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Search results for: Lost-people

USA-IMMIGRATION/STORMS
RTX8DVH0
December 04, 2020
People who lost their home due to heavy rains caused by Hurricane Iota are seen living on the side of...
EL PROGRESO, Honduras
People who lost their home due to heavy rains caused by Hurricane Iota are seen living on the side of...
People who lost their home due to heavy rains caused by Hurricane Iota are seen living on the side of a highway, in El Progreso, Honduras November 19, 2020. Picture taken November 19, 2020. REUTERS/Jorge Cabrera
USA-IMMIGRATION/STORMS
RTX8DVGW
December 04, 2020
A general view shows people and their belongings under an overpass, where they are sheltered along other...
San Pedro Sula, Honduras
A general view shows people and their belongings under an overpass, where they are sheltered along other...
A general view shows people and their belongings under an overpass, where they are sheltered along other residents that lost their homes due to the floods caused by heavy rain brought by Hurricane Iota, in San Pedro Sula, Honduras November 19, 2020. Picture taken November 19, 2020. REUTERS/Jorge Cabrera
GLOBAL-POY/STORIES-2020
RTX8BCUC
November 23, 2020
Juliana, who says she is four months pregnant, reacts in front of the body of her husband Davi Barboza,...
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
Pictures of the Year: A Picture and its Story
Juliana, who says she is four months pregnant, reacts in front of the body of her husband Davi Barboza, who was shot in Sao Carlos, during a police operation after heavy confrontations between drug gangs, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, August 27, 2020. Reuters photographer Ricardo Moraes: "About 10 hours into covering clashes between drug gangs battling to take control of the Sao Carlos slums complex in Rio de Janeiro, and a police operation to quell the violence, I found Juliana sobbing in anguish next to the body of her husband Davi, who was found shot dead after the conflict. I was struck by the contrasts in the scene – Juliana's sorrow compared to the stoic faces of the police officers, the military uniforms and weapons surrounding her. Covering violence in Rio is always a challenge. Dealing with the police, residents or victims is not easy, and the situation can change at any minute. That day, I was witness to a lot of distressing events – people being taken hostage, heavy shootouts, police chasing gang members and Juliana's despair. 'My husband, he was what he was. But he was a good man," Juliana said to me the day after she lost Davi. "He was my prince.' REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes/File photo SEARCH "POY STORIES 2020" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
STORM-IOTA/
RTX8AOI6
November 20, 2020
People queue for food under an overpass, where they are sheltered along other residents that lost their...
San Pedro Sula, Honduras
People queue for food under an overpass, where they are sheltered along other residents that lost their...
People queue for food under an overpass, where they are sheltered along other residents that lost their homes due to the floods caused by heavy rain brought by Storm Iota, in San Pedro Sula, Honduras November 19, 2020. REUTERS/Jorge Cabrera TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
STORM-IOTA/
RTX8AOEL
November 20, 2020
People queue for food under an overpass, where they are sheltered along other residents that lost their...
San Pedro Sula, Honduras
People queue for food under an overpass, where they are sheltered along other residents that lost their...
People queue for food under an overpass, where they are sheltered along other residents that lost their homes due to the floods caused by heavy rain brought by Storm Iota, in San Pedro Sula, Honduras November 19, 2020. REUTERS/Jorge Cabrera
STORM-IOTA/
RTX8AOEK
November 20, 2020
People queue for food under an overpass, where they are sheltered along other residents that lost their...
San Pedro Sula, Honduras
People queue for food under an overpass, where they are sheltered along other residents that lost their...
People queue for food under an overpass, where they are sheltered along other residents that lost their homes due to the floods caused by heavy rain brought by Storm Iota, in San Pedro Sula, Honduras November 19, 2020. REUTERS/Jorge Cabrera
STORM-IOTA/
RTX8AOEE
November 20, 2020
A general view shows people and their belongings under an overpass, where they are sheltered along other...
San Pedro Sula, Honduras
A general view shows people and their belongings under an overpass, where they are sheltered along other...
A general view shows people and their belongings under an overpass, where they are sheltered along other residents that lost their homes due to the floods caused by heavy rain brought by Storm Iota, in San Pedro Sula, Honduras November 19, 2020. REUTERS/Jorge Cabrera
STORM-IOTA/
RTX8AOCW
November 20, 2020
People queue for food under an overpass, where they are sheltered along other residents that lost their...
San Pedro Sula, Honduras
People queue for food under an overpass, where they are sheltered along other residents that lost their...
People queue for food under an overpass, where they are sheltered along other residents that lost their homes due to the floods caused by heavy rain brought by Storm Iota, in San Pedro Sula, Honduras November 19, 2020. REUTERS/Jorge Cabrera
STORM-IOTA/
RTX8AOCR
November 20, 2020
People queue for food under an overpass, where they are sheltered along other residents that lost their...
San Pedro Sula, Honduras
People queue for food under an overpass, where they are sheltered along other residents that lost their...
People queue for food under an overpass, where they are sheltered along other residents that lost their homes due to the floods caused by heavy rain brought by Storm Iota, in San Pedro Sula, Honduras November 19, 2020. REUTERS/Jorge Cabrera
USA-ELECTION/REACTION
RTX87ZTX
November 08, 2020
People celebrate after the news media projected that U.S. President Donald Trump had lost his re-election...
St Louis, UNITED STATES
People celebrate after the news media projected that U.S. President Donald Trump had lost his re-election...
People celebrate after the news media projected that U.S. President Donald Trump had lost his re-election bid, during a rally in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S. November 7, 2020. REUTERS/Lawrence Bryant
USA-ELECTION/REACTION
RTX87ZTP
November 08, 2020
A person holds a bottle as people celebrate after the news media projected that U.S. President Donald...
St Louis, UNITED STATES
A person holds a bottle as people celebrate after the news media projected that U.S. President Donald...
A person holds a bottle as people celebrate after the news media projected that U.S. President Donald Trump had lost his re-election bid, during a rally in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S. November 7, 2020. REUTERS/Lawrence Bryant
USA-ELECTION/REACTION
RTX87ZTO
November 08, 2020
A person holds a bottle as people celebrate after the news media projected that U.S. President Donald...
St Louis, UNITED STATES
A person holds a bottle as people celebrate after the news media projected that U.S. President Donald...
A person holds a bottle as people celebrate after the news media projected that U.S. President Donald Trump had lost his re-election bid, during a rally in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S. November 7, 2020. REUTERS/Lawrence Bryant
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8V
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8U
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8T
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8S
October 15, 2020
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8R
October 15, 2020
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8Q
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8O
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8N
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City,...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8K
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8E
October 15, 2020
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8F
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8D
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8C
October 15, 2020
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New...
New York, UNITED STATES
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E89
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/LATAM-POVERTY
RTX80L7W
October 07, 2020
Douglas Felipe Alves Nascimento, 21, who lost his job at a textile firm and tries to make a living selling...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Latin America's middle class during COVID-19 pandemic
Douglas Felipe Alves Nascimento, 21, who lost his job at a textile firm and tries to make a living selling candy on the streets, calls his mother while sitting at a shelter for homeless people, during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, in Sao Paulo, Brazil July 28, 2020. Picture taken July 28, 2020. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDIA-VICTIMS
RTX7Z83D
October 01, 2020
Sana Shaikh, 18, a student, shows a picture on her phone of her father Shaikh Ansar Ahmed, a retired...
Mumbai, India
The Wider Image: Indians share the stories of loved ones they lost to the pandemic
Sana Shaikh, 18, a student, shows a picture on her phone of her father Shaikh Ansar Ahmed, a retired government employee, who died due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), as she poses for a photograph, in Mumbai, India, September 27, 2020. "Everything has changed. We have lost a big support, we have lost the only male member of the family. After my dad's demise I don't enjoy things that I used to enjoy doing when he was around. My mother has obviously faced a bigger change in her life. Our life will be stable in the future but it will be extremely difficult for my mother to carry on without her husband. Public healthcare must be of high quality and free of cost for poor and middle class people in the pandemic," said Shaikh. REUTERS/Francis Mascarenhas SEARCH "COVID DEATHS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/TAIWAN-FESTIVAL
RTX7SZ47
September 01, 2020
People wait in a car that is used to transport the water lanterns for the Hungry Ghost Festival, the...
Keelung, Taiwan
Hungry Ghost Festival in Keelung
People wait in a car that is used to transport the water lanterns for the Hungry Ghost Festival, the lanterns will drift off into the sea as guides to help the lost ghost accepting the passage into afterlife, in Keelung, Taiwan, September 1, 2020. REUTERS/Ann Wang
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHILE-UNEMPLOYMENT
RTX7S9TC
August 28, 2020
Ana Veliz, who is unemployed, stands at her shack as her son (not pictured) makes soap bubbles at 'El...
Santiago, Chile
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Santiago
Ana Veliz, who is unemployed, stands at her shack as her son (not pictured) makes soap bubbles at 'El Sueno de Todos' (The dream of all), an unauthorized settlement without potable water, sewerage and power, where mainly people who lost their jobs were forced to build shacks, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Santiago, Chile August 25, 2020. Picture taken August 25, 2020. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHILE-UNEMPLOYMENT
RTX7S9TD
August 28, 2020
A pregnant woman repairs her shack at 'El Sueno de Todos' (The dream of all), an unauthorized settlement...
Santiago, Chile
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Santiago
A pregnant woman repairs her shack at 'El Sueno de Todos' (The dream of all), an unauthorized settlement without potable water, sewerage and power, where mainly people who lost their jobs were forced to build shacks, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Santiago, Chile August 15, 2020. Picture taken August 15, 2020. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHILE-UNEMPLOYMENT
RTX7S9SP
August 28, 2020
Charlote Madet, who has an informal job, transports a bottle of potable water at 'El Sueno de Todos'...
Santiago, Chile
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Santiago
Charlote Madet, who has an informal job, transports a bottle of potable water at 'El Sueno de Todos' (The dream of all), an unauthorized settlement without potable water, sewerage and power, where mainly people who lost their jobs were forced to build shacks, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Santiago, Chile August 24, 2020. Picture taken August 24, 2020. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHILE-UNEMPLOYMENT
RTX7S9QK
August 28, 2020
Jairo Llanquiman, whose relatives are unemployed, uses a baby trolley to have fun at 'El Sueno de Todos'...
Santiago, Chile
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Santiago
Jairo Llanquiman, whose relatives are unemployed, uses a baby trolley to have fun at 'El Sueno de Todos' (The dream of all), an unauthorized settlement without potable water, sewerage and power, where mainly people who lost their jobs were forced to build shacks, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Santiago, Chile August 24, 2020. Picture taken August 24, 2020. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHILE-UNEMPLOYMENT
RTX7S9QE
August 28, 2020
Erwin Cheuquelen, who is unemployed, places a net at the neighborhood headquarters in 'El Sueno de Todos'...
Santiago, Chile
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Santiago
Erwin Cheuquelen, who is unemployed, places a net at the neighborhood headquarters in 'El Sueno de Todos' (The dream of all), an unauthorized settlement without potable water, sewerage and power, where mainly people who lost their jobs were forced to build shacks, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Santiago, Chile August 22, 2020. Picture taken August 22, 2020. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHILE-UNEMPLOYMENT
RTX7S9PS
August 28, 2020
Alex Soto, son of Eliana (not pictured), who is unemployed, takes a bath at 'El Sueno de Todos' (The...
Santiago, Chile
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Santiago
Alex Soto, son of Eliana (not pictured), who is unemployed, takes a bath at 'El Sueno de Todos' (The dream of all), an unauthorized settlement without potable water, sewerage and power, where mainly people who lost their jobs were forced to build shacks, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Santiago, Chile August 22, 2020. Picture taken August 22, 2020. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHILE-UNEMPLOYMENT
RTX7S9PR
August 28, 2020
Nayaret, who is unemployed, along with her partner Mario, take a break after cooking at 'El Sueno de...
Santiago, Chile
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Santiago
Nayaret, who is unemployed, along with her partner Mario, take a break after cooking at 'El Sueno de Todos' (The dream of all), an unauthorized settlement without potable water, sewerage and power, where mainly people who lost their jobs were forced to build shacks, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Santiago, Chile August 22, 2020. Picture taken August 22, 2020. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHILE-UNEMPLOYMENT
RTX7S9PJ
August 28, 2020
Ulises Rivera, who is unemployed, uses a speker to pray at 'El Sueno de Todos' (The dream of all), an...
Santiago, Chile
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Santiago
Ulises Rivera, who is unemployed, uses a speker to pray at 'El Sueno de Todos' (The dream of all), an unauthorized settlement without potable water, sewerage and power, where mainly people who lost their jobs were forced to build shacks, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Santiago, Chile August 22, 2020. Picture taken August 22, 2020. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHILE-UNEMPLOYMENT
RTX7S9P5
August 28, 2020
Cesar Torres, who is unemployed, casts his shadow while he repairs a roof at 'El Sueno de Todos' (The...
Santiago, Chile
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Santiago
Cesar Torres, who is unemployed, casts his shadow while he repairs a roof at 'El Sueno de Todos' (The dream of all), an unauthorized settlement without potable water, sewerage and power, where mainly people who lost their jobs were forced to build shacks, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Santiago, Chile August 16, 2020. Picture taken August 16, 2020. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHILE-UNEMPLOYMENT
RTX7S9OY
August 28, 2020
Brandon, who is unemployed, holds an egg tray which he won after a raffle at 'El Sueno de Todos' (The...
Santiago, Chile
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Santiago
Brandon, who is unemployed, holds an egg tray which he won after a raffle at 'El Sueno de Todos' (The dream of all), an unauthorized settlement without potable water, sewerage and power, where mainly people who lost their jobs were forced to build shacks, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Santiago, Chile August 22, 2020. Picture taken August 22, 2020. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHILE-UNEMPLOYMENT
RTX7S9NP
August 28, 2020
Patricvio Vergara, who has an informal job, digs a hole to build a shack at 'El Sueno de Todos' (The...
Santiago, Chile
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Santiago
Patricvio Vergara, who has an informal job, digs a hole to build a shack at 'El Sueno de Todos' (The dream of all), an unauthorized settlement without potable water, sewerage and power, where mainly people who lost their jobs were forced to build shacks, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Santiago, Chile August 22, 2020. Picture taken August 22, 2020. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHILE-UNEMPLOYMENT
RTX7S9NM
August 28, 2020
Jano, who is unemployed, carries a wood piece to repair his shack at 'El Sueno de Todos' (The dream of...
Santiago, Chile
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Santiago
Jano, who is unemployed, carries a wood piece to repair his shack at 'El Sueno de Todos' (The dream of all), an unauthorized settlement without potable water, sewerage and power, where mainly people who lost their jobs were forced to build shacks, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Santiago, Chile August 16, 2020. Picture taken August 16, 2020. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHILE-UNEMPLOYMENT
RTX7S9NL
August 28, 2020
Cesar Torres, who is unemployed, uses a hammer to repair a roof at 'El Sueno de Todos' (The dream of...
Santiago, Chile
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Santiago
Cesar Torres, who is unemployed, uses a hammer to repair a roof at 'El Sueno de Todos' (The dream of all), an unauthorized settlement without potable water, sewerage and power, where mainly people who lost their jobs were forced to build shacks, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Santiago, Chile August 16, 2020. Picture taken August 16, 2020. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHILE-UNEMPLOYMENT
RTX7S9NC
August 28, 2020
Locals help to build a neighborhood headquarters at 'El Sueno de Todos' (The dream of all), an unauthorized...
Santiago, Chile
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Santiago
Locals help to build a neighborhood headquarters at 'El Sueno de Todos' (The dream of all), an unauthorized settlement without potable water, sewerage and power, where mainly people who lost their jobs were forced to build shacks, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Santiago, Chile August 15, 2020. Picture taken August 15, 2020. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHILE-UNEMPLOYMENT
RTX7S9MV
August 28, 2020
Tawanza, who is unemployed, carries her son Flores as they leave 'El Sueno de Todos' (The dream of all),...
Santiago, Chile
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Santiago
Tawanza, who is unemployed, carries her son Flores as they leave 'El Sueno de Todos' (The dream of all), an unauthorized settlement without potable water, sewerage and power, where mainly people who lost their jobs are building shacks, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Santiago, Chile August 15, 2020. Picture taken August 15, 2020. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
USA-STORMS/LAURAMARCO
RTX7RAF6
August 23, 2020
Rescue workers look for people in the debris after a wall fell down next to a house, where a mother and...
Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
Rescue workers look for people in the debris after a wall fell down due to Storm Laura passing through...
Rescue workers look for people in the debris after a wall fell down next to a house, where a mother and her son lost their lives, after Storm Laura passed through Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic August 23, 2020. REUTERS/Ricardo Rojas
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-JOBS
RTX7P0X6
August 11, 2020
Men repair potholes as part of a local government program that offers temporary work for people who lost...
Ciudad Juarez, Mexico
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Ciudad Juarez
Men repair potholes as part of a local government program that offers temporary work for people who lost their jobs due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico August 11, 2020. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-JOBS
RTX7P0X0
August 11, 2020
A man carries a broom on his back after sweeping a street as part of a local government program that...
Ciudad Juarez, Mexico
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Ciudad Juarez
A man carries a broom on his back after sweeping a street as part of a local government program that offers temporary work for people who lost their jobs due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico August 11, 2020. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-JOBS
RTX7P0WV
August 11, 2020
People clean a street as part of a local government program that offers temporary work for people who...
Ciudad Juarez, Mexico
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Ciudad Juarez
People clean a street as part of a local government program that offers temporary work for people who lost their jobs due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico August 11, 2020. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-JOBS
RTX7P0WP
August 11, 2020
People sweep a street as part of a local government program that offers temporary work for people who...
Ciudad Juarez, Mexico
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Ciudad Juarez
People sweep a street as part of a local government program that offers temporary work for people who lost their jobs due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico August 11, 2020. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-JOBS
RTX7P0WO
August 11, 2020
People sweep a street as part of a local government program that offers temporary work for people who...
Ciudad Juarez, Mexico
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Ciudad Juarez
People sweep a street as part of a local government program that offers temporary work for people who lost their jobs due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico August 11, 2020. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
LEBANON-SECURITY/BLAST-VIGIL
RTX7OY1B
August 11, 2020
People take part during a vigil for the victims lost in a massive explosion, in Beirut, Lebanon August...
Beirut, Lebanon
Lebanese mourning lost ones during a vigil at time of blast
People take part during a vigil for the victims lost in a massive explosion, in Beirut, Lebanon August 11, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
LEBANON-SECURITY/BLAST-VIGIL
RTX7OXVY
August 11, 2020
People take part in a candle vigil for the victims lost in a massive explosion, in Beirut, Lebanon August...
Beirut, Lebanon
Lebanese mourning lost ones hold candle vigil at time of blast
People take part in a candle vigil for the victims lost in a massive explosion, in Beirut, Lebanon August 11, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
LEBANON-SECURITY/BLAST-VIGIL
RTX7OXTQ
August 11, 2020
People take part in a candle vigil for the victims lost in a massive explosion, in Beirut, Lebanon August...
Beirut, Lebanon
Lebanese mourning lost ones hold candle vigil at time of blast
People take part in a candle vigil for the victims lost in a massive explosion, in Beirut, Lebanon August 11, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
LEBANON-SECURITY/BLAST-VIGIL
RTX7OXLT
August 11, 2020
People take part in a vigil for the victims lost in a massive explosion, in Beirut, Lebanon August 11,...
Beirut, Lebanon
Lebanese mourning lost ones during a vigil at time of blast
People take part in a vigil for the victims lost in a massive explosion, in Beirut, Lebanon August 11, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
LEBANON-SECURITY/BLAST-VIGIL
RTX7OXLD
August 11, 2020
People take part in a vigil for the victims lost in a massive explosion, in Beirut, Lebanon August 11,...
Beirut, Lebanon
Lebanese mourning lost ones during a vigil at time of blast
People take part in a vigil for the victims lost in a massive explosion, in Beirut, Lebanon August 11, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
LEBANON-SECURITY/BLAST-VIGIL
RTX7OXKZ
August 11, 2020
People take part in a vigil for the victims lost in a massive explosion, in Beirut, Lebanon August 11,...
Beirut, Lebanon
Lebanese mourning lost ones during a vigil at time of blast
People take part in a vigil for the victims lost in a massive explosion, in Beirut, Lebanon August 11, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
LEBANON-SECURITY/BLAST-VIGIL
RTX7OXEC
August 11, 2020
People take part in a vigil for the victims lost in a massive explosion, in Beirut, Lebanon August 11,...
Beirut, Lebanon
Lebanese mourning lost ones during a vigil at time of blast
People take part in a vigil for the victims lost in a massive explosion, in Beirut, Lebanon August 11, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
GLOBAL-RACE/PROTESTS-ST. PAUL
RTS3JF5W
July 12, 2020
People dance during a demonstration in St. Paul, Minnesota, U.S. July 12, 2020. Mothers, spouses and...
St. Paul, UNITED STATES
Mothers, spouses and relatives of loved ones lost to police violence march in St. Paul
People dance during a demonstration in St. Paul, Minnesota, U.S. July 12, 2020. Mothers, spouses and relatives of loved ones lost to police violence join supporters protesting racial inequality in the National Mothers March Against Police Violence in St. Paul, Minnesota. REUTERS/Brandon Bell
GLOBAL-RACE/PROTESTS-ST. PAUL
RTS3JF52
July 12, 2020
People rally in front of the St. Paul Capitol, in St. Paul, Minnesota, U.S. July 12, 2020. Mothers, spouses...
St. Paul, UNITED STATES
Mothers, spouses and relatives of loved ones lost to police violence march in St. Paul
People rally in front of the St. Paul Capitol, in St. Paul, Minnesota, U.S. July 12, 2020. Mothers, spouses and relatives of loved ones lost to police violence join supporters protesting racial inequality in the National Mothers March Against Police Violence in St. Paul, Minnesota. REUTERS/Brandon Bell
GLOBAL-RACE/PROTESTS-ST. PAUL
RTS3JF51
July 12, 2020
People march in the street during a demonstration in St. Paul, Minnesota, U.S. July 12, 2020. Mothers,...
St. Paul, UNITED STATES
Mothers, spouses and relatives of loved ones lost to police violence march in St. Paul
People march in the street during a demonstration in St. Paul, Minnesota, U.S. July 12, 2020. Mothers, spouses and relatives of loved ones lost to police violence join supporters protesting racial inequality in the National Mothers March Against Police Violence in St. Paul, Minnesota. REUTERS/Brandon Bell
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