centre. The force is mainly composed of brigades from Misrata, a port city about 250 km (155 miles) north west of Sirte. Misrata gained fighting experience and power from its prominent role in the 2011 uprising against Muammar Gaddafi. "I am constantly following the Libya story and I am in touch with few friends in Misrata since 2011 - they keep me updated," Tomasevic says. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic SEARCH "GORAN LIBYA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOPG
May 24, 2016
Men play soccer at a pitch in the town of Remada, Tunisia April 11, 2016. Tunisia's 2011 uprising created...
REMADA, Tunisia
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge
Men play soccer at a pitch in the town of Remada, Tunisia April 11, 2016. Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile ground for jihadist recruiters. Hundreds of Islamist militants were freed from prison as part of an amnesty for those detained under Ben Ali. Ultra-conservative salafists began to flex their muscle, seizing control of mosques and clashing with secularists. As Tunisia's politics have stabilised, the government has reasserted control, taking back mosques, banning the local al Qaeda affiliate Ansar al Sharia, and forcing many militants to flee. At first the jihadists mostly headed to Syria. But now Libya is more popular with them - many Tunisians have become key figures in Islamic State there. In all, officials estimate that between 4,000-6,000 Tunisians have left to fight for Islamic State and other groups, among them university graduates and professionals recruited online. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOP7
May 24, 2016
People inspect a burnt room inside their house, which was damaged by fighting between Islamic State jihadists...
BEN GUERDANE, Tunisia
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge
People inspect a burnt room inside their house, which was damaged by fighting between Islamic State jihadists and government forces in Ben Guerdane, near the Libyan border, Tunisia April 12, 2016. After a U.S. air strike killed a Tunisian jihadist commander in western Libya in late February, dozens of Islamic State fighters sneaked across the border into Tunisia and attacked an army barracks and police bases in the town of Ben Guerdane. In the battle that followed, Islamic State militants shot dead local Tunisian anti-terrorism chief Colonel Abdel Atti Abdelkabir metres from his home. Residents including the colonel's brother say they recognised some of the attackers as former neighbours and classmates who had left to train with Islamic State in Libya. In all, more than 50 militants died in the assault. The battle was further evidence of how Libya’s chaos has spilled over into its more stable neighbour. Tunisia, one of the most secular countries in the Arab world, is trying to nurture the nascent democracy that grew out of its 2011 uprising against Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali. But it also faces an intensifying battle against Islamist militants – not least Tunisian fighters now based just across the border. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOP5
May 24, 2016
A sign is seen at the edge of Remada, Tunisia April 11, 2016. Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile...
REMADA, Tunisia
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge
A sign is seen at the edge of Remada, Tunisia April 11, 2016. Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile ground for jihadist recruiters. Hundreds of Islamist militants were freed from prison as part of an amnesty for those detained under Ben Ali. Ultra-conservative salafists began to flex their muscle, seizing control of mosques and clashing with secularists. As Tunisia's politics have stabilised, the government has reasserted control, taking back mosques, banning the local al Qaeda affiliate Ansar al Sharia, and forcing many militants to flee. At first the jihadists mostly headed to Syria. But now Libya is more popular with them - many Tunisians have become key figures in Islamic State there. In all, officials estimate that between 4,000-6,000 Tunisians have left to fight for Islamic State and other groups, among them university graduates and professionals recruited online. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOP3
May 24, 2016
Yahya, father of Bechar Zongya, gestures during an interview with Reuters journalists in the town of...
REMADA, Tunisia
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge
Yahya, father of Bechar Zongya, gestures during an interview with Reuters journalists in the town of Remada, Tunisia April 11, 2016. Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile ground for jihadist recruiters. Hundreds of Islamist militants were freed from prison as part of an amnesty for those detained under Ben Ali. Ultra-conservative salafists began to flex their muscle, seizing control of mosques and clashing with secularists. As Tunisia's politics have stabilised, the government has reasserted control, taking back mosques, banning the local al Qaeda affiliate Ansar al Sharia, and forcing many militants to flee. At first the jihadists mostly headed to Syria. But now Libya is more popular with them - many Tunisians have become key figures in Islamic State there. In all, officials estimate that between 4,000-6,000 Tunisians have left to fight for Islamic State and other groups, among them university graduates and professionals recruited online. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOP0
May 24, 2016
A woman sits outside her house, which was damaged in fighting between Islamic State jihadists and government...
BEN GUERDANE, Tunisia
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge
A woman sits outside her house, which was damaged in fighting between Islamic State jihadists and government forces, in Ben Guerdane, near the Libyan border, Tunisia April 12, 2016. After a U.S. air strike killed a Tunisian jihadist commander in western Libya in late February, dozens of Islamic State fighters sneaked across the border into Tunisia and attacked an army barracks and police bases in the town of Ben Guerdane. In the battle that followed, Islamic State militants shot dead local Tunisian anti-terrorism chief Colonel Abdel Atti Abdelkabir metres from his home. Residents including the colonel's brother say they recognised some of the attackers as former neighbours and classmates who had left to train with Islamic State in Libya. In all, more than 50 militants died in the assault. The battle was further evidence of how Libya’s chaos has spilled over into its more stable neighbour. Tunisia, one of the most secular countries in the Arab world, is trying to nurture the nascent democracy that grew out of its 2011 uprising against Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali. But it also faces an intensifying battle against Islamist militants – not least Tunisian fighters now based just across the border. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOOW
May 24, 2016
A woman walks past a truck loaded with containers in the town of Remada, Tunisia April 11, 2016. Tunisia's...
REMADA, Tunisia
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge
A woman walks past a truck loaded with containers in the town of Remada, Tunisia April 11, 2016. Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile ground for jihadist recruiters. Hundreds of Islamist militants were freed from prison as part of an amnesty for those detained under Ben Ali. Ultra-conservative salafists began to flex their muscle, seizing control of mosques and clashing with secularists. As Tunisia's politics have stabilised, the government has reasserted control, taking back mosques, banning the local al Qaeda affiliate Ansar al Sharia, and forcing many militants to flee. At first the jihadists mostly headed to Syria. But now Libya is more popular with them - many Tunisians have become key figures in Islamic State there. In all, officials estimate that between 4,000-6,000 Tunisians have left to fight for Islamic State and other groups, among them university graduates and professionals recruited online. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOOU
May 24, 2016
Yarusi Kadi, 21 (C), an unemployed graduate, smiles as he poses for a photograph with his grandmother...
REMADA, Tunisia
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge
Yarusi Kadi, 21 (C), an unemployed graduate, smiles as he poses for a photograph with his grandmother at his house in the town of Remada, Tunisia April 11, 2016. Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile ground for jihadist recruiters. Hundreds of Islamist militants were freed from prison as part of an amnesty for those detained under Ben Ali. Ultra-conservative salafists began to flex their muscle, seizing control of mosques and clashing with secularists. As Tunisia's politics have stabilised, the government has reasserted control, taking back mosques, banning the local al Qaeda affiliate Ansar al Sharia, and forcing many militants to flee. At first the jihadists mostly headed to Syria. But now Libya is more popular with them - many Tunisians have become key figures in Islamic State there. In all, officials estimate that between 4,000-6,000 Tunisians have left to fight for Islamic State and other groups, among them university graduates and professionals recruited online. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOOK
May 24, 2016
Photographs of Rahma (L), the wife of Noureddine Chouchane, a jihadist who was killed during a U.S strike...
Tunis, Tunisia
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge
Photographs of Rahma (L), the wife of Noureddine Chouchane, a jihadist who was killed during a U.S strike in Libya, and her sister Gofran (R), are seen in a newspaper in Tunis, Tunisia April 14, 2016. Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile ground for jihadist recruiters. Hundreds of Islamist militants were freed from prison as part of an amnesty for those detained under Ben Ali. Ultra-conservative salafists began to flex their muscle, seizing control of mosques and clashing with secularists. As Tunisia's politics have stabilised, the government has reasserted control, taking back mosques, banning the local al Qaeda affiliate Ansar al Sharia, and forcing many militants to flee. At first the jihadists mostly headed to Syria. But now Libya is more popular with them - many Tunisians have become key figures in Islamic State there. In all, officials estimate that between 4,000-6,000 Tunisians have left to fight for Islamic State and other groups, among them university graduates and professionals recruited online. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOOJ
May 24, 2016
Mohamed Slimi, whose son Tarak Slimi is suspected to have joined Islamic State in Libya, sits at his...
EL KEF, Tunisia
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge
Mohamed Slimi, whose son Tarak Slimi is suspected to have joined Islamic State in Libya, sits at his house in El Kef, Tunisia April 14, 2016. Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile ground for jihadist recruiters. Hundreds of Islamist militants were freed from prison as part of an amnesty for those detained under Ben Ali. Ultra-conservative salafists began to flex their muscle, seizing control of mosques and clashing with secularists. As Tunisia's politics have stabilised, the government has reasserted control, taking back mosques, banning the local al Qaeda affiliate Ansar al Sharia, and forcing many militants to flee. At first the jihadists mostly headed to Syria. But now Libya is more popular with them - many Tunisians have become key figures in Islamic State there. In all, officials estimate that between 4,000-6,000 Tunisians have left to fight for Islamic State and other groups, among them university graduates and professionals recruited online. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOOH
May 24, 2016
Fethiya Charni, weeps as she holds a photograph and the passport of her son Tarak Slimi, who is suspected...
EL KEF, Tunisia
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge
Fethiya Charni, weeps as she holds a photograph and the passport of her son Tarak Slimi, who is suspected to have joined Islamic State in Libya, at her house in El Kef, Tunisia April 14, 2016. Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile ground for jihadist recruiters. Hundreds of Islamist militants were freed from prison as part of an amnesty for those detained under Ben Ali. Ultra-conservative salafists began to flex their muscle, seizing control of mosques and clashing with secularists. As Tunisia's politics have stabilised, the government has reasserted control, taking back mosques, banning the local al Qaeda affiliate Ansar al Sharia, and forcing many militants to flee. At first the jihadists mostly headed to Syria. But now Libya is more popular with them - many Tunisians have become key figures in Islamic State there. In all, officials estimate that between 4,000-6,000 Tunisians have left to fight for Islamic State and other groups, among them university graduates and professionals recruited online. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOOE
May 24, 2016
Fethiya Charni holds a photograph and the passport of her son Tarak Slimi, who is suspected to have joined...
EL KEF, Tunisia
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge
Fethiya Charni holds a photograph and the passport of her son Tarak Slimi, who is suspected to have joined Islamic State in Libya, at her house in El Kef, Tunisia April 14, 2016. Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile ground for jihadist recruiters. Hundreds of Islamist militants were freed from prison as part of an amnesty for those detained under Ben Ali. Ultra-conservative salafists began to flex their muscle, seizing control of mosques and clashing with secularists. As Tunisia's politics have stabilised, the government has reasserted control, taking back mosques, banning the local al Qaeda affiliate Ansar al Sharia, and forcing many militants to flee. At first the jihadists mostly headed to Syria. But now Libya is more popular with them - many Tunisians have become key figures in Islamic State there. In all, officials estimate that between 4,000-6,000 Tunisians have left to fight for Islamic State and other groups, among them university graduates and professionals recruited online. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOOC
May 24, 2016
A man who's brother,Tarak Slimi, is suspected to have joined Islamic State in Libya, shows how the family...
EL KEF, Tunisia
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge
A man who's brother,Tarak Slimi, is suspected to have joined Islamic State in Libya, shows how the family managed to board up a door after it was damaged during a police raid in El Kef, Tunisia April 14, 2016. Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile ground for jihadist recruiters. Hundreds of Islamist militants were freed from prison as part of an amnesty for those detained under Ben Ali. Ultra-conservative salafists began to flex their muscle, seizing control of mosques and clashing with secularists. As Tunisia's politics have stabilised, the government has reasserted control, taking back mosques, banning the local al Qaeda affiliate Ansar al Sharia, and forcing many militants to flee. At first the jihadists mostly headed to Syria. But now Libya is more popular with them - many Tunisians have become key figures in Islamic State there. In all, officials estimate that between 4,000-6,000 Tunisians have left to fight for Islamic State and other groups, among them university graduates and professionals recruited online. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOOB
May 24, 2016
People are seen at a Radio Web studio during training at a youth centre in Ben Guerdane, Tunisia April...
BEN GUERDANE, Tunisia
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge
People are seen at a Radio Web studio during training at a youth centre in Ben Guerdane, Tunisia April 12, 2016. After a U.S. air strike killed a Tunisian jihadist commander in western Libya in late February, dozens of Islamic State fighters sneaked across the border into Tunisia and attacked an army barracks and police bases in the town of Ben Guerdane. In the battle that followed, Islamic State militants shot dead local Tunisian anti-terrorism chief Colonel Abdel Atti Abdelkabir metres from his home. Residents including the colonel's brother say they recognised some of the attackers as former neighbours and classmates who had left to train with Islamic State in Libya. In all, more than 50 militants died in the assault. The battle was further evidence of how Libya’s chaos has spilled over into its more stable neighbour. Tunisia, one of the most secular countries in the Arab world, is trying to nurture the nascent democracy that grew out of its 2011 uprising against Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali. But it also faces an intensifying battle against Islamist militants – not least Tunisian fighters now based just across the border. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOO9
May 24, 2016
Hamid Ishi stands in his house, which was squatted by Islamic State jihadists and damaged during fighting...
BEN GUERDANE, Tunisia
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge
Hamid Ishi stands in his house, which was squatted by Islamic State jihadists and damaged during fighting with government forces, in Ben Guerdane, Tunisia April 10, 2016. After a U.S. air strike killed a Tunisian jihadist commander in western Libya in late February, dozens of Islamic State fighters sneaked across the border into Tunisia and attacked an army barracks and police bases in the town of Ben Guerdane. In the battle that followed, Islamic State militants shot dead local Tunisian anti-terrorism chief Colonel Abdel Atti Abdelkabir metres from his home. Residents including the colonel's brother say they recognised some of the attackers as former neighbours and classmates who had left to train with Islamic State in Libya. In all, more than 50 militants died in the assault. The battle was further evidence of how Libya’s chaos has spilled over into its more stable neighbour. Tunisia, one of the most secular countries in the Arab world, is trying to nurture the nascent democracy that grew out of its 2011 uprising against Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali. But it also faces an intensifying battle against Islamist militants – not least Tunisian fighters now based just across the border. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOO8
May 24, 2016
A municipal worker adds the finishing touches in Martyr's Square to a memorial to those recently killed...
BEN GUERDANE, Tunisia
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge
A municipal worker adds the finishing touches in Martyr's Square to a memorial to those recently killed by Islamic State's fighters in Ben Guerdane, near the Libyan border, Tunisia April 12, 2016. After a U.S. air strike killed a Tunisian jihadist commander in western Libya in late February, dozens of Islamic State fighters sneaked across the border into Tunisia and attacked an army barracks and police bases in the town of Ben Guerdane. In the battle that followed, Islamic State militants shot dead local Tunisian anti-terrorism chief Colonel Abdel Atti Abdelkabir metres from his home. Residents including the colonel's brother say they recognised some of the attackers as former neighbours and classmates who had left to train with Islamic State in Libya. In all, more than 50 militants died in the assault. The battle was further evidence of how Libya’s chaos has spilled over into its more stable neighbour. Tunisia, one of the most secular countries in the Arab world, is trying to nurture the nascent democracy that grew out of its 2011 uprising against Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali. But it also faces an intensifying battle against Islamist militants – not least Tunisian fighters now based just across the border. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOO6
May 24, 2016
The father and son of Abdel Atti Abdelkabir, a policeman who was killed by Islamic State jihadists, pose...
BEN GUERDANE, Tunisia
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge
The father and son of Abdel Atti Abdelkabir, a policeman who was killed by Islamic State jihadists, pose for a picture in Ben Guerdane, Tunisia April 10, 2016. After a U.S. air strike killed a Tunisian jihadist commander in western Libya in late February, dozens of Islamic State fighters sneaked across the border into Tunisia and attacked an army barracks and police bases in the town of Ben Guerdane. In the battle that followed, Islamic State militants shot dead local Tunisian anti-terrorism chief Colonel Abdel Atti Abdelkabir metres from his home. Residents including the colonel's brother say they recognised some of the attackers as former neighbours and classmates who had left to train with Islamic State in Libya. In all, more than 50 militants died in the assault. The battle was further evidence of how Libya’s chaos has spilled over into its more stable neighbour. Tunisia, one of the most secular countries in the Arab world, is trying to nurture the nascent democracy that grew out of its 2011 uprising against Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali. But it also faces an intensifying battle against Islamist militants – not least Tunisian fighters now based just across the border. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFONZ
May 24, 2016
A road sign shows the direction of Libya near the border crossing at Dhiba, Tunisia April 11, 2016. ...
DHIBA, Tunisia
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge
A road sign shows the direction of Libya near the border crossing at Dhiba, Tunisia April 11, 2016. Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile ground for jihadist recruiters. Hundreds of Islamist militants were freed from prison as part of an amnesty for those detained under Ben Ali. Ultra-conservative salafists began to flex their muscle, seizing control of mosques and clashing with secularists. As Tunisia's politics have stabilised, the government has reasserted control, taking back mosques, banning the local al Qaeda affiliate Ansar al Sharia, and forcing many militants to flee. At first the jihadists mostly headed to Syria. But now Libya is more popular with them - many Tunisians have become key figures in Islamic State there. In all, officials estimate that between 4,000-6,000 Tunisians have left to fight for Islamic State and other groups, among them university graduates and professionals recruited online. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFONY
May 24, 2016
A house which was damaged during fighting with government forces stands in Ben Guerdane, near the Libyan...
BEN GUERDANE, Tunisia
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge
A house which was damaged during fighting with government forces stands in Ben Guerdane, near the Libyan border, Tunisia April 10, 2016. After a U.S. air strike killed a Tunisian jihadist commander in western Libya in late February, dozens of Islamic State fighters sneaked across the border into Tunisia and attacked an army barracks and police bases in the town of Ben Guerdane. In the battle that followed, Islamic State militants shot dead local Tunisian anti-terrorism chief Colonel Abdel Atti Abdelkabir metres from his home. Residents including the colonel's brother say they recognised some of the attackers as former neighbours and classmates who had left to train with Islamic State in Libya. In all, more than 50 militants died in the assault. The battle was further evidence of how Libya’s chaos has spilled over into its more stable neighbour. Tunisia, one of the most secular countries in the Arab world, is trying to nurture the nascent democracy that grew out of its 2011 uprising against Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali. But it also faces an intensifying battle against Islamist militants – not least Tunisian fighters now based just across the border. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFONS
May 24, 2016
A Tunisian security forces tank is seen through a car window at Dhiba by the Tunisian and Libyan border...
DHIBA, Tunisia
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge
A Tunisian security forces tank is seen through a car window at Dhiba by the Tunisian and Libyan border crossing, Tunisia April 11, 2016. Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile ground for jihadist recruiters. Hundreds of Islamist militants were freed from prison as part of an amnesty for those detained under Ben Ali. Ultra-conservative salafists began to flex their muscle, seizing control of mosques and clashing with secularists. As Tunisia's politics have stabilised, the government has reasserted control, taking back mosques, banning the local al Qaeda affiliate Ansar al Sharia, and forcing many militants to flee. At first the jihadists mostly headed to Syria. But now Libya is more popular with them - many Tunisians have become key figures in Islamic State there. In all, officials estimate that between 4,000-6,000 Tunisians have left to fight for Islamic State and other groups, among them university graduates and professionals recruited online. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFONQ
May 24, 2016
People stand where their neighbour Abdel Atti Abdelkabir, a policeman, was killed by Islamic State jihadists...
BEN GUERDANE, Tunisia
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge
People stand where their neighbour Abdel Atti Abdelkabir, a policeman, was killed by Islamic State jihadists in Ben Guerdane, near the Libyan border, Tunisia April 10, 2016. After a U.S. air strike killed a Tunisian jihadist commander in western Libya in late February, dozens of Islamic State fighters sneaked across the border into Tunisia and attacked an army barracks and police bases in the town of Ben Guerdane. In the battle that followed, Islamic State militants shot dead local Tunisian anti-terrorism chief Colonel Abdel Atti Abdelkabir metres from his home. Residents including the colonel's brother say they recognised some of the attackers as former neighbours and classmates who had left to train with Islamic State in Libya. In all, more than 50 militants died in the assault. The battle was further evidence of how Libya’s chaos has spilled over into its more stable neighbour. Tunisia, one of the most secular countries in the Arab world, is trying to nurture the nascent democracy that grew out of its 2011 uprising against Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali. But it also faces an intensifying battle against Islamist militants – not least Tunisian fighters now based just across the border. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOND
May 24, 2016
Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile ground for jihadist recruiters. Hundreds of Islamist militants...
EL KEF, Tunisia
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge
Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile ground for jihadist recruiters. Hundreds of Islamist militants were freed from prison as part of an amnesty for those detained under Ben Ali. Ultra-conservative salafists began to flex their muscle, seizing control of mosques and clashing with secularists. As Tunisia's politics have stabilised, the government has reasserted control, taking back mosques, banning the local al Qaeda affiliate Ansar al Sharia, and forcing many militants to flee. At first the jihadists mostly headed to Syria. But now Libya is more popular with them - many Tunisians have become key figures in Islamic State there. In all, officials estimate that between 4,000-6,000 Tunisians have left to fight for Islamic State and other groups, among them university graduates and professionals recruited online. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY Matching text TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFONC
May 24, 2016
Household items lie on the ground at a house that was squatted by Islamic State jihadists and damaged...
BEN GUERDANE, Tunisia
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge
Household items lie on the ground at a house that was squatted by Islamic State jihadists and damaged during fighting with government forces in Ben Guerdane, near the Libyan border, Tunisia April 10, 2016. After a U.S. air strike killed a Tunisian jihadist commander in western Libya in late February, dozens of Islamic State fighters sneaked across the border into Tunisia and attacked an army barracks and police bases in the town of Ben Guerdane. In the battle that followed, Islamic State militants shot dead local Tunisian anti-terrorism chief Colonel Abdel Atti Abdelkabir metres from his home. Residents including the colonel's brother say they recognised some of the attackers as former neighbours and classmates who had left to train with Islamic State in Libya. In all, more than 50 militants died in the assault. The battle was further evidence of how Libya’s chaos has spilled over into its more stable neighbour. Tunisia, one of the most secular countries in the Arab world, is trying to nurture the nascent democracy that grew out of its 2011 uprising against Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali. But it also faces an intensifying battle against Islamist militants – not least Tunisian fighters now based just across the border. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFONA
May 24, 2016
A minaret, that was damaged during fighting between Islamic State jihadists and government forces, is...
BEN GUERDANE, Tunisia
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge
A minaret, that was damaged during fighting between Islamic State jihadists and government forces, is seen in Ben Guerdane, near the Libyan border, Tunisia April 10, 2016. After a U.S. air strike killed a Tunisian jihadist commander in western Libya in late February, dozens of Islamic State fighters sneaked across the border into Tunisia and attacked an army barracks and police bases in the town of Ben Guerdane. In the battle that followed, Islamic State militants shot dead local Tunisian anti-terrorism chief Colonel Abdel Atti Abdelkabir metres from his home. Residents including the colonel's brother say they recognised some of the attackers as former neighbours and classmates who had left to train with Islamic State in Libya. In all, more than 50 militants died in the assault. The battle was further evidence of how Libya’s chaos has spilled over into its more stable neighbour. Tunisia, one of the most secular countries in the Arab world, is trying to nurture the nascent democracy that grew out of its 2011 uprising against Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali. But it also faces an intensifying battle against Islamist militants – not least Tunisian fighters now based just across the border. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Anniversary
Anniversary
Libya Uprising 5th anniversary
40 PICTURES
ALGERIA-POLITICS/
RTS7SUZ
November 18, 2015
Women look at religious books at the 20th International Book Fair (SILA) in Algiers, Algeria, November...
Algiers, Algeria
Women look at religious books at the 20th International Book Fair (SILA) in Algiers
Women look at religious books at the 20th International Book Fair (SILA) in Algiers, Algeria, November 02, 2015. Organisers of an international book fair in Algeria last week confiscated more than 100 books on jihadism and the Arab Spring, highlighting sensitivities over regional turmoil in one of the few Arab countries to remain relatively unscathed. The fair drew tens of thousands of visitors to its stands, scores of foreign publishers and praise from officials for one of the country's top cultural events. But the seizure of the books showed that stability is a delicate issue in a country still emerging from a decade of war in the 1990s, and which watched uprisings topple other North African governments in Tunisia, Libya and Egypt four years ago. Picture taken November 02, 2015. REUTERS/Ramzi Boudina
ALGERIA-POLITICS/
RTS7SUV
November 18, 2015
A man looks at religious books at the 20th International Book Fair (SILA) in Algiers, Algeria, November...
Algiers, Algeria
A man looks at religious books at the 20th International Book Fair (SILA) in Algiers
A man looks at religious books at the 20th International Book Fair (SILA) in Algiers, Algeria, November 05, 2015. Organisers of an international book fair in Algeria last week confiscated more than 100 books on jihadism and the Arab Spring, highlighting sensitivities over regional turmoil in one of the few Arab countries to remain relatively unscathed. The fair drew tens of thousands of visitors to its stands, scores of foreign publishers and praise from officials for one of the country's top cultural events. But the seizure of the books showed that stability is a delicate issue in a country still emerging from a decade of war in the 1990s, and which watched uprisings topple other North African governments in Tunisia, Libya and Egypt four years ago. Picture taken November 05, 2015. REUTERS/Ramzi Boudina
ALGERIA-POLITICS/
RTS7SUU
November 18, 2015
People look at books at the 20th International Book Fair (SILA) in Algiers, Algeria, November 02, 2015....
Algiers, Algeria
People look at books at the 20th International Book Fair (SILA) in Algiers
People look at books at the 20th International Book Fair (SILA) in Algiers, Algeria, November 02, 2015. Organisers of an international book fair in Algeria last week confiscated more than 100 books on jihadism and the Arab Spring, highlighting sensitivities over regional turmoil in one of the few Arab countries to remain relatively unscathed. The fair drew tens of thousands of visitors to its stands, scores of foreign publishers and praise from officials for one of the country's top cultural events. But the seizure of the books showed that stability is a delicate issue in a country still emerging from a decade of war in the 1990s, and which watched uprisings topple other North African governments in Tunisia, Libya and Egypt four years ago. Picture taken November 02, 2015. REUTERS/Ramzi Boudina
ALGERIA-POLITICS/
RTS7SUQ
November 18, 2015
A man looks at religious books at the 20th International Book Fair (SILA) in Algiers, Algeria, November...
Algiers, Algeria
A man looks at religious books at the 20th International Book Fair (SILA) in Algiers
A man looks at religious books at the 20th International Book Fair (SILA) in Algiers, Algeria, November 02, 2015. Organisers of an international book fair in Algeria last week confiscated more than 100 books on jihadism and the Arab Spring, highlighting sensitivities over regional turmoil in one of the few Arab countries to remain relatively unscathed. The fair drew tens of thousands of visitors to its stands, scores of foreign publishers and praise from officials for one of the country's top cultural events. But the seizure of the books showed that stability is a delicate issue in a country still emerging from a decade of war in the 1990s, and which watched uprisings topple other North African governments in Tunisia, Libya and Egypt four years ago. Picture taken November 02, 2015. REUTERS/Ramzi Boudina
SINAI-SECURITY/EGYPT
RTX1EXEO
May 28, 2015
A man buys fuel for his motor bike in plastic bottles as residents suffer from fuel shortage, in Rafah,...
NORTHERN SINAI, Egypt
A man buys fuel for his motor bike in plastic bottles as residents suffer from fuel shortage, in Rafah...
A man buys fuel for his motor bike in plastic bottles as residents suffer from fuel shortage, in Rafah, northern Sinai, Egypt, May 25, 2015. Authorities in the Sinai Peninsula are battling insurgents who support Islamic State, the militant group that has seized parts of Iraq, Syria and Libya. The Sinai conflict, which has has displaced hundreds of Egyptians, is the biggest security challenge for President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, who has promised to deliver stability after four years of turmoil triggered by the 2011 uprising. Picture taken May 25, 2015. REUTERS/Asmaa Waguih
SINAI-SECURITY/EGYPT
RTX1EWZC
May 28, 2015
A family transports barrels of water, during a water shortage, on a main road in Sheikh Zuwayed city,...
NORTHERN SINAI, Egypt
A family transports barrels of water, during a water shortage, on a main road in Sheikh Zuwayed city
A family transports barrels of water, during a water shortage, on a main road in Sheikh Zuwayed city, northern Sinai, Egypt, May 24, 2015. Authorities in the Sinai Peninsula are battling insurgents who support Islamic State, the militant group that has seized parts of Iraq, Syria and Libya. The Sinai conflict, which has has displaced hundreds of Egyptians, is the biggest security challenge for President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, who has promised to deliver stability after four years of turmoil triggered by the 2011 uprising. Picture taken May 24, 2015. REUTERS/Asmaa Waguih
SINAI-SECURITY/EGYPT
RTX1EWUZ
May 28, 2015
A woman who was displaced from the border areas of northern Sinai is seen near shacks on the outskirts...
NORTHERN SINAI, Egypt
A woman who was displaced from the border areas of northern Sinai is seen near shacks on the outskirts...
A woman who was displaced from the border areas of northern Sinai is seen near shacks on the outskirts of Al-Arish city, Egypt, May 25, 2015. Authorities in the Sinai Peninsula are battling insurgents who support Islamic State, the militant group that has seized parts of Iraq, Syria and Libya. The Sinai conflict, which has has displaced hundreds of Egyptians, is the biggest security challenge for President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, who has promised to deliver stability after four years of turmoil triggered by the 2011 uprising. Picture taken May 25, 2015. REUTERS/Asmaa Waguih
SINAI-SECURITY/EGYPT
RTX1EWUI
May 28, 2015
Displaced families from the border areas on northern Sinai are seen near their shacks at the outskirts...
NORTHERN SINAI, Egypt
Displaced families from the border areas on northern Sinai are seen near their shacks at the outskirts...
Displaced families from the border areas on northern Sinai are seen near their shacks at the outskirts of Al-Arish city, northern Sinai, Egypt, May 25, 2015. Authorities in the Sinai Peninsula are battling insurgents who support Islamic State, the militant group that has seized parts of Iraq, Syria and Libya. The Sinai conflict, which has has displaced hundreds of Egyptians, is the biggest security challenge for President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, who has promised to deliver stability after four years of turmoil triggered by the 2011 uprising. Picture taken May 25, 2015. REUTERS/Asmaa Waguih
SINAI-SECURITY/EGYPT
RTX1EWQV
May 28, 2015
Pickup trucks filled with personal belongings, leave the border areas in northern Sinai, where authorities...
NORTHERN SINAI, Egypt
Pickup trucks filled with personal belongings, leave the border areas in northern Sinai
Pickup trucks filled with personal belongings, leave the border areas in northern Sinai, where authorities are battling insurgents on the high way between Al-Arish and the border town of Rafah, Egypt, May 25, 2015. Authorities in the Sinai Peninsula are battling insurgents who support Islamic State, the militant group that has seized parts of Iraq, Syria and Libya. The Sinai conflict, which has has displaced hundreds of Egyptians, is the biggest security challenge for President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, who has promised to deliver stability after four years of turmoil triggered by the 2011 uprising. Picture taken May 25, 2015. REUTERS/Asmaa Waguih
SINAI-SECURITY/EGYPT
RTX1EWQL
May 28, 2015
A pickup truck, filled with a family's belongings, leaves the border area in northern Sinai, where authorities...
NORTHERN SINAI, Egypt
A pickup truck, filled with a family's belongings, leaves the border area in northern Sinai
A pickup truck, filled with a family's belongings, leaves the border area in northern Sinai, where authorities are battling insurgents on the high way between Al-Arish and the border town of Rafah, Egypt, May 25, 2015. Authorities in the Sinai Peninsula are battling insurgents who support Islamic State, the militant group that has seized parts of Iraq, Syria and Libya. The Sinai conflict, which has has displaced hundreds of Egyptians, is the biggest security challenge for President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, who has promised to deliver stability after four years of turmoil triggered by the 2011 uprising. Picture taken May 25, 2015. REUTERS/Asmaa Waguih
SINAI-SECURITY/EGYPT
RTX1EWLX
May 28, 2015
An Egyptian soldier inspects vehicles at a check point in northern Sinai, May 25, 2015. Authorities in...
NORTHERN SINAI, Egypt
An Egyptian soldier inspects vehicles at a check point in northern Sinai
An Egyptian soldier inspects vehicles at a check point in northern Sinai, May 25, 2015. Authorities in the Sinai Peninsula are battling insurgents who support Islamic State, the militant group that has seized parts of Iraq, Syria and Libya. The Sinai conflict, which has has displaced hundreds of Egyptians, is the biggest security challenge for President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, who has promised to deliver stability after four years of turmoil triggered by the 2011 uprising. Picture taken May 25, 2015. REUTERS/Asmaa Waguih
SINAI-SECURITY/EGYPT
RTX1EWLU
May 28, 2015
An Egyptian army tank is seen stationed outside a school taken over by soldiers in the Sinai Peninsula...
AL-ARISH, Egypt
An Egyptian army tank is seen stationed outside a school taken over by soldiers in the Sinai Peninsula...
An Egyptian army tank is seen stationed outside a school taken over by soldiers in the Sinai Peninsula between the northern Sinai cities of Al-Arish and Sheikh Zuwayed, May 25, 2015. Authorities in the Sinai Peninsula are battling insurgents who support Islamic State, the militant group that has seized parts of Iraq, Syria and Libya. The Sinai conflict, which has has displaced hundreds of Egyptians, is the biggest security challenge for President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, who has promised to deliver stability after four years of turmoil triggered by the 2011 uprising. Picture taken May 25, 2015. REUTERS/Asmaa Waguih
SINAI-SECURITY/EGYPT
RTX1EWLR
May 28, 2015
An Egyptian military vehicle is seen on the highway northern Sinai, May 25, 2015. Authorities in the...
AL-ARISH, Egypt
An Egyptian military vehicle is seen on the highway northern Sinai
An Egyptian military vehicle is seen on the highway northern Sinai, May 25, 2015. Authorities in the Sinai Peninsula are battling insurgents who support Islamic State, the militant group that has seized parts of Iraq, Syria and Libya. The Sinai conflict, which has has displaced hundreds of Egyptians, is the biggest security challenge for President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, who has promised to deliver stability after four years of turmoil triggered by the 2011 uprising. Picture taken May 25, 2015. REUTERS/Asmaa Waguih
SINAI-SECURITY/EGYPT
RTX1EWLO
May 28, 2015
A military helicopter conducts an aerial patrol above Sheikh Zuwayed city, northern Sinai, May 25, 2015....
Sheikh Zuwayed, Egypt
A military helicopter conducts an aerial patrol above Sheikh Zuwayed city
A military helicopter conducts an aerial patrol above Sheikh Zuwayed city, northern Sinai, May 25, 2015. Authorities in the Sinai Peninsula are battling insurgents who support Islamic State, the militant group that has seized parts of Iraq, Syria and Libya. The Sinai conflict, which has has displaced hundreds of Egyptians, is the biggest security challenge for President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, who has promised to deliver stability after four years of turmoil triggered by the 2011 uprising. Picture taken May 25, 2015. REUTERS/Asmaa Waguih
SINAI-SECURITY/EGYPT
RTX1EWLN
May 28, 2015
An army soldier is seen talking to locals at a check point between the northern Sinai cities of Al-Arish...
AL-ARISH, Egypt
An army soldier is seen talking to locals at a check point between the northern Sinai cities of Al-Arish...
An army soldier is seen talking to locals at a check point between the northern Sinai cities of Al-Arish and Sheikh Zuwayed, May 25, 2015. Authorities in the Sinai Peninsula are battling insurgents who support Islamic State, the militant group that has seized parts of Iraq, Syria and Libya. The Sinai conflict, which has has displaced hundreds of Egyptians, is the biggest security challenge for President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, who has promised to deliver stability after four years of turmoil triggered by the 2011 uprising. Picture taken May 25, 2015. REUTERS/Asmaa Waguih
LIBYA-SECURITY/
RTR4WF1J
April 07, 2015
A warplane belonging to Libyan pro-government forces is seen minutes before an explosion in an area under...
Benghazi, Libya
A warplane belonging to Libyan pro-government forces is seen minutes before an explosion in an area under...
A warplane belonging to Libyan pro-government forces is seen minutes before an explosion in an area under control by members of the Shura Council of Libyan Revolutionaries, an alliance of former anti-Gaddafi rebels who have joined forces with Islamist group Ansar al-Sharia, in Benghazi April 7, 2015. REUTERS/Esam Omran Al-Fetori
LIBYA-MIGRANTS/
RTR4UT8U
March 25, 2015
An illegal migrant bathes her son in an immigration holding centre located on the outskirts of Misrata...
MISRATA, Libya
An illegal migrant bathes her son in an immigration holding centre located on the outskirts of Misrata...
An illegal migrant bathes her son in an immigration holding centre located on the outskirts of Misrata March 11, 2015. Italy wants Egypt and Tunisia to play a role in rescuing stricken migrant vessels in the Mediterranean, a government planning paper showed, so that survivors could be taken back to African instead of European ports. Last April Italy rescued 4,000 migrants from boats trying to reach European shores in only 48 hours in a deepening immigration crisis that is being made worse by the turmoil in Libya, which has grappled with chaos and rampant militias since the ousting of Muammar Gaddafi in 2011. Picture taken March 11, 2015. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
LIBYA-SECURITY/
RTR4U0V5
March 19, 2015
A Libya Dawn fighter uses a monocoular to look at Islamic State (IS) militant positions near Sirte March...
Sirte, Libya
Libya Dawn fighter uses a monocoular to look at Islamic State (IS) militant positions near Sirte
A Libya Dawn fighter uses a monocoular to look at Islamic State (IS) militant positions near Sirte March 19, 2015. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
LIBYA-SECURITY/
RTR4U0QR
March 19, 2015
Libya Dawn fighters patrol with a vehicle near Sirte March 19, 2015. The Libya Dawn armed group that...
Sirte, Libya
Libya Dawn fighters patrol with a vehicle near Sirte
Libya Dawn fighters patrol with a vehicle near Sirte March 19, 2015. The Libya Dawn armed group that backs the self-declared government in the capital Tripoli. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
LIBYA-SECURITY/
RTR4TO51
March 17, 2015
A Libya Dawn fighter shoulders a rocket-propelled grenade (RPG) launcher at a checkpoint near Sirte March...
Sirte, Libya
Libya Dawn fighter shoulders a RPG launcher at a checkpoint near Sirte
A Libya Dawn fighter shoulders a rocket-propelled grenade (RPG) launcher at a checkpoint near Sirte March 17, 2015. The Libya Dawn armed group backs the self-declared government in the capital Tripoli. Islamic State has been exploiting the turmoil in Libya, where the internationally recognised government of Libyan Prime Minister Abdullah al-Thinni and the administration in Tripoli and their respective allies are fighting for power. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic (LIBYA - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS MILITARY)
LIBYA-SECURITY/
RTR4TLW1
March 16, 2015
A member of the Libyan pro-government forces, backed by the locals, holds a weapon during street clashes...
Benghazi, Libya
A member of the Libyan pro-government forces holds a weapon during street clashes with the Shura Council...
A member of the Libyan pro-government forces, backed by the locals, holds a weapon during street clashes with the Shura Council of Libyan Revolutionaries, an alliance of former anti-Gaddafi rebels who have joined forces with Islamist group Ansar al-Sharia, in Benghazi March 16, 2015. REUTERS/Esam Omran Al-Fetori (LIBYA - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS MILITARY CONFLICT)
LIBYA-SECURITY/
RTR4TLR9
March 16, 2015
A view of a wall damaged by shelling after clashes between members of the Libyan pro-government forces,...
Benghazi, Libya
A view of a wall damaged by shelling after clashes between members of the Libyan pro-government forces...
A view of a wall damaged by shelling after clashes between members of the Libyan pro-government forces, backed by the locals, and Shura Council of Libyan Revolutionaries, an alliance of former anti-Gaddafi rebels who have joined forces with Islamist group Ansar al-Sharia, in Benghazi March 16, 2015. REUTERS/Esam Omran Al-Fetori (LIBYA - Tags: CIVIL UNREST MILITARY POLITICS CONFLICT)
LIBYA-SECURITY/
RTR4TLQR
March 16, 2015
A member of the Libyan pro-government forces, backed by the locals, is seen through a hole during street...
Benghazi, Libya
A member of the Libyan pro-government forces is seen through a hole during street clashes with the Shura...
A member of the Libyan pro-government forces, backed by the locals, is seen through a hole during street clashes with the Shura Council of Libyan Revolutionaries, an alliance of former anti-Gaddafi rebels who have joined forces with Islamist group Ansar al-Sharia, in Benghazi March 16, 2015. REUTERS/Esam Omran Al-Fetori (LIBYA - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS MILITARY CONFLICT)
LIBYA-SECURITY/
RTR4TJRG
March 16, 2015
A fighter from Misrata sits on top of a vehicle near Sirte March 16, 2015. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic (LIBYA...
Sirte, Libya
Fighter from Misrata sits on top of a vehicle near Sirte
A fighter from Misrata sits on top of a vehicle near Sirte March 16, 2015. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic (LIBYA - Tags: CIVIL UNREST TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
LIBYA-SECURITY/
RTR4TFL6
March 15, 2015
A fighter from Misrata uses a cell phone near Sirte March 15, 2015. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic (LIBYA -...
Sirte, Libya
A fighter from Misrata uses a cell phone near Sirte
A fighter from Misrata uses a cell phone near Sirte March 15, 2015. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic (LIBYA - Tags: CIVIL UNREST)
TUNISIA-LIBYA/
RTR4SPY9
March 10, 2015
A seized arms cache is displayed at a National Guard post in Medenine March 9, 2015. Tunisian troops...
Medenine, Tunisia
A seized arms cache is displayed at a National Guard post in Medenine
A seized arms cache is displayed at a National Guard post in Medenine March 9, 2015. Tunisian troops have captured a second large arms cache near the border with Libya, including Kalashnikov rifles and rockets, a security source said on Monday. Tunisia is waging a campaign against hardline Islamist groups who emerged after a 2011 uprising against autocrat Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali that put the North African country on track to democracy. Picture taken March 9, 2015. REUTERS/Stringer (TUNISIA - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST MILITARY)
TUNISIA-LIBYA/
RTR4SPY8
March 10, 2015
A seized arms cache is displayed at a National Guard post in Medenine March 9, 2015. Tunisian troops...
Medenine, Tunisia
A seized arms cache is displayed at a National Guard post in Medenine
A seized arms cache is displayed at a National Guard post in Medenine March 9, 2015. Tunisian troops have captured a second large arms cache near the border with Libya, including Kalashnikov rifles and rockets, a security source said on Monday. Tunisia is waging a campaign against hardline Islamist groups who emerged after a 2011 uprising against autocrat Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali that put the North African country on track to democracy. Picture taken March 9, 2015. REUTERS/Stringer (TUNISIA - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST MILITARY)
TUNISIA-LIBYA/
RTR4SPY7
March 10, 2015
A seized arms cache is displayed at a National Guard post in Medenine March 9, 2015. Tunisian troops...
Medenine, Tunisia
A seized arms cache is displayed at a National Guard post in Medenine
A seized arms cache is displayed at a National Guard post in Medenine March 9, 2015. Tunisian troops have captured a second large arms cache near the border with Libya, including Kalashnikov rifles and rockets, a security source said on Monday. Tunisia is waging a campaign against hardline Islamist groups who emerged after a 2011 uprising against autocrat Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali that put the North African country on track to democracy. Picture taken March 9, 2015. REUTERS/Stringer (TUNISIA - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST MILITARY)
LIBYA-SECURITY/
RTR4SI4P
March 08, 2015
A fighter from Misrata's Marsa Kateeba walks in front of an unexploded aircraft missile, which the fighters...
SIDRE, Libya
A fighter from Misrata's Marsa Kateeba walks in front of unexploded aircraft missile, which fighters...
A fighter from Misrata's Marsa Kateeba walks in front of an unexploded aircraft missile, which the fighters say was fired by forces loyal to General Khalifa Haftar, near town of Sidre March 8, 2015. Kateeba is the Arabic word for unit. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic (LIBYA - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
News
News
Islamic State Beheads Coptic Christians - 18 Feb 2015
14 PICTURES
LIBYA-UPRISING/ANNIVERSARY
RTR4PZVU
February 17, 2015
Libyans celebrate the fourth anniversary of the revolution against Muammar Gaddafi at Martyrs' Square...
Tripoli, Libya
Libyans celebrate fourth anniversary of revolution against Muammar Gaddafi at Martyrs' Square in Tripoli...
Libyans celebrate the fourth anniversary of the revolution against Muammar Gaddafi at Martyrs' Square in Tripoli February 17, 2015. REUTERS/Hani Amara (LIBYA - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST ANNIVERSARY)
LIBYA-UPRISING/ANNIVERSARY/
RTR4PZV9
February 17, 2015
A Libyan woman holds a picture of a person who was killed during the revolution against Muammar Gaddafi...
Tripoli, Libya
A Libyan woman holds a picture of a person who was killed during the revolution against Muammar Gaddafi...
A Libyan woman holds a picture of a person who was killed during the revolution against Muammar Gaddafi during a celebration of the fourth anniversary of the revolution at Martyrs' Square in Tripoli, February 17, 2015. REUTERS/Hani Amara (LIBYA - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST ANNIVERSARY)
LIBYA-UPRISING/ANNIVERSARY
RTR4PZTD
February 17, 2015
Libyans celebrate the fourth anniversary of the revolution against Muammar Gaddafi at Martyrs' Square...
Tripoli, Libya
Libyans celebrate fourth anniversary of the revolution against Muammar Gaddafi at Martyrs' Square in...
Libyans celebrate the fourth anniversary of the revolution against Muammar Gaddafi at Martyrs' Square in Tripoli February 17, 2015. REUTERS/Hani Amara (LIBYA - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST ANNIVERSARY)
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