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SURINAME/
RTR3HI66
March 18, 2014
Surinamese men of mixed ethnic origins compete in the Indian folk sport called Makhan Chor (butter thief)...
Paramaribo, Suriname
Surinamese men of mixed ethnic origins compete in the Indian folk sport called Makhan Chor during the...
Surinamese men of mixed ethnic origins compete in the Indian folk sport called Makhan Chor (butter thief) during the Hindu Festival of Holi, known as the Festival of Colors, in Paramaribo, Suriname, March 17, 2014. Makhan Chor is played by forming a human pyramid with the lightest on top trying to grab a jar of butter hanging some 6 to 7 meters high. Makhan Chor is also one of the many names of the Hindu Lord Krishna who steals butter with his friends. REUTERS/Ranu Abhelakh (SURINAME - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY)
SURINAME/
RTR3HI63
March 18, 2014
Surinamese men of mixed ethnic origins compete in the Indian folk sport called Makhan Chor (butter thief)...
Paramaribo, Suriname
Surinamese men of mixed ethnic origins compete in the Indian folk sport called Makhan Chor during the...
Surinamese men of mixed ethnic origins compete in the Indian folk sport called Makhan Chor (butter thief) during the Hindu Festival of Holi, known as the Festival of Colors, in Paramaribo, Suriname, March 17, 2014. Makhan Chor is played by forming a human pyramid with the lightest on top trying to grab a jar of butter hanging some 6 to 7 meters high. Makhan Chor is also one of the many names of the Hindu Lord Krishna who steals butter with his friends. REUTERS/Ranu Abhelakh (SURINAME - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY)
LITHIUM/
RTXY9E9
November 07, 2013
A llama stands next to a cactus growing on Incahuasi Island above the Uyuni salt lake, which holds the...
Uyuni, Bolivia
A llama stands next to a cactus growing on Incahuasi Island above the Uyuni salt lake in southwestern...
A llama stands next to a cactus growing on Incahuasi Island above the Uyuni salt lake, which holds the world's largest reserve of lithium, located at 3,656 meters (11,995 ft) above sea level in southwestern Bolivia, November 7, 2012. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called 'lithium triangle' is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken November 7, 2012. REUTERS/David Mercado (BOLIVIA - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT ENERGY ANIMALS)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9EX
April 05, 2013
A view of a church in Peine, on the edge of the Atacama salt flat, in the Atacama desert of northern...
Peine, Chile
A view of a church in Peine, on the edge of the Atacama salt flat in northern Chile
A view of a church in Peine, on the edge of the Atacama salt flat, in the Atacama desert of northern Chile, January 9, 2013. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called "lithium triangle" is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken January 9, 2013. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado (CHILE - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY ENERGY)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9EW
April 05, 2013
An aerial view of the brine pools and processing areas of the Soquimich lithium mine on the Atacama salt...
ATACAMA, Chile
An aerial view of the Soquimich lithium mine on the Atacama salt flat in northern Chile
An aerial view of the brine pools and processing areas of the Soquimich lithium mine on the Atacama salt flat, the largest lithium deposit currently in production, in the Atacama desert of northern Chile, January 10, 2013. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called 'lithium triangle' is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken January 10, 2013. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado (CHILE - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT ENERGY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9EV
April 05, 2013
A view of the plant where Rockwood Lithium processes lithium carbonate from brine concentrate brought...
Antofagasta, Chile
A view of the plant where Rockwood Lithium processes lithium carbonate in Antofagasta
A view of the plant where Rockwood Lithium processes lithium carbonate from brine concentrate brought from the Atacama salt flat in Antofagasta, northern Chile, January 14, 2013. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called 'lithium triangle' is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken January 14, 2013. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado (CHILE - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9EU
April 05, 2013
Workers from the Rockwood Lithium mine play soccer during their time off in Peine, on the edge of the...
Peine, Chile
Workers from the Rockwood Lithium mine play soccer during their time off in Peine in northern Chile
Workers from the Rockwood Lithium mine play soccer during their time off in Peine, on the edge of the Atacama salt flat in the Atacama desert of northern Chile, January 12, 2013. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called "lithium triangle" is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken January 12, 2013. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado (CHILE - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT SPORT ENERGY)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9ET
April 05, 2013
A view of samples of lithium carbonate processed from the Rockwood Lithium mine on the Atacama salt flat,...
Antofagasta, Chile
A view of samples of lithium carbonate processed from the Rockwood Lithium mine on the Atacama salt flat...
A view of samples of lithium carbonate processed from the Rockwood Lithium mine on the Atacama salt flat, the largest lithium deposit currently in production, in Antofagasta, northern Chile, January 14, 2013. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called "lithium triangle" is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken January 14, 2013. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado (CHILE - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9ES
April 05, 2013
A worker for Rockwood Lithium walks among sacks of lithium carbonate produced from the Atacama salt flat,...
Antofagasta, Chile
A worker for Rockwood Lithium walks among sacks of lithium carbonate produced from the Atacama salt flat...
A worker for Rockwood Lithium walks among sacks of lithium carbonate produced from the Atacama salt flat, the largest lithium deposit currently in production, in Antofagasta, northern Chile, January 14, 2013. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called "lithium triangle" is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken January 14, 2013. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado (CHILE - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9ER
April 05, 2013
A worker walks up a conveyor belt carrying halite at the Rockwood Lithium plant on the Atacama salt flat,...
ATACAMA, Chile
A worker walks up a conveyor belt carrying halite at the Rockwood Lithium plant on the Atacama salt flat...
A worker walks up a conveyor belt carrying halite at the Rockwood Lithium plant on the Atacama salt flat, the largest lithium deposit currently in production, in the Atacama desert of northern Chile, January 7, 2013. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called "lithium triangle" is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado (CHILE - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9EQ
April 05, 2013
A worker protects his face from the sun as he inspects machinery at the Rockwood Lithium plant on the...
ATACAMA, Chile
A worker protects his face from the sun as he inspects machinery at the Rockwood Lithium plant on the...
A worker protects his face from the sun as he inspects machinery at the Rockwood Lithium plant on the Atacama salt flat, the largest lithium deposit currently in production, in the Atacama desert of northern Chile, January 8, 2013. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called 'lithium triangle' is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken January 8, 2013. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado (CHILE - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9EO
April 05, 2013
A worker walks in front of brine pools at the Rockwood Lithium plant on the Atacama salt flat, the largest...
ATACAMA, Chile
A worker walks in front of brine pools at the Rockwood Lithium plant on the Atacama salt flat in northern...
A worker walks in front of brine pools at the Rockwood Lithium plant on the Atacama salt flat, the largest lithium deposit currently in production, in the Atacama desert of northern Chile, January 8, 2013. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called "lithium triangle" is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken January 8, 2013. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado (CHILE - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9EN
April 05, 2013
A view of a brine pool and pumps at the Rockwood Lithium plant on the Atacama salt flat, the largest...
ATACAMA, Chile
A view of a brine pool at the Rockwood Lithium plant on the Atacama salt flat in northern Chile
A view of a brine pool and pumps at the Rockwood Lithium plant on the Atacama salt flat, the largest lithium deposit currently in production in the Atacama desert of northern Chile, January 7, 2013. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called "lithium triangle" is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken January 7, 2013. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado (CHILE - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9EM
April 05, 2013
A road leads to the brine pools that are part of the lithium pilot plant on the Uyuni salt lake, which...
Uyuni, Bolivia
A road leads to the brine pools that are part of the lithium pilot plant on the edge of the Uyuni salt...
A road leads to the brine pools that are part of the lithium pilot plant on the Uyuni salt lake, which holds the world's largest reserve of lithium, located at 3,656 meters (11,995 ft) above sea level in southwestern Bolivia, November 5, 2012. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called 'lithium triangle' is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken November 5, 2012. REUTERS/David Mercado (BOLIVIA - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9EL
April 05, 2013
Workers take samples from a brine pool at the Rockwood Lithium plant on the Atacama salt flat, the largest...
ATACAMA, Chile
Workers take samples from a brine pool at the Rockwood Lithium plant on the Atacama salt flat in northern...
Workers take samples from a brine pool at the Rockwood Lithium plant on the Atacama salt flat, the largest lithium deposit currently in production, in the Atacama desert of northern Chile, January 8, 2013. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called 'lithium triangle' is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken January 8, 2013. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado (CHILE - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT TRAVEL)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9EK
April 05, 2013
An aerial view of the brine pools and processing areas of the Rockwood lithium plant on the Atacama salt...
ATACAMA, Chile
An aerial view of the Rockwood lithium plant on the Atacama salt flat in northern Chile
An aerial view of the brine pools and processing areas of the Rockwood lithium plant on the Atacama salt flat, the largest lithium deposit currently in production, in the Atacama desert of northern Chile, January 10, 2013. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called "lithium triangle" is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken January 10, 2013. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado (CHILE - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT ENERGY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9EJ
April 05, 2013
Tourists prepare for a picnic on the Uyuni salt lake, which holds the world's largest reserve of lithium,...
Uyuni, Bolivia
Tourists prepare for a picnic on the Uyuni salt lake in southwestern Bolivia
Tourists prepare for a picnic on the Uyuni salt lake, which holds the world's largest reserve of lithium, located at 3,656 meters (11,995 ft) above sea level in southwestern Bolivia, November 7, 2012. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called 'lithium triangle' is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken November 7, 2012. REUTERS/David Mercado (BOLIVIA - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT TRAVEL ENERGY)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9EI
April 05, 2013
A view of one of the brine pools that are part of the lithium pilot plant on the Uyuni salt lake, which...
Uyuni, Bolivia
A view of one of the brine pools that are part of the lithium pilot plant on the Uyuni salt lake in southwestern...
A view of one of the brine pools that are part of the lithium pilot plant on the Uyuni salt lake, which holds the world's largest reserve of lithium, located at 3,656 meters (11,995 ft) above sea level in southwestern Bolivia, November 5, 2012. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called "lithium triangle" is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken November 5, 2012. REUTERS/David Mercado (BOLIVIA - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9EH
April 05, 2013
Piles of salt are pictured before a truck arrives to cart them away on the Uyuni salt lake, which holds...
Uyuni, Bolivia
Piles of salt are pictured before a truck arrives to cart them away on the Uyuni salt lake in southwestern...
Piles of salt are pictured before a truck arrives to cart them away on the Uyuni salt lake, which holds the world's largest reserve of lithium, located at 3,656 meters (11,995 ft) above sea level in southwestern Bolivia, at sunrise on November 7, 2012. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called "lithium triangle" is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken November 7, 2012. REUTERS/David Mercado (BOLIVIA - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9EG
April 05, 2013
A Bolivian man breaks salt to be trucked away from the Uyuni salt lake, which holds the world's largest...
Uyuni, Bolivia
A Bolivian man breaks salt to be trucked away from the Uyuni salt lake in southwestern Bolivia
A Bolivian man breaks salt to be trucked away from the Uyuni salt lake, which holds the world's largest reserve of lithium, located at 3,656 meters (11,995 ft) above sea level in southwestern Bolivia, at sunrise November 7, 2012. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called "lithium triangle" is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken November 7, 2012. REUTERS/David Mercado (BOLIVIA - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)
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LITHIUM/
RTXY9EF
April 05, 2013
Laboratory technicians Gabriela Torrez (L) and Bernabe Apaza analyze brine samples at the lithium pilot...
Uyuni, Bolivia
Laboratory technicians analyze brine samples at the lithium pilot plant on the southern edge of the Uyuni...
Laboratory technicians Gabriela Torrez (L) and Bernabe Apaza analyze brine samples at the lithium pilot plant on the southern edge of the Uyuni salt lake, which holds the world's largest reserve of lithium, located at 3,656 meters (11,995 ft) above sea level in southwestern Bolivia, November 5, 2012. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called "lithium triangle" is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken November 5, 2012. REUTERS/David Mercado (BOLIVIA - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9EE
April 05, 2013
A view of the lithium pilot plant on the southern edge of the Uyuni salt lake, which holds the world's...
Uyuni, Bolivia
A view of the lithium pilot plant on the southern edge of the Uyuni salt lake in southwestern Bolivia...
A view of the lithium pilot plant on the southern edge of the Uyuni salt lake, which holds the world's largest reserve of lithium, located at 3,656 meters (11,995 ft) above sea level in southwestern Bolivia, November 5, 2012. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called 'lithium triangle' is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken November 5, 2012. REUTERS/David Mercado (BOLIVIA - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9ED
April 05, 2013
Flags of different countries fly from posts on the Uyuni salt lake, which holds the world's largest reserve...
Uyuni, Bolivia
Flags of different countries fly from posts on the Uyuni salt lake in southwestern Bolivia
Flags of different countries fly from posts on the Uyuni salt lake, which holds the world's largest reserve of lithium, located at 3,656 meters (11,995 ft) above sea level in southwestern Bolivia, November 6, 2012. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called 'lithium triangle' is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken November 6, 2012. REUTERS/David Mercado (BOLIVIA - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9EC
April 05, 2013
A view of the crystallized surface of the Uyuni salt lake, which holds the world's largest reserve of...
Uyuni, Bolivia
A view of the crystallized surface of the Uyuni salt lake in southwestern Bolivia
A view of the crystallized surface of the Uyuni salt lake, which holds the world's largest reserve of lithium, located at 3,656 meters (11,995 ft) above sea level in southwestern Bolivia, at sunrise on November 7, 2012. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called "lithium triangle" is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken November 7, 2012. REUTERS/David Mercado (BOLIVIA - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9EB
April 05, 2013
A view of sunset of the Salar del Hombre Muerto, or Dead Man's salt flat, at around 4,000 meters (13,123...
SALTA PROVINCE, Argentina
A view at sunset of the Salar del Hombre Muerto in Salta Province
A view of sunset of the Salar del Hombre Muerto, or Dead Man's salt flat, at around 4,000 meters (13,123 feet) above sea level, on the border of the northern Argentine provinces of Catamarca and Salta, October 29, 2012. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called 'lithium triangle' is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January.Picture taken October 29, 2012. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT TRAVEL ENERGY)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9EA
April 05, 2013
A tourist sits on Incahuasi Island while looking out over the Uyuni salt lake, which holds the world's...
Uyuni, Bolivia
A tourist sits on Incahuasi Island while looking out over the Uyuni salt lake in southwestern Bolivia...
A tourist sits on Incahuasi Island while looking out over the Uyuni salt lake, which holds the world's largest reserve of lithium, located at 3,656 meters (11,995 ft) above sea level in southwestern Bolivia, November 6, 2012. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called "lithium triangle" is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken November 6, 2012. REUTERS/David Mercado (BOLIVIA - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT ENERGY TRAVEL)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9E8
April 05, 2013
A worker from Galaxy Resources lithium mining division puts on a mask before going to work at the Salar...
Salta, Argentina
A worker from Galaxy Resources lithium mining division puts on a mask in Salta Province
A worker from Galaxy Resources lithium mining division puts on a mask before going to work at the Salar del Hombre Muerto, or Dead Man's Salt Flat, an important source of lithium at around 4,000 meters (13,123 feet) above sea level on the border of the northern Argentine provinces of Catamarca and Salta, October 28, 2012. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called "lithium triangle" is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken October 28, 2012. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9E7
April 05, 2013
Geologist Mariela Hoyos (L) and her assistant Lucindo Lamas of Galaxy Resources adjust the flow of brine...
Salta, Argentina
Galaxy Resources workers adjust the flow of brine from the Salar del Hombre Muerto in Salta Province
Geologist Mariela Hoyos (L) and her assistant Lucindo Lamas of Galaxy Resources adjust the flow of brine from the Salar del Hombre Muerto, or Dead Man's Salt Flat, which is around 4,000 meters (13,123 feet) above sea level on the border of the northern Argentine provinces of Catamarca and Salta, as they prepare for future lithium production, October 27, 2012. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called 'lithium triangle' is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken October 27, 2012. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9E6
April 05, 2013
Flamingos walk on the Salar del Hombre Muerto, or Dead Man's Salt Flat, an important source of lithium...
Salta, Argentina
Flamingos walk on the Salar del Hombre Muerto in Salta Province
Flamingos walk on the Salar del Hombre Muerto, or Dead Man's Salt Flat, an important source of lithium at around 4,000 meters (13,123 feet) above sea level on the border of the northern Argentine provinces of Catamarca and Salta, October 28, 2012. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called 'lithium triangle' is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken October 28, 2012. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT TRAVEL ANIMALS ENERGY)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9E5
April 05, 2013
Laundry lies drying in the sun in the area around the Salar del Hombre Muerto, or Dead Man's Salt Flat,...
CIENAGA REDONDA, Argentina
Laundry lies drying in the sun in the area around the Salar del Hombre Muerto in Cienaga Redonda
Laundry lies drying in the sun in the area around the Salar del Hombre Muerto, or Dead Man's Salt Flat, at around 4,000 meters (13,123 feet) above sea level, in Cienaga Redonda on the border of the northern Argentine provinces of Catamarca and Salta, October 29, 2012. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called "lithium triangle" is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken October 29, 2012. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9E4
April 05, 2013
Braulio Lopez of Galaxy Resources lithium mining division carts halite concentrate at the Salar del Hombre...
Salta, Argentina
Braulio Lopez of Galaxy Resources lithium mining division carts halite concentrate at the Salar del Hombre...
Braulio Lopez of Galaxy Resources lithium mining division carts halite concentrate at the Salar del Hombre Muerto, or Dead Man's Salt Flat, an important source of lithium at around 4,000 meters (13,123 feet) above sea level on the border of the northern Argentine provinces of Catamarca and Salta, October 28, 2012. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called "lithium triangle" is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken October 28, 2012. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9E3
April 05, 2013
Overview of a mining camp on the Salar del Hombre Muerto, or Dead Man's Salt Flat, an important source...
Salta, Argentina
Overview of a mining camp on the Salar del Hombre Muerto in Salta Province
Overview of a mining camp on the Salar del Hombre Muerto, or Dead Man's Salt Flat, an important source of lithium at around 4,000 meters (13,123 feet) above sea level on the border of the northern Argentine provinces of Catamarca and Salta, October 28, 2012. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called "lithium triangle" is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken October 28, 2012. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9E2
April 05, 2013
Braulio Lopez (R) and Ramon Calpanchay of Galaxy Resources lithium mining division shovel halite concentrate...
Salta, Argentina
Galaxy Resources workers shovel halite concentrate at the Salar del Hombre Muerto in Salta Province
Braulio Lopez (R) and Ramon Calpanchay of Galaxy Resources lithium mining division shovel halite concentrate at the Salar del Hombre Muerto, or Dead Man's Salt Flat, an important source of lithium at around 4,000 meters (13,123 feet) above sea level on the border of the northern Argentine provinces of Catamarca and Salta, October 28, 2012. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called 'lithium triangle' is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken October 28, 2012. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9E1
April 05, 2013
Engineer Martin Marquez of Galaxy Resources lithium mining division checks a concentration of halite...
Salta, Argentina
Engineer Martin Marquez of Galaxy Resources lithium mining division checks a concentration of halite...
Engineer Martin Marquez of Galaxy Resources lithium mining division checks a concentration of halite at the Salar del Hombre Muerto, or Dead Man's Salt Flat, an important source of lithium at around 4,000 meters (13,123 feet) above sea level on the border of the northern Argentine provinces of Catamarca and Salta, October 28, 2012. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called 'lithium triangle' is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken October 28, 2012. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)
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LITHIUM/
RTXY9DY
April 05, 2013
An overview of the Salar del Hombre Muerto, or Dead Man's Salt Flat, an important source of lithium at...
Salta, Argentina
An overview of the Salar del Hombre Muerto in Salta Province
An overview of the Salar del Hombre Muerto, or Dead Man's Salt Flat, an important source of lithium at around 4,000 meters (13,123 feet) above sea level on the border of the northern Argentine provinces of Catamarca and Salta, October 28, 2012. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called "lithium triangle" is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken October 28, 2012. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)

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LITHIUM/
RTXY9DX
April 05, 2013
A view of a lithium mining camp on the Salar del Hombre Muerto, or Dead Man's Salt Flat, at around 4,000...
SALTA PROVINCE, Argentina
A view of a lithium mining camp on the Salar del Hombre Muerto in Salta Province
A view of a lithium mining camp on the Salar del Hombre Muerto, or Dead Man's Salt Flat, at around 4,000 meters (13,123 feet) above sea level, on the border of the northern Argentine provinces of Catamarca and Salta, October 29, 2012. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called "lithium triangle" is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken October 29, 2012. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENVIRONMENT ENERGY)

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CES-LG/
RTR3C80D
January 08, 2013
Showgoers look at a display of 55-inch OLED televisions in the LG Electronics booth during the first...
Las Vegas, UNITED STATES
Showgoers look at a display of 55-inch OLED televisions in the LG Electronics booth during the first...
Showgoers look at a display of 55-inch OLED televisions in the LG Electronics booth during the first day of the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 8, 2013. The sets are the largest, lightest and thinnest OLED 3D TVs in production, a representative said. The televisions are expected to begin shipping in March. REUTERS/Steve Marcus (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
BOLIVIA/
RTX110Y7
November 07, 2012
A llama stands next to a cactus growing on Incahuasi Island above the Uyuni salt lake, which holds the...
La Paz, Bolivia
A llama stands next to a cactus growing on Incahuasi Island above the Uyuni salt lake
A llama stands next to a cactus growing on Incahuasi Island above the Uyuni salt lake, which holds the world's largest reserve of lithium, located at 3,656 meters (11,995 ft) above sea level in southwestern Bolivia, November 7, 2012. Argentina, Chile and Bolivia hold the planet's largest reserves of lithium, the world's lightest metal and a key component in batteries used to power a range of technologies from cell phones to laptops to electric cars. Industrial production from countries in this so-called 'lithium triangle' is already high. Chile is the world's leading source of the metal, turning out around 40 percent of global supply, and Argentina is also a significant producer. Output from the Andes may soon rise after Bolivia - the country that holds an estimated 50 percent of the world's lithium reserves - opened its first lithium pilot plant in January. Picture taken November 7, 2012. REUTERS/David Mercado (BOLIVIA - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENERGY) BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE
SLOVENIA/
RTR30Y4Q
April 19, 2012
Matevz Lenarcic drinks coffee in front of his plane after landing in Brnik Airport April 19, 2012. Biologist...
Brnik, Slovenia
Matevz Lenarcic drinks coffee in front of his plane after landing in Brnik Airport
Matevz Lenarcic drinks coffee in front of his plane after landing in Brnik Airport April 19, 2012. Biologist and environmentalist Lenarcic set off on January 9 on a journey around the world in an ultra-light aircraft. He aims to break the records for the lightest aircraft and the least amount of fuel used to fly around the world, while raising awareness of global air pollution. Lenarcic flew the Virus SW914 ultra-light single-engine airplane produced by Slovenian company Pipistrel. The aircraft is a modified version of one of their earlier models which won awards in NASA-sponsored competitions for its exceptional fuel efficiency in 2007 and 2008. REUTERS/Srdjan Zivulovic (SLOVENIA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY TRANSPORT SOCIETY ENERGY)
SLOVENIA/
RTR30Y46
April 19, 2012
Matevz Lenarcic hugs his wife after landing in Brnik Airport April 19, 2012. Biologist and environmentalist...
Brnik, Slovenia
Matevz Lenarcic hugs his wife after landing in Brnik Airport
Matevz Lenarcic hugs his wife after landing in Brnik Airport April 19, 2012. Biologist and environmentalist Lenarcic set off on January 9 on a journey around the world in an ultra-light aircraft. He aims to break the records for the lightest aircraft and the least amount of fuel used to fly around the world, while raising awareness of global air pollution. Lenarcic flew the Virus SW914 ultra-light single-engine airplane produced by Slovenian company Pipistrel. The aircraft is a modified version of one of their earlier models which won awards in NASA-sponsored competitions for its exceptional fuel efficiency in 2007 and 2008. REUTERS/Srdjan Zivulovic (SLOVENIA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY TRANSPORT SOCIETY ENERGY)
SLOVENIA/
RTR30Y3P
April 19, 2012
Matevz Lenarcic passes by an EasyJet plane as he lands in Brnik Airport April 19, 2012. Biologist and...
Brnik, Slovenia
Matevz Lenarcic passes by an EasyJet plane as he lands in Brnik Airport
Matevz Lenarcic passes by an EasyJet plane as he lands in Brnik Airport April 19, 2012. Biologist and environmentalist Lenarcic set off on January 9 on a journey around the world in an ultra-light aircraft. He aims to break the records for the lightest aircraft and the least amount of fuel used to fly around the world, while raising awareness of global air pollution. Lenarcic flew the Virus SW914 ultra-light single-engine airplane produced by Slovenian company Pipistrel. The aircraft is a modified version of one of their earlier models which won awards in NASA-sponsored competitions for its exceptional fuel efficiency in 2007 and 2008. REUTERS/Srdjan Zivulovic (SLOVENIA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY TRANSPORT SOCIETY ENERGY)
SLOVENIA/
RTR30Y3E
April 19, 2012
Matevz Lenarcic pours champagne on his plane after landing in Brnik Airport April 19, 2012. Biologist...
Brnik, Slovenia
Matevz Lenarcic pours champagne on his plane after landing in Brnik Airport
Matevz Lenarcic pours champagne on his plane after landing in Brnik Airport April 19, 2012. Biologist and environmentalist Lenarcic set off on January 9 on a journey around the world in an ultra-light aircraft. He aims to break the records for the lightest aircraft and the least amount of fuel used to fly around the world, while raising awareness of global air pollution. Lenarcic flew the Virus SW914 ultra-light single-engine airplane produced by Slovenian company Pipistrel. The aircraft is a modified version of one of their earlier models which won awards in NASA-sponsored competitions for its exceptional fuel efficiency in 2007 and 2008. REUTERS/Srdjan Zivulovic (SLOVENIA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY TRANSPORT SOCIETY ENERGY)
SLOVENIA/
RTR30Y3A
April 19, 2012
Matevz Lenarcic gestures in front of his plane after landing in Brnik Airport April 19, 2012. Biologist...
Brnik, Slovenia
Matevz Lenarcic gestures in front of his plane after landing in Brnik Airport
Matevz Lenarcic gestures in front of his plane after landing in Brnik Airport April 19, 2012. Biologist and environmentalist Lenarcic set off on January 9 on a journey around the world in an ultra-light aircraft. He aims to break the records for the lightest aircraft and the least amount of fuel used to fly around the world, while raising awareness of global air pollution. Lenarcic flew the Virus SW914 ultra-light single-engine airplane produced by Slovenian company Pipistrel. The aircraft is a modified version of one of their earlier models which won awards in NASA-sponsored competitions for its exceptional fuel efficiency in 2007 and 2008. REUTERS/Srdjan Zivulovic (SLOVENIA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY TRANSPORT ENERGY SOCIETY)
SLOVENIA/
RTR30Y31
April 19, 2012
Matevz Lenarcic gestures in front of his plane after landing in Brnik Airport April 19, 2012. Biologist...
Brnik, Slovenia
Matevz Lenarcic gestures in front of his plane after landing in Brnik Airport
Matevz Lenarcic gestures in front of his plane after landing in Brnik Airport April 19, 2012. Biologist and environmentalist Lenarcic set off on January 9 on a journey around the world in an ultra-light aircraft. He aims to break the records for the lightest aircraft and the least amount of fuel used to fly around the world, while raising awareness of global air pollution. Lenarcic will fly the Virus SW914 ultra-light single-engine airplane produced by Slovenian company Pipistrel. The aircraft is a modified version of one of their earlier models which won awards in NASA-sponsored competitions for its exceptional fuel efficiency in 2007 and 2008. REUTERS/Srdjan Zivulovic (SLOVENIA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY TRANSPORT ENERGY SOCIETY)
SLOVENIA/
RTR2W0J4
January 08, 2012
Matevz Lenarcic flies over the mountains during test flight in Ajdovscina January 4, 2012. Biologist...
Ajdovscina, Slovenia
Matevz Lenarcic flies over the mountains during test flight in Ajdovscina
Matevz Lenarcic flies over the mountains during test flight in Ajdovscina January 4, 2012. Biologist and environmentalist Lenarcic plans to set off on a two-month journey around the world in an ultra-light aircraft on January 3, 2012. Lenarcic aims to break the records for the lightest aircraft and the least amount of fuel used to fly around the world, while raising awareness of global air pollution. He will fly the Virus-SW 914 ultra-light single-engine airplane produced by Slovenian company Pipistrel. The aircraft is a modified version of one of their earlier models which won awards in NASA-sponsored competitions for its exceptional fuel efficiency in 2007 and 2008.
Picture taken January 4, 2012. REUTERS/Srdjan Zivulovic (SLOVENIA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY TRANSPORT)
SLOVENIA/
RTR2W0J3
January 08, 2012
Matevz Lenarcic takes off with his Pipistrel Virus-SW 914 plane at the start of the flight around the...
Brnik, Slovenia
Matevz Lenarcic takes off with his plane at the start of the flight around the world in Brnik airport...
Matevz Lenarcic takes off with his Pipistrel Virus-SW 914 plane at the start of the flight around the world in Brnik airport, January 8, 2012. Biologist and environmentalist Lenarcic plans to set off on a two-month journey around the world in an ultra-light aircraft. Lenarcic aims to break the records for the lightest aircraft and the least amount of fuel used to fly around the world, while raising awareness of global air pollution. He will fly the Virus-SW 914 ultra-light single-engine airplane produced by Slovenian company Pipistrel. The aircraft is a modified version of one of their earlier models which won awards in NASA-sponsored competitions for its exceptional fuel efficiency in 2007 and 2008. REUTERS/Srdjan Zivulovic (SLOVENIA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY TRANSPORT)
SLOVENIA/
RTR2W0J2
January 08, 2012
Matevz Lenarcic (L) and Ivo Boscarol, owner of the Pipistrel give thumb ups before flight in Brnik airport,...
Brnik, Slovenia
Lenarcic and Boscarol, owner of the Pipistrel give thumb ups before flight in Brnik airport
Matevz Lenarcic (L) and Ivo Boscarol, owner of the Pipistrel give thumb ups before flight in Brnik airport, January 8, 2012. Biologist and environmentalist Lenarcic plans to set off on a two-month journey around the world in an ultra-light aircraft. Lenarcic aims to break the records for the lightest aircraft and the least amount of fuel used to fly around the world, while raising awareness of global air pollution. He will fly the Virus-SW 914 ultra-light single-engine airplane produced by Slovenian company Pipistrel. The aircraft is a modified version of one of their earlier models which won awards in NASA-sponsored competitions for its exceptional fuel efficiency in 2007 and 2008. REUTERS/Srdjan Zivulovic (SLOVENIA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY TRANSPORT)
SLOVENIA/
RTR2W0J0
January 08, 2012
Matevz Lenarcic shut the door in his Pipistrel Virus-SW 914 plane before taking off at Brnik airport,...
Brnik, Slovenia
Lenarcic shut the door in the plane before flight in Brnik airport
Matevz Lenarcic shut the door in his Pipistrel Virus-SW 914 plane before taking off at Brnik airport, January 8, 2012. Biologist and environmentalist Lenarcic plans to set off on a two-month journey around the world in an ultra-light aircraft. Lenarcic aims to break the records for the lightest aircraft and the least amount of fuel used to fly around the world, while raising awareness of global air pollution. He will fly the Virus-SW914 ultra-light single-engine airplane produced by Slovenian company Pipistrel. The aircraft is a modified version of one of their earlier models which won awards in NASA-sponsored competitions for its exceptional fuel efficiency in 2007 and 2008.
REUTERS/Srdjan Zivulovic (SLOVENIA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY TRANSPORT)
SLOVENIA/
RTR2VQKP
December 30, 2011
Matevz Lenarcic pilots a plane during a test flight in Ajdovscina December 28, 2011. The biologist and...
Ajdovscina, Slovenia
Matevz Lenarcic pilots a plane during a test flight in Ajdovscina
Matevz Lenarcic pilots a plane during a test flight in Ajdovscina December 28, 2011. The biologist and environmentalist plans to set off on a two-month journey around the world in an ultra-light aircraft on January 3, 2012. Lenarcic aims to break the records for the lightest aircraft and the least amount of fuel used to fly around the world, while raising awareness of global air pollution. He will fly the Virus SW914 ultra-light single-engine airplane produced by Slovenian company Pipistrel. The aircraft is a modified version of one of their earlier models which won awards in NASA-sponsored competitions for its exceptional fuel efficiency in 2007 and 2008. Picture taken December 28, 2011.
REUTERS/Srdjan Zivulovic (SLOVENIA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY TRANSPORT)
SLOVENIA/
RTR2VQKL
December 30, 2011
Matevz Lenarcic flies over the mountains during a test flight in Ajdovscina December 28, 2011. The biologist...
Ajdovscina, Slovenia
Lenarcic flies over the mountains during a test flight in Ajdovscina
Matevz Lenarcic flies over the mountains during a test flight in Ajdovscina December 28, 2011. The biologist and environmentalist plans to set off on a two-month journey around the world in an ultra-light aircraft on January 3, 2012. Lenarcic aims to break the records for the lightest aircraft and the least amount of fuel used to fly around the world, while raising awareness of global air pollution. He will fly the Virus SW914 ultra-light single-engine airplane produced by Slovenian company Pipistrel. The aircraft is a modified version of one of their earlier models which won awards in NASA-sponsored competitions for its exceptional fuel efficiency in 2007 and 2008. Picture taken December 28, 2011. REUTERS/Srdjan Zivulovic (SLOVENIA)
SLOVENIA/
RTR2VQKJ
December 30, 2011
Matevz Lenarcic pilots a plane during a test flight in Ajdovscina December 28, 2011. The biologist and...
Ajdovscina, Slovenia
Lenarcic pilots a plane during a test flight in Ajdovscina
Matevz Lenarcic pilots a plane during a test flight in Ajdovscina December 28, 2011. The biologist and environmentalist plans to set off on a two-month journey around the world in an ultra-light aircraft on January 3, 2012. Lenarcic aims to break the records for the lightest aircraft and the least amount of fuel used to fly around the world, while raising awareness of global air pollution. He will fly the Virus SW914 ultra-light single-engine airplane produced by Slovenian company Pipistrel. The aircraft is a modified version of one of their earlier models which won awards in NASA-sponsored competitions for its exceptional fuel efficiency in 2007 and 2008. Picture taken December 28, 2011.
REUTERS/Srdjan Zivulovic (SLOVENIA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY TRANSPORT)
SLOVENIA/
RTR2VQKH
December 30, 2011
Matevz Lenarcic flies over the mountains during a test flight in Ajdovscina December 28, 2011. The biologist...
Ajdovscina, Slovenia
Lenarcic flies over the mountains during a test flight in Ajdovscina
Matevz Lenarcic flies over the mountains during a test flight in Ajdovscina December 28, 2011. The biologist and environmentalist plans to set off on a two-month journey around the world in an ultra-light aircraft on January 3, 2012. Lenarcic aims to break the records for the lightest aircraft and the least amount of fuel used to fly around the world, while raising awareness of global air pollution. He will fly the Virus SW914 ultra-light single-engine airplane produced by Slovenian company Pipistrel. The aircraft is a modified version of one of their earlier models which won awards in NASA-sponsored competitions for its exceptional fuel efficiency in 2007 and 2008. Picture taken December 28, 2011.REUTERS/Srdjan Zivulovic (SLOVENIA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY TRANSPORT)
SLOVENIA/
RTR2VQKE
December 30, 2011
Matevz Lenarcic checks the equipment in the plane before a test flight in Ajdovscina December 28, 2011....
Ajdovscina, Slovenia
Lenarcic checks the equipment in the plane before a test flight in Ajdovscina
Matevz Lenarcic checks the equipment in the plane before a test flight in Ajdovscina December 28, 2011. The biologist and environmentalist plans to set off on a two-month journey around the world in an ultra-light aircraft on January 3, 2012. Lenarcic aims to break the records for the lightest aircraft and the least amount of fuel used to fly around the world, while raising awareness of global air pollution. He will fly the Virus SW914 ultra-light single-engine airplane produced by Slovenian company Pipistrel. The aircraft is a modified version of one of their earlier models which won awards in NASA-sponsored competitions for its exceptional fuel efficiency in 2007 and 2008. Picture taken December 28, 2011. REUTERS/Srdjan Zivulovic (SLOVENIA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY TRANSPORT)
SLOVENIA/
RTR2VQKD
December 30, 2011
Matevz Lenarcic (R) speaks with a technician before a test flight in Ajdovscina December 28, 2011. The...
Ajdovscina, Slovenia
Lenarcic speaks with a technician before a test flight in Ajdovscina
Matevz Lenarcic (R) speaks with a technician before a test flight in Ajdovscina December 28, 2011. The biologist and environmentalist plans to set off on a two-month journey around the world in an ultra-light aircraft on January 3, 2012. Lenarcic aims to break the records for the lightest aircraft and the least amount of fuel used to fly around the world, while raising awareness of global air pollution. He will fly the Virus SW914 ultra-light single-engine airplane produced by Slovenian company Pipistrel. The aircraft is a modified version of one of their earlier models which won awards in NASA-sponsored competitions for its exceptional fuel efficiency in 2007 and 2008. Picture taken December 28, 2011.REUTERS/Srdjan Zivulovic (SLOVENIA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY TRANSPORT)
SLOVENIA/
RTR2VQJE
December 30, 2011
Matevz Lenarcic poses before a test flight in Ajdovscina December 28, 2011. The biologist and environmentalist...
Ajdovscina, Slovenia
Lenarcic poses before a test flight in Ajdovscina
Matevz Lenarcic poses before a test flight in Ajdovscina December 28, 2011. The biologist and environmentalist plans to set off on a two-month journey around the world in an ultra-light aircraft on January 3, 2012. Lenarcic aims to break the records for the lightest aircraft and the least amount of fuel used to fly around the world, while raising awareness of global air pollution. He will fly the Virus SW914 ultra-light single-engine airplane produced by Slovenian company Pipistrel. The aircraft is a modified version of one of their earlier models which won awards in NASA-sponsored competitions for its exceptional fuel efficiency in 2007 and 2008. Picture taken December 28, 2011. REUTERS/Srdjan Zivulovic (SLOVENIA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY TRANSPORT)
SLOVENIA/
RTR2VQJD
December 30, 2011
Matevz Lenarcic poses before a test flight in Ajdovscina December 28, 2011. The biologist and environmentalist...
Ajdovscina, Slovenia
Lenarcic poses before test flight in Ajdovscina
Matevz Lenarcic poses before a test flight in Ajdovscina December 28, 2011. The biologist and environmentalist plans to set off on a two-month journey around the world in an ultra-light aircraft on January 3, 2012. Lenarcic aims to break the records for the lightest aircraft and the least amount of fuel used to fly around the world, while raising awareness of global air pollution. He will fly the Virus SW914 ultra-light single-engine airplane produced by Slovenian company Pipistrel. The aircraft is a modified version of one of their earlier models which won awards in NASA-sponsored competitions for its exceptional fuel efficiency in 2007 and 2008. Picture taken December 28, 2011. REUTERS/Srdjan Zivulovic (SLOVENIA - Tags: TRANSPORT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
SLOVENIA/
RTR2VQJB
December 30, 2011
Matevz Lenarcic poses before a test flight in Ajdovscina December 28, 2011. The biologist and environmentalist...
Ajdovscina, Slovenia
Lenarcic poses before a test flight in Ajdovscina
Matevz Lenarcic poses before a test flight in Ajdovscina December 28, 2011. The biologist and environmentalist plans to set off on a two-month journey around the world in an ultra-light aircraft on January 3, 2012. Lenarcic aims to break the records for the lightest aircraft and the least amount of fuel used to fly around the world, while raising awareness of global air pollution. He will fly the Virus SW914 ultra-light single-engine airplane produced by Slovenian company Pipistrel. The aircraft is a modified version of one of their earlier models which won awards in NASA-sponsored competitions for its exceptional fuel efficiency in 2007 and 2008. Picture taken December 28, 2011.
REUTERS/Srdjan Zivulovic (SLOVENIA - Tags: TRANSPORT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
SLOVENIA/
RTR2VQJ8
December 30, 2011
Matevz Lenarcic checks the equipment in the plane before a test flight in Ajdovscina December 28, 2011....
Ajdovscina, Slovenia
Lenarcic checks the equipment in the plane before a test flight in Ajdovscina
Matevz Lenarcic checks the equipment in the plane before a test flight in Ajdovscina December 28, 2011. The biologist and environmentalist plans to set off on a two-month journey around the world in an ultra-light aircraft on January 3, 2012. Lenarcic aims to break the records for the lightest aircraft and the least amount of fuel used to fly around the world, while raising awareness of global air pollution. He will fly the Virus SW914 ultra-light single-engine airplane produced by Slovenian company Pipistrel. The aircraft is a modified version of one of their earlier models which won awards in NASA-sponsored competitions for its exceptional fuel efficiency in 2007 and 2008. Picture taken December 28, 2011. REUTERS/Srdjan Zivulovic (SLOVENIA - Tags: TRANSPORT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
SLOVENIA/
RTR2VQJ2
December 30, 2011
Matevz Lenarcic checks the plane before a test flight in Ajdovscina December 28, 2011. Biologist and...
Ajdovscina, Slovenia
Lenarcic checks the plane before test flight in Ajdovscina
Matevz Lenarcic checks the plane before a test flight in Ajdovscina December 28, 2011. Biologist and environmentalist Matevz Lenarcic plans to set off on a two-month journey around the world in an ultra-light aircraft on January 3, 2012. Lenarcic aims to break the records for the lightest aircraft and the least amount of fuel used to fly around the world, while raising awareness of global air pollution. He will fly the Virus SW914 ultra-light single-engine airplane produced by Slovenian company Pipistrel. The aircraft is a modified version of one of their earlier models which won awards in NASA-sponsored competitions for its exceptional fuel efficiency in 2007 and 2008. Picture taken December 28, 2011.
REUTERS/Srdjan Zivulovic (SLOVENIA - Tags: TRANSPORT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
SOCCER-SPAIN/
RTR2DQX9
May 11, 2010
Argentina's national soccer team player Lionel Messi displays the new F50 adiZero soccer boots during...
Barcelona, Spain
Argentina's national soccer team player Lionel Messi displays the new F50 adiZero soccer boots during...
Argentina's national soccer team player Lionel Messi displays the new F50 adiZero soccer boots during a promotional event at Montmelo circuit near Barcelona May 11, 2010. The boots, weighing only 165 grams, are the lightest in the world and they will be featured in the upcoming World Cup in South Africa, according to Adidas. REUTERS/Gustau Nacarino (SPAIN - Tags: SPORT SOCCER WORLD CUP BUSINESS)
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