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Search results for: Liquid-biofuel

ISRAEL-ENVIRONMENT/
RTX32UFX
March 27, 2017
A general view shows the new waste collection plant which creates what is known as Refuse Derived Fuel...
Tel Aviv, Israel
A general view shows the new waste collection plant which creates what is known as Refuse Derived Fuel...
A general view shows the new waste collection plant which creates what is known as Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) in the outskirts of Tel Aviv, Israel March 26, 2017. Picture taken March 26, 2017. REUTERS/Nir Elias
BRITAIN/
RTR2HCKQ
August 17, 2010
Professor Martin Tangey, Director of Edinburgh Napier University Biofuel Research Centre, holds a jar...
Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Professor Martin Tangey holds a jar of butanol during a media viewing in Edinburgh
Professor Martin Tangey, Director of Edinburgh Napier University Biofuel Research Centre, holds a jar of butanol during a media viewing in Edinburgh, Scotland August 17, 2010. The University which has has filed a patent for a new super butanol biofuel made from whiskey by-products, 'pot ale' - a liquid taken from the copper stills, and 'draff' which is the spent grain, claims the bio-fuel gives 30% more output power than ethanol. REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: ENERGY SCI TECH BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT)
BRITAIN/
RTR2HCKJ
August 17, 2010
Professor Martin Tangey, Director of Edinburgh Napier University Biofuel Research Centre, holds a glass...
Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Professor Martin Tangey holds a glass of whisky during a media viewing in Edinburgh
Professor Martin Tangey, Director of Edinburgh Napier University Biofuel Research Centre, holds a glass of whisky during a media viewing in Edinburgh, Scotland August 17, 2010. The University, which has filed a patent for a new super butanol biofuel made from whiskey by-products, 'pot ale' - a liquid taken from the copper stills, and 'draff' which is the spent grain, claims the bio-fuel gives 30% more output power than ethanol. REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: ENERGY SCI TECH ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
BRITAIN/
RTR2HCKE
August 17, 2010
Professor Martin Tangey, Director of Edinburgh Napier University Biofuel Research Centre, looks at a...
Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Professor Martin Tangey looks at a glass of whisky and a jar of butanol during a media viewing in Edinburgh...
Professor Martin Tangey, Director of Edinburgh Napier University Biofuel Research Centre, looks at a glass of whisky and a jar of butanol during a media viewing in Edinburgh, Scotland August 17, 2010. The University which has has filed a patent for a new super butanol biofuel made from whiskey by-products, 'pot ale' - a liquid taken from the copper stills, and 'draff' which is the spent grain, claims the bio-fuel gives 30% more output power than ethanol. REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: ENERGY SCI TECH BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT)
ENERGY-CELLULOSE/
RTX6F63
June 02, 2008
A vial of cellulosic material sits in a fridge inside a research facility for cellulosic ethanol at the...
Guelph, Canada
To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/
A vial of cellulosic material sits in a fridge inside a research facility for cellulosic ethanol at the University of Guelph in Guelph, in this May 7, 2008 file photo. In the search for renewable energy, turning low-value materials like switchgrass and corn husks into ethanol to fuel cars is something of a Holy Grail. But scientists on the front lines of this search are finding that making the process commercially and environmentally viable is proving much harder than some of the hype would suggest. To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/ REUTERS/Mark Blinch/Files (CANADA)
ENERGY-CELLULOSE/
RTX6F5Z
June 02, 2008
A vial of cellulosic material is shown at a research facility for cellulosic ethanol at the University...
Guelph, Canada
To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/
A vial of cellulosic material is shown at a research facility for cellulosic ethanol at the University of Guelph in Guelph, in this May 7, 2008 file photo. In the search for renewable energy, turning low-value materials like switchgrass and corn husks into ethanol to fuel cars is something of a Holy Grail. But scientists on the front lines of this search are finding that making the process commercially and environmentally viable is proving much harder than some of the hype would suggest. To match feature ENERGY-CELLULOSE/ REUTERS/Mark Blinch/Files (CANADA)
USA-ENERGY/
RTX4GZY
December 07, 2007
Thomas Wallace of the Enzyme Development Corporation empties an analytical sample from a tank where corn...
Nevada, UNITED STATES
Thomas Wallace takes a sample from the production line as corn is converted into ethanol at the Lincolnway...
Thomas Wallace of the Enzyme Development Corporation empties an analytical sample from a tank where corn is being converted into ethanol inside the Lincolnway Energy plant in the town of Nevada, Iowa, December 6, 2007. The company, one of a growing number across Iowa and the United States, converts corn to fuel ethanol to be used in flexible-fuelled vehicles as an alternative energy source to oil. The business operates around the clock seven days a week, processing approximately 50,000 bushels (1.27 tonnes) of corn daily, and creating 150,000 gallons (567,752 litres) of ethanol per day. REUTERS/Jason Reed (UNITED STATES)
USA-ENERGY/BIOFUEL
RTX9KG
November 12, 2007
Steve MacDougall delivers a mixture of biofuel, made from refined soybean oil and low sulfur heating...
Norwood, UNITED STATES
Steve MacDougall delivers a mixture of biofuel, made from refined soybean oil and low sulfur heating...
Steve MacDougall delivers a mixture of biofuel, made from refined soybean oil and low sulfur heating oil, for Mass Biofuel to a home in Norwood, Massachusetts November 12, 2007. REUTERS/Brian Snyder (UNITED STATES)
USA-ENERGY/BIOFUEL
RTX9KE
November 12, 2007
Don Grady points to his new furnace which burns a mixture of biofuel, made from refined soybean oil and...
Westwood, UNITED STATES
Don Grady points to his new furnace which burns a mixture of biofuel, made from refined soybean oil and...
Don Grady points to his new furnace which burns a mixture of biofuel, made from refined soybean oil and low sulfur heating oil in Westwood, Massachusetts November 12, 2007. REUTERS/Brian Snyder (UNITED STATES)
USA-ENERGY/BIOFUEL
RTX9K9
November 12, 2007
Steve MacDougall delivers a mixture of biofuel, made from refined soybean oil and low sulfur heating...
Norwood, UNITED STATES
Steve MacDougall delivers a mixture of biofuel, made from refined soybean oil and low sulfur heating...
Steve MacDougall delivers a mixture of biofuel, made from refined soybean oil and low sulfur heating oil for Mass Biofuel to a home in Norwood, Massachusetts November 12, 2007. REUTERS/Brian Snyder (UNITED STATES)
USA-ENERGY/BIOFUEL
RTX9K6
November 12, 2007
A mixture of biofuel, made from refined soybean oil and low sulfur heating oil is delivered by Mass Biofuel...
Norwood, UNITED STATES
A mixture of biofuel, made from refined soybean oil and low sulfur heating oil is delivered by Mass Biofuel...
A mixture of biofuel, made from refined soybean oil and low sulfur heating oil is delivered by Mass Biofuel to a home in Norwood, Massachusetts November 12, 2007. REUTERS/Brian Snyder (UNITED STATES)
USA-ENERGY/BIOFUEL
RTX9K1
November 12, 2007
Steve MacDougall delivers a mixture of biofuel, made from refined soybean oil, and low sulfur heating...
Needham, UNITED STATES
Steve MacDougall delivers a mixture of biofuel, made from refined soybean oil, and low sulfur heating...
Steve MacDougall delivers a mixture of biofuel, made from refined soybean oil, and low sulfur heating oil for Mass Biofuel to a home in Needham, Massachusetts November 12, 2007. REUTERS/Brian Snyder (UNITED STATES)
FOOD ARGENTINA BIOFUEL
RTR19N69
October 06, 2005
A tube containing biofuel made with soy oil is displayed over soybeans at a biodiesel plant in Chacabuco,...
Chacabuco, Argentina
To match feature FOOD ARGENTINA BIOFUEL
A tube containing biofuel made with soy oil is displayed over soybeans at a biodiesel plant in Chacabuco, some 145 miles (230 km) west of Buenos Aires, October 6, 2005. Argentine engineers Edmundo Defferrari, Luciano Pugawko and German Beckmann developed a biodiesel plant prototype in Chacabuco at a cost of $152,000 and their goal is to sell similar plants to farmers who are anxious to lower their fuel costs or even achieve self-sufficiency in the face of soaring oil prices. Armed with 12 tonnes of soybeans their plant can produce enough biofuel in one day to fill the tanks of five soy trucks. Picture taken on October 6, 2005. To match feature FOOD ARGENTINA BIOFUEL REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci
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