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Trump wrestler enters Mexican lucha libre ring
14 PICTURES
ARGENTINA-ELECTION/
RTX1TW4J
October 30, 2015
Maximo Kirchner (3rd L), son of Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, talks to lawmakers...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Maximo Kirchner talks to lawmakers Cabandie and Larroque alongside Economy Minister Kicillof during a...
Maximo Kirchner (3rd L), son of Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, talks to lawmakers Juan Cabandie (C, standing) and Andres Larroque (2nd R) alongside Economy Minister Axel Kicillof (R), Martin Sabbatella (L), head of the Argentine government's Federal Authority on Audio Visual Communications Services (AFSCA) and Cabinet Chief Anibal Fernandez during a ceremony at the Casa Rosada Presidential Palace in Buenos Aires, October 29, 2015. Fernandez de Kirchner, a fiery leftist who often rails against Western excess, will leave behind a divided nation. She is hailed by the poor for expanding social welfare programs and protecting local industry but loathed by others who blame her for strangling the economy. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci
ARGENTINA-ELECTION/
RTX1TW3T
October 30, 2015
Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner gestures as she speak to supporters from a balcony...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Argentina's President Fernandez de Kirchner gestures as she speaks to supporters from a balcony at the...
Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner gestures as she speak to supporters from a balcony at the Casa Rosada Presidential Palace in Buenos Aires October 29, 2015. Fernandez de Kirchner, a fiery leftist who often rails against Western excess, will leave behind a divided nation. She is hailed by the poor for expanding social welfare programs and protecting local industry but loathed by others who blame her for strangling the economy. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci
ARGENTINA-ELECTION/
RTX1TW3S
October 30, 2015
Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner talks to Economy Minister Axel Kicillof during a...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Argentina's President Fernandez de Kirchner talks to Economy Minister Kicillof during a ceremony at the...
Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner talks to Economy Minister Axel Kicillof during a ceremony at the Casa Rosada Presidential Palace in Buenos Aires, October 29, 2015. Fernandez de Kirchner, a fiery leftist who often rails against Western excess, will leave behind a divided nation. She is hailed by the poor for expanding social welfare programs and protecting local industry but loathed by others who blame her for strangling the economy. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci
ARGENTINA-ELECTION/
RTX1TW3G
October 30, 2015
Argentina's Cabinet Chief Anibal Fernandez (C) is applauded by other members of the government during...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Argentina's Cabinet Chief Fernandez is applauded by other members of the government during a ceremony...
Argentina's Cabinet Chief Anibal Fernandez (C) is applauded by other members of the government during a ceremony with Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner (not pictured) at the Casa Rosada Presidential Palace in Buenos Aires, October 29, 2015. Fernandez de Kirchner, a fiery leftist who often rails against Western excess, will leave behind a divided nation. She is hailed by the poor for expanding social welfare programs and protecting local industry but loathed by others who blame her for strangling the economy. Surrounding Fernandez are (from left): Chief of staff Eduardo de Pedro, Martin Sabbatella, head of the Argentine government's Federal Authority on Audio Visual Communications Services (AFSCA), elected lawmaker and Fernandez de Kirchner's son Maximo Kirchner, lawmaker Juan Cabandie and Berazategui's Mayor Juan Mussi. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci
ARGENTINA-ELECTION/
RTX1TW34
October 30, 2015
Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner appears on a balcony to talk to supporters at the...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Argentina's President Fernandez de Kirchner appears on a balcony to talk to supporters at the Casa Rosada...
Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner appears on a balcony to talk to supporters at the Casa Rosada Presidential Palace in Buenos Aires October 29, 2015. Fernandez de Kirchner, a fiery leftist who often rails against Western excess, will leave behind a divided nation. She is hailed by the poor for expanding social welfare programs and protecting local industry but loathed by others who blame her for strangling the economy. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci
ARGENTINA-ELECTION/
RTX1TW2V
October 30, 2015
A supporter of Argentina's President Fernandez de Kirchner holds up a pillow with a photo of her stamped...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
A supporter of Argentina's President Fernandez de Kirchner holds up a pillow with a photo of her stamped...
A supporter of Argentina's President Fernandez de Kirchner holds up a pillow with a photo of her stamped on it as he waits for her at the Casa Rosada Presidential Palace in Buenos Aires October 29, 2015. Fernandez de Kirchner, a fiery leftist who often rails against Western excess, will leave behind a divided nation. She is hailed by the poor for expanding social welfare programs and protecting local industry but loathed by others who blame her for strangling the economy. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci
ARGENTINA-ELECTION/
RTX1TW1X
October 30, 2015
Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner speaks to supporters from a balcony at the Casa...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Argentina's President Fernandez de Kirchner speaks to supporters from a balcony at the Casa Rosada Presidential...
Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner speaks to supporters from a balcony at the Casa Rosada Presidential Palace in Buenos Aires October 29, 2015. Fernandez de Kirchner, a fiery leftist who often rails against Western excess, will leave behind a divided nation. She is hailed by the poor for expanding social welfare programs and protecting local industry but loathed by others who blame her for strangling the economy. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci
ARGENTINA-ELECTION/
RTX1TVZT
October 29, 2015
Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner appears on a balcony to talk to supporters at the...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Argentina's President Fernandez de Kirchner appears on a balcony to talk to supporters at the Casa Rosada...
Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner appears on a balcony to talk to supporters at the Casa Rosada Presidential Palace in Buenos Aires October 29, 2015. Fernandez de Kirchner, a fiery leftist who often rails against Western excess, will leave behind a divided nation. She is hailed by the poor for expanding social welfare programs and protecting local industry but loathed by others who blame her for strangling the economy. REUTERS/Marcos BrindicciTPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
ARGENTINA-ELECTION/
RTX1TVU0
October 29, 2015
Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner gestures in front of an image of former First Lady...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Argentina's President Fernandez de Kirchner gestures during a ceremony at the Casa Rosada Presidential...
Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner gestures in front of an image of former First Lady Eva Peron during a ceremony at the Casa Rosada Presidential Palace in Buenos Aires, October 29, 2015. Fernandez de Kirchner, a fiery leftist who often rails against Western excess, will leave behind a divided nation. She is hailed by the poor for expanding social welfare programs and protecting local industry but loathed by others who blame her for strangling the economy. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci
ARGENTINA-ELECTION/
RTX1TVTZ
October 29, 2015
Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner listens to Economy Minister Axel Kicillof during...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Argentina's President Fernandez de Kirchner listens to Economy Minister Kicillof during a ceremony at...
Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner listens to Economy Minister Axel Kicillof during a ceremony at the Casa Rosada Presidential Palace in Buenos Aires, October 29, 2015. Fernandez de Kirchner, a fiery leftist who often rails against Western excess, will leave behind a divided nation. She is hailed by the poor for expanding social welfare programs and protecting local industry but loathed by others who blame her for strangling the economy. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci
ARGENTINA-ELECTION/
RTX1TVTQ
October 29, 2015
Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner gestures in front of an image of former First Lady...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Argentina's President Fernandez de Kirchner gestures during a ceremony at the Casa Rosada Presidential...
Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner gestures in front of an image of former First Lady Eva Peron during a ceremony at the Casa Rosada Presidential Palace in Buenos Aires, October 29, 2015. Fernandez de Kirchner, a fiery leftist who often rails against Western excess, will leave behind a divided nation. She is hailed by the poor for expanding social welfare programs and protecting local industry but loathed by others who blame her for strangling the economy. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci
ARGENTINA-ELECTION/
RTX1TVTP
October 29, 2015
Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner talks to Economy Minister Axel Kicillof during a...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Argentina's President Fernandez de Kirchner talks to Economy Minister Kicillof during a ceremony at the...
Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner talks to Economy Minister Axel Kicillof during a ceremony at the Casa Rosada Presidential Palace in Buenos Aires, October 29, 2015. Fernandez de Kirchner, a fiery leftist who often rails against Western excess, will leave behind a divided nation. She is hailed by the poor for expanding social welfare programs and protecting local industry but loathed by others who blame her for strangling the economy. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci
CANADA-CRUDE/SHUT-INS
RTX1RKET
September 08, 2015
Storage tanks at Maidstone well site about 60 kilometres east of field office during a tour of Gear Energy's...
LLOYDMINSTER, Canada
Maidstone well site during a tour of Gear Energy's well site near Lloydminster
Storage tanks at Maidstone well site about 60 kilometres east of field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well sites near Lloydminster, Saskatchewan August 27, 2015. Amid the corn and canola fields of eastern Saskatchewan, oil foreman Dwayne Roy is doing what Saudi Arabia and fellow OPEC producers are loath to do: shutting the taps on active wells. Inside a six-foot-square wooden shed that houses a basic hydraulic pump, the Gear Energy Ltd employee demonstrates how shutting down a conventional heavy oil well in this lesser-known Canadian oil patch is as simple as flipping a switch. His company has already done so hundreds of times this year, making the Lloydminster industry among the first in the world to yield in a global battle for oil market share that has sent crude prices tumbling to six-year lows. Picture taken August 27, 2015. REUTERS/Dan Riedlhuber
CANADA-CRUDE/SHUT-INS
RTX1RKES
September 08, 2015
Storage tanks at Maidstone well site about 60 kilometres east of field office during a tour of Gear Energy's...
LLOYDMINSTER, Canada
Maidstone well site during a tour of Gear Energy's well site near Lloydminster
Storage tanks at Maidstone well site about 60 kilometres east of field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well sites near Lloydminster, Saskatchewan August 27, 2015. Amid the corn and canola fields of eastern Saskatchewan, oil foreman Dwayne Roy is doing what Saudi Arabia and fellow OPEC producers are loath to do: shutting the taps on active wells. Inside a six-foot-square wooden shed that houses a basic hydraulic pump, the Gear Energy Ltd employee demonstrates how shutting down a conventional heavy oil well in this lesser-known Canadian oil patch is as simple as flipping a switch. His company has already done so hundreds of times this year, making the Lloydminster industry among the first in the world to yield in a global battle for oil market share that has sent crude prices tumbling to six-year lows. Picture taken August 27, 2015. REUTERS/Dan Riedlhuber
CANADA-CRUDE/SHUT-INS
RTX1RKER
September 08, 2015
Maidstone well site about 60 kilometres east of field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well sites...
LLOYDMINSTER, Canada
Maidstone well site during a tour of Gear Energy's well site near Lloydminster
Maidstone well site about 60 kilometres east of field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well sites near Lloydminster, Saskatchewan August 27, 2015. Amid the corn and canola fields of eastern Saskatchewan, oil foreman Dwayne Roy is doing what Saudi Arabia and fellow OPEC producers are loath to do: shutting the taps on active wells. Inside a six-foot-square wooden shed that houses a basic hydraulic pump, the Gear Energy Ltd employee demonstrates how shutting down a conventional heavy oil well in this lesser-known Canadian oil patch is as simple as flipping a switch. His company has already done so hundreds of times this year, making the Lloydminster industry among the first in the world to yield in a global battle for oil market share that has sent crude prices tumbling to six-year lows. Picture taken August 27, 2015. REUTERS/Dan Riedlhuber
CANADA-CRUDE/SHUT-INS
RTX1RKEQ
September 08, 2015
Dwayne Roy, Sr. foreman, stands near picture in field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well site...
LLOYDMINSTER, Canada
Roy in office during a tour of Gear Energy's well site in Lloydminster
Dwayne Roy, Sr. foreman, stands near picture in field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well site in Lloydminster, Alberta August 27, 2015. Amid the corn and canola fields of eastern Saskatchewan, oil foreman Dwayne Roy is doing what Saudi Arabia and fellow OPEC producers are loath to do: shutting the taps on active wells. Inside a six-foot-square wooden shed that houses a basic hydraulic pump, the Gear Energy Ltd employee demonstrates how shutting down a conventional heavy oil well in this lesser-known Canadian oil patch is as simple as flipping a switch. His company has already done so hundreds of times this year, making the Lloydminster industry among the first in the world to yield in a global battle for oil market share that has sent crude prices tumbling to six-year lows.Picture taken August 27, 2015. REUTERS/Dan Riedlhuber
CANADA-CRUDE/SHUT-INS
RTX1RKEP
September 08, 2015
Storage tanks rise above corn fields at a well site about 60 kilometres east of the field office during...
LLOYDMINSTER, Canada
Well sites in corn field during a tour of Gear Energy's well site near Lloydminster
Storage tanks rise above corn fields at a well site about 60 kilometres east of the field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well sites near Lloydminster, Saskatchewan August 27, 2015. Amid the corn and canola fields of eastern Saskatchewan, oil foreman Dwayne Roy is doing what Saudi Arabia and fellow OPEC producers are loath to do: shutting the taps on active wells. Inside a six-foot-square wooden shed that houses a basic hydraulic pump, the Gear Energy Ltd employee demonstrates how shutting down a conventional heavy oil well in this lesser-known Canadian oil patch is as simple as flipping a switch. His company has already done so hundreds of times this year, making the Lloydminster industry among the first in the world to yield in a global battle for oil market share that has sent crude prices tumbling to six-year lows. Picture taken August 27, 2015. REUTERS/Dan Riedlhuber
CANADA-CRUDE/SHUT-INS
RTX1RKEO
September 08, 2015
A well head pumps oil into storage tanks at a well site about 60 kilometres east of field office during...
LLOYDMINSTER, Canada
Well head at well site during a tour of Gear Energy's well site near Lloydminster
A well head pumps oil into storage tanks at a well site about 60 kilometres east of field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well sites near Lloydminster, Saskatchewan August 27, 2015. Amid the corn and canola fields of eastern Saskatchewan, oil foreman Dwayne Roy is doing what Saudi Arabia and fellow OPEC producers are loath to do: shutting the taps on active wells. Inside a six-foot-square wooden shed that houses a basic hydraulic pump, the Gear Energy Ltd employee demonstrates how shutting down a conventional heavy oil well in this lesser-known Canadian oil patch is as simple as flipping a switch. His company has already done so hundreds of times this year, making the Lloydminster industry among the first in the world to yield in a global battle for oil market share that has sent crude prices tumbling to six-year lows. Picture taken August 27, 2015. REUTERS/Dan Riedlhuber
CANADA-CRUDE/SHUT-INS
RTX1RKEL
September 08, 2015
Maidstone well site about 60 kilometres east of field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well sites...
LLOYDMINSTER, Canada
Maidstone well site during a tour of Gear Energy's well site near Lloydminster
Maidstone well site about 60 kilometres east of field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well sites near Lloydminster, Saskatchewan August 27, 2015. Amid the corn and canola fields of eastern Saskatchewan, oil foreman Dwayne Roy is doing what Saudi Arabia and fellow OPEC producers are loath to do: shutting the taps on active wells. Inside a six-foot-square wooden shed that houses a basic hydraulic pump, the Gear Energy Ltd employee demonstrates how shutting down a conventional heavy oil well in this lesser-known Canadian oil patch is as simple as flipping a switch. His company has already done so hundreds of times this year, making the Lloydminster industry among the first in the world to yield in a global battle for oil market share that has sent crude prices tumbling to six-year lows. Picture taken August 27, 2015. REUTERS/Dan Riedlhuber
CANADA-CRUDE/SHUT-INS
RTX1RKEK
September 08, 2015
Maidstone well site about 60 kilometres east of field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well sites...
LLOYDMINSTER, Canada
Maidstone well site during a tour of Gear Energy's well site near Lloydminster
Maidstone well site about 60 kilometres east of field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well sites near Lloydminster, Saskatchewan August 27, 2015. Amid the corn and canola fields of eastern Saskatchewan, oil foreman Dwayne Roy is doing what Saudi Arabia and fellow OPEC producers are loath to do: shutting the taps on active wells. Inside a six-foot-square wooden shed that houses a basic hydraulic pump, the Gear Energy Ltd employee demonstrates how shutting down a conventional heavy oil well in this lesser-known Canadian oil patch is as simple as flipping a switch. His company has already done so hundreds of times this year, making the Lloydminster industry among the first in the world to yield in a global battle for oil market share that has sent crude prices tumbling to six-year lows. Picture taken August 27, 2015. REUTERS/Dan Riedlhuber
CANADA-CRUDE/SHUT-INS
RTX1RKEJ
September 08, 2015
Maidstone well site about 60 kilometres east of field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well sites...
LLOYDMINSTER, Canada
Maidstone well site during a tour of Gear Energy's well site near Lloydminster
Maidstone well site about 60 kilometres east of field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well sites near Lloydminster, Saskatchewan August 27, 2015. Amid the corn and canola fields of eastern Saskatchewan, oil foreman Dwayne Roy is doing what Saudi Arabia and fellow OPEC producers are loath to do: shutting the taps on active wells. Inside a six-foot-square wooden shed that houses a basic hydraulic pump, the Gear Energy Ltd employee demonstrates how shutting down a conventional heavy oil well in this lesser-known Canadian oil patch is as simple as flipping a switch. His company has already done so hundreds of times this year, making the Lloydminster industry among the first in the world to yield in a global battle for oil market share that has sent crude prices tumbling to six-year lows. Picture taken August 27, 2015. REUTERS/Dan Riedlhuber
CANADA-CRUDE/SHUT-INS
RTX1RKEI
September 08, 2015
A Maidstone well site about 60 kilometres east of field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well sites...
LLOYDMINSTER, Canada
Maidstone well site during a tour of Gear Energy's well site in Lloydminster
A Maidstone well site about 60 kilometres east of field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well sites in Lloydminster, Saskatchewan August 27, 2015. Amid the corn and canola fields of eastern Saskatchewan, oil foreman Dwayne Roy is doing what Saudi Arabia and fellow OPEC producers are loath to do: shutting the taps on active wells. Inside a six-foot-square wooden shed that houses a basic hydraulic pump, the Gear Energy Ltd employee demonstrates how shutting down a conventional heavy oil well in this lesser-known Canadian oil patch is as simple as flipping a switch. His company has already done so hundreds of times this year, making the Lloydminster industry among the first in the world to yield in a global battle for oil market share that has sent crude prices tumbling to six-year lows. Picture taken August 27, 2015. REUTERS/Dan Riedlhuber
CANADA-CRUDE/SHUT-INS
RTX1RKEB
September 08, 2015
Storage tank and load valves (bottom) at a well site about 60 kilometres east of the field office during...
LLOYDMINSTER, Canada
Storage tanks and load valves at well site during a tour of Gear Energy's well site near Lloydminster...
Storage tank and load valves (bottom) at a well site about 60 kilometres east of the field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well sites near Lloydminster, Saskatchewan August 27, 2015. Amid the corn and canola fields of eastern Saskatchewan, oil foreman Dwayne Roy is doing what Saudi Arabia and fellow OPEC producers are loath to do: shutting the taps on active wells. Inside a six-foot-square wooden shed that houses a basic hydraulic pump, the Gear Energy Ltd employee demonstrates how shutting down a conventional heavy oil well in this lesser-known Canadian oil patch is as simple as flipping a switch. His company has already done so hundreds of times this year, making the Lloydminster industry among the first in the world to yield in a global battle for oil market share that has sent crude prices tumbling to six-year lows. Picture taken August 27, 2015. REUTERS/Dan Riedlhuber
CANADA-CRUDE/SHUT-INS
RTX1RKEA
September 08, 2015
A shut-in well site about 60 kilometres east of the field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well...
LLOYDMINSTER, Canada
Shut-in well site during a tour of Gear Energy's well site near Lloydminster
A shut-in well site about 60 kilometres east of the field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well sites near Lloydminster, Saskatchewan August 27, 2015. Amid the corn and canola fields of eastern Saskatchewan, oil foreman Dwayne Roy is doing what Saudi Arabia and fellow OPEC producers are loath to do: shutting the taps on active wells. Inside a six-foot-square wooden shed that houses a basic hydraulic pump, the Gear Energy Ltd employee demonstrates how shutting down a conventional heavy oil well in this lesser-known Canadian oil patch is as simple as flipping a switch. His company has already done so hundreds of times this year, making the Lloydminster industry among the first in the world to yield in a global battle for oil market share that has sent crude prices tumbling to six-year lows. Picture taken August 27, 2015. REUTERS/Dan Riedlhuber
CANADA-CRUDE/SHUT-INS
RTX1RKE9
September 08, 2015
Well head pumping oil into storage tank at a well site about 60 kilometres east of the field office during...
LLOYDMINSTER, Canada
Well head at well site during a tour of Gear Energy's well site near Lloydminster
Well head pumping oil into storage tank at a well site about 60 kilometres east of the field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well sites near Lloydminster, Saskatchewan August 27, 2015. Amid the corn and canola fields of eastern Saskatchewan, oil foreman Dwayne Roy is doing what Saudi Arabia and fellow OPEC producers are loath to do: shutting the taps on active wells. Inside a six-foot-square wooden shed that houses a basic hydraulic pump, the Gear Energy Ltd employee demonstrates how shutting down a conventional heavy oil well in this lesser-known Canadian oil patch is as simple as flipping a switch. His company has already done so hundreds of times this year, making the Lloydminster industry among the first in the world to yield in a global battle for oil market share that has sent crude prices tumbling to six-year lows. Picture taken August 27, 2015. REUTERS/Dan Riedlhuber
CANADA-CRUDE/SHUT-INS
RTX1RKE8
September 08, 2015
Storage tank load valves at a well site about 60 kilometres east of the field office during a tour of...
LLOYDMINSTER, Canada
Load valves at well site during a tour of Gear Energy's well site near Lloydminster
Storage tank load valves at a well site about 60 kilometres east of the field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well sites near Lloydminster, Saskatchewan August 27, 2015. Amid the corn and canola fields of eastern Saskatchewan, oil foreman Dwayne Roy is doing what Saudi Arabia and fellow OPEC producers are loath to do: shutting the taps on active wells. Inside a six-foot-square wooden shed that houses a basic hydraulic pump, the Gear Energy Ltd employee demonstrates how shutting down a conventional heavy oil well in this lesser-known Canadian oil patch is as simple as flipping a switch. His company has already done so hundreds of times this year, making the Lloydminster industry among the first in the world to yield in a global battle for oil market share that has sent crude prices tumbling to six-year lows. Picture taken August 27, 2015. REUTERS/Dan Riedlhuber
CANADA-CRUDE/SHUT-INS
RTX1RKE7
September 08, 2015
Pipeline valve between pump and storage tank is secured shut at shut-in well site about 60 kilometres...
LLOYDMINSTER, Canada
Shut-in well site during a tour of Gear Energy's well site near Lloydminster
Pipeline valve between pump and storage tank is secured shut at shut-in well site about 60 kilometres east of field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well sites near Lloydminster, Saskatchewan August 27, 2015. Amid the corn and canola fields of eastern Saskatchewan, oil foreman Dwayne Roy is doing what Saudi Arabia and fellow OPEC producers are loath to do: shutting the taps on active wells. Inside a six-foot-square wooden shed that houses a basic hydraulic pump, the Gear Energy Ltd employee demonstrates how shutting down a conventional heavy oil well in this lesser-known Canadian oil patch is as simple as flipping a switch. His company has already done so hundreds of times this year, making the Lloydminster industry among the first in the world to yield in a global battle for oil market share that has sent crude prices tumbling to six-year lows. Picture taken August 27, 2015. REUTERS/Dan Riedlhuber
CANADA-CRUDE/SHUT-INS
RTX1RKE6
September 08, 2015
A shut-in well site about 60 kilometres east of field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well sites...
LLOYDMINSTER, Canada
Shut-in well site during a tour of Gear Energy's well site near Lloydminster
A shut-in well site about 60 kilometres east of field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well sites near Lloydminster, Saskatchewan August 27, 2015. Amid the corn and canola fields of eastern Saskatchewan, oil foreman Dwayne Roy is doing what Saudi Arabia and fellow OPEC producers are loath to do: shutting the taps on active wells. Inside a six-foot-square wooden shed that houses a basic hydraulic pump, the Gear Energy Ltd employee demonstrates how shutting down a conventional heavy oil well in this lesser-known Canadian oil patch is as simple as flipping a switch. His company has already done so hundreds of times this year, making the Lloydminster industry among the first in the world to yield in a global battle for oil market share that has sent crude prices tumbling to six-year lows. Picture taken August 27, 2015. REUTERS/Dan Riedlhuber
CANADA-CRUDE/SHUT-INS
RTX1RKE5
September 08, 2015
Sr. foreman Dwayne Roy checking tap for production at an active well site about 60 kilometres east of...
LLOYDMINSTER, Canada
Checking tap production at well site during a tour of Gear Energy's well site near Lloydminster
Sr. foreman Dwayne Roy checking tap for production at an active well site about 60 kilometres east of field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well sites near Lloydminster, Saskatchewan August 27, 2015. Amid the corn and canola fields of eastern Saskatchewan, oil foreman Dwayne Roy is doing what Saudi Arabia and fellow OPEC producers are loath to do: shutting the taps on active wells. Inside a six-foot-square wooden shed that houses a basic hydraulic pump, the Gear Energy Ltd employee demonstrates how shutting down a conventional heavy oil well in this lesser-known Canadian oil patch is as simple as flipping a switch. His company has already done so hundreds of times this year, making the Lloydminster industry among the first in the world to yield in a global battle for oil market share that has sent crude prices tumbling to six-year lows. Picture taken August 27, 2015. REUTERS/Dan Riedlhuber
CANADA-CRUDE/SHUT-INS
RTX1RKE4
September 08, 2015
The 'off' switch for the engine that runs the pump at a well site about 60 kilometres east of the field...
LLOYDMINSTER, Canada
'Off' switch at well site during a tour of Gear Energy's well site near Lloydminster
The 'off' switch for the engine that runs the pump at a well site about 60 kilometres east of the field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well sites near Lloydminster, Saskatchewan August 27, 2015. Amid the corn and canola fields of eastern Saskatchewan, oil foreman Dwayne Roy is doing what Saudi Arabia and fellow OPEC producers are loath to do: shutting the taps on active wells. Inside a six-foot-square wooden shed that houses a basic hydraulic pump, the Gear Energy Ltd employee demonstrates how shutting down a conventional heavy oil well in this lesser-known Canadian oil patch is as simple as flipping a switch. His company has already done so hundreds of times this year, making the Lloydminster industry among the first in the world to yield in a global battle for oil market share that has sent crude prices tumbling to six-year lows. Picture taken August 27, 2015. REUTERS/Dan Riedlhuber
CANADA-CRUDE/SHUT-INS
RTX1RKE3
September 08, 2015
Abandoned well site about 60 kilometres east of field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well sites...
LLOYDMINSTER, Canada
Abandoned well site during a tour of Gear Energy's well site near Lloydminster
Abandoned well site about 60 kilometres east of field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well sites near Lloydminster, Saskatchewan August 27, 2015. Amid the corn and canola fields of eastern Saskatchewan, oil foreman Dwayne Roy is doing what Saudi Arabia and fellow OPEC producers are loath to do: shutting the taps on active wells. Inside a six-foot-square wooden shed that houses a basic hydraulic pump, the Gear Energy Ltd employee demonstrates how shutting down a conventional heavy oil well in this lesser-known Canadian oil patch is as simple as flipping a switch. His company has already done so hundreds of times this year, making the Lloydminster industry among the first in the world to yield in a global battle for oil market share that has sent crude prices tumbling to six-year lows. Picture taken August 27, 2015. REUTERS/Dan Riedlhuber
CANADA-CRUDE/SHUT-INS
RTX1RKE1
September 08, 2015
Sr. foreman Dwayne Roy checking tap for production at an active well site about 60 kilometres east of...
LLOYDMINSTER, Canada
Checking tap production at well site during a tour of Gear Energy's well site near Lloydminster
Sr. foreman Dwayne Roy checking tap for production at an active well site about 60 kilometres east of field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well sites near Lloydminster, Saskatchewan August 27, 2015. Amid the corn and canola fields of eastern Saskatchewan, oil foreman Dwayne Roy is doing what Saudi Arabia and fellow OPEC producers are loath to do: shutting the taps on active wells. Inside a six-foot-square wooden shed that houses a basic hydraulic pump, the Gear Energy Ltd employee demonstrates how shutting down a conventional heavy oil well in this lesser-known Canadian oil patch is as simple as flipping a switch. His company has already done so hundreds of times this year, making the Lloydminster industry among the first in the world to yield in a global battle for oil market share that has sent crude prices tumbling to six-year lows. Picture taken August 27, 2015. REUTERS/Dan Riedlhuber
CANADA-CRUDE/SHUT-INS
RTX1RKE0
September 08, 2015
Near empty parking lot at hotel in City of Lloydminster following a tour of Gear Energy's well sites...
LLOYDMINSTER, Canada
Near empty parking lot at hotel in City following a tour of Gear Energy's well site near Lloydminster...
Near empty parking lot at hotel in City of Lloydminster following a tour of Gear Energy's well sites near Lloydminster, Saskatchewan August 27, 2015. Amid the corn and canola fields of eastern Saskatchewan, oil foreman Dwayne Roy is doing what Saudi Arabia and fellow OPEC producers are loath to do: shutting the taps on active wells. Inside a six-foot-square wooden shed that houses a basic hydraulic pump, the Gear Energy Ltd employee demonstrates how shutting down a conventional heavy oil well in this lesser-known Canadian oil patch is as simple as flipping a switch. His company has already done so hundreds of times this year, making the Lloydminster industry among the first in the world to yield in a global battle for oil market share that has sent crude prices tumbling to six-year lows. Picture taken August 27, 2015. REUTERS/Dan Riedlhuber
CANADA-CRUDE/SHUT-INS
RTX1RKDY
September 08, 2015
Real estate for sale in City of Lloydminster following a tour of Gear Energy's well sites near Lloydminster,...
LLOYDMINSTER, Canada
Real estate for sale in City following a tour of Gear Energy's well site near Lloydminster
Real estate for sale in City of Lloydminster following a tour of Gear Energy's well sites near Lloydminster, Saskatchewan August 27, 2015. Amid the corn and canola fields of eastern Saskatchewan, oil foreman Dwayne Roy is doing what Saudi Arabia and fellow OPEC producers are loath to do: shutting the taps on active wells. Inside a six-foot-square wooden shed that houses a basic hydraulic pump, the Gear Energy Ltd employee demonstrates how shutting down a conventional heavy oil well in this lesser-known Canadian oil patch is as simple as flipping a switch. His company has already done so hundreds of times this year, making the Lloydminster industry among the first in the world to yield in a global battle for oil market share that has sent crude prices tumbling to six-year lows. Picture taken August 27, 2015. REUTERS/Dan Riedlhuber
CANADA-CRUDE/SHUT-INS
RTX1RKDX
September 08, 2015
Real estate for sale in City of Lloydminster following a tour of Gear Energy's well sites near Lloydminster,...
LLOYDMINSTER, Canada
Real estate for sale in City following a tour of Gear Energy's well site near Lloydminster
Real estate for sale in City of Lloydminster following a tour of Gear Energy's well sites near Lloydminster, Saskatchewan August 27, 2015. Amid the corn and canola fields of eastern Saskatchewan, oil foreman Dwayne Roy is doing what Saudi Arabia and fellow OPEC producers are loath to do: shutting the taps on active wells. Inside a six-foot-square wooden shed that houses a basic hydraulic pump, the Gear Energy Ltd employee demonstrates how shutting down a conventional heavy oil well in this lesser-known Canadian oil patch is as simple as flipping a switch. His company has already done so hundreds of times this year, making the Lloydminster industry among the first in the world to yield in a global battle for oil market share that has sent crude prices tumbling to six-year lows. Picture taken August 27, 2015. REUTERS/Dan Riedlhuber
CANADA-CRUDE/SHUT-INS
RTX1RKDW
September 08, 2015
A shut-in well site about 60 kilometres east of field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well sites...
LLOYDMINSTER, Canada
Shut-in well site during a tour of Gear Energy's well site near Lloydminster
A shut-in well site about 60 kilometres east of field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well sites near Lloydminster, Saskatchewan August 27, 2015. Amid the corn and canola fields of eastern Saskatchewan, oil foreman Dwayne Roy is doing what Saudi Arabia and fellow OPEC producers are loath to do: shutting the taps on active wells. Inside a six-foot-square wooden shed that houses a basic hydraulic pump, the Gear Energy Ltd employee demonstrates how shutting down a conventional heavy oil well in this lesser-known Canadian oil patch is as simple as flipping a switch. His company has already done so hundreds of times this year, making the Lloydminster industry among the first in the world to yield in a global battle for oil market share that has sent crude prices tumbling to six-year lows. Picture taken August 27, 2015. REUTERS/Dan Riedlhuber
CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS
RTR3M1AX
April 21, 2014
A fisherman paddles the waters of the Kitimat Arm of the Douglas Channel in his canoe in northern British...
KITIMAT, Canada
A fisherman paddles the waters of the Kitimat Arm on the Douglas Channel in his canoe in northern British...
A fisherman paddles the waters of the Kitimat Arm of the Douglas Channel in his canoe in northern British Columbia near to where Enbridge Inc plans to build its Northern Gateway pipeline terminal facility April 13, 2014.Enbridge plans to build a massive marine terminal for its oil pipeline carrying diluted bitumen 1,177 km (731 miles) from Alberta's oil sands to the deepwater port in Kitimat, where it would be loaded on supertankers and shipped to Asia. The pipeline is loathed by environmentalists who fear it will hasten the development of Canada's oil sands and exacerbate climate change. But it is also fiercely opposed by many aboriginals along the pipeline path and shipping routes. Picture taken April 13, 2014. To match Feature CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS REUTERS/Julie Gordon (CANADA - Tags: BUSINESS ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)
CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS
RTR3M1AW
April 21, 2014
Murray Minchin, of the grassroots environmental group Douglas Channel Watch, leans over the edge of a...
KITIMAT, Canada
Minchin, of Douglas Channel Watch, leans over the edge of a boat to help retrieve a crab trap on the...
Murray Minchin, of the grassroots environmental group Douglas Channel Watch, leans over the edge of a boat to help retrieve a crab trap on the Douglas Channel, in northern British Columbia near to where Enbridge Inc plans to build its Northern Gateway pipeline terminal facility April 13, 2014. Enbridge plans to build a massive marine terminal for its oil pipeline carrying diluted bitumen 1,177 km (731 miles) from Alberta's oil sands to the deepwater port in Kitimat, where it would be loaded on supertankers and shipped to Asia. The pipeline is loathed by environmentalists who fear it will hasten the development of Canada's oil sands and exacerbate climate change. But it is also fiercely opposed by many aboriginals along the pipeline path and shipping routes. Picture taken April 13, 2014. To match Feature CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS REUTERS/Julie Gordon (CANADA - Tags: BUSINESS ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)
CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS
RTR3M1AV
April 21, 2014
The Haisla community of Kitimaat Village is seen from the waters of the Kitimat Arm of the Douglas Channel,...
KITIMAT, Canada
The Haisla community of Kitimaat Village is seen from the waters of the Kitimat Arm of the Douglas Channel,...
The Haisla community of Kitimaat Village is seen from the waters of the Kitimat Arm of the Douglas Channel, in northern British Columbia near to where Enbridge Inc plans to build its Northern Gateway pipeline terminal facility April 13, 2014. Enbridge plans to build a massive marine terminal for its oil pipeline carrying diluted bitumen 1,177 km (731 miles) from Alberta's oil sands to the deepwater port in Kitimat, where it would be loaded on supertankers and shipped to Asia. The pipeline is loathed by environmentalists who fear it will hasten the development of Canada's oil sands and exacerbate climate change. But it is also fiercely opposed by many aboriginals along the pipeline path and shipping routes. Picture taken April 13, 2014. To match Feature CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS REUTERS/Julie Gordon (CANADA - Tags: BUSINESS ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)
CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS
RTR3M1AU
April 21, 2014
Trevor Amos stands in his fishing boat with a freshly killed seal on the Douglas Channel, in northern...
KITIMAT, Canada
Amos stands in his fishing boat with a freshly killed seal on the Douglas Channel, in northern British...
Trevor Amos stands in his fishing boat with a freshly killed seal on the Douglas Channel, in northern British Columbia near to where Enbridge Inc plans to build its Northern Gateway pipeline terminal facility April 13, 2014. Enbridge plans to build a massive marine terminal for its oil pipeline carrying diluted bitumen 1,177 km (731 miles) from Alberta's oil sands to the deepwater port in Kitimat, where it would be loaded on supertankers and shipped to Asia. The pipeline is loathed by environmentalists who fear it will hasten the development of Canada's oil sands and exacerbate climate change. But it is also fiercely opposed by many aboriginals along the pipeline path and shipping routes. Picture taken April 13, 2014. To match Feature CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS REUTERS/Julie Gordon (CANADA - Tags: BUSINESS ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)
CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS
RTR3M1AS
April 21, 2014
Trevor Amos watches his daughter Arlene while eating left-over spaghetti on his small fishing boat on...
KITIMAT, Canada
Amos watches his daughter Arlene while eating left-over spaghetti on his small fishing boat on the Douglas...
Trevor Amos watches his daughter Arlene while eating left-over spaghetti on his small fishing boat on the Douglas Channel in northern British Columbia near to where Enbridge Inc plans to build its Northern Gateway pipeline terminal facility April 13, 2014. Enbridge plans to build a massive marine terminal for its oil pipeline carrying diluted bitumen 1,177 km (731 miles) from Alberta's oil sands to the deepwater port in Kitimat, where it would be loaded on supertankers and shipped to Asia. The pipeline is loathed by environmentalists who fear it will hasten the development of Canada's oil sands and exacerbate climate change. But it is also fiercely opposed by many aboriginals along the pipeline path and shipping routes. Picture taken April 13, 2014. To match Feature CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS
REUTERS/Julie Gordon (CANADA - Tags: BUSINESS ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)
CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS
RTR3M1AR
April 21, 2014
A gutted seal lays in the fishing boat of Trevor Amos on the Douglas Channel, in northern British Columbia...
KITIMAT, Canada
A gutted seal lays in the fishing boat of Trevor Amos on the Douglas Channel, in northern British Columbia...
A gutted seal lays in the fishing boat of Trevor Amos on the Douglas Channel, in northern British Columbia near to where Enbridge Inc plans to build its Northern Gateway pipeline terminal facility April 13, 2014. Enbridge plans to build a massive marine terminal for its oil pipeline carrying diluted bitumen 1,177 km (731 miles) from Alberta's oil sands to the deepwater port in Kitimat, where it would be loaded on supertankers and shipped to Asia. The pipeline is loathed by environmentalists who fear it will hasten the development of Canada's oil sands and exacerbate climate change. But it is also fiercely opposed by many aboriginals along the pipeline path and shipping routes. Picture taken April 13, 2014. To match Feature CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS REUTERS/Julie Gordon (CANADA - Tags: BUSINESS ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)
CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS
RTR3M1AQ
April 21, 2014
Trevor Amos talks to his daughter Arlene after shooting a seal in the Douglas Channel, near to where...
KITIMAT, Canada
Amos talks to his daughter Arlene after shooting a seal in the Douglas Channel in northern British Columbia...
Trevor Amos talks to his daughter Arlene after shooting a seal in the Douglas Channel, near to where Enbridge Inc plans to build its Northern Gateway pipeline terminal facility April 13, 2014. Enbridge plans to build a massive marine terminal for its oil pipeline carrying diluted bitumen 1,177 km (731 miles) from Alberta's oil sands to the deepwater port in Kitimat, where it would be loaded on supertankers and shipped to Asia. The pipeline is loathed by environmentalists who fear it will hasten the development of Canada's oil sands and exacerbate climate change. But it is also fiercely opposed by many aboriginals along the pipeline path and shipping routes. Picture taken April 13, 2014. To match Feature CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS REUTERS/Julie Gordon (CANADA - Tags: BUSINESS ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)
CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS
RTR3M1AP
April 21, 2014
Gerald Amos holds a female crab caught in a cove on the Douglas Channel, in northern British Columbia...
KITIMAT, Canada
Amos holds a female crab caught in a cove on the Douglas Channel in northern British Columbia
Gerald Amos holds a female crab caught in a cove on the Douglas Channel, in northern British Columbia near to where Enbridge Inc plans to build its Northern Gateway pipeline terminal facility April 13, 2014. Enbridge plans to build a massive marine terminal for its oil pipeline carrying diluted bitumen 1,177 km (731 miles) from Alberta's oil sands to the deepwater port in Kitimat, where it would be loaded on supertankers and shipped to Asia. The pipeline is loathed by environmentalists who fear it will hasten the development of Canada's oil sands and exacerbate climate change. But it is also fiercely opposed by many aboriginals along the pipeline path and shipping routes. Picture taken April 13, 2014. To match Feature CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS REUTERS/Julie Gordon (CANADA - Tags: BUSINESS ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)
CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS
RTR3M1AN
April 21, 2014
A view of Dungeness crabs caught in a cove on the Douglas Channel, in northern British Columbia near...
KITIMAT, Canada
A view of Dungeness crabs caught in a cove on the Douglas Channel, in northern British Columbia
A view of Dungeness crabs caught in a cove on the Douglas Channel, in northern British Columbia near to where Enbridge Inc plans to build its Northern Gateway pipeline terminal facility April 13, 2014. Enbridge plans to build a massive marine terminal for its oil pipeline carrying diluted bitumen 1,177 km (731 miles) from Alberta's oil sands to the deepwater port in Kitimat, where it would be loaded on supertankers and shipped to Asia. The pipeline is loathed by environmentalists who fear it will hasten the development of Canada's oil sands and exacerbate climate change. But it is also fiercely opposed by many aboriginals along the pipeline path and shipping routes. Picture taken April 13, 2014. To match Feature CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS REUTERS/Julie Gordon (CANADA - Tags: BUSINESS ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)
CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS
RTR3M1AM
April 21, 2014
Gerald Amos prepares his crab traps to fish in a cove on the Douglas Channel, in northern British Columbia...
KITIMAT, Canada
Amos prepares his crab traps to fish in a cove on the Douglas Channel, in northern British Columbia
Gerald Amos prepares his crab traps to fish in a cove on the Douglas Channel, in northern British Columbia near to where Enbridge Inc plans to build its Northern Gateway pipeline terminal facility April 13, 2014. Enbridge plans to build a massive marine terminal for its oil pipeline carrying diluted bitumen 1,177 km (731 miles) from Alberta's oil sands to the deepwater port in Kitimat, where it would be loaded on supertankers and shipped to Asia. The pipeline is loathed by environmentalists who fear it will hasten the development of Canada's oil sands and exacerbate climate change. But it is also fiercely opposed by many aboriginals along the pipeline path and shipping routes. Picture taken April 13, 2014. To match Feature CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS REUTERS/Julie Gordon (CANADA - Tags: BUSINESS ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)
CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS
RTR3M1AL
April 21, 2014
A fishing boat floats in the waters of the Douglas Channel, in northern British Columbia near to where...
KITIMAT, Canada
A fishing boat floats in the waters of the Douglas Channel, near to where Enbridge Inc plans to build...
A fishing boat floats in the waters of the Douglas Channel, in northern British Columbia near to where Enbridge Inc plans to build its Northern Gateway pipeline terminal facility April 13, 2014. Enbridge plans to build a massive marine terminal for its oil pipeline carrying diluted bitumen 1,177 km (731 miles) from Alberta's oil sands to the deepwater port in Kitimat, where it would be loaded on supertankers and shipped to Asia. The pipeline is loathed by environmentalists who fear it will hasten the development of Canada's oil sands and exacerbate climate change. But it is also fiercely opposed by many aboriginals along the pipeline path and shipping routes.Picture taken April 13, 2014. To match Feature CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS REUTERS/Julie Gordon (CANADA - Tags: BUSINESS ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)
CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS
RTR3M1AK
April 21, 2014
Gerald Amos talks on the radio in his boat, while out on the waters of the Douglas Channel in northern...
KITIMAT, Canada
Amos talks on the radio in his boat, while out on the waters of the Douglas Channel in northern British...
Gerald Amos talks on the radio in his boat, while out on the waters of the Douglas Channel in northern British Columbia, just a few miles away from where Enbridge Inc plans to build its Northern Gateway pipeline terminal facility April 13, 2014. April 13, 2014. Enbridge plans to build a massive marine terminal for its oil pipeline carrying diluted bitumen 1,177 km (731 miles) from Alberta's oil sands to the deepwater port in Kitimat, where it would be loaded on supertankers and shipped to Asia. The pipeline is loathed by environmentalists who fear it will hasten the development of Canada's oil sands and exacerbate climate change. But it is also fiercely opposed by many aboriginals along the pipeline path and shipping routes. Picture taken April 13, 2014. To match Feature CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS REUTERS/Julie Gordon (CANADA - Tags: BUSINESS ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)
CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS
RTR3M1AJ
April 21, 2014
Snow-capped mountains peak out over a cove area favored by fishermen in the Douglas Channel, in northern...
KITIMAT, Canada
Snow-capped mountains peak out over a cove area favored by fishermen in the Douglas Channel, in northern...
Snow-capped mountains peak out over a cove area favored by fishermen in the Douglas Channel, in northern British Columbia near to where Enbridge Inc plans to build its Northern Gateway pipeline terminal facility April 13, 2014. Enbridge plans to build a massive marine terminal for its oil pipeline carrying diluted bitumen 1,177 km (731 miles) from Alberta's oil sands to the deepwater port in Kitimat, where it would be loaded on supertankers and shipped to Asia. The pipeline is loathed by environmentalists who fear it will hasten the development of Canada's oil sands and exacerbate climate change. But it is also fiercely opposed by many aboriginals along the pipeline path and shipping routes. Picture taken April 13, 2014. To match Feature CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS REUTERS/Julie Gordon (CANADA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS
RTR3M1AI
April 21, 2014
Gerald Amos (L) drives his boat in the Kitimat Arm of the Douglas Channel as Murray Minchin of Douglas...
KITIMAT, Canada
Amos drives his boat in the Kitimat Arm of the Douglas Channel as Murray Minchin of Douglas Channel Watch...
Gerald Amos (L) drives his boat in the Kitimat Arm of the Douglas Channel as Murray Minchin of Douglas Channel Watch looks on in northern British Columbia, just miles away from where Enbridge Inc plans to build its Northern Gateway pipeline terminal facility April 13, 2014. Enbridge plans to build a massive marine terminal for its oil pipeline carrying diluted bitumen 1,177 km (731 miles) from Alberta's oil sands to the deepwater port in Kitimat, where it would be loaded on supertankers and shipped to Asia. The pipeline is loathed by environmentalists who fear it will hasten the development of Canada's oil sands and exacerbate climate change. But it is also fiercely opposed by many aboriginals along the pipeline path and shipping routes. Picture taken April 13, 2014. To match Feature CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS REUTERS/Julie Gordon (CANADA - Tags: BUSINESS ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)
CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS
RTR3M1AH
April 21, 2014
Gerald Amos prepares his crab traps to fish in a cove on the Douglas Channel, in northern British Columbia...
KITIMAT, Canada
Amos prepares his crab traps to fish in a cove on the Douglas Channel, in northern British Columbia
Gerald Amos prepares his crab traps to fish in a cove on the Douglas Channel, in northern British Columbia near to where Enbridge Inc plans to build its Northern Gateway pipeline terminal facility April 13, 2014. Enbridge plans to build a massive marine terminal for its oil pipeline carrying diluted bitumen 1,177 km (731 miles) from Alberta's oil sands to the deepwater port in Kitimat, where it would be loaded on supertankers and shipped to Asia. The pipeline is loathed by environmentalists who fear it will hasten the development of Canada's oil sands and exacerbate climate change. But it is also fiercely opposed by many aboriginals along the pipeline path and shipping routes. Picture taken April 13, 2014. To match Feature CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS REUTERS/Julie Gordon (CANADA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS
RTR3M1AD
April 21, 2014
Gerald Amos prepares his crab traps to fish in a cove on the Douglas Channel, in northern British Columbia...
KITIMAT, Canada
Amos prepares his crab traps to fish in a cove on the Douglas Channel, in northern British Columbia
Gerald Amos prepares his crab traps to fish in a cove on the Douglas Channel, in northern British Columbia near to where Enbridge Inc plans to build its Northern Gateway pipeline terminal facility April 13, 2014. Enbridge plans to build a massive marine terminal for its oil pipeline carrying diluted bitumen 1,177 km (731 miles) from Alberta's oil sands to the deepwater port in Kitimat, where it would be loaded on supertankers and shipped to Asia. The pipeline is loathed by environmentalists who fear it will hasten the development of Canada's oil sands and exacerbate climate change. But it is also fiercely opposed by many aboriginals along the pipeline path and shipping routes. Picture taken April 13, 2014. To match Feature CANADA-PIPELINE/ABORIGINALS REUTERS/Julie Gordon (CANADA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT ENERGY BUSINESS)
UKRAINE/BARRICADES
RTX188Y9
February 05, 2014
A supporter of Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovich holds a placard as police troops stand guard during...
Kiev, Ukraine
A supporter of Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovich holds a placard as police troops stand guard during...
A supporter of Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovich holds a placard as police troops stand guard during a protest outside the Parliament in Kiev February 5, 2014. A political gulf of historic dimensions divides Ukraine but down the hill from where parliament commenced a new session of mutual loathing on Tuesday, the gap on the ground narrows - to Molotov cocktail range. Placards read "Stop Maidan". REUTERS/Gleb Garanich (UKRAINE - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)
UKRAINE/BARRICADES
RTX188XM
February 05, 2014
Ukrainian deputies leave for a break during a session in Parliament in Kiev February 5, 2014. A political...
Kiev, Ukraine
Ukrainian deputies leave for a break during a session in Parliament in Kiev
Ukrainian deputies leave for a break during a session in Parliament in Kiev February 5, 2014. A political gulf of historic dimensions divides Ukraine but down the hill from where parliament commenced a new session of mutual loathing on Tuesday, the gap on the ground narrows - to Molotov cocktail range. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich (UKRAINE - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)
UKRAINE/BARRICADES
RTX188X5
February 05, 2014
Ukrainian heavyweight boxer and opposition politician Vitaly Klitschko addresses parliament as speaker...
Kiev, Ukraine
Ukrainian heavyweight boxer and opposition politician Klitschko addresses parliament as speaker Rybak...
Ukrainian heavyweight boxer and opposition politician Vitaly Klitschko addresses parliament as speaker Volodymyr Rybak (top R) looks on in Kiev February 5, 2014. A political gulf of historic dimensions divides Ukraine but down the hill from where parliament commenced a new session of mutual loathing on Tuesday, the gap on the ground narrows - to Molotov cocktail range. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich (UKRAINE - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)
GERMANY/
RTX15460
November 07, 2013
Israeli Jewish web designer Nili Shani works next to her cat Mitze at her office in Berlin November 5,...
Berlin, Germany
Israeli Jewish web designer Nili Shani works next to her cat Mitze at her office in Berlin
Israeli Jewish web designer Nili Shani works next to her cat Mitze at her office in Berlin November 5, 2013. "I came with my ex-girlfriend to Germany. I had many prejudices at the time. When you grow up in Israel you don't think great about Germany. I do now, but at the time there was fear and prejudice, she said. Apart from once, when she felt threatened by members of a motorcycle gang in one Berlin district, she says she feels safe in the multi-cultural, left-leaning district of Kreuzberg. "I wouldn't want to live in an area, where only native Germans live. Maybe I would like it, but I prefer to live in a cultural mixed district. Things have changed a lot in the last 13 years. When I left for Berlin, people would ask, 'what do you want there?' They didn't know Berlin. But today many find Berlin very cool and they come on visits. The image of Berlin has changed a lot for Israelis in the last ten years. What used to be the loathed capital of the Third Reich is now considered a great, open cosmopolitan city. Many Israelis flee from what's happening in the country and Berlin is a good destination'. November 9th marks the 75th anniversary of the 'Kristallnacht' ('crystal night' or also referred to as 'night of broken glass') when Nazi thugs conducted a wave of violent anti-Jewish pogroms on the streets of Berlin and other cities in 1938. Picture taken November 5, 2013. REUTERS/Thomas Peter (GERMANY - Tags: SOCIETY ANNIVERSARY)
News
News
Reactions to Thatcher's Death - 10 Apr 2013
29 PICTURES
EGYPT-INVESTMENT/
RTR38QUE
October 03, 2012
A new hotel, being built by the Qatari Diar company as part of its investment in Egypt, stands near Kornish...
Cairo, Egypt
A new hotel, being built by the Qatari Diar company as part of its investment in Egypt, stands near Kornish...
A new hotel, being built by the Qatari Diar company as part of its investment in Egypt, stands near Kornish El Nile in Cairo September 30, 2012. A trickle of foreign donor aid looks like Egypt's best hope of averting a balance of payments crisis for now because many of the investors who fled the country last year are loath to return until the government seals a loan from the IMF. A deal with the International Monetary Fund would lend vital credibility to a new Islamist-led administration desperate to revive inward investment that ground to a halt after last year's popular uprising against Hosni Mubarak. Picture taken September 30, 2012. To match Feature EGYPT-INVESTMENT REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany (EGYPT - Tags: BUSINESS REAL ESTATE CONSTRUCTION)
EGYPT-INVESTMENT/
RTR38QU8
October 03, 2012
A new hotel, being built by the Qatari Diar company as part of its investment in Egypt, stands near Kornish...
Cairo, Egypt
A new hotel, being built by the Qatari Diar company as part of its investment in Egypt, stands near Kornish...
A new hotel, being built by the Qatari Diar company as part of its investment in Egypt, stands near Kornish El Nile in Cairo September 30, 2012. A trickle of foreign donor aid looks like Egypt's best hope of averting a balance of payments crisis for now because many of the investors who fled the country last year are loath to return until the government seals a loan from the IMF. A deal with the International Monetary Fund would lend vital credibility to a new Islamist-led administration desperate to revive inward investment that ground to a halt after last year's popular uprising against Hosni Mubarak. Picture taken September 30, 2012. To match Feature EGYPT-INVESTMENT/ REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany (EGYPT - Tags: BUSINESS REAL ESTATE CONSTRUCTION)
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