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Search results for: Low-paid-work

FINANCIAL-CRISIS2008/LEHMAN
RTS20WJM
September 11, 2018
Jose Manuel Abel, 52, cleans a table in the restaurant where he works as a waiter in Chipiona, southern...
CHIPIONA, Spain
The Wider Image: Rebuilding lives, 10 years after Lehman's fall
Jose Manuel Abel, 52, cleans a table in the restaurant where he works as a waiter in Chipiona, southern Spain, August 23, 2018. Abel bade farewell to his wife and children and left his native Spain in 2012 after losing his job. He spent six years in Germany doing low-paid work before returning home last year. He now has a temporary job as a waiter, working 17 hours a day, but he expects to be laid off once the summer tourists stop coming to Chipiona. "I'm working as a waiter and I don't have a problem with that because I think that any kind of job is respectable," Abel said. "I have studies, training and I intend to use them in the future." Abel is also working with friends to set up a local political party which will contest municipal elections in 2019. "I don't want my sons to suffer and live what I had to live through," he said. "I don't want them to migrate and look for a job opportunity away from this marvellous place." REUTERS/Marcelo del Pozo SEARCH "LEHMAN 10" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
EUROPE-MIGRANTS/TURKEY
RTS354U
October 05, 2015
A Syrian man who had fled the war in his homeland stands outside shops run by Syrians in a low-income...
Ankara, Turkey
A Syrian man who had fled the war in his homeland stands outside shops run by Syrians in a low-income...
A Syrian man who had fled the war in his homeland stands outside shops run by Syrians in a low-income neighborhood of Ankara, Turkey, September 29, 2015. Nearly five years after the conflict in Syria began, Turkey has shouldered the brunt of the humanitarian burden, sheltering at least 2.3 million Syrians, the largest refugee population in the world. But tensions are simmering between Turk and Syrians as it struggles to integrate a population that does not speak the language and is largely prevented from working. Turkey's refugee camps can house only a fraction of the refugees, who prefer to take their chances in Turkish cities, where they look for low-paid employment or resort to begging. Initial optimism on the part of both refugees and their hosts has given way to resentment and mistrust, helping fuel a tide of migrants fleeing countries that are poor or at war and hoping to reach - legally or illegally - the wealthy EU. Picture taken September 29, 2015. REUTERS/Umit Bektas
EUROPE-MIGRANTS/TURKEY
RTS354T
October 05, 2015
Syrian refugees stroll on a street of a low-income neighborhood in Ankara, Turkey, September 29, 2015....
Ankara, Turkey
Syrian refugees stroll on a street of a low-income neighborhood in Ankara
Syrian refugees stroll on a street of a low-income neighborhood in Ankara, Turkey, September 29, 2015. Nearly five years after the conflict in Syria began, Turkey has shouldered the brunt of the humanitarian burden, sheltering at least 2.3 million Syrians, the largest refugee population in the world. But tensions are simmering between Turk and Syrians as it struggles to integrate a population that does not speak the language and is largely prevented from working. Turkey's refugee camps can house only a fraction of the refugees, who prefer to take their chances in Turkish cities, where they look for low-paid employment or resort to begging. Initial optimism on the part of both refugees and their hosts has given way to resentment and mistrust, helping fuel a tide of migrants fleeing countries that are poor or at war and hoping to reach - legally or illegally - the wealthy EU. Picture taken September 29, 2015. REUTERS/Umit Bektas
EUROPE-MIGRANTS/TURKEY
RTS354S
October 05, 2015
A Syrian man (R) who had fled the war in his homeland sits outside his coffee shop in a low-income neighborhood...
Ankara, Turkey
A Syrian man who had fled the war in his homeland sits outside his coffee shop in a low-income neighborhood...
A Syrian man (R) who had fled the war in his homeland sits outside his coffee shop in a low-income neighborhood of Ankara, Turkey, September 29, 2015. Nearly five years after the conflict in Syria began, Turkey has shouldered the brunt of the humanitarian burden, sheltering at least 2.3 million Syrians, the largest refugee population in the world. But tensions are simmering between Turk and Syrians as it struggles to integrate a population that does not speak the language and is largely prevented from working. Turkey's refugee camps can house only a fraction of the refugees, who prefer to take their chances in Turkish cities, where they look for low-paid employment or resort to begging. Initial optimism on the part of both refugees and their hosts has given way to resentment and mistrust, helping fuel a tide of migrants fleeing countries that are poor or at war and hoping to reach - legally or illegally - the wealthy EU. Picture taken September 29, 2015. REUTERS/Umit Bektas
EUROPE-MIGRANTS/TURKEY
RTS354P
October 05, 2015
A Syrian woman who had fled the war in her homeland shops at a market in a low-income neighborhood of...
Ankara, Turkey
A Syrian woman who had fled the war in her homeland shops at a market in a low-income neighborhood of...
A Syrian woman who had fled the war in her homeland shops at a market in a low-income neighborhood of Ankara, Turkey, September 29, 2015. Nearly five years after the conflict in Syria began, Turkey has shouldered the brunt of the humanitarian burden, sheltering at least 2.3 million Syrians, the largest refugee population in the world. But tensions are simmering between Turk and Syrians as it struggles to integrate a population that does not speak the language and is largely prevented from working. Turkey's refugee camps can house only a fraction of the refugees, who prefer to take their chances in Turkish cities, where they look for low-paid employment or resort to begging. Initial optimism on the part of both refugees and their hosts has given way to resentment and mistrust, helping fuel a tide of migrants fleeing countries that are poor or at war and hoping to reach - legally or illegally - the wealthy EU. Picture taken September 29, 2015. REUTERS/Umit Bektas
EUROPE-MIGRANTS/TURKEY
RTS354N
October 05, 2015
Syrian refugees stroll on a street of a low-income neighborhood in Ankara, Turkey, September 29, 2015....
Ankara, Turkey
Syrian refugees stroll on a street of a low-income neighborhood in Ankara
Syrian refugees stroll on a street of a low-income neighborhood in Ankara, Turkey, September 29, 2015. Nearly five years after the conflict in Syria began, Turkey has shouldered the brunt of the humanitarian burden, sheltering at least 2.3 million Syrians, the largest refugee population in the world. But tensions are simmering between Turk and Syrians as it struggles to integrate a population that does not speak the language and is largely prevented from working. Turkey's refugee camps can house only a fraction of the refugees, who prefer to take their chances in Turkish cities, where they look for low-paid employment or resort to begging. Initial optimism on the part of both refugees and their hosts has given way to resentment and mistrust, helping fuel a tide of migrants fleeing countries that are poor or at war and hoping to reach - legally or illegally - the wealthy EU. Picture taken September 29, 2015. REUTERS/Umit Bektas
SAFRICA-LABOUR/
RTXZOKP
May 16, 2013
People work on machines at a clothing factory at an industrial town of Newcastle, 260 km (162 miles)...
Newcastle, South Africa
People work on machines at clothing factory at an industrial town of Newcastle
People work on machines at a clothing factory at an industrial town of Newcastle, 260 km (162 miles) southeast of Johannesburg May 8, 2013. South Africa says its garment industry is better regulated and workers are better paid than in ultra low-cost Asian producers like Bangladesh, where the collapse of a factory killed more than 1,100 people last month. Picture taken May 8, 2013. REUTERS/Jon Herskovitz (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: BUSINESS TEXTILE)
SAFRICA-LABOUR/
RTXZOKK
May 16, 2013
Workers work on machines at a clothing factory at an industrial town of Newcastle, 260 km (162 miles)...
Newcastle, South Africa
Workers work on machines at a clothing factory at an industrial town of Newcastle
Workers work on machines at a clothing factory at an industrial town of Newcastle, 260 km (162 miles) southeast of Johannesburg May 8, 2013. South Africa says its garment industry is better regulated and workers are better paid than in ultra low-cost Asian producers like Bangladesh, where the collapse of a factory killed more than 1,100 people last month. Picture taken May 8, 2013. REUTERS/Jon Herskovitz (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: BUSINESS TEXTILE)
SAFRICA-LABOUR/
RTXZOKF
May 16, 2013
A woman works at a clothing factory at the industrial town of Newcastle, 260 km (162 miles) southeast...
Newcastle, South Africa
Woman works at clothing factory at the industrial town of Newcastle
A woman works at a clothing factory at the industrial town of Newcastle, 260 km (162 miles) southeast of Johannesburg May 8, 2013. South Africa says its garment industry is better regulated and workers are better paid than in ultra low-cost Asian producers like Bangladesh, where the collapse of a factory killed more than 1,100 people last month. Picture taken May 8, 2013. REUTERS/Jon Herskovitz (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: BUSINESS TEXTILE)
CHINA-CONGRESS/LEADERSHIP
RTR3A5HX
November 08, 2012
Workers finish work at the Honda Lock factory in the factory town of Xiaolan in the southern China's...
Xiaolan, China
Workers finish work at Honda Lock factory in Xiaolan in Guangdong province
Workers finish work at the Honda Lock factory in the factory town of Xiaolan in the southern China's Guangdong province November 1, 2012. Workers at the Honda Lock auto parts plant went on strike two years ago, weary of their low paid, grinding work. Word of their action -- a rare early instance of a strike that crippled production for a multinational corporation in China -- spread rapidly on social media, inspiring other workers at plants across the country and forced many firms and local authorities to respond by raising minimum wages and benefits. Picture taken November 1, 2012. REUTERS/James Pomfret (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
MYANMAR-ROHINGYAS/
RTR33TM8
June 18, 2012
An ethnic Rohingya from Myanmar and living in Malaysia, Muhammad Karim Muhammad Salim (L), 13, attends...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
An ethnic Rohingya from Myanmar and living in Malaysia, Muhammad Karim Muhammad Salim, 13, attends his...
An ethnic Rohingya from Myanmar and living in Malaysia, Muhammad Karim Muhammad Salim (L), 13, attends his Koran reading class in Kuala Lumpur May 30, 2012. The Rohingya in Myanmar are usually landless as well as stateless, and scratch a living from low-paid casual labor. During the so-called "sailing season" between monsoons, thousands of Rohingya attempt to cross the Bay of Bengal in small, ramshackle fishing boats. Their destination: Muslim-majority Malaysia, where thousands of Rohingya work, mostly illegally. Every year up to 40 villagers head out to sea on Malaysia-bound boats. They each pay about 200,000 kyat, or $250, a small fortune by local standards. But the extended Rohingya families who raise the sum regard it as an investment. Picture taken May 30, 2012. REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad (MALAYSIA - Tags: SOCIETY CONFLICT EDUCATION)
MYANMAR-ROHINGYAS/
RTR33TM7
June 18, 2012
An ethnic Rohingya from Myanmar and living in Malaysia waits for a prayer at the National Mosque in Kuala...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
An ethnic Rohingya from Myanmar and living in Malaysia waits for a prayer at the National Mosque in Kuala...
An ethnic Rohingya from Myanmar and living in Malaysia waits for a prayer at the National Mosque in Kuala Lumpur June 17, 2012. The Rohingya in Myanmar are usually landless as well as stateless, and scratch a living from low-paid casual labor. During the so-called "sailing season" between monsoons, thousands of Rohingya attempt to cross the Bay of Bengal in small, ramshackle fishing boats. Their destination: Muslim-majority Malaysia, where thousands of Rohingya work, mostly illegally. Every year up to 40 villagers head out to sea on Malaysia-bound boats. They each pay about 200,000 kyat, or $250, a small fortune by local standards. But the extended Rohingya families who raise the sum regard it as an investment. Picture taken June 17, 2012. REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad (MALAYSIA - Tags: SOCIETY RELIGION CONFLICT)
MYANMAR-ROHINGYAS/
RTR33TM5
June 18, 2012
Abul Foyaz Abdul Hakim, an ethnic Rohingya from Myanmar and living in Malaysia, sits in his living room...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Abul Foyaz Abdul Hakim, an ethnic Rohingya from Myanmar and living in Malaysia, sits in his living room...
Abul Foyaz Abdul Hakim, an ethnic Rohingya from Myanmar and living in Malaysia, sits in his living room with his family at their house in Kuala Lumpur May 31, 2012. Abul Foyaz came to Malaysia 18 years ago, got married and raised his children in Malaysia. The Rohingya in Myanmar are usually landless as well as stateless, and scratch a living from low-paid casual labor. During the so-called "sailing season" between monsoons, thousands of Rohingya attempt to cross the Bay of Bengal in small, ramshackle fishing boats. Their destination: Muslim-majority Malaysia, where thousands of Rohingya work, mostly illegally. Every year up to 40 villagers head out to sea on Malaysia-bound boats. They each pay about 200,000 kyat, or $250, a small fortune by local standards. But the extended Rohingya families who raise the sum regard it as an investment. Picture taken May 31, 2012. REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad (MALAYSIA - Tags: SOCIETY RELIGION CONFLICT)
MYANMAR-ROHINGYAS/
RTR33TLU
June 18, 2012
Ethnic Rohingyas from Myanmar and living in Malaysia wait for a prayer next to a display of Koranic verses...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Ethnic Rohingyas from Myanmar and living in Malaysia wait for a prayer next to a display of Koranic verses...
Ethnic Rohingyas from Myanmar and living in Malaysia wait for a prayer next to a display of Koranic verses that say "I bear witness that there is no god but Allah, and I bear witness that Muhammad is the Messenger of Allah", outside a mosque in Kuala Lumpur June 17, 2012. The Rohingya in Myanmar are usually landless as well as stateless, and scratch a living from low-paid casual labor. During the so-called "sailing season" between monsoons, thousands of Rohingya attempt to cross the Bay of Bengal in small, ramshackle fishing boats. Their destination: Muslim-majority Malaysia, where thousands of Rohingya work, mostly illegally. Every year up to 40 villagers head out to sea on Malaysia-bound boats. They each pay about 200,000 kyat, or $250, a small fortune by local standards. But the extended Rohingya families who raise the sum regard it as an investment. Picture taken June 17, 2012. REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad (MALAYSIA - Tags: SOCIETY RELIGION CONFLICT)
MYANMAR-ROHINGYAS/
RTR33TLT
June 18, 2012
An ethnic Rohingya from Myanmar and living in Malaysia looks on as he finishes his prayer at a mosque...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
An ethnic Rohingya from Myanmar and living in Malaysia looks on as he finishes his prayer at a mosque...
An ethnic Rohingya from Myanmar and living in Malaysia looks on as he finishes his prayer at a mosque in Kuala Lumpur June 17, 2012. The Rohingya in Myanmar are usually landless as well as stateless, and scratch a living from low-paid casual labor. During the so-called "sailing season" between monsoons, thousands of Rohingya attempt to cross the Bay of Bengal in small, ramshackle fishing boats. Their destination: Muslim-majority Malaysia, where thousands of Rohingya work, mostly illegally. Every year up to 40 villagers head out to sea on Malaysia-bound boats. They each pay about 200,000 kyat, or $250, a small fortune by local standards. But the extended Rohingya families who raise the sum regard it as an investment. Picture taken June 17, 2012. REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad (MALAYSIA - Tags: SOCIETY RELIGION CONFLICT)
MYANMAR-ROHINGYAS/
RTR33TLQ
June 18, 2012
An ethnic Rohingya from Myanmar and living in Malaysia, wearing a traditional Malay "songkok" prayer...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
An ethnic Rohingya from Myanmar and living in Malaysia, wearing a traditional Malay "songkok" prayer...
An ethnic Rohingya from Myanmar and living in Malaysia, wearing a traditional Malay "songkok" prayer cap, recites prayers at a mosque in Kuala Lumpur June 17, 2012. The Rohingya in Myanmar are usually landless as well as stateless, and scratch a living from low-paid casual labor. During the so-called "sailing season" between monsoons, thousands of Rohingya attempt to cross the Bay of Bengal in small, ramshackle fishing boats. Their destination: Muslim-majority Malaysia, where thousands of Rohingya work, mostly illegally. Every year up to 40 villagers head out to sea on Malaysia-bound boats. They each pay about 200,000 kyat, or $250, a small fortune by local standards. But the extended Rohingya families who raise the sum regard it as an investment. Picture taken June 17, 2012. REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad (MALAYSIA - Tags: SOCIETY RELIGION CONFLICT)
MYANMAR-ROHINGYAS/
RTR33TLI
June 18, 2012
Ethnic Rohingyas from Myanmar and living in Malaysia talk as they wait for a prayer outside a mosque...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Ethnic Rohingyas from Myanmar and living in Malaysia talk as they wait for a prayer outside a mosque...
Ethnic Rohingyas from Myanmar and living in Malaysia talk as they wait for a prayer outside a mosque in Kuala Lumpur June 17, 2012. The Rohingya in Myanmar are usually landless as well as stateless, and scratch a living from low-paid casual labor. During the so-called "sailing season" between monsoons, thousands of Rohingya attempt to cross the Bay of Bengal in small, ramshackle fishing boats. Their destination: Muslim-majority Malaysia, where thousands of Rohingya work, mostly illegally. Every year up to 40 villagers head out to sea on Malaysia-bound boats. They each pay about 200,000 kyat, or $250, a small fortune by local standards. But the extended Rohingya families who raise the sum regard it as an investment. Picture taken June 17, 2012. REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad (MALAYSIA - Tags: SOCIETY RELIGION CONFLICT)
MYANMAR-ROHINGYAS/
RTR33TLH
June 18, 2012
Ethnic Rohingyas from Myanmar and living in Malaysia gather before a prayer at the National Mosque in...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Ethnic Rohingyas from Myanmar and living in Malaysia gather before a prayer at the National Mosque in...
Ethnic Rohingyas from Myanmar and living in Malaysia gather before a prayer at the National Mosque in Kuala Lumpur June 17, 2012. The Rohingya in Myanmar are usually landless as well as stateless, and scratch a living from low-paid casual labor. During the so-called "sailing season" between monsoons, thousands of Rohingya attempt to cross the Bay of Bengal in small, ramshackle fishing boats. Their destination: Muslim-majority Malaysia, where thousands of Rohingya work, mostly illegally. Every year up to 40 villagers head out to sea on Malaysia-bound boats. They each pay about 200,000 kyat, or $250, a small fortune by local standards. But the extended Rohingya families who raise the sum regard it as an investment. Picture taken June 17, 2012. REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad (MALAYSIA - Tags: SOCIETY RELIGION CONFLICT)
MYANMAR-ROHINGYAS/
RTR33TLG
June 18, 2012
A young ethnic Rohingya from Myanmar and living in Malaysia, Nur Begum Shamshu Alam, 5, attends her Malay...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
A young ethnic Rohingya from Myanmar and living in Malaysia, Nur Begum Shamshu Alam, 5, attends her Malay...
A young ethnic Rohingya from Myanmar and living in Malaysia, Nur Begum Shamshu Alam, 5, attends her Malay language class in Kuala Lumpur May 30, 2012. The Rohingya in Myanmar are usually landless as well as stateless, and scratch a living from low-paid casual labor. During the so-called "sailing season" between monsoons, thousands of Rohingya attempt to cross the Bay of Bengal in small, ramshackle fishing boats. Their destination: Muslim-majority Malaysia, where thousands of Rohingya work, mostly illegally. Every year up to 40 villagers head out to sea on Malaysia-bound boats. They each pay about 200,000 kyat, or $250, a small fortune by local standards. But the extended Rohingya families who raise the sum regard it as an investment. Picture taken May 30, 2012. REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad (MALAYSIA - Tags: SOCIETY POLITICS)
MYANMAR-ROHINGYAS/
RTR33TLF
June 18, 2012
Ethnic Rohingyas from Myanmar and living in Malaysia perform prayers at a mosque in Kuala Lumpur June...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Ethnic Rohingyas from Myanmar and living in Malaysia perform prayers at a mosque in Kuala Lumpur
Ethnic Rohingyas from Myanmar and living in Malaysia perform prayers at a mosque in Kuala Lumpur June 17, 2012. The Rohingya in Myanmar are usually landless as well as stateless, and scratch a living from low-paid casual labor. During the so-called "sailing season" between monsoons, thousands of Rohingya attempt to cross the Bay of Bengal in small, ramshackle fishing boats. Their destination: Muslim-majority Malaysia, where thousands of Rohingya work, mostly illegally. Every year up to 40 villagers head out to sea on Malaysia-bound boats. They each pay about 200,000 kyat, or $250, a small fortune by local standards. But the extended Rohingya families who raise the sum regard it as an investment. Picture taken June 17, 2012. REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad (MALAYSIA - Tags: SOCIETY RELIGION)
ALGERIA/
RTR31DR9
April 29, 2012
A woman walks past policemen standing guard as graduates who work temporary jobs in the public sector...
Algiers, Algeria
Woman walks past policemen standing guard as graduates who work temporary jobs in the public sector protest...
A woman walks past policemen standing guard as graduates who work temporary jobs in the public sector protest against the government in downtown Algiers April 29, 2012. The protesters are among thousands of young Algerian university graduates who are placed by the state in low-paid temporary public sector jobs until they can be allocated long-term posts. The protesters say they have been stuck for too long in the low-paid jobs, and will boycott the May 10 parliamentary election unless they are moved to permanent roles. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra (ALGERIA - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT POLITICS CIVIL UNREST EDUCATION)
ALGERIA/
RTR31DQY
April 29, 2012
A graduate who works temporary jobs in the public sector protests next to a line of police against the...
Algiers, Algeria
Graduate who works temporary jobs in the public sector protests against the government in downtown Algiers...
A graduate who works temporary jobs in the public sector protests next to a line of police against the government in downtown Algiers April 29, 2012. The protesters are among thousands of young Algerian university graduates who are placed by the state in low-paid temporary public sector jobs until they can be allocated long-term posts. The protesters say they have been stuck for too long in the low-paid jobs, and will boycott the May 10 parliamentary election unless they are moved to permanent roles. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra (ALGERIA - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT POLITICS CIVIL UNREST EDUCATION)
ALGERIA/
RTR31DQT
April 29, 2012
A graduates who works temporary jobs in the public sector protests against the government in downtown...
Algiers, Algeria
Graduate who works temporary jobs in the public sector protests against the government in downtown Algiers...
A graduates who works temporary jobs in the public sector protests against the government in downtown Algiers April 29, 2012. The protesters are among thousands of young Algerian university graduates who are placed by the state in low-paid temporary public sector jobs until they can be allocated long-term posts. The protesters say they have been stuck for too long in the low-paid jobs, and will boycott the May 10 parliamentary election unless they are moved to permanent roles. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra (ALGERIA - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT POLITICS CIVIL UNREST EDUCATION)
ALGERIA/
RTR31DQ5
April 29, 2012
Graduates who work temporary jobs in the public sector protest against the government in downtown Algiers...
Algiers, Algeria
Graduates who work temporary jobs in the public sector protest against the government in downtown Algiers...
Graduates who work temporary jobs in the public sector protest against the government in downtown Algiers April 29, 2012. The protesters are among thousands of young Algerian university graduates who are placed by the state in low-paid temporary public sector jobs until they can be allocated long-term posts. The protesters say they have been stuck for too long in the low-paid jobs, and will boycott the May 10 parliamentary election unless they are moved to permanent roles. Banner reads " We want permanent employment."REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra (ALGERIA - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT POLITICS CIVIL UNREST EDUCATION)
ALGERIA/
RTR31DQ0
April 29, 2012
Graduates who work temporary jobs in the public sector protest against the government in downtown Algiers...
Algiers, Algeria
Graduates who work temporary jobs in the public sector protest against the government in downtown Algiers...
Graduates who work temporary jobs in the public sector protest against the government in downtown Algiers April 29, 2012. The protesters are among thousands of young Algerian university graduates who are placed by the state in low-paid temporary public sector jobs until they can be allocated long-term posts. The protesters say they have been stuck for too long in the low-paid jobs, and will boycott the May 10 parliamentary election unless they are moved to permanent roles. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra (ALGERIA - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT POLITICS CIVIL UNREST EDUCATION)
ALGERIA/
RTR31DPM
April 29, 2012
Policemen stand guard as graduates who work temporary jobs in the public sector protest against the government...
Algiers, Algeria
Policemen stand guard as graduates who work temporary jobs in the public sector protest against the government...
Policemen stand guard as graduates who work temporary jobs in the public sector protest against the government in downtown Algiers April 29, 2012. The protesters are among thousands of young Algerian university graduates who are placed by the state in low-paid temporary public sector jobs until they can be allocated long-term posts. The protesters say they have been stuck for too long in the low-paid jobs, and will boycott the May 10 parliamentary election unless they are moved to permanent roles. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra (ALGERIA - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT POLITICS CIVIL UNREST EDUCATION)
ALGERIA/
RTR31DPJ
April 29, 2012
Graduates who work temporary jobs in the public sector protest against the government in downtown Algiers...
Algiers, Algeria
Graduates who work temporary jobs in the public sector protest against the government in downtown Algiers...
Graduates who work temporary jobs in the public sector protest against the government in downtown Algiers April 29, 2012. The protesters are among thousands of young Algerian university graduates who are placed by the state in low-paid temporary public sector jobs until they can be allocated long-term posts. The protesters say they have been stuck for too long in the low-paid jobs, and will boycott the May 10 parliamentary election unless they are moved to permanent roles. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra (ALGERIA - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT POLITICS CIVIL UNREST EDUCATION)
ALGERIA/
RTR31DPH
April 29, 2012
Graduates who work temporary jobs in the public sector protest against the government in downtown Algiers...
Algiers, Algeria
Graduates who work temporary jobs in the public sector protest against the government in downtown Algiers...
Graduates who work temporary jobs in the public sector protest against the government in downtown Algiers April 29, 2012. The protesters are among thousands of young Algerian university graduates who are placed by the state in low-paid temporary public sector jobs until they can be allocated long-term posts. The protesters say they have been stuck for too long in the low-paid jobs, and will boycott the May 10 parliamentary election unless they are moved to permanent roles. Placard (C) reads "Stop Pre-employment". REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra (ALGERIA - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT POLITICS CIVIL UNREST EDUCATION)
BRAZIL/
RTR2RYZ6
September 28, 2011
A Haitian man cleans a car window in Manaus September 21, 2011. Since the January 12, 2010 earthquake...
Manaus, Brazil
A Haitian man cleans a car window in Manaus
A Haitian man cleans a car window in Manaus September 21, 2011. Since the January 12, 2010 earthquake that killed around 250,000 people in Haiti, hundreds of Haitians have been migrating to Brazil via Peru and Ecuador. According to the Pastoral do Migrante, a Catholic entity that helps Haitians seeking refugee status in Brazil, there are more than 2,000 Haitians in the Amazonas State region of Brazil, with only around 400 having managed to acquire resident visas from the government. Most work in construction and in factories, earning little more than the minimum wage of $300 monthly, leaving them little or no money to send home to family in Haiti, according to the Association of Haitian Workers in Manaus. Picture taken on September 21, 2011. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER SOCIETY IMMIGRATION TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
CHINA-WEALTH/
RTR2HFUM
August 20, 2010
A cleaner works in front of a building that makes up the luxurious Chateau Laffitte Hotel, an imitation...
Beijing, China
A cleaner works in front of a building that makes up the luxurious Chateau Laffitte Hotel on the outskirts...
A cleaner works in front of a building that makes up the luxurious Chateau Laffitte Hotel, an imitation of the 1650 Château Maisons-Laffitte by the French architect François Mansart, located on the outskirts of Beijing August 20, 2010. In 2004, when the hotel was under construction, the owners were accused of forcing local farmers off their land, and offering them low-paid jobs as compensation. China's richest citizens are even wealthier than the statistics suggest, and may hold as much as 9.3 trillion yuan (US$1.4 trillion) of hidden assets, according to a Credit Suisse-sponsored study by a top economic think-tank. And nearly two thirds of that unreported income goes into the pockets of the richest 10 percent, widening China's already troubling wealth gap, said Wang Xiaolu, the economist at the China Society of Economic Reform (CSER), who headed the survey. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS)
CHINA-WEALTH/
RTR2HFUL
August 20, 2010
A cleaner works in front of a building that makes up the luxurious Chateau Laffitte Hotel, an imitation...
Beijing, China
A cleaner works in front of a building that makes up the luxurious Chateau Laffitte Hotel on the outskirts...
A cleaner works in front of a building that makes up the luxurious Chateau Laffitte Hotel, an imitation of the 1650 Château Maisons-Laffitte by the French architect François Mansart, located on the outskirts of Beijing August 20, 2010. In 2004, when the hotel was under construction, the owners were accused of forcing local farmers off their land, and offering them low-paid jobs as compensation. China's richest citizens are even wealthier than the statistics suggest, and may hold as much as 9.3 trillion yuan (US$1.4 trillion) of hidden assets, according to a Credit Suisse-sponsored study by a top economic think-tank. And nearly two thirds of that unreported income goes into the pockets of the richest 10 percent, widening China's already troubling wealth gap, said Wang Xiaolu, the economist at the China Society of Economic Reform (CSER), who headed the survey. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS)
CHINA-WEALTH/
RTR2HFTD
August 20, 2010
A cleaner works in front of a building that makes up the luxurious Chateau Laffitte Hotel, an imitation...
Beijing, China
A cleaner works in front of a building that makes up the luxurious Chateau Laffitte Hotel located on...
A cleaner works in front of a building that makes up the luxurious Chateau Laffitte Hotel, an imitation of the 1650 Château Maisons-Laffitte by the French architect François Mansart, located on the outskirts of Beijing August 20, 2010. In 2004, when the hotel was under construction, the owners were accused of forcing local farmers off their land, and offering them low-paid jobs as compensation. China's richest citizens are even wealthier than the statistics suggest, and may hold as much as 9.3 trillion yuan (US$1.4 trillion) of hidden assets, according to a Credit Suisse-sponsored study by a top economic think-tank. And nearly two thirds of that unreported income goes into the pockets of the richest 10 percent, widening China's already troubling wealth gap, said Wang Xiaolu, the economist at the China Society of Economic Reform (CSER), who headed the survey. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS)
CHINA-WEALTH/
RTR2HFT7
August 20, 2010
A cleaner works in front of a building that makes up the luxurious Chateau Laffitte Hotel, an imitation...
Beijing, China
A cleaner works in front of a building that makes up the luxurious Chateau Laffitte Hotel on the outskirts...
A cleaner works in front of a building that makes up the luxurious Chateau Laffitte Hotel, an imitation of the 1650 Château Maisons-Laffitte by the French architect François Mansart, located on the outskirts of Beijing August 20, 2010. In 2004, when the hotel was under construction, the owners were accused of forcing local farmers off their land, and offering them low-paid jobs as compensation. China's richest citizens are even wealthier than the statistics suggest, and may hold as much as 9.3 trillion yuan (US$1.4 trillion) of hidden assets, according to a Credit Suisse-sponsored study by a top economic think-tank. And nearly two thirds of that unreported income goes into the pockets of the richest 10 percent, widening China's already troubling wealth gap, said Wang Xiaolu, the economist at the China Society of Economic Reform (CSER), who headed the survey. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS)
JAPAN-ELECTION/POOR
RTR1S9FY
July 26, 2007
People wait for Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's stumping speech for Sunday's upper house election...
MATSUDO, Japan
People wait for Japanese PM Abe's stumping speech for Sunday's upper house election in Matsudo, near...
People wait for Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's stumping speech for Sunday's upper house election on a pedestrian overpass in Matsudo, near Tokyo July 26, 2007. The "working poor" feels left behind in Japan's economic recovery the ruling Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) is touting as one of its major achievements as it heads into Sunday's election for parliament's upper house. Widespread anxiety among the low-paid in Japan, where the minimum wage averages 673 yen ($5.59) an hour, is one source of rising support for opposition parties, almost all of whom have promised to do more to help those on low incomes. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN)
JAPAN-ELECTION/POOR
RTR1S9FV
July 26, 2007
People wait for Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's stumping speech for Sunday's upper house election...
MATSUDO, Japan
People wait for Japanese PM Abe 's stumping speech for Sunday's upper house election in Matsudo, near...
People wait for Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's stumping speech for Sunday's upper house election on a pedestrian overpass in Matsudo, near Tokyo July 26, 2007. The "working poor" feels left behind in Japan's economic recovery the ruling Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) is touting as one of its major achievements as it heads into Sunday's election for parliament's upper house. Widespread anxiety among the low-paid in Japan, where the minimum wage averages 673 yen ($5.59) an hour, is one source of rising support for opposition parties, almost all of whom have promised to do more to help those on low incomes. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN)
MUSLIMWOMEN-EUROPE/BARS
RTR1PB78
May 03, 2007
Tunisian-born Laila Ghlis stands behind the bar at Chez Laila where she works in Paris April 14, 2007....
Paris, France
To match feature MUSLIMWOMEN-EUROPE/BARS
Tunisian-born Laila Ghlis stands behind the bar at Chez Laila where she works in Paris April 14, 2007. North African women in France, most of whom are Muslims, often find themselves in low-paid work and by choice or necessity, some break taboos as they walk a delicate path between Islamic tradition and modern French culture. Ghlis does so by working with strange men and dealing in alcohol, both "haram" (forbidden) for pious Muslims, as she serves glasses of whisky-on-ice and bottled orange juice to her mainly Muslim customers in the Paris bar. Picture taken April 14, 2007. To match feature MUSLIMWOMEN-EUROPE/BARS REUTERS/Ola Galal (FRANCE)
MEXICO-DRUGS/
RTR1KXV9
January 06, 2007
Mexican army soldiers guard one of the access to the local police central command in Tijuana January...
Tijuana, Mexico
Mexican army soldiers guard one of the access to the local police central command in Tijuana
Mexican army soldiers guard one of the access to the local police central command in Tijuana January 6, 2007. Many of Tijuana's 2,300 municipal police angrily walked off the job late on Thursday after federal forces hauled their weapons off for inspection in a hunt for officers in cahoots with crime gangs. The seizure of some 1,600 guns underscored a widespread belief that many low-paid local police work with criminals. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO)
MEXICO-DRUGS/
RTR1KXUR
January 06, 2007
A local police officer puts his hand on his empty holster during a patrol in downtown Tijuana January...
Tijuana, Mexico
A local police officer puts his hand on his empty holster during a patrol in downtown Tijuana
A local police officer puts his hand on his empty holster during a patrol in downtown Tijuana January 6, 2007. Many of Tijuana's 2,300 municipal police angrily walked off the job late on Thursday after federal forces hauled their weapons off for inspection in a hunt for officers in cahoots with crime gangs. The seizure of some 1,600 guns underscored a widespread belief that many low-paid local police work with criminals. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO)
GERMANY
RTR1DI1I
May 18, 2006
Bavarian hospital doctors protest against low pay and long working hours as they hold up a banner reading:...
Erlangen, Germany
Bavarian hospital doctors protest against low pay and long working hours during a demonstration in Erlangen...
Bavarian hospital doctors protest against low pay and long working hours as they hold up a banner reading: 'Job performance must be paid' during a demonstration in the northern Bavarian town of Erlangen May 18, 2006. More than 12,000 doctors across Germany went on strike on Tuesday for a week in the biggest walkout in the sector since a dispute over pay flared two months ago. REUTERS/Alexandra Winkler
GERMANY
RTR7B99
April 06, 2005
Workers harvest asparagus in a field in the Bavarian village of Hohenwart, April 6, 2005. The asparagus...
Hohenwart, Germany
Workers harvest asparagus in a field in Hohenwart.
Workers harvest asparagus in a field in the Bavarian village of Hohenwart, April 6, 2005. The asparagus harvest from late March to June attracts a seasonal migration of workers from Eastern European countries to pick the crops, a labour intensive and extremely low paid job in Germany. The DBV farmers' association complained Germans are too lazy to do the work and urged the government on Wednesday to continue to allow farmers to employ thousands of seasonal harvest workers from eastern Europe, despite more than five million unemployed. REUTERS/Alexandra Winkler AX/AA
INDONESIA
RTR154Q8
October 30, 2002
Indonesian craftsmen construct guitars in Kembangan village outside
Solo, Central Java October 30, 2002....
Solo, Indonesia - Republic of
INDONESIAN CRAFTSMEN CONSRUCT GUITARS IN SOLO.
Indonesian craftsmen construct guitars in Kembangan village outside
Solo, Central Java October 30, 2002. About 400 craftsmen make up the
manufacturing centre in the village, which started in 1961, when many
local residents who worked as low-paid factory workers in Solo, found a
lucrative business in guitar-making. REUTERS/Supri

SUPRI/JS
INDONESIA
RTRD124
October 30, 2002
Indonesian craftsmen construct guitars in Kembangan village outside
Solo, Central Java October 30, 2002....
Solo, Indonesia - Republic of
INDONESIAN CRAFTSMEN CONSRUCT GUITARS IN SOLO.
Indonesian craftsmen construct guitars in Kembangan village outside
Solo, Central Java October 30, 2002. About 400 craftsmen make up the
manufacturing centre in the village, which started in 1961, when many
local residents who worked as low-paid factory workers in Solo, found a
lucrative business in guitar-making. REUTERS/Supri

SUPRI/JS
THAILAND MYANMAR WORKERS
RTRSF6Q
November 16, 1999
FOR RELEASE WITH STORY BC-THAILAND-MYANMAR-WORKERS - Thai farmers and Myanmar labour work the ricefields...
Maesot, Thailand - Kingdom of
FARMERS WORK IN RICE FIELDS IN MAESOT.
FOR RELEASE WITH STORY BC-THAILAND-MYANMAR-WORKERS - Thai farmers and Myanmar labour work the ricefields near the Thai town of Maesot, bordering Myanmar. Thousands of tonnes of rotting fruit and flowers and deserted factory lines are testimony to an exodus of illegal Myanmar workers targeted in a massive Thai repatriation drive. Struggling with high unemployment amid its worst economic crisis in decades, Thailand has revived a plan to repatriate 600,000 Myanmar migrants working illegally in low-paid factory and farm jobs.

JIR
THAILAND MYANMAR WORKERS
RTRSF6F
November 16, 1999
FOR RELEASE WITH STORY BC-THAILAND-MYANMAR-WORKERS - Thai factory worker Banpot Poolpipat closes the...
Maesot, Thailand - Kingdom of
A FACTORY WORKER CLOSES THE DOOR AFTER WORKERS WERE SENT BACK TO MYANMAR.
FOR RELEASE WITH STORY BC-THAILAND-MYANMAR-WORKERS - Thai factory worker Banpot Poolpipat closes the gate to a pineapple canning factory as boxes of the tinned fruit, bound for Germany, lie unattended after all of the factory labour from Myanmar were sent back to their homeland by Thai authorities. Thousands of tonnes of rotting fruit and flowers and deserted factory lines are testimony to an exodus of illegal Myanmar workers targeted in a massive Thai repatriation drive. Struggling with high unemployment amid its worst economic crisis in decades, Thailand has revived a plan to repatriate 600,000 Myanmar migrants working illegally in low-paid factory and farm jobs.

JIR/TAN
GERMANY SLAVES
RTRRCLK
October 07, 1999
FILE PHOTO 5NOV97 - Two elderly Jewish women, Sara Ehrenhat, 76, (R), and Heryka Shejnberg, 72, (L),...
London, Germany - FDR
FORMER NAZI SLAVE LABOURERS EHRENHAT AND SHEJNBERG FILE PHOTOS.
FILE PHOTO 5NOV97 - Two elderly Jewish women, Sara Ehrenhat, 76, (R), and Heryka Shejnberg, 72, (L), react November 5 1997, after a German court rejected their demand to be paid for work as slave labourers in the Nazi death camp of Auschwitz. German industrialists and the government October 7 offered to pay 6 billion marks ($3.3 billion) in compensation to hundreds of thousands of Nazi-era labourers, lawyers said. The labourers' attorneys immediately denounced the offer as far too low.

KM/
GERMANY
RTRPN6K
May 31, 1999
German employees take part in a rally in Munich May 31. The German government has changed the law for...
Munich, Germany
GERMAN EMPLOYEES DEMONSTRATE IN MUNICH.
German employees take part in a rally in Munich May 31. The German government has changed the law for employees earning 630 German marks or less a month who used to be exempt from taxes, health insurance and social security payments. The government has started taxing low paid jobs in a move which has prompted many people to quit such work.

MAD
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