Ajax loader
By using our website, you agree to our use of cookies as described in Cookie Policy.

Can't find what you're looking for?

 

Be sure to Sign in to see all available content.

 

If you don't have an account, Register here.

Search results for: M.I.A

GLOBAL-POY/STORIES-2020
RTX8BCUX
November 23, 2020
Dr. Joseph Varon, 58, the chief medical officer at United Memorial Medical Center (UMMC), and a team...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Pictures of the Year: A Picture and its Story
Dr. Joseph Varon, 58, the chief medical officer at United Memorial Medical Center (UMMC), and a team of healthcare workers perform CPR on a COVID-19 patient at UMMC, during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Houston, Texas, U.S., July 17, 2020. Reuters photographer Callaghan O'Hare: "Houston's COVID-19 cases had been rising for weeks and it was my third time photographing patients in the intensive care unit. I was following Doctor Varon and his team as they intubated two patients with worsening conditions. The first intubation went smoothly. We walked into the second patient's room and almost as soon as they began the procedure, his heart rate dropped. The air was filled with anxiety. I was in a corner of the room with my camera and it wasn't until two medical students jumped onto the bed and began administering chest compressions that I realized the patient was dying. The whole scene took place over the course of thirty minutes as we all nervously watched the clock and his heart rate monitor. Although this patient was surrounded by people while he died, they were faceless doctors in hazmat suits. He wasn't able to say goodbye to his family, friends, and the people who cared about him. I looked him up later on Facebook, and his profile picture had a filter on it that said, "I'm an essential worker, I can't stay home." I often think about him and the likelihood that he contracted the coronavirus at work. I hope his image and his story resonate with people and show why it's important to wear a mask and stay at home to protect those that can't." REUTERS/Callaghan O'Hare/File photo SEARCH "POY STORIES 2020" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
GLOBAL-POY/STORIES-2020
RTX8BCUU
November 23, 2020
Patricia McCloskey and her husband Mark McCloskey draw their firearms on protestors as they enter their...
St.Louis, UNITED STATES
Pictures of the Year: A Picture and its Story
Patricia McCloskey and her husband Mark McCloskey draw their firearms on protestors as they enter their neighbourhood during a protest against St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson, in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S. June 28, 2020. Reuters photogrpaher Lawrence Bryant: "That Sunday evening, several hundred Black and white protesters walked through an open gate into the community where the couple – Mark McCloskey and his wife Patricia McCloskey – lived. They were met by Mark McCloskey holding what looked like an automatic rifle and shouting 'get out!' several times at the crowd. I was not overly worried, even when he appeared to cock his weapon. But then Patricia McCloskey appeared from the front of the house holding a handgun. She had her finger on the trigger and looked nervous and I became a little bit more worried, as there were kids out there and she was sporadically pointing the gun at random people. I was just trying to make frames, stay safe, dodge the barrel of the gun and stay out of sight and out of line. I'm a big, Black man and I always have to pay attention to that anyway. I'm pleased with the pictures I took of the scene. I may have liked a longer lens to be able to zoom in on the couple, but the fact that I had only one camera meant I captured not just the McCloskeys, but also the protesters around them. A lot of the photos out there focus on the couple holding the guns, but to me that's not telling the whole story. I wanted to show there were people protesting peacefully and the couple came to engage them." REUTERS/Lawrence Bryant/File photo SEARCH "POY STORIES 2020" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
GLOBAL-POY/2020
RTX8AAYK
November 18, 2020
Neonatal Nurse Kirsty Hartley carries newborn Theo Anderson, who was born prematurely, to his mother...
Burnley, United Kingdom
Pictures of the Year
Neonatal Nurse Kirsty Hartley carries newborn Theo Anderson, who was born prematurely, to his mother Kirsty Anderson, in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at the Lancashire Women and Newborn Centre at Burnley General Hospital, during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Burnley, East Lancashire, Britain, May 15, 2020. Kirsty Anderson found McKay on Instagram and said the photograph meant that friends and family, who were unable to visit her in hospital because of the coronavirus, could now see how small Theo was. "I'm going to send a copy to her for Theo's memory box," McKay said. REUTERS/Hannah McKay/Pool/File photo TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SEARCH "GLOBAL POY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "REUTERS POY" FOR ALL BEST OF 2020 PACKAGES.
GLOBAL-POY/2020
RTX8AAVY
November 18, 2020
Juliana, who says she is four months pregnant, reacts in front of the body of her husband Davi Barboza,...
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
Pictures of the Year
Juliana, who says she is four months pregnant, reacts in front of the body of her husband Davi Barboza, who was shot in Sao Carlos during a police operation after heavy confrontations between drug gangs, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, August 27, 2020. "I want to ask whoever is in that life to get out," Juliana said. "Think of your family because it's very difficult for us. I don't know how I'm going to go back home and not see him anymore." REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes/File Photo TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SEARCH "GLOBAL POY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "REUTERS POY" FOR ALL BEST OF 2020 PACKAGES.
USA-ELECTION/OHIO
RTX877TH
November 04, 2020
Johanna poses for a portrait as she waits to vote during early voting in the 2020 U.S. presidential election...
Cleveland, UNITED STATES
Portraits of Ohio voters
Johanna poses for a portrait as she waits to vote during early voting in the 2020 U.S. presidential election in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., October 31, 2020. When asked why she was voting she said "I'm voting to protect our democracy." Picture taken October 31, 2020. REUTERS/Da'Shaunae Marisa
USA-ELECTION/OHIO
RTX877TF
November 04, 2020
Sherice Pitpan poses for a portrait as she waits to vote during early voting in the 2020 U.S. presidential...
Cleveland, UNITED STATES
Portraits of Ohio voters
Sherice Pitpan poses for a portrait as she waits to vote during early voting in the 2020 U.S. presidential election in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., October 31, 2020. When asked why she was voting she said "I'm voting to make a difference and Black lives matter." Picture taken October 31, 2020. REUTERS/Da'Shaunae Marisa
USA-ELECTION/OHIO
RTX877I6
November 04, 2020
Dontez Graham poses for a portrait as he waits to vote during early voting in the 2020 U.S. presidential...
Cleveland, UNITED STATES
Portraits of Ohio voters
Dontez Graham poses for a portrait as he waits to vote during early voting in the 2020 U.S. presidential election in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., October 31, 2020. When asked why he was voting he said "I'm voting to make a difference." Picture taken October 31, 2020. REUTERS/Da'Shaunae Marisa
USA-ELECTION/
RTX86Z16
November 03, 2020
"I'm a Future Voter" sticker is seen on the Fearless Girl statue on Election Day outside the New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
2020 U.S. presidential election in New York
"I'm a Future Voter" sticker is seen on the Fearless Girl statue on Election Day outside the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), in Manhattan, New York City, New York, U.S., November 3, 2020. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
USA-ELECTION/
RTX86YXU
November 03, 2020
"I'm a Future Voter" sticker is seen on the Fearless Girl statue on Election Day outside the New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
2020 U.S. presidential election in New York
"I'm a Future Voter" sticker is seen on the Fearless Girl statue on Election Day outside the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), in Manhattan, New York City, New York, U.S., November 3, 2020. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
USA-ELECTION/
RTX86YX4
November 03, 2020
"I'm a Future Voter" sticker is seen on the Fearless Girl statue on Election Day outside the New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
2020 U.S. presidential election in New York
"I'm a Future Voter" sticker is seen on the Fearless Girl statue on Election Day outside the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), in Manhattan, New York City, New York, U.S., November 3, 2020. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
USA-ELECTION/GEORGIA
RTX85XC5
October 29, 2020
View of "I'm a Georgia voter" stickers on the penultimate day of early voting ahead of Election Day 2020,...
Atlanta, UNITED STATES
View of "I'm a Georgia voter" stickers on the penultimate day of early voting ahead of Election Day 2020,...
View of "I'm a Georgia voter" stickers on the penultimate day of early voting ahead of Election Day 2020, in Atlanta, South Fulton County, Georgia, U.S., October 29, 2020. REUTERS/Brandon Bell
JAPAN-TATTOOS/
RTX859CK
October 26, 2020
Part-time worker Tenji Okasaka, 24, pets his cat as he poses for a photograph at his house in Niiza,...
NIIZA, Japan
The Wider Image: Breaking taboos: Japan's tattoo fans bare their ink
Part-time worker Tenji Okasaka, 24, pets his cat as he poses for a photograph at his house in Niiza, Saitama Prefecture, Japan, September 25, 2020. "Some people probably look at me funny, but I don't pay attention to it anymore. Yes, there are times when people think I'm part of a gang, but I don't worry about it that much. I'll keep on going until I don't have any skin uncoloured", said Okasaka. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon SEARCH "KYUNG-HOON TATTOOS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
JAPAN-TATTOOS/
RTX859C2
October 26, 2020
Construction worker Hiroshi Yoshimura, 44, takes household goods stored on the balcony at his home in...
Tokyo, Japan
The Wider Image: Breaking taboos: Japan's tattoo fans bare their ink
Construction worker Hiroshi Yoshimura, 44, takes household goods stored on the balcony at his home in Tokyo, Japan, October 2, 2020. "I usually cover it up, so nobody even in the neighbourhood can say that guy has tattoos. But if I'm walking somewhere or using the train or something, police stop me a lot and ask me to roll up my sleeves to see if I'm using drugs, or if I'm in a gang", said Yoshimura. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon SEARCH "KYUNG-HOON TATTOOS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
FRANCE-SECURITY/TRIBUTE
RTX840I7
October 21, 2020
A woman wearing a protective face mask with the words "I'm a teacher" written on it pays homage to Samuel...
Nice, France
National tribute to beheaded French teacher Samuel Paty
A woman wearing a protective face mask with the words "I'm a teacher" written on it pays homage to Samuel Paty, the French teacher who was beheaded on the streets of the Paris suburb of Conflans-Sainte-Honorine, as part of a national tribute, in Nice, France, October 21, 2020. REUTERS/Eric Gaillard
FRANCE-SECURITY/TRIBUTE
RTX840HY
October 21, 2020
A woman wearing a protective face mask with the words "I'm a teacher" written on it pays homage to Samuel...
Nice, France
National tribute to beheaded French teacher Samuel Paty
A woman wearing a protective face mask with the words "I'm a teacher" written on it pays homage to Samuel Paty, the French teacher who was beheaded on the streets of the Paris suburb of Conflans-Sainte-Honorine, as part of a national tribute, in Nice, France, October 21, 2020. REUTERS/Eric Gaillard
USA-ELECTION/CORONAVIRUS
RTX83FW2
October 19, 2020
Owner Leo Bongiorno talks to Reuters insider his Bangor Trust Brewing in the Northampton County borough...
Bangor, UNITED STATES
Owner Leo Bongiorno talks to Reuters insider his Bangor Trust Brewing in Bangor
Owner Leo Bongiorno talks to Reuters insider his Bangor Trust Brewing in the Northampton County borough of Bangor, Pennsylvania, U.S., October 2, 2020. "I'm scared shitless" of losing the business, said Bongiorno, a liberal who sat out the 2016 election because his preferred candidate, Bernie Sanders, had lost to Hillary Clinton in the Democratic primary. "If I go back in time and vote for Hillary, I would do it." Photo taken October 2, 2020. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
USA-ELECTION/CORONAVIRUS
RTX83FVV
October 19, 2020
Owner Leo Bongiorno talks to Reuters insider his Bangor Trust Brewing in the Northampton County borough...
Bangor, UNITED STATES
Owner Leo Bongiorno talks to Reuters insider his Bangor Trust Brewing in Bangor
Owner Leo Bongiorno talks to Reuters insider his Bangor Trust Brewing in the Northampton County borough of Bangor, Pennsylvania, U.S., October 2, 2020. "I'm scared shitless" of losing the business, said Bongiorno, a liberal who sat out the 2016 election because his preferred candidate, Bernie Sanders, had lost to Hillary Clinton in the Democratic primary. "If I go back in time and vote for Hillary, I would do it." Photo taken October 2, 2020. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E9B
October 15, 2020
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E9A
October 15, 2020
Cravats and bow ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Cravats and bow ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Cravats and bow ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E99
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E98
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury looks at silk ties displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury looks at silk ties displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury looks at silk ties displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E97
October 15, 2020
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
London, United Kingdom
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E96
October 15, 2020
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E95
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E94
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E92
October 15, 2020
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E91
October 15, 2020
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E90
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8Z
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury holds a bespoke tailcoat in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row,...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury holds a bespoke tailcoat in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row,...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury holds a bespoke tailcoat in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8Y
October 15, 2020
Bunches of swatches are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Bunches of swatches are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Bunches of swatches are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8X
October 15, 2020
Handkerchiefs are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Handkerchiefs are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Handkerchiefs are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8W
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8P
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8M
October 15, 2020
A general view of Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak,...
London, United Kingdom
General view of Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak,...
A general view of Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8L
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
USA-ELECTION/GEORGIA
RTX820JX
October 13, 2020
Pam McCray displays an "I'm a Georgia voter" sticker on the handle of the leash for her dog Angel Rose...
Smyrna, UNITED STATES
Pam McCray displays an "I'm a Georgia voter" sticker on the handle of the leash for her dog Angel Rose...
Pam McCray displays an "I'm a Georgia voter" sticker on the handle of the leash for her dog Angel Rose after leaving a polling location in Smyrna, Georgia, U.S. October 13, 2020. REUTERS/Elijah Nouvelage
USA-ELECTION/GEORGIA
RTX820JP
October 13, 2020
Pam McCray displays an "I'm a Georgia voter" sticker on the handle of the leash for her dog Angel Rose...
Smyrna, UNITED STATES
Pam McCray displays an "I'm a Georgia voter" sticker on the handle of the leash for her dog Angel Rose...
Pam McCray displays an "I'm a Georgia voter" sticker on the handle of the leash for her dog Angel Rose after leaving a polling location in Smyrna, Georgia, U.S. October 13, 2020. REUTERS/Elijah Nouvelage
USA-ELECTION/GEORGIA
RTX81ZCA
October 13, 2020
A woman wears an "I'm a Georgia voter" sticker after casting her election ballot at a Cobb County polling...
Marietta, UNITED STATES
Voters line up to cast their election ballot in Marietta
A woman wears an "I'm a Georgia voter" sticker after casting her election ballot at a Cobb County polling station in Marietta, Georgia, U.S., October 13, 2020. REUTERS/Elijah Nouvelage
EGYPT-ART/MENTAL HEALTH
RTX80LJO
October 07, 2020
Egyptian artist Amal Salah, 35, stands by her artwork "You Know I'm No Good", made of medicine pills,...
Cairo, Egypt
Artwork made of medicine pills by Egyptian artist Salah is seen in Cairo
Egyptian artist Amal Salah, 35, stands by her artwork "You Know I'm No Good", made of medicine pills, depicting late singer Amy Winehouse, part of a mental health project to cope with grief in Cairo, Egypt October 6, 2020. Picture taken October 6, 2020. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
EGYPT-ART/MENTAL HEALTH
RTX80LCD
October 07, 2020
Egyptian artist Amal Salah, 35, poses next to her artwork "I'm Alive", made from pills, part of a project...
Cairo, Egypt
Egyptian artist Salah creates artwork for grief project in Cairo
Egyptian artist Amal Salah, 35, poses next to her artwork "I'm Alive", made from pills, part of a project to cope with grief, at her home's gallery room in Cairo, Egypt October 6, 2020. Picture taken October 6, 2020. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
CLIMATE-CHANGE/USA-NAVAJO
RTX804AF
October 05, 2020
Summer Weeks, 23, bathes her daughter Ravynn Weeks, 2, who are both from Navajo Nation, in a tub outside...
Gap, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: Climate change is drying the lifeblood of Navajo ranchers as their lands become desert...
Summer Weeks, 23, bathes her daughter Ravynn Weeks, 2, who are both from Navajo Nation, in a tub outside their home in the Bodaway Chapter in the Navajo Nation near Gap, Arizona, U.S. September 17, 2020. The family lives in a house with no running water or electricity on a family compound with several extended family members who also have homes there. "I don't mind living without running water and electricity. I grew up this way so I'm used to it. I came here because I wanted my kids to have the same kind of upbringing that I had," said Summer. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith SEARCH "NAVAJO KEITH" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
CLIMATE-CHANGE/USA-NAVAJO
RTX804A4
October 05, 2020
Leonard Sloan, 64, lifts a visor off of his wife Maybelle Sloan, 59, who are both from Navajo Nation,...
Gap, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: Climate change is drying the lifeblood of Navajo ranchers as their lands become desert...
Leonard Sloan, 64, lifts a visor off of his wife Maybelle Sloan, 59, who are both from Navajo Nation, at their sheep camp in the Bodaway Chapter in the Navajo Nation in Gap, Arizona, U.S. September 17, 2020. "I go out everyday to take care of my sheep. There's coyotes out there and sometimes people steal them so I got to be there. Sometimes I have to go to do something like go to town to do my laundry and then I can't go out but then the very next day I go out super early because I'm worried about them," said Maybelle. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SEARCH "NAVAJO KEITH" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
MEXICO-WOMEN/VIOLENCE
RTX7ZMAK
October 03, 2020
A demonstrator holds a banner reading "I march because I'm alive and I don't know how long" during a...
SALTILLO, Mexico
A demonstrator holds a banner reading "I march because I'm alive and I don't know how long" during a...
A demonstrator holds a banner reading "I march because I'm alive and I don't know how long" during a march to demand justice for the murder of Alondra Gallegos in Saltillo, Mexico October 2, 2020. REUTERS/Daniel Becerril
USA-ELECTION/LATINO-WISCONSIN
RTX7ZGBE
October 02, 2020
Margarita Garcia, who also refers her artist name Daysy Good, poses for a photograph at her vending stand...
Milwaukee, UNITED STATES
Margarita Garcia, who also refers her artist name Daysy Good, poses for a photograph at her vending stand...
Margarita Garcia, who also refers her artist name Daysy Good, poses for a photograph at her vending stand outside El Rey grocery market in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, U.S., September 21, 2020. Having called Milwaukee home for over 30-years, Garcia has participated in presidential elections in the past. "I'm undecided who to vote at the moment," she says in Spanish, finding it difficult to trust either of the candidates. "Trump has said and done horrible things but the other party isn't clean either." Picture taken September 21, 2020. REUTERS/Sebastian Hidalgo
USA-ELECTION/LATINO-WISCONSIN
RTX7ZGBD
October 02, 2020
Margarita Garcia, who also refers her artist name Daysy Good, poses for a photograph at her vending stand...
Milwaukee, UNITED STATES
Margarita Garcia, who also refers her artist name Daysy Good, poses for a photograph at her vending stand...
Margarita Garcia, who also refers her artist name Daysy Good, poses for a photograph at her vending stand outside El Rey grocery market in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, U.S., September 21, 2020. Having called Milwaukee home for over 30-years, Garcia has participated in presidential elections in the past. "I'm undecided who to vote at the moment," she says in Spanish, finding it difficult to trust either of the candidates. "Trump has said and done horrible things but the other party isn't clean either." Picture taken September 21, 2020. REUTERS/Sebastian Hidalgo
USA-ELECTION/LATINO-WISCONSIN
RTX7ZGBB
October 02, 2020
Julio Guerrero, a proud Bernie Sanders' supporter and 3rd generation Mexican-American, poses for a photograph...
Milwaukee, UNITED STATES
Julio Guerrero, a proud Bernie Sanders' supporter and 3rd generation Mexican-American, poses for a photograph...
Julio Guerrero, a proud Bernie Sanders' supporter and 3rd generation Mexican-American, poses for a photograph outside his home in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, U.S., September 21, 2020. "Regardless of what happens I'm excited about the younger generations to be active in national politics," he said, "there's hope in the future." Picture taken September 21, 2020. REUTERS/Sebastian Hidalgo
USA-ELECTION/LATINO-WISCONSIN
RTX7ZGB5
October 02, 2020
Julio Guerrero, a proud Bernie Sanders' supporter and 3rd generation Mexican-American, poses for a photograph...
Milwaukee, UNITED STATES
Julio Guerrero, a proud Bernie Sanders' supporter and 3rd generation Mexican-American, poses for a photograph...
Julio Guerrero, a proud Bernie Sanders' supporter and 3rd generation Mexican-American, poses for a photograph outside his home in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, U.S., September 21, 2020. "Regardless of what happens I'm excited about the younger generations to be active in national politics," he said, "there's hope in the future." Picture taken September 21, 2020. REUTERS/Sebastian Hidalgo
USA-ELECTION/LATINO-WISCONSIN
RTX7ZGAZ
October 02, 2020
Julio Guerrero, a proud Bernie Sanders' supporter and 3rd generation Mexican-American, poses for a photograph...
Milwaukee, UNITED STATES
Julio Guerrero, a proud Bernie Sanders' supporter and 3rd generation Mexican-American, poses for a photograph...
Julio Guerrero, a proud Bernie Sanders' supporter and 3rd generation Mexican-American, poses for a photograph outside his home in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, U.S., September 21, 2020. "Regardless of what happens I'm excited about the younger generations to be active in national politics," he said, "there's hope in the future." Picture taken September 21, 2020. REUTERS/Sebastian Hidalgo
USA-ELECTION/LATINO-WISCONSIN
RTX7ZGAT
October 02, 2020
Julio Guerrero, a proud Bernie Sanders' supporter and 3rd generation Mexican-American, poses for a photograph...
Milwaukee, UNITED STATES
Julio Guerrero, a proud Bernie Sanders' supporter and 3rd generation Mexican-American, poses for a photograph...
Julio Guerrero, a proud Bernie Sanders' supporter and 3rd generation Mexican-American, poses for a photograph outside his home in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, U.S., September 21, 2020. "Regardless of what happens I'm excited about the younger generations to be active in national politics," he said, "there's hope in the future." Picture taken September 21, 2020. REUTERS/Sebastian Hidalgo
USA-ELECTION/LATINO-WISCONSIN
RTX7ZGAR
October 02, 2020
Julio Guerrero, a proud Bernie Sanders' supporter and 3rd generation Mexican-American, poses for a photograph...
Milwaukee, UNITED STATES
Julio Guerrero, a proud Bernie Sanders' supporter and 3rd generation Mexican-American, poses for a photograph...
Julio Guerrero, a proud Bernie Sanders' supporter and 3rd generation Mexican-American, poses for a photograph outside his home in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, U.S., September 21, 2020. "Regardless of what happens I'm excited about the younger generations to be active in national politics," he said, "there's hope in the future." Picture taken September 21, 2020. REUTERS/Sebastian Hidalgo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/DAUGHTER-CANCER
RTX7YI9L
September 28, 2020
Strangely, I can't clearly picture the face of the surgeon who changed my family's life. I'm not sure...
TAL-QROQQ, Malta
The Wider Image: The pandemic, a deadly cancer and my 14-year-old daughter
Strangely, I can't clearly picture the face of the surgeon who changed my family's life. I'm not sure I'd recognize him if I bumped into him in the street. And yet I can vividly recall his face turning pale the instant he looked at the X-rays of my 14-year-old daughter's shoulder. Her chronic pain had first been diagnosed as a likely inflammation, and then possibly some problem in the muscle that could be fixed with a few physiotherapy sessions. But on that day, October 31, 2019, we found out that it was Ewing's Sarcoma, a rare and extremely aggressive form of bone cancer. The cancer had started deep in the sponge bone of her humerus and then broke out through the bone surface, causing excruciating pain, then metastasizing to several other parts of her body. Rebecca, or Becs, as we call her, was suddenly fighting for her life. REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi SEARCH "REBECCA LUPI" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY THE IMAGES SHOULD ONLY BE USED TOGETHER WITH THE STORY - NO STAND-ALONE USES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/PHILIPPINE-NURSES
RTX7VW8M
September 16, 2020
Dean, who asked that her surname not be used, is photographed at her family's home in Caloocan City,...
Caloocan, Philippines
Coronavirus pandemic "hero" Filipino nurses struggle to leave home
Dean, who asked that her surname not be used, is photographed at her family's home in Caloocan City, Metro Manila, Philippines September 2, 2020, with boxes of documents she used to apply for a nursing job in the UK. She is one of the nurses prevented from leaving the Philippines by a government restriction on health workers' movements. "As long as I'm in the Philippines, nothing will come out of my life," she said. Picture taken September 2, 2020. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/PHILIPPINE-NURSES
RTX7VW8D
September 16, 2020
Dean, who asked that her surname not be used, grows vegetables at her family's backyard in Caloocan City,...
Caloocan, Philippines
Coronavirus pandemic "hero" Filipino nurses struggle to leave home
Dean, who asked that her surname not be used, grows vegetables at her family's backyard in Caloocan City, Metro Manila, Philippines September 2, 2020 to lessen their expenses during the COVID-19 pandemic. She is one of the nurses prevented from leaving the Philippines by a government restriction on health workers' movements. "As long as I'm in the Philippines, nothing will come out of my life," she said. Picture taken September 2, 2020. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez
THAILAND-PROTESTS/
RTX7TLCR
September 05, 2020
People hold up their tablets with slogans reading "Servant of the dictator, I'm ashamed for uncle", as...
Bangkok, Thailand
Anti-government protesters and students attend a demonstration in Bangkok
People hold up their tablets with slogans reading "Servant of the dictator, I'm ashamed for uncle", as anti-government protesters and students attend a demonstration demanding the government to resign, in front of the Ministry of Education in Bangkok, Thailand September 5, 2020. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun
BRAZIL-VIOLENCE/SHOOTING
RTX7SHIE
August 29, 2020
Juliana, who says she is four months pregnant, reacts in front of the body of her husband Davi Barboza,...
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
A Picture and its Story: The despair of a Rio widow, in a city struggling with violence
Juliana, who says she is four months pregnant, reacts in front of the body of her husband Davi Barboza, who was shot in Sao Carlos, during a police operation after heavy confrontations between drug gangs, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, August 27, 2020. "I want to ask whoever is in that life to get out," Juliana said. "Think of your family because it's very difficult for us. I don't know how I'm going to go back home and not see him anymore." REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes/File Photo SEARCH "SAO CARLOS SLUMS MORAES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
BRAZIL-VIOLENCE/SHOOTING
RTX7SHI6
August 29, 2020
Juliana, who says she is four months pregnant, reacts in front of the body of her husband Davi Barboza,...
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
A Picture and its Story: The despair of a Rio widow, in a city struggling with violence
Juliana, who says she is four months pregnant, reacts in front of the body of her husband Davi Barboza, who was shot in Sao Carlos, during a police operation after heavy confrontations between drug gangs, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, August 27, 2020. "I want to ask whoever is in that life to get out," Juliana said. "Think of your family because it's very difficult for us. I don't know how I'm going to go back home and not see him anymore." REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes/File Photo SEARCH "SAO CARLOS SLUMS MORAES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
BRAZIL-VIOLENCE/SHOOTING
RTX7SHI8
August 29, 2020
Juliana, who says she is four months pregnant, reacts as police officers cover the body of her husband...
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
A Picture and its Story: The despair of a Rio widow, in a city struggling with violence
Juliana, who says she is four months pregnant, reacts as police officers cover the body of her husband Davi Barboza, who was shot in Sao Carlos, during a police operation after heavy confrontations between drug gangs, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, August 27, 2020. "I want to ask whoever is in that life to get out," Juliana said. "Think of your family because it's very difficult for us. I don't know how I'm going to go back home and not see him anymore." REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes/File Photo SEARCH "SAO CARLOS SLUMS MORAES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-INTERNATIONAL-STUDENTS
RTX7QSQD
August 20, 2020
Shiyu Bao (centre) and her fellow classmates who are international students from China, get ready to...
Sydney, Australia
The Wider Image: Chinese students in Australia head home as coronavirus upends study
Shiyu Bao (centre) and her fellow classmates who are international students from China, get ready to take pictures in their graduation gowns around campus at the University of Sydney, after their in-person graduation ceremony was cancelled during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Sydney, Australia, July 4, 2020. "I have polished my resume and have applied for a few jobs but I've had no success so far. I'm willing to do even unpaid internships as long as I get to stay here," said Bao. REUTERS/Loren Elliott SEARCH "INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS AUSTRALIA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-TEXAS
RTX7MG0V
July 29, 2020
Dr. Joseph Varon, 58, the chief medical officer at United Memorial Medical Center (UMMC), goes over the...
Houston, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: 'I cannot save everybody': Houston doctor fights newest COVID-19 surge
Dr. Joseph Varon, 58, the chief medical officer at United Memorial Medical Center (UMMC), goes over the files of patients infected with COVID-19, at a daily meeting with his team of healthcare workers, during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, at UMMC, in Houston, Texas, U.S., July 17, 2020. "I'm afraid that at some point in time I'm going have to make some very serious decisions," Varon said. "I'm starting to get the idea that I cannot save everybody." REUTERS/Callaghan O'Hare SEARCH "COVID-19 HOUSTON VARON" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-TEXAS
RTX7MFZU
July 29, 2020
The scene inside United Memorial Medical Center in Houston has become all too familiar: Overwhelmed medical...
Houston, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: 'I cannot save everybody': Houston doctor fights newest COVID-19 surge
The scene inside United Memorial Medical Center in Houston has become all too familiar: Overwhelmed medical staff fighting to curb the wave of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients that come through the hospital's doors every day. While in earlier pandemic hot spots like New York the medical emergency has subsided, Texas is among the many U.S. states battling a resurgence of the virus that is straining their healthcare systems. Dr. Joseph Varon, the chief medical officer of United Memorial Medical Center (UMMC,) said he is afraid he will soon face a dilemma many doctors elsewhere said they confronted earlier in the pandemic: Deciding who to save. "I'm afraid that at some point in time I'm going have to make some very serious decisions," he told Reuters in an interview. "I'm starting to get the idea that I cannot save everybody." Varon, 58, is overseeing the hospital's unit dedicated to COVID-19 patients, where he said he tends to an average of 40 people a day. He said he signed more death certificates in the last week than at any point in his career. REUTERS/Callaghan O'Hare TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SEARCH "COVID-19 HOUSTON VARON" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY Matching Text: HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-TEXAS
Sort by
Display
Items per page
Page
of 37