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Search results for: Looking-back

USA-MAYFLOWER/
RTX7OSNG
August 10, 2020
A crew member looks out from the bow of the newly renovated Mayflower II, a replica of the original...
Plymouth, UNITED STATES
The Mayflower II sails back to its berth in Plymouth
A crew member looks out from the bow of the newly renovated Mayflower II, a replica of the original ship that sailed from England in 1620, as it sails back to its berth in Plymouth, Massachusetts, U.S., August 10, 2020. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
USA-MAYFLOWER/
RTX7OSJU
August 10, 2020
A crew member looks out from the bow of the newly renovated Mayflower II, a replica of the original...
Plymouth, UNITED STATES
The Mayflower II sails back to its berth in Plymouth
A crew member looks out from the bow of the newly renovated Mayflower II, a replica of the original ship that sailed from England in 1620, as it sails back to its berth in Plymouth, Massachusetts, U.S., August 10, 2020. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
USA-TRUMP/
RTX7ND3Z
August 03, 2020
White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows looks back at U.S. President Donald Trump after passing him a...
Washington, UNITED STATES
U.S. President Trump holds executive order signing event in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington...
White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows looks back at U.S. President Donald Trump after passing him a private note in the midst of an executive order signing event on "hiring American" in a darkened Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., August 3, 2020. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
USA-ELECTION/
RTX7M62N
July 27, 2020
A passenger in a passing car looks out at Super Happy Fun America's "Back the Blue/President Trump Standout"...
Stoneham, UNITED STATES
Super Happy Fun America holds a "Back the Blue/President Trump Standout" in Stoneham
A passenger in a passing car looks out at Super Happy Fun America's "Back the Blue/President Trump Standout" in Stoneham, Massachusetts, U.S., July 27, 2020. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
MEXICO-POLITICS/PLANE
RTX7M3F5
July 27, 2020
A military personnel wearing a protective mask looks back as he sits at the console of a plane, Boeing...
Mexico City, Mexico
Military personnel wearing a protective mask looks back as he sits at the console of a plane, that Mexico's...
A military personnel wearing a protective mask looks back as he sits at the console of a plane, Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner, that Mexico's President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador is selling, during a media tour at the presidential hangar at Benito Juarez International Airport, in Mexico City, Mexico July 27, 2020. REUTERS/Henry Romero
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXR7
July 10, 2020
Egilda Orrico, an activist, sits in the window of 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Egilda Orrico, an activist, sits in the window of 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. "This place changed my life. This house chose me, then I chose it" said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXQK
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim who since the end of April has been living in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim who since the end of April has been living in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, opens a window in her room, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. "I escaped from my home and an anti-violence centre put me in a hotel for 3 weeks. I didn't leave the room and I had a lot of panic attacks. I felt so lonely, even though my son was with me. When I arrived at Lucha I felt for the first time that I was not alone. After a short time here, the panic attacks were over," said the woman. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXOS
July 10, 2020
Milva Pistoni, an activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Milva Pistoni, an activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, prepares bread at the house, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. "Lucha is a house of mothers, made by women for women" said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXMK
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim who since the end of April has been living in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim who since the end of April has been living in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, sleeps on the sofa, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. ?Maybe I loved too much and this love was never returned to me. When I saw Lucha?s door for the first time, it was like seeing paradise after dying? said the woman. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXKY
July 10, 2020
A portrait of Simona Ammerata, the activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A portrait of Simona Ammerata, the activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. "I had the idea for Lucha with my sisters, and we made it happen. For me, it's the possibility that the world can change. Women who enter Lucha teach me what it means to suffer from domestic violence and how to escape from it. I have the tools to help, but they have the experience" said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXKX
July 10, 2020
Barbara Tarantino, an activist and seamstress from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Barbara Tarantino, an activist and seamstress from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, is seen at work, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. "There should be 1,000 places like Lucha. Here I found a place of humanity that made me fall in love with my job again" said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXH9
July 10, 2020
Rachele Damiani, an activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Rachele Damiani, an activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, attends the screening of a film at the house, in Rome, Italy, July 7, 2020. "Lucha pushes me to ask myself a lot of questions. It makes possible difficult but wonderful ways to grow as a person", said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXFR
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen due to anonymity, attends her personal consultation...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen due to anonymity, attends her personal consultation with an activist at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The woman has been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXDN
July 10, 2020
Domestic abuse victims, whose faces cannot be seen to protect their identities, attend a weekly meeting...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Domestic abuse victims, whose faces cannot be seen to protect their identities, attend a weekly meeting with activists at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The women have been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXDA
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, chats to an activist at Rome's...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, chats to an activist at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The woman has been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXC1
July 10, 2020
People attend a screening of a film at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
People attend a screening of a film at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 7, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXBR
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, chats to activists at Rome's...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, chats to activists at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The woman has been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXBF
July 10, 2020
An activist talks to a child of a domestic abuse victim who used to live in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
An activist talks to a child of a domestic abuse victim who used to live in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXA0
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, attends a personal consultation...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, attends a personal consultation with an activist at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The woman has been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IX8E
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, with her face obscured to protect her identity, hugs one of the activists during...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, with her face obscured to protect her identity, hugs one of the activists during a visit back to 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women’s house run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. “Lucha will always be my home” said the victim who lived in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' for two years.'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women’s rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city’s heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence – and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IX8D
July 10, 2020
A child is reflected on a mirror inside a tailoring room at 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A child is reflected on a mirror inside a tailoring room at 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA
RTS3IKMB
July 08, 2020
U.S. Assistant Secretary for Health Admiral Brett Giroir displays his personal protective face mask as...
Washington, UNITED STATES
U.S. Assistant Secretary for Health Admiral Brett Giroir speaks at a White House coronavirus task force...
U.S. Assistant Secretary for Health Admiral Brett Giroir displays his personal protective face mask as U.S. Vice President Mike Pence looks on and Dr. Deborah Birx, the White House coronavirus response coordinator, puts her mask back on during a White House coronavirus disease (COVID-19) task force briefing at the U.S. Education Department in Washington, U.S., July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/IRAQ-YAZIDIS
RTS3I4I7
July 06, 2020
Sons of displaced Yazidi Nayef al-Hamo look at the wreckage of their home in Sharya town as they head...
Dohuk, Iraq
Yazidi displaced family al-Hamo leave their home in Sharya town and head back to Sinjar
Sons of displaced Yazidi Nayef al-Hamo look at the wreckage of their home in Sharya town as they head back to Sinjar following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and economic crisis, near Dohuk, Iraq July 3, 2020. Picture taken July 3, 2020. REUTERS/Ari Jalal
BRITAIN-ROYALS/CHARLES
RTS3H20V
July 01, 2020
Britain's Prince Charles looks at a Gloucestershire Old Spot pig with her piglets during a visit to Cotswold...
Cheltenham, United Kingdom
Britain's Prince Charles visits Cotswold Farm Park
Britain's Prince Charles looks at a Gloucestershire Old Spot pig with her piglets during a visit to Cotswold Farm Park in Guiting Power near Cheltenham, Britain July 1, 2020. Farm parks work at preserving British native breeds, encouraging visitors to return to them when they re-open and go back regularly throughout the year to watch the animals change and grow. Kirsty Wigglesworth/Pool via REUTERS
BRITAIN-ROYALS/CHARLES
RTS3H1ZO
July 01, 2020
Britain's Prince Charles looks at a Gloucestershire Old Spot pig with her piglets during a visit to Cotswold...
Cheltenham, United Kingdom
Britain's Prince Charles visits Cotswold Farm Park
Britain's Prince Charles looks at a Gloucestershire Old Spot pig with her piglets during a visit to Cotswold Farm Park in Guiting Power near Cheltenham, Britain July 1, 2020. Farm parks work at preserving British native breeds, encouraging visitors to return to them when they re-open and go back regularly throughout the year to watch the animals change and grow. Kirsty Wigglesworth/Pool via REUTERS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
BRITAIN-ROYALS/CHARLES
RTS3H1ZA
July 01, 2020
Britain's Prince Charles looks at a Gloucestershire Old Spot pig with her piglets during a visit to Cotswold...
Cheltenham, United Kingdom
Britain's Prince Charles visits Cotswold Farm Park
Britain's Prince Charles looks at a Gloucestershire Old Spot pig with her piglets during a visit to Cotswold Farm Park in Guiting Power near Cheltenham, Britain July 1, 2020. Farm parks work at preserving British native breeds, encouraging visitors to return to them when they re-open and go back regularly throughout the year to watch the animals change and grow. Kirsty Wigglesworth/Pool via REUTERS
BRITAIN-ROYALS/CHARLES
RTS3H1VY
July 01, 2020
Britain's Prince Charles looks at a Gloucestershire Old Spot pig with her piglets during a visit to Cotswold...
Cheltenham, United Kingdom
Britain's Prince Charles Cotswold Farm Park
Britain's Prince Charles looks at a Gloucestershire Old Spot pig with her piglets during a visit to Cotswold Farm Park in Guiting Power near Cheltenham, Britain July 1, 2020. Farm parks work at preserving British native breeds, encouraging visitors to return to them when they re-open and go back regularly throughout the year to watch the animals change and grow. Kirsty Wigglesworth/Pool via REUTERS
BRITAIN-ROYALS/CHARLES
RTS3H1VS
July 01, 2020
Britain's Prince Charles looks at a Gloucestershire Old Spot pig with her piglets during a visit to Cotswold...
Cheltenham, United Kingdom
Britain's Prince Charles Cotswold Farm Park
Britain's Prince Charles looks at a Gloucestershire Old Spot pig with her piglets during a visit to Cotswold Farm Park in Guiting Power near Cheltenham, Britain July 1, 2020. Farm parks work at preserving British native breeds, encouraging visitors to return to them when they re-open and go back regularly throughout the year to watch the animals change and grow. Kirsty Wigglesworth/Pool via REUTERS
ARIZONA-POLICE/
RTS3G26E
June 26, 2020
A TPD officer looks on as protesters gather outside Tucson Police headquarters shortly after a vigil...
Tucson, UNITED STATES
Vigil for Carlos Ingram Lopez in Tucson
A TPD officer looks on as protesters gather outside Tucson Police headquarters shortly after a vigil following a video being released showing the April 21 death of Latino man Carlos Ingram Lopez. The family says Lopez, 27, was having a mental health emergency as police restrained him with his hands behind his back on the ground before he died of cardiac arrest outside his grandmother's home while in Tucson police custody, in Tucson, Arizona, June 25, 2020. Picture taken June 25, 2020. REUTERS/Cheney Orr
ARIZONA-POLICE/
RTS3G268
June 26, 2020
A TPD officer looks on as protesters gather outside Tucson Police headquarters shortly after a vigil...
Tucson, UNITED STATES
Vigil for Carlos Ingram Lopez in Tucson
A TPD officer looks on as protesters gather outside Tucson Police headquarters shortly after a vigil following a video being released showing the April 21 death of Latino man Carlos Ingram Lopez. The family says Lopez, 27, was having a mental health emergency as police restrained him with his hands behind his back on the ground before he died of cardiac arrest outside his grandmother's home while in Tucson police custody, in Tucson, Arizona, June 25, 2020. Picture taken June 25, 2020. REUTERS/Cheney Orr
MINNEAPOLIS-POLICE/PROTESTS-DENVER
RTS3DAKY
June 15, 2020
Athena Sylvers looks back after addressing the crowd at the Pride Liberation March, an event highlighting...
Denver, UNITED STATES
Pride Liberation March in Denver
Athena Sylvers looks back after addressing the crowd at the Pride Liberation March, an event highlighting the Black Lives Matter movement within the LGBTQ community in Denver, Colorado, U.S., June 14, 2020. Picture taken June 14, 2020. REUTERS/Kevin Mohatt
MINNEAPOLIS-POLICE/SHOOTER-IMAGE
RTS3C5UF
June 10, 2020
Stunned protesters surround a car that has driven into their ranks. A man is lying on the ground nearby....
Seattle, UNITED STATES
A Picture and its Story: A shooting in Seattle
Stunned protesters surround a car that has driven into their ranks. A man is lying on the ground nearby. Another man exits the driver's side of the vehicle brandishing a gun. The protesters back away from him and he runs off and melts into the crowd as medics rush to help the wounded man. The dramatic scenes of the drive-by shooting on the streets of Seattle were captured by Reuters photographer Lindsey Wasson during protests against police brutality and racism that have rocked the city - and many other places across the United States - in recent days. Wasson, a Seattle native, has been covering the protests in Washington state's largest city since May 31. She took the series of pictures on Sunday evening from the window of a local newspaper that has offices overlooking a street that became a flashpoint. "I had maybe just stepped to the main window, and I was looking over the crowd and seeing what was going on. I heard a scream and commotion and rushed to the dirty side window to photograph what was happening in a side street," she said. "The whole sequence probably took a minute, it happened very quickly." REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SEARCH "WASSON MAN SHOT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. Matching Text: MINNEAPOLIS-POLICE/SHOOTER-IMAGE TEMPLATE OUT
MINNEAPOLIS-POLICE/
RTS39P9B
May 31, 2020
Police officers look on as a car burns in the back as protesters continue to rally against the death...
Washington, UNITED STATES
Protests against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd in Washington
Police officers look on as a car burns in the back as protesters continue to rally against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, near the White House, in Washington, U.S., May 30, 2020. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SENEGAL-EDUCATION
RTS3987X
May 27, 2020
A boy looks out of a bus window as teachers prepare to board government chartered buses to go back to...
Dakar, Senegal
The outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Dakar
A boy looks out of a bus window as teachers prepare to board government chartered buses to go back to schools of countryside towns, scheduled to reopen next week, amid travel bans between regions due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Dakar, Senegal May 27, 2020. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-NEWBORN
RTX7JQH9
May 20, 2020
Reuters photographer Hannah McKay, looks on as her father Jim McKay, puts up a tent for her to sleep...
Coventry, United Kingdom
A Picture and its Story: How photographer captured baby image in coronavirus lockdown
Reuters photographer Hannah McKay, looks on as her father Jim McKay, puts up a tent for her to sleep in, in the back garden of their family home, during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Coventry, Britain, May 13, 2020. Hannah McKay had the opportunity to travel north to cover medical workers in the cities of Blackburn and Burnley and divided the six-hour journey into two parts, sleeping in a tent in her parents' garden in Coventry before setting off the next morning. REUTERS/Hannah McKay SEARCH "COVID-19 BIRTH UK" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/FRANCE-SCHOOL
RTX7JPQM
May 20, 2020
A school nurse looks at a student cleaning his hands with hydroalcoholic gel at the entrance of the College...
Nantes, France
French college students return to school in Nantes
A school nurse looks at a student cleaning his hands with hydroalcoholic gel at the entrance of the College Rosa Parks school during its reopening in Nantes as a small part of French shoolchildren head back to their schools with new rules and social distancing during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in France, May 20, 2020. REUTERS/Stephane Mahe
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA
RTX7IZ65
May 14, 2020
A local resident wears a sign on her back as she looks on as the funeral procession of Glen Ridge Police...
GLEN RIDGE, UNITED STATES
Funeral service held for police officer Charles Roberts who died of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in...
A local resident wears a sign on her back as she looks on as the funeral procession of Glen Ridge Police Department officer Charles Roberts approaches at his funeral service after the 45-year-old father of three died of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Glen Ridge, New Jersey, U.S., May 14, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Segar
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SWISS-EDUCATION
RTX7I968
May 10, 2020
Mael Moussadek Emonot plays on a piano as his sister Eva looks on, as they prepare to go back to school...
Geneva, Switzerland
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Geneva
Mael Moussadek Emonot plays on a piano as his sister Eva looks on, as they prepare to go back to school the next day, after Switzerland smoothen the lockdown measures during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Geneva, May 10, 2020. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SWISS-BUSINESS
RTX7HZ6X
May 08, 2020
A poster reading " Welcome back. It starts again on May 11th. We look forward to you" is seen at a woman's...
Zurich, Switzerland
The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Zurich
A poster reading " Welcome back. It starts again on May 11th. We look forward to you" is seen at a woman's clothing store, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, in Zurich, Switzerland May 8, 2020. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA
RTX7H8MA
May 04, 2020
The statue of American clergyman and author Edward Everett Hale is draped to look like a healthcare worker...
Boston, UNITED STATES
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Massachusetts
The statue of American clergyman and author Edward Everett Hale is draped to look like a healthcare worker with the word "HERO" on the back, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S., May 4, 2020. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/NETHERLANDS-TALLSHIP
RTX7FS60
April 26, 2020
A Dutch student looks out of a car upon arrival on a tallship after sailing back from Cuba instead of...
Harlingen, Netherlands
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Harlingen
A Dutch student looks out of a car upon arrival on a tallship after sailing back from Cuba instead of flying due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Harlingen, Netherlands, April 26, 2020. REUTERS/Eva Plevier
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA
RTX7FI8J
April 24, 2020
U.S. President Donald Trump looks back at Small Business Administration Administrator Jovita Carranza...
Washington, UNITED STATES
U.S. President Trump participates in coronavirus relief bill signing ceremony at the White House in Washington...
U.S. President Donald Trump looks back at Small Business Administration Administrator Jovita Carranza while Sen. Roy Blunt (R-MO) looks on as the president signs the "Paycheck Protection Program and Health Care Enhancement Act," approving additional coronavirus disease (COVID-19) relief for the U.S. economy and hospitals treating people sickened by the pandemic, during a signing ceremony in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, U.S., April 24, 2020. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA
RTX7EKSH
April 20, 2020
Gene Campbell, 89, who contracted coronavirus disease (COVID-19) at Life Care Center of Kirkland in...
EDMONDS, UNITED STATES
Gene Campbell, 89, who contracted coronavirus disease (COVID-19) at Life Care Center of Kirkland, leaves...
Gene Campbell, 89, who contracted coronavirus disease (COVID-19) at Life Care Center of Kirkland in early March, looks back at his son Charlie Campbell, reflected in the window, as he leaves Swedish Medical Center Edmonds after spending six weeks in the hospital in Edmonds, Washington, U.S. April 20, 2020. REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-NEW YORK
RTX7DXBB
April 17, 2020
An elderly man looks up at the sky as an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) wheels him back into the...
New York, UNITED STATES
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in New York
An elderly man looks up at the sky as an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) wheels him back into the Cobble Hill Health Center nursing home during the ongoing outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in the Brooklyn borough of New York, U.S., April 17, 2020. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA
RTS38NE6
April 10, 2020
A parishioner of the New Song Church looks back at a Stations of the Cross as the spread of coronavirus...
Henderson, UNITED STATES
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Henderson, Nevada
A parishioner of the New Song Church looks back at a Stations of the Cross as the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, during an improvised social distance Good Friday celebrations in Henderson, Nevada U.S., April 10, 2020. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Pictures Report
Pictures Report
A look back at the Oklahoma City bombing in 21 images
21 PICTURES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA
RTS386AN
April 06, 2020
White House coronavirus response coordinator Dr. Deborah Birx and U.S. President Donald Trump look back...
Washington, UNITED STATES
U.S. President Trump leads the daily coronavirus task force briefing at the White House in Washington...
White House coronavirus response coordinator Dr. Deborah Birx and U.S. President Donald Trump look back at charts showing the spread across the United States of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak during the daily coronavirus task force briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S., April 5, 2020. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA
RTS386AA
April 06, 2020
White House coronavirus response coordinator Dr. Deborah Birx and U.S. President Donald Trump look back...
Washington, UNITED STATES
U.S. President Trump leads the daily coronavirus task force briefing at the White House in Washington...
White House coronavirus response coordinator Dr. Deborah Birx and U.S. President Donald Trump look back at charts showing the spread across the United States of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak during the daily coronavirus task force briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S., April 5, 2020. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/NIGERIA
RTS37N5V
March 30, 2020
A girl looks back while her mother's temperature is been taken at the boarder between Abuja and Nassarawa,...
Abuja, Nigeria
A girl looks back while her mother's temperature is been taken at the boarder between Abuja and Nassarawa,...
A girl looks back while her mother's temperature is been taken at the boarder between Abuja and Nassarawa, as the authorities try to limit the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), Nigeria March 30, 2020. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA
RTS378M4
March 25, 2020
U.S. President Donald Trump looks back at U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin as the president addresses...
Washington, UNITED STATES
U.S. President Trump leads daily coronavirus briefing at the White House in Washington
U.S. President Donald Trump looks back at U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin as the president addresses the coronavirus task force daily briefing with Dr. Anthony Fauci, Vice President Mike Pence and Mnuchin at the White House in Washington, U.S., March 25, 2020. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA
RTS371FI
March 24, 2020
Puppy Django looks out the car as his owner Jon Cross fills out paperwork to cross back into South Australia...
BORDERTOWN, Australia
Puppy Django looks out the car as his owner Jon Cross fills out paperwork to cross back into South Australia...
Puppy Django looks out the car as his owner Jon Cross fills out paperwork to cross back into South Australia from Victoria during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Bordertown, Australia, March 24, 2020. REUTERS/Tracey Nearmy
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA
RTS371FH
March 24, 2020
Puppy Django looks out the car window as his owner Jon Cross fills out paperwork to cross back into South...
BORDERTOWN, Australia
Puppy Django looks out the car window as his owner Jon Cross fills out paperwork to cross back into South...
Puppy Django looks out the car window as his owner Jon Cross fills out paperwork to cross back into South Australia from Victoria during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Bordertown, Australia, March 24, 2020. REUTERS/Tracey Nearmy
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA
RTS37131
March 24, 2020
Seattle City Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda reaches over to check in to a council meeting by phone due...
Seattle, UNITED STATES
During the outbreak of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Seattle
Seattle City Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda reaches over to check in to a council meeting by phone due to the council's temporary work from home policy as infant daughter Camila Valdes-Mosqueda looks back to see her computer screen during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Seattle, Washington, U.S. March 23, 2020. REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson
Pictures Report
Pictures Report
The women who ran for president
45 PICTURES
U.S. Politics
U.S. Politics
The women who ran for president
45 PICTURES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SRI LANKA
RTS360ZD
March 14, 2020
A Buddhist monk looks back before the prayers during a pirith chanting throughout the night for the well...
Colombo, Sri Lanka
Buddhist monks arrive for the prayers of a pirith chanting throughout the night for the well being of...
A Buddhist monk looks back before the prayers during a pirith chanting throughout the night for the well being of coronavirus affected people in the world as Sri Lanka deals with a major spike in confirmed cases and those suspected of being affected, at Independence square, in Colombo, Sri Lanka March 14, 2020. REUTERS/Dinuka Liyanawatte
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SRI LANKA
RTS360X5
March 14, 2020
A Buddhist monk looks back before the prayers during a pirith chanting through out the night for the...
Colombo, Sri Lanka
A Buddhist monk looks back before the prayers during a pirith chanting through out the night for the...
A Buddhist monk looks back before the prayers during a pirith chanting through out the night for the well being of coronavirus affected people in the world as Sri Lanka deals with a major spike in confirmed cases and those suspected of being affected, at Independence square, in Colombo, Sri Lanka March 14, 2020. REUTERS/Dinuka Liyanawatte
USA-IMMIGRATION/ASYLUM SEEKERS
RTS35U69
March 12, 2020
A short stretch of the meandering Rio Grande - the river that marks the border between the United States...
Penitas, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: A year documenting migration on Rio Grande
A short stretch of the meandering Rio Grande - the river that marks the border between the United States and Mexico - has been for a long time a focal point for migrants looking to head north, seeking a better life. In the first half of 2019, it became a scene of chaos and misery as unprecedented numbers of asylum seekers arrived, mostly Central Americans. Families fleeing poverty and gang violence sought to cross at a record rate, overwhelming the border patrol agents on the U.S. side. As summer gave way to autumn, the numbers declined dramatically. U.S. President Donald Trump, who had campaigned on an anti-immigration platform, passed a series of measures to curb entry and pressured Mexico to make its own border more secure. As a result of the new policies, tens of thousands of migrants have been turned back across the border to wait in Mexico for the resolution of their immigration cases and the U.S. government has more tools to deny asylum seekers outright. The U.S. border patrol said total apprehensions at the southwest border hit a high of nearly 133,000 in May 2019. By November that decreased to some 34,000. Reuters photographer Adrees Latif has spent much of the last year in the Rio Grande Valley, documenting the extraordinary scenes. REUTERS/Adrees Latif SEARCH "RIO GRANDE PATROL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. Matching Text: USA-IMMIGRATION/ASYLUM SEEKERS. TEMPLATE OUT
USA-IMMIGRATION/ASYLUM SEEKERS
RTS35RWR
March 12, 2020
A short stretch of the meandering Rio Grande - the river that marks the border between the United States...
Penitas, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: A year documenting migration on Rio Grande
A short stretch of the meandering Rio Grande - the river that marks the border between the United States and Mexico - has been for a long time a focal point for migrants looking to head north, seeking a better life. In the first half of 2019, it became a scene of chaos and misery as unprecedented numbers of asylum seekers arrived, mostly Central Americans. Families fleeing poverty and gang violence sought to cross at a record rate, overwhelming the border patrol agents on the U.S. side. As summer gave way to autumn, the numbers declined dramatically. U.S. President Donald Trump, who had campaigned on an anti-immigration platform, passed a series of measures to curb entry and pressured Mexico to make its own border more secure. As a result of the new policies, tens of thousands of migrants have been turned back across the border to wait in Mexico for the resolution of their immigration cases and the U.S. government has more tools to deny asylum seekers outright. The U.S. border patrol said total apprehensions at the southwest border hit a high of nearly 133,000 in May 2019. By November that decreased to some 34,000. Reuters photographer Adrees Latif has spent much of the last year in the Rio Grande Valley, documenting the extraordinary scenes. REUTERS/Adrees Latif SEARCH "RIO GRANDE PATROL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. Matching Text: USA-IMMIGRATION/ASYLUM SEEKERS. TEMPLATE OUT
Pictures Report
Pictures Report
Harry and Meghan bow out from official roles
45 PICTURES
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