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Search results for: Major-depression

MIDEAST-CRISIS/SYRIA-TURKEY
RTX4IJBQ
January 23, 2018
A military weapon is seen on the back of a pick-up truck near Mount Barsaya, northeast of Afrin, Syria...
AFRIN, Syria
A military weapon is seen on the back of a pick-up truck near Mount Barsaya
A military weapon is seen on the back of a pick-up truck near Mount Barsaya, northeast of Afrin, Syria January 23, 2018. REUTERS/Khalil Ashawi
MIDEAST-CRISIS/SYRIA-TURKEY
RTX4IJB4
January 23, 2018
A Turkish military tank is seen near Mount Barsaya, northeast of Afrin, Syria January 23, 2018. REUTERS/Khalil...
AFRIN, Syria
A Turkish military tank is seen near Mount Barsaya
A Turkish military tank is seen near Mount Barsaya, northeast of Afrin, Syria January 23, 2018. REUTERS/Khalil Ashawi
MIDEAST-CRISIS/SYRIA-TURKEY
RTX4IJAK
January 23, 2018
Turkish military tanks are seen near Mount Barsaya, northeast of Afrin, Syria January 23, 2018. REUTERS/Khalil...
AFRIN, Syria
Turkish military tanks are seen near Mount Barsaya
Turkish military tanks are seen near Mount Barsaya, northeast of Afrin, Syria January 23, 2018. REUTERS/Khalil Ashawi
MIDEAST-CRISIS/SYRIA-TURKEY
RTX4IH26
January 23, 2018
A Turkish army howitzer fires from a military post on the Turkish-Syrian border in Hatay province, Turkey...
Hatay, Turkey
A Turkish army howitzer fires from a military post on the Turkish-Syrian border in Hatay province
A Turkish army howitzer fires from a military post on the Turkish-Syrian border in Hatay province, Turkey January 23, 2018. REUTERS/Umit Bektas
MEXICO-STORM/PATRICIA
RTX1T27D
October 24, 2015
Municipal employees work in a landslide in Autlan, Mexico October 24, 2015. Hurricane Patricia, one of...
Autlan, Mexico
Municipal employees work in a landslide in Autlan
Municipal employees work in a landslide in Autlan, Mexico October 24, 2015. Hurricane Patricia, one of the strongest storms ever recorded, crashed into western Mexico with rain and winds of up to 165 mph (266 kph), hammering coastal areas but causing less damage than had been feared as it skirted cities and major tourist resorts.Mowing down trees, flooding streets and battering buildings, Patricia plowed into Mexico as a Category 5 hurricane on Friday evening before grinding inland. It rapidly lost power in the mountains that rise up along the Pacific coast and was downgraded to a tropical depression on Saturday morning as it headed through central Mexico. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
MEXICO-STORM/PATRICIA
RTX1T26Q
October 24, 2015
A boy looks at a tree felled by wind after the passing of Hurricane Patricia in La Union de Tula, Mexico...
LA UNION DE TULA, Mexico
A boy looks at a tree felled by wind after the passing of Hurricane Patricia in La Union de Tula, Mexico...
A boy looks at a tree felled by wind after the passing of Hurricane Patricia in La Union de Tula, Mexico October 24, 2015. Hurricane Patricia, one of the strongest storms ever recorded, crashed into western Mexico with rain and winds of up to 165 mph (266 kph), hammering coastal areas but causing less damage than had been feared as it skirted cities and major tourist resorts.Mowing down trees, flooding streets and battering buildings, Patricia plowed into Mexico as a Category 5 hurricane on Friday evening before grinding inland. It rapidly lost power in the mountains that rise up along the Pacific coast and was downgraded to a tropical depression on Saturday morning as it headed through central Mexico. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
MEXICO-STORM/PATRICIA
RTX1T26L
October 24, 2015
A sign felled by wind after the passing Hurricane Patricia is seen in La Union de Tula, Mexico October...
LA UNION DE TULA, Mexico
A sign felled by wind after the passing Hurricane Patricia is seen in La Union de Tula
A sign felled by wind after the passing Hurricane Patricia is seen in La Union de Tula, Mexico October 24, 2015. Hurricane Patricia, one of the strongest storms ever recorded, crashed into western Mexico with rain and winds of up to 165 mph (266 kph), hammering coastal areas but causing less damage than had been feared as it skirted cities and major tourist resorts.Mowing down trees, flooding streets and battering buildings, Patricia plowed into Mexico as a Category 5 hurricane on Friday evening before grinding inland. It rapidly lost power in the mountains that rise up along the Pacific coast and was downgraded to a tropical depression on Saturday morning as it headed through central Mexico. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
MEXICO-STORM/PATRICIA
RTX1T1XQ
October 24, 2015
Boys play next to a tree fell by wind after the passing of Hurricane Patricia in La Union de Tula, Mexico...
LA UNION DE TULA, Mexico
Boys play next to a tree fell by wind after the passing of Hurricane Patricia in La Union de Tula
Boys play next to a tree fell by wind after the passing of Hurricane Patricia in La Union de Tula, Mexico October 24, 2015. Hurricane Patricia, one of the strongest storms ever recorded, crashed into western Mexico with rain and winds of up to 165 mph (266 kph), hammering coastal areas but causing less damage than had been feared as it skirted cities and major tourist resorts.Mowing down trees, flooding streets and battering buildings, Patricia plowed into Mexico as a Category 5 hurricane on Friday evening before grinding inland. It rapidly lost power in the mountains that rise up along the Pacific coast and was downgraded to a tropical depression on Saturday morning as it headed through central Mexico. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
MEXICO-STORM/PATRICIA
RTX1T1WT
October 24, 2015
Branches of a tree are seen on a house after the passing of Hurricane Patricia in La Union de Tula, Mexico...
LA UNION DE TULA, Mexico
Branches of a tree are seen on a house after the passing of Hurricane Patricia in La Union de Tula
Branches of a tree are seen on a house after the passing of Hurricane Patricia in La Union de Tula, Mexico October 24, 2015. Hurricane Patricia, one of the strongest storms ever recorded, crashed into western Mexico with rain and winds of up to 165 mph (266 kph), hammering coastal areas but causing less damage than had been feared as it skirted cities and major tourist resorts.Mowing down trees, flooding streets and battering buildings, Patricia plowed into Mexico as a Category 5 hurricane on Friday evening before grinding inland. It rapidly lost power in the mountains that rise up along the Pacific coast and was downgraded to a tropical depression on Saturday morning as it headed through central Mexico. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
MEXICO-STORM/PATRICIA
RTX1T1T8
October 24, 2015
Electricity poles impacted by wind after the passing of Hurricane Patricia are seen in La Union de Tula,...
LA UNION DE TULA, Mexico
Electricity poles impacted by wind after the passing of Hurricane Patricia are seen in La Union de Tula...
Electricity poles impacted by wind after the passing of Hurricane Patricia are seen in La Union de Tula, Mexico October 24, 2015. Hurricane Patricia, one of the strongest storms ever recorded, crashed into western Mexico with rain and winds of up to 165 mph (266 kph), hammering coastal areas but causing less damage than had been feared as it skirted cities and major tourist resorts. Mowing down trees, flooding streets and battering buildings, Patricia plowed into Mexico as a Category 5 hurricane on Friday evening before grinding inland. It rapidly lost power in the mountains that rise up along the Pacific coast and was downgraded to a tropical depression on Saturday morning as it headed through central Mexico. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
MEXICO-STORM/PATRICIA
RTX1T1T7
October 24, 2015
An electricity pole impacted by wind after the passing of Hurricane Patricia is seen in La Union de Tula,...
LA UNION DE TULA, Mexico
Electricity pole impacted by wind after the passing of Hurricane Patricia is seen in La Union de Tula...
An electricity pole impacted by wind after the passing of Hurricane Patricia is seen in La Union de Tula, Mexico October 24, 2015. Hurricane Patricia, one of the strongest storms ever recorded, crashed into western Mexico with rain and winds of up to 165 mph (266 kph), hammering coastal areas but causing less damage than had been feared as it skirted cities and major tourist resorts.Mowing down trees, flooding streets and battering buildings, Patricia plowed into Mexico as a Category 5 hurricane on Friday evening before grinding inland. It rapidly lost power in the mountains that rise up along the Pacific coast and was downgraded to a tropical depression on Saturday morning as it headed through central Mexico. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
NISSAN-EARNINGS/
RTX14W2S
November 01, 2013
Visitors look at Nissan Motor Co's vehicles displayed at the company's showroom in Yokohama, south of...
Yokohama, Japan
Visitors look at Nissan Motor Co's vehicles displayed at the company's showroom in Yokohama
Visitors look at Nissan Motor Co's vehicles displayed at the company's showroom in Yokohama, south of Tokyo November 1, 2013. Nissan Motor Co cut its annual net profit outlook by nearly 20 percent on Friday, depressed by a sales slowdown in China and Southeast Asia and by a major vehicle recall in September. REUTERS/Yuya Shino (JAPAN - Tags: TRANSPORT BUSINESS)
NISSAN-EARNINGS/
RTX14W2Q
November 01, 2013
A logo of Nissan Motor Co is seen on a steering wheel of a car at the company's showroom in Yokohama,...
Yokohama, Japan
A logo of Nissan Motor Co is seen on a steering wheel of a car at the company's showroom in Yokohama
A logo of Nissan Motor Co is seen on a steering wheel of a car at the company's showroom in Yokohama, south of Tokyo November 1, 2013. Nissan Motor Co cut its annual net profit outlook by nearly 20 percent on Friday, depressed by a sales slowdown in China and Southeast Asia and by a major vehicle recall in September. REUTERS/Yuya Shino (JAPAN - Tags: TRANSPORT BUSINESS LOGO)
NISSAN-EARNINGS/
RTX14W2O
November 01, 2013
A logo of Nissan Motor Co is seen on the wheel of a car at the company's showroom in Yokohama, south...
Yokohama, Japan
A logo of Nissan Motor Co is seen on the wheel of a car at the company's showroom in Yokohama
A logo of Nissan Motor Co is seen on the wheel of a car at the company's showroom in Yokohama, south of Tokyo November 1, 2013. Nissan Motor Co cut its annual net profit outlook by nearly 20 percent on Friday, depressed by a sales slowdown in China and Southeast Asia and by a major vehicle recall in September. REUTERS/Yuya Shino (JAPAN - Tags: TRANSPORT BUSINESS LOGO)
NISSAN-EARNINGS/
RTX14W2N
November 01, 2013
A visitor runs past the logo of Nissan Motor Co at the company's showroom in Yokohama, south of Tokyo...
Yokohama, Japan
A visitor runs past the logo of Nissan Motor Co at the company's showroom in Yokohama
A visitor runs past the logo of Nissan Motor Co at the company's showroom in Yokohama, south of Tokyo November 1, 2013. Nissan Motor Co cut its annual net profit outlook by nearly 20 percent on Friday, depressed by a sales slowdown in China and Southeast Asia and by a major vehicle recall in September. REUTERS/Yuya Shino (JAPAN - Tags: TRANSPORT BUSINESS LOGO)
NISSAN-EARNINGS/
RTX14W2K
November 01, 2013
A man sits inside Nissan Motor Co's New Mobility concept car displayed at the company's showroom in Yokohama,...
Yokohama, Japan
A man sits inside Nissan Motor Co's New Mobility concept car displayed at the company's showroom in Yokohama...
A man sits inside Nissan Motor Co's New Mobility concept car displayed at the company's showroom in Yokohama, south of Tokyo November 1, 2013. Nissan Motor Co cut its annual net profit outlook by nearly 20 percent on Friday, depressed by a sales slowdown in China and Southeast Asia and by a major vehicle recall in September. REUTERS/Yuya Shino (JAPAN - Tags: TRANSPORT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY BUSINESS)
NISSAN-EARNINGS/
RTX14W2B
November 01, 2013
A visitor sits inside Nissan Motor Co's New Mobility concept car displayed at the company's showroom...
Yokohama, Japan
A visitor sits inside Nissan Motor Co's New Mobility concept car displayed at the company's showroom...
A visitor sits inside Nissan Motor Co's New Mobility concept car displayed at the company's showroom in Yokohama, south of Tokyo November 1, 2013. Nissan Motor Co cut its annual net profit outlook by nearly 20 percent on Friday, depressed by a sales slowdown in China and Southeast Asia and by a major vehicle recall in September. REUTERS/Yuya Shino (JAPAN - Tags: TRANSPORT BUSINESS)
NISSAN-EARNINGS/
RTX14W2A
November 01, 2013
A man walks past the logo of Nissan Motor Co outside the company's global headquarters in Yokohama, south...
Yokohama, Japan
A man walks past the logo of Nissan Motor Co outside the company's global headquarters in Yokohama
A man walks past the logo of Nissan Motor Co outside the company's global headquarters in Yokohama, south of Tokyo November 1, 2013. Nissan Motor Co cut its annual net profit outlook by nearly 20 percent on Friday, depressed by a sales slowdown in China and Southeast Asia and by a major vehicle recall in September. REUTERS/Yuya Shino (JAPAN - Tags: BUSINESS LOGO TRANSPORT)
CENTRALAMERICA-COFFEE/
RTR3CKSF
January 17, 2013
Coffee beans are seen in a roaster at the La Majada coffee farm in Ahuachapan January 10, 2013. Central...
Ahuachapan, El Salvador
Coffee beans are seen in a roaster at the La Majada coffee farm in Ahuachapan
Coffee beans are seen in a roaster at the La Majada coffee farm in Ahuachapan January 10, 2013. Central American farmers who produce some of the world's most sought-after coffee beans are grappling with the re-emergence of a merciless old foe: a tree-killing fungus known as roya spread by the wind. Aggressive outbreaks of the blight have hit Central America's major coffee-producing nations and Mexico, which are home to more than a fifth of the world's arabica coffee production. The pandemic risks decimating yields, threatening hundreds of thousands of livelihoods and export revenues in some of Latin America's poorest countries. Making matters worse, coffee prices have fallen by about half since a mid-2011 peak, leaving farmers to face a double-whammy of shrinking incomes on top of depressed output. Picture taken January 10, 2013. REUTERS/Ulises Rodriguez (EL SALVADOR - Tags: AGRICULTURE BUSINESS)
CENTRALAMERICA-COFFEE/
RTR3CKSC
January 17, 2013
Healthy coffee cherries are pictured at the La Majada coffee farm in Ahuachapan January 10, 2013. Central...
Ahuachapan, El Salvador
Healthy coffee cherries are pictured at the La Majada coffee farm in Ahuachapan
Healthy coffee cherries are pictured at the La Majada coffee farm in Ahuachapan January 10, 2013. Central American farmers who produce some of the world's most sought-after coffee beans are grappling with the re-emergence of a merciless old foe: a tree-killing fungus known as roya spread by the wind. Aggressive outbreaks of the blight have hit Central America's major coffee-producing nations and Mexico, which are home to more than a fifth of the world's arabica coffee production. The pandemic risks decimating yields, threatening hundreds of thousands of livelihoods and export revenues in some of Latin America's poorest countries. Making matters worse, coffee prices have fallen by about half since a mid-2011 peak, leaving farmers to face a double-whammy of shrinking incomes on top of depressed output. Picture taken January 10, 2013. REUTERS/Ulises Rodriguez (EL SALVADOR - Tags: AGRICULTURE BUSINESS)
CENTRALAMERICA-COFFEE/
RTR3CKSB
January 17, 2013
A coffee picker carries sacks of coffee cherries at a plantation in El Crucero, about 20 km (12 miles)...
El Crucero, Nicaragua
A coffee picker carries sacks of coffee cherries at a plantation in El Crucero
A coffee picker carries sacks of coffee cherries at a plantation in El Crucero, about 20 km (12 miles) south of Managua, January 9, 2013. Central American farmers who produce some of the world's most sought-after coffee beans are grappling with the re-emergence of a merciless old foe: a tree-killing fungus known as roya spread by the wind. Aggressive outbreaks of the blight have hit Central America's major coffee-producing nations and Mexico, which are home to more than a fifth of the world's arabica coffee production. The pandemic risks decimating yields, threatening hundreds of thousands of livelihoods and export revenues in some of Latin America's poorest countries. Making matters worse, coffee prices have fallen by about half since a mid-2011 peak, leaving farmers to face a double-whammy of shrinking incomes on top of depressed output. Picture taken January 9, 2013. REUTERS/Oswaldo Rivas (NICARAGUA - Tags: AGRICULTURE BUSINESS)
CENTRALAMERICA-COFFEE/
RTR3CKSA
January 17, 2013
A coffee picker shows coffee cherries affected by a tree-killing fungus known as roya at a plantation...
El Crucero, Nicaragua
A coffee picker shows coffee cherries affected by a tree-killing fungus known as roya at a plantation...
A coffee picker shows coffee cherries affected by a tree-killing fungus known as roya at a plantation in El Crucero, about 20 km (12 miles) south of Managua, January 9, 2013. Central American farmers who produce some of the world's most sought-after coffee beans are grappling with the re-emergence of a merciless old foe: the tree-killing fungus roya spread by the wind. Aggressive outbreaks of the blight have hit Central America's major coffee-producing nations and Mexico, which are home to more than a fifth of the world's arabica coffee production. The pandemic risks decimating yields, threatening hundreds of thousands of livelihoods and export revenues in some of Latin America's poorest countries. Making matters worse, coffee prices have fallen by about half since a mid-2011 peak, leaving farmers to face a double-whammy of shrinking incomes on top of depressed output. Picture taken January 9, 2013. REUTERS/Oswaldo Rivas (NICARAGUA - Tags: AGRICULTURE BUSINESS)
CENTRALAMERICA-COFFEE/
RTR3CKS6
January 17, 2013
A coffee picker is pictured at a plantation in El Crucero, about 20 km (12 miles) south of Managua, January...
El Crucero, Nicaragua
A coffee picker is pictured at a plantation in El Crucero
A coffee picker is pictured at a plantation in El Crucero, about 20 km (12 miles) south of Managua, January 9, 2013. Central American farmers who produce some of the world's most sought-after coffee beans are grappling with the re-emergence of a merciless old foe: a tree-killing fungus known as roya spread by the wind. Aggressive outbreaks of the blight have hit Central America's major coffee-producing nations and Mexico, which are home to more than a fifth of the world's arabica coffee production. The pandemic risks decimating yields, threatening hundreds of thousands of livelihoods and export revenues in some of Latin America's poorest countries. Making matters worse, coffee prices have fallen by about half since a mid-2011 peak, leaving farmers to face a double-whammy of shrinking incomes on top of depressed output. Picture taken January 9, 2013. REUTERS/Oswaldo Rivas (NICARAGUA - Tags: AGRICULTURE BUSINESS)
CENTRALAMERICA-COFFEE/
RTR3CKS4
January 17, 2013
Coffee pickers walk at a plantation in El Crucero, about 20 km (12 miles) south of Managua, January 9,...
El Crucero, Nicaragua
Coffee pickers walk at a plantation in El Crucero
Coffee pickers walk at a plantation in El Crucero, about 20 km (12 miles) south of Managua, January 9, 2013. Central American farmers who produce some of the world's most sought-after coffee beans are grappling with the re-emergence of a merciless old foe: a tree-killing fungus known as roya spread by the wind. Aggressive outbreaks of the blight have hit Central America's major coffee-producing nations and Mexico, which are home to more than a fifth of the world's arabica coffee production. The pandemic risks decimating yields, threatening hundreds of thousands of livelihoods and export revenues in some of Latin America's poorest countries. Making matters worse, coffee prices have fallen by about half since a mid-2011 peak, leaving farmers to face a double-whammy of shrinking incomes on top of depressed output. Picture taken January 9, 2013. REUTERS/Oswaldo Rivas (NICARAGUA - Tags: AGRICULTURE BUSINESS)
CENTRALAMERICA-COFFEE/
RTR3CKRY
January 17, 2013
A man casts a shadow on a basin with coffee cherries before they are washed at La Majada coffee farm...
Ahuachapan, El Salvador
A man casts a shadow on a basin with coffee cherries before they are washed at La Majada coffee farm...
A man casts a shadow on a basin with coffee cherries before they are washed at La Majada coffee farm in Ahuachapan, El Salvador, January 10, 2013. Central American farmers who produce some of the world's most sought-after coffee beans are grappling with the re-emergence of a merciless old foe: a tree-killing fungus known as roya spread by the wind. Aggressive outbreaks of the blight have hit Central America's major coffee-producing nations and Mexico, which are home to more than a fifth of the world's arabica coffee production. The pandemic risks decimating yields, threatening hundreds of thousands of livelihoods and export revenues in some of Latin America's poorest countries. Making matters worse, coffee prices have fallen by about half since a mid-2011 peak, leaving farmers to face a double-whammy of shrinking incomes on top of depressed output. Picture taken January 10, 2013. REUTERS/Ulises Rodriguez (EL SALVADOR - Tags: AGRICULTURE BUSINESS)
CENTRALAMERICA-COFFEE/
RTR3CKRW
January 17, 2013
A worker dries coffee beans at the La Majada coffee farm in Ahuachapan January 10, 2013. Central American...
Ahuachapan, El Salvador
A worker dries coffee beans at the La Majada coffee farm in Ahuachapan
A worker dries coffee beans at the La Majada coffee farm in Ahuachapan January 10, 2013. Central American farmers who produce some of the world's most sought-after coffee beans are grappling with the re-emergence of a merciless old foe: a tree-killing fungus known as roya spread by the wind. Aggressive outbreaks of the blight have hit Central America's major coffee-producing nations and Mexico, which are home to more than a fifth of the world's arabica coffee production. The pandemic risks decimating yields, threatening hundreds of thousands of livelihoods and export revenues in some of Latin America's poorest countries. Making matters worse, coffee prices have fallen by about half since a mid-2011 peak, leaving farmers to face a double-whammy of shrinking incomes on top of depressed output. Picture taken January 10, 2013. REUTERS/Ulises Rodriguez (EL SALVADOR - Tags: AGRICULTURE BUSINESS)
CENTRALAMERICA-COFFEE/
RTR3CKRQ
January 17, 2013
Coffee cherries affected by a tree-killing fungus known as roya are pictured at the La Majada coffee...
Ahuachapan, El Salvador
Coffee cherries affected by a tree-killing fungus known as roya are pictured at the La Majada coffee...
Coffee cherries affected by a tree-killing fungus known as roya are pictured at the La Majada coffee farm in Ahuachapan January 10, 2013. Central American farmers who produce some of the world's most sought-after coffee beans are grappling with the re-emergence of a merciless old foe: the tree-killing fungus roya spread by the wind. Aggressive outbreaks of the blight have hit Central America's major coffee-producing nations and Mexico, which are home to more than a fifth of the world's arabica coffee production. The pandemic risks decimating yields, threatening hundreds of thousands of livelihoods and export revenues in some of Latin America's poorest countries. Making matters worse, coffee prices have fallen by about half since a mid-2011 peak, leaving farmers to face a double-whammy of shrinking incomes on top of depressed output. Picture taken January 10, 2013. REUTERS/Ulises Rodriguez (EL SALVADOR - Tags: AGRICULTURE BUSINESS)
CENTRALAMERICA-COFFEE/
RTR3CKRP
January 17, 2013
Leaves of a coffee plant affected by a tree-killing fungus known as roya are pictured at the La Majada...
Ahuachapan, El Salvador
Leaves of a coffee plant affected by a tree-killing fungus known as roya are pictured at the La Majada...
Leaves of a coffee plant affected by a tree-killing fungus known as roya are pictured at the La Majada coffee farm in Ahuachapan January 10, 2013. Central American farmers who produce some of the world's most sought-after coffee beans are grappling with the re-emergence of a merciless old foe: the tree-killing fungus roya spread by the wind. Aggressive outbreaks of the blight have hit Central America's major coffee-producing nations and Mexico, which are home to more than a fifth of the world's arabica coffee production. The pandemic risks decimating yields, threatening hundreds of thousands of livelihoods and export revenues in some of Latin America's poorest countries. Making matters worse, coffee prices have fallen by about half since a mid-2011 peak, leaving farmers to face a double-whammy of shrinking incomes on top of depressed output. Picture taken January 10, 2013. REUTERS/Ulises Rodriguez (EL SALVADOR - Tags: AGRICULTURE BUSINESS)
CENTRALAMERICA-COFFEE/
RTR3CKRO
January 17, 2013
Leaves of a coffee plant affected by a tree-killing fungus known as roya are pictured at the La Majada...
Ahuachapan, El Salvador
Leaves of a coffee plant affected by a tree-killing fungus known as roya are pictured at the La Majada...
Leaves of a coffee plant affected by a tree-killing fungus known as roya are pictured at the La Majada coffee farm in Ahuachapan January 10, 2013. Central American farmers who produce some of the world's most sought-after coffee beans are grappling with the re-emergence of a merciless old foe: the tree-killing fungus roya spread by the wind. Aggressive outbreaks of the blight have hit Central America's major coffee-producing nations and Mexico, which are home to more than a fifth of the world's arabica coffee production. The pandemic risks decimating yields, threatening hundreds of thousands of livelihoods and export revenues in some of Latin America's poorest countries. Making matters worse, coffee prices have fallen by about half since a mid-2011 peak, leaving farmers to face a double-whammy of shrinking incomes on top of depressed output. Picture taken January 10, 2013. REUTERS/Ulises Rodriguez (EL SALVADOR - Tags: AGRICULTURE BUSINESS)
MARKETS-PRECIOUS/
RTR315E9
April 24, 2012
Customers crowd at a gold jewellery showroom on the occasion of Akshaya Tritiya, a major gold buying...
Kochi, India
Customers crowd at a gold jewellery showroom on the occasion of Akshaya Tritiya in Kochi
Customers crowd at a gold jewellery showroom on the occasion of Akshaya Tritiya, a major gold buying festival in the southern Indian city of Kochi April 24, 2012. Demand for physical bullion in major consumer India picked up a touch on Tuesday, the day of Akshaya Tritiya, a key gold-buying festival, but volumes remained light. Indian gold demand has been depressed this year by weakness in the rand, which makes dollar-priced metal more expensive for local buyers. REUTERS/Sivaram V (INDIA - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES)
MARKETS-PRECIOUS/
RTR315DX
April 24, 2012
A salesgirl is reflected in a mirror inside a gold jewellery showroom on the occasion of Akshaya Tritiya,...
Kochi, India
Salesgirl is reflected in a mirror inside a gold jewellery showroom on occasion of Akshaya Tritiya in...
A salesgirl is reflected in a mirror inside a gold jewellery showroom on the occasion of Akshaya Tritiya, a major gold buying festival in the southern Indian city of Kochi April 24, 2012. Demand for physical bullion in major consumer India picked up a touch on Tuesday, the day of Akshaya Tritiya, a key gold-buying festival, but volumes remained light. Indian gold demand has been depressed this year by weakness in the rand, which makes dollar-priced metal more expensive for local buyers. REUTERS/Sivaram V (INDIA - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES)
USA-STOCKS/FLIGHT
RTXUTE2
November 19, 2010
Leanne Chase poses for a portrait at her home in Boston, Massachusetts November 18, 2010. The faith --...
Boston, UNITED STATES
To match special report USA-STOCKS/FLIGHT
Leanne Chase poses for a portrait at her home in Boston, Massachusetts November 18, 2010. The faith -- and money -- individual investors once held in the stock market has severely eroded. Two painful major stock market crashes over the last decade combined with the advent of arcane, complicated trading practices has created widespread suspicion of Wall Street, which many people now regard as no better than a roulette table. The last crash wiped out all of the gains made during the 2000s after the dot-com wipeout. The worry now is that a Lost Decade will create a Lost Generation of investors who avoid the market in a way not seen since the Great Depression. Picture taken November 18, 2010. To match special report USA-STOCKS/FLIGHT REUTERS/Brian Snyder (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS)
USA-STOCKS/FLIGHT
RTXUTDY
November 19, 2010
Leanne Chase poses for a portrait at her home in Boston, Massachusetts November 18, 2010. The faith --...
Boston, UNITED STATES
To match special report USA-STOCKS/FLIGHT
Leanne Chase poses for a portrait at her home in Boston, Massachusetts November 18, 2010. The faith -- and money -- individual investors once held in the stock market has severely eroded. Two painful major stock market crashes over the last decade combined with the advent of arcane, complicated trading practices has created widespread suspicion of Wall Street, which many people now regard as no better than a roulette table. The last crash wiped out all of the gains made during the 2000s after the dot-com wipeout. The worry now is that a Lost Decade will create a Lost Generation of investors who avoid the market in a way not seen since the Great Depression. Picture taken November 18, 2010. To match special report USA-STOCKS/FLIGHT REUTERS/Brian Snyder (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS)
USA-STOCKS/FLIGHT
RTXUTDX
November 19, 2010
Leanne Chase poses for a portrait at her home in Boston, Massachusetts November 18, 2010. The faith --...
Boston, UNITED STATES
To match special report USA-STOCKS/FLIGHT
Leanne Chase poses for a portrait at her home in Boston, Massachusetts November 18, 2010. The faith -- and money -- individual investors once held in the stock market has severely eroded. Two painful major stock market crashes over the last decade combined with the advent of arcane, complicated trading practices has created widespread suspicion of Wall Street, which many people now regard as no better than a roulette table. The last crash wiped out all of the gains made during the 2000s after the dot-com wipeout. The worry now is that a Lost Decade will create a Lost Generation of investors who avoid the market in a way not seen since the Great Depression. Picture taken November 18, 2010. To match special report USA-STOCKS/FLIGHT REUTERS/Brian Snyder (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS)
USA-STOCKS/FLIGHT
RTXUTDQ
November 19, 2010
Leanne Chase poses for a portrait with a chart of the Dow Jones Stock Market on her laptop computer screen...
Boston, UNITED STATES
To match special report USA-STOCKS/FLIGHT
Leanne Chase poses for a portrait with a chart of the Dow Jones Stock Market on her laptop computer screen at her home in Boston, Massachusetts November 18, 2010. The faith -- and money -- individual investors once held in the stock market has severely eroded. Two painful major stock market crashes over the last decade combined with the advent of arcane, complicated trading practices has created widespread suspicion of Wall Street, which many people now regard as no better than a roulette table. The last crash wiped out all of the gains made during the 2000s after the dot-com wipeout. The worry now is that a Lost Decade will create a Lost Generation of investors who avoid the market in a way not seen since the Great Depression. Picture taken November 18, 2010. To match special report USA-STOCKS/FLIGHT REUTERS/Brian Snyder (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS)
USA-STOCKS/FLIGHT
RTXUTDM
November 19, 2010
Leanne Chase poses for a portrait with a chart of the Dow Jones Stock Market on her laptop computer screen...
Boston, UNITED STATES
To match special report USA-STOCKS/FLIGHT
Leanne Chase poses for a portrait with a chart of the Dow Jones Stock Market on her laptop computer screen at her home in Boston, Massachusetts November 18, 2010. The faith -- and money -- individual investors once held in the stock market has severely eroded. Two painful major stock market crashes over the last decade combined with the advent of arcane, complicated trading practices has created widespread suspicion of Wall Street, which many people now regard as no better than a roulette table. The last crash wiped out all of the gains made during the 2000s after the dot-com wipeout. The worry now is that a Lost Decade will create a Lost Generation of investors who avoid the market in a way not seen since the Great Depression. Picture taken November 18, 2010. To match special report USA-STOCKS/FLIGHT REUTERS/Brian Snyder (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS)
STORM-PAULA/
RTXTH3R
October 15, 2010
A worker clears branches of a tree blocking a street in Havana October 15, 2010. Tropical Depression...
Havana, Cuba
A worker clears branches of a tree blocking a street in Havana
A worker clears branches of a tree blocking a street in Havana October 15, 2010. Tropical Depression Paula spun itself out over Cuba on Friday after smacking the capital Havana and the island's western tobacco-growing province with driving rain and high winds. There were no reports of deaths or major damage from the storm, indicating the communist-ruled Caribbean nation was spared the destruction it suffered from three powerful hurricanes in 2008. REUTERS/Desmond Boylan (CUBA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)
STORM-PAULA/
RTXTH3J
October 15, 2010
Workers clear branches of a tree blocking a street in Havana October 15, 2010. Tropical Depression Paula...
Havana, Cuba
Workers clear branches of a tree blocking a street in Havana
Workers clear branches of a tree blocking a street in Havana October 15, 2010. Tropical Depression Paula spun itself out over Cuba on Friday after smacking the capital Havana and the island's western tobacco-growing province with driving rain and high winds. There were no reports of deaths or major damage from the storm, indicating the communist-ruled Caribbean nation was spared the destruction it suffered from three powerful hurricanes in 2008. REUTERS/Desmond Boylan (CUBA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)
STORM-PAULA/
RTXTH3G
October 15, 2010
Fallen power lines are seen as a worker clears branches of a tree blocking a street in Havana October...
Havana, Cuba
Fallen power lines are seen as a worker clears branches of a tree blocking a street in Havana
Fallen power lines are seen as a worker clears branches of a tree blocking a street in Havana October 15, 2010. Tropical Depression Paula spun itself out over Cuba on Friday after smacking the capital Havana and the island's western tobacco-growing province with driving rain and high winds. There were no reports of deaths or major damage from the storm, indicating the communist-ruled Caribbean nation was spared the destruction it suffered from three powerful hurricanes in 2008. REUTERS/Desmond Boylan (CUBA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)
STORM-PAULA/
RTXTH3F
October 15, 2010
People walk beside the stump of a tree fallen after thunderstorms in Havana October 15, 2010. Tropical...
Havana, Cuba
People walk beside the stump of a tree fallen after thunderstorms in Havana
People walk beside the stump of a tree fallen after thunderstorms in Havana October 15, 2010. Tropical Depression Paula spun itself out over Cuba on Friday after smacking the capital Havana and the island's western tobacco-growing province with driving rain and high winds. There were no reports of deaths or major damage from the storm, indicating the communist-ruled Caribbean nation was spared the destruction it suffered from three powerful hurricanes in 2008. REUTERS/Desmond Boylan (CUBA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)
STORM-PAULA/
RTXTH2W
October 15, 2010
People look at fallen power lines blocking a street in Havana October 15, 2010. Tropical Depression Paula...
Havana, Cuba
People look at fallen power lines blocking a street in Havana
People look at fallen power lines blocking a street in Havana October 15, 2010. Tropical Depression Paula spun itself out over Cuba on Friday after smacking the capital Havana and the island's western tobacco-growing province with driving rain and high winds. There were no reports of deaths or major damage from the storm, indicating the communist-ruled Caribbean nation was spared the destruction it suffered from three powerful hurricanes in 2008. REUTERS/Desmond Boylan (CUBA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)
STORM-PAULA/
RTXTH2T
October 15, 2010
A worker carries a ladder near fallen power lines blocking a street in Havana October 15, 2010. Tropical...
Havana, Cuba
A worker carries a ladder near fallen power lines blocking a street in Havana
A worker carries a ladder near fallen power lines blocking a street in Havana October 15, 2010. Tropical Depression Paula spun itself out over Cuba on Friday after smacking the capital Havana and the island's western tobacco-growing province with driving rain and high winds. There were no reports of deaths or major damage from the storm, indicating the communist-ruled Caribbean nation was spared the destruction it suffered from three powerful hurricanes in 2008. REUTERS/Desmond Boylan (CUBA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)
STORM-PAULA/
RTXTH2P
October 15, 2010
A worker clears branches of a tree blocking a street in Havana October 15, 2010. Tropical Depression...
Havana, Cuba
A worker clears branches of a tree blocking a street in Havana
A worker clears branches of a tree blocking a street in Havana October 15, 2010. Tropical Depression Paula spun itself out over Cuba on Friday after smacking the capital Havana and the island's western tobacco-growing province with driving rain and high winds. There were no reports of deaths or major damage from the storm, indicating the communist-ruled Caribbean nation was spared the destruction it suffered from three powerful hurricanes in 2008. REUTERS/Desmond Boylan (CUBA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)
STORM-PAULA/
RTXTH2R
October 14, 2010
People look from their balconies at fallen power lines blocking a street in Havana October 15, 2010....
Havana, Cuba
People look from their balconies at fallen power lines blocking a street in Havana
People look from their balconies at fallen power lines blocking a street in Havana October 15, 2010. Tropical Depression Paula spun itself out over Cuba on Friday after smacking the capital Havana and the island's western tobacco-growing province with driving rain and high winds. There were no reports of deaths or major damage from the storm, indicating the communist-ruled Caribbean nation was spared the destruction it suffered from three powerful hurricanes in 2008. REUTERS/Desmond Boylan (CUBA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)
AUTOSALES/USA
RTR2EOGS
June 02, 2010
Chrysler vehicles are reflected in a Chrysler 300 at a dealership in Alexandria, Virginia June 2, 2010....
Alexandria, UNITED STATES
Chrysler vehicles are on display at a dealership in Alexandria, Virginia
Chrysler vehicles are reflected in a Chrysler 300 at a dealership in Alexandria, Virginia June 2, 2010. Major automakers recorded double-digit U.S. sales gains in May from depressed year-earlier levels as industry -wide sales ticked up for a seventh consecutive month with a boost from orders by rental agencies. REUTERS/Molly Riley (UNITED STATES - Tags: TRANSPORT BUSINESS)
AUTOSALES/USA
RTR2EOGN
June 02, 2010
Chrysler vehicles are on display at a dealership in Alexandria, Virginia June 2, 2010. Major automakers...
Alexandria, UNITED STATES
Chrysler vehicles are on display at a dealership in Alexandria, Virginia
Chrysler vehicles are on display at a dealership in Alexandria, Virginia June 2, 2010. Major automakers recorded double-digit U.S. sales gains in May from depressed year-earlier levels as industry -wide sales ticked up for a seventh consecutive month with a boost from orders by rental agencies. REUTERS/Molly Riley (UNITED STATES - Tags: TRANSPORT BUSINESS)
AUTOSALES/USA
RTR2EOGC
June 02, 2010
Chrysler vehicles are on display at a dealership in Alexandria, Virginia June 2, 2010. Major automakers...
Alexandria, UNITED STATES
Chrysler vehicles are on display at a dealership in Alexandria, Virginia
Chrysler vehicles are on display at a dealership in Alexandria, Virginia June 2, 2010. Major automakers recorded double-digit U.S. sales gains in May from depressed year-earlier levels as industry -wide sales ticked up for a seventh consecutive month with a boost from orders by rental agencies. REUTERS/Molly Riley (UNITED STATES - Tags: TRANSPORT BUSINESS)
AUTOSALES/USA
RTR2EOG5
June 02, 2010
Chrysler vehicles are on display at a dealership in Alexandria, Virginia June 2, 2010. Major automakers...
Alexandria, UNITED STATES
Chrysler vehicles are on display at a dealership in Alexandria, Virginia
Chrysler vehicles are on display at a dealership in Alexandria, Virginia June 2, 2010. Major automakers recorded double-digit U.S. sales gains in May from depressed year-earlier levels as industry -wide sales ticked up for a seventh consecutive month with a boost from orders by rental agencies. REUTERS/Molly Riley (UNITED STATES - Tags: TRANSPORT BUSINESS)
SHELL/
RTR29TDU
February 04, 2010
Royal Dutch Shell oil company's Chief Executive Peter Voser speaks during the presentation of the Q4...
The Hague, Netherlands
Royal Dutch Shell oil company's CEO Voser speaks during the presentation of the Q4 and annual results...
Royal Dutch Shell oil company's Chief Executive Peter Voser speaks during the presentation of the Q4 and annual results in The Hague February 4, 2010. Shell posted a 75 percent fall in fourth-quarter profits to $1.18 billion, as the oil major was punished for falling output and its strong position in the depressed refining and natural gas businesses. REUTERS/Jerry Lampen (NETHERLANDS - Tags: BUSINESS ENERGY)
SHELL/
RTR29TDM
February 04, 2010
Royal Dutch Shell oil company's Chief Executive Peter Voser speaks during the presentation of the Q4...
The Hague, Netherlands
Royal Dutch Shell oil company's CEO Voser speaks during the presentation of the Q4 and annual results...
Royal Dutch Shell oil company's Chief Executive Peter Voser speaks during the presentation of the Q4 and annual results in The Hague February 4, 2010. Shell posted a 75 percent fall in fourth-quarter profits to $1.18 billion, as the oil major was punished for falling output and its strong position in the depressed refining and natural gas businesses. REUTERS/Jerry Lampen (NETHERLANDS - Tags: BUSINESS ENERGY)
SHELL/
RTR29TDK
February 04, 2010
Royal Dutch Shell oil company's Chief Executive Peter Voser speaks during the presentation of the Q4...
The Hague, Netherlands
Royal Dutch Shell oil company's CEO Voser speaks during the presentation of the Q4 and annual results...
Royal Dutch Shell oil company's Chief Executive Peter Voser speaks during the presentation of the Q4 and annual results in The Hague February 4, 2010. Shell posted a 75 percent fall in fourth-quarter profits to $1.18 billion, as the oil major was punished for falling output and its strong position in the depressed refining and natural gas businesses. REUTERS/Jerry Lampen (NETHERLANDS - Tags: BUSINESS ENERGY)
SHELL/
RTR29TCR
February 04, 2010
Royal Dutch Shell oil company's Chief Executive Peter Voser speaks during the presentation of the Q4...
The Hague, Netherlands
Royal Dutch Shell oil company's CEO Voser speaks during the presentation of the Q4 and annual results...
Royal Dutch Shell oil company's Chief Executive Peter Voser speaks during the presentation of the Q4 and annual results in The Hague February 4, 2010. Shell posted a 75 percent fall in fourth-quarter profits to $1.18 billion, as the oil major was punished for falling output and its strong position in the depressed refining and natural gas businesses. REUTERS/Jerry Lampen (NETHERLANDS - Tags: BUSINESS ENERGY)
SHELL/
RTR29TCB
February 04, 2010
Royal Dutch Shell oil company's Chief Executive Peter Voser speaks during the presentation of the Q4...
The Hague, Netherlands
Royal Dutch Shell oil company's CEO Voser speaks during the presentation of the Q4 and annual results...
Royal Dutch Shell oil company's Chief Executive Peter Voser speaks during the presentation of the Q4 and annual results in The Hague February 4, 2010. Shell posted a 75 percent fall in fourth-quarter profits to $1.18 billion, as the oil major was punished for falling output and its strong position in the depressed refining and natural gas businesses. REUTERS/Jerry Lampen (NETHERLANDS - Tags: BUSINESS ENERGY)
SHELL/
RTR29TC7
February 04, 2010
Royal Dutch Shell oil company's Chief Executive Peter Voser speaks during the presentation of the Q4...
The Hague, Netherlands
Royal Dutch Shell oil company's CEO Voser speaks during the presentation of the Q4 and annual results...
Royal Dutch Shell oil company's Chief Executive Peter Voser speaks during the presentation of the Q4 and annual results in The Hague February 4, 2010. Shell posted a 75 percent fall in fourth-quarter profits to $1.18 billion, as the oil major was punished for falling output and its strong position in the depressed refining and natural gas businesses. REUTERS/Jerry Lampen (NETHERLANDS - Tags: BUSINESS ENERGY)
MARKETS-STOCKS/
RTXBV1A
February 20, 2009
Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange February 20, 2009. U.S. stocks tumbled on Friday,...
New York, UNITED STATES
Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange
Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange February 20, 2009. U.S. stocks tumbled on Friday, depressing the Dow to levels last seen more than six years ago as investors worried a financial sector rescue might involve nationalization of major banks, wiping out shareholders. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton (UNITED STATES)
MARKETS-STOCKS/
RTXBV17
February 20, 2009
Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange February 20, 2009. U.S. stocks tumbled on Friday,...
New York, UNITED STATES
Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange
Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange February 20, 2009. U.S. stocks tumbled on Friday, depressing the Dow to levels last seen more than six years ago as investors worried a financial sector rescue might involve nationalization of major banks, wiping out shareholders. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton (UNITED STATES)
MARKETS-STOCKS/
RTXBV15
February 20, 2009
Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange February 20, 2009. U.S. stocks tumbled on Friday,...
New York, UNITED STATES
Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange
Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange February 20, 2009. U.S. stocks tumbled on Friday, depressing the Dow to levels last seen more than six years ago as investors worried a financial sector rescue might involve nationalization of major banks, wiping out shareholders. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton (UNITED STATES)
FINANCIAL-BAILOUT/
RTX8ZC2
September 27, 2008
U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) works at his desk while congressional negotiators work...
Washington, UNITED STATES
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid works at his desk while congressional negotiators work on a bailout...
U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) works at his desk while congressional negotiators work on a bailout package for the current financial and banking crisis, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, September 27, 2008. The U.S. Congress embarked on a weekend mission to strike a deal on a proposed $700 billion bailout of the financial industry before stock markets open on Monday in an attempt to end the greatest financial crisis since the Great Depression. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES)
FINANCIAL-BAILOUT/
RTX8ZBV
September 27, 2008
U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) works in his office while congressional negotiators work...
Washington, UNITED STATES
Reid works in his office while congressional negotiators work on a bailout package for the current financial...
U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) works in his office while congressional negotiators work on a bailout package for the current financial and banking crisis, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, September 27, 2008. The U.S. Congress embarked on a weekend mission to strike a deal on a proposed $700 billion bailout of the financial industry before stock markets open on Monday in an attempt to end the greatest financial crisis since the Great Depression. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES)
LEHMAN-MERRILL/
RTR21WQW
September 15, 2008
People walk by the Merrill Lynch building in New York September 15, 2008. he imminent disappearance of...
New York, UNITED STATES
People walk by the Merrill Lynch building in New York
People walk by the Merrill Lynch building in New York September 15, 2008. he imminent disappearance of major investment banks Lehman Brothers and Merrill Lynch presents a double-barrelled hit to an already wounded job market, and will likely depress salaries on Wall Street. REUTERS/Chip East (UNITED STATES)
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