Ajax loader
By using our website, you agree to our use of cookies as described in Cookie Policy.

Can't find what you're looking for?

 

Be sure to Sign in to see all available content.

 

If you don't have an account, Register here.

Search results for: Malt-house

BEVERAGES-BEER/EUROPE
RTX67RF5
June 06, 2018
Samples of malt and hop pellets used in the brewing of beer are seen at the brew house at Farsons Brewery...
Mriehel, Malta
Samples of malt and hop pellets used in the brewing of beer are seen at the brew house at Farsons Brewery...
Samples of malt and hop pellets used in the brewing of beer are seen at the brew house at Farsons Brewery in Mriehel, Malta June 4, 2018. Picture taken June 4, 2018. REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi
BELGIUM-BEER/
RTX2LUMT
August 18, 2016
Axel Henrard, psychologist and President of the Belgian Homebrewers association, mills malt in a former...
ATTERT, Belgium
Henrard, President of the Belgian Homebrewers association, mills malt in a former barn of his house in...
Axel Henrard, psychologist and President of the Belgian Homebrewers association, mills malt in a former barn of his house as he starts making his own beer in Attert, Belgium, August 11, 2016. Picture taken August 11, 2016. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir
BELGIUM-BEER/
RTX2LUMQ
August 18, 2016
Axel Henrard, psychologist and President of the Belgian Homebrewers association, mills malt in a former...
ATTERT, Belgium
Henrard, President of the Belgian Homebrewers association, mills malt in a former barn of his house in...
Axel Henrard, psychologist and President of the Belgian Homebrewers association, mills malt in a former barn of his house as he starts making his own beer in Attert, Belgium, August 11, 2016. Picture taken August 11, 2016. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir
BELGIUM-BEER/
RTX2LUKT
August 18, 2016
Jean-Christophe Larsimont, Vice President of the Belgian Homebrewers association, pours malt as he starts...
SAMBREVILLE, Belgium
Larsimont, Vice President of the Belgian Homebrewers association, pours malt as he starts making his...
Jean-Christophe Larsimont, Vice President of the Belgian Homebrewers association, pours malt as he starts making his own beer in the garage of his house in Sambreville, Belgium, August 9, 2016. Picture taken August 9, 2016. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir
GERMANY-BEER/
RTR3LS08
April 18, 2014
The brew house of the Bavarian Weihenstephan brewery in Freising is pictured on April 3, 2014. A slump...
Freising, Germany
Picture shows the brew house of the Bavarian Weihenstephan brewery in Freising
The brew house of the Bavarian Weihenstephan brewery in Freising is pictured on April 3, 2014. A slump in consumption of more than a third in the last 25 years has hit Germany, Europe's biggest beer producer, triggering intense competition and price discounting. With young Germans turning to spirits and non-alcoholic fruit drinks, beer sales fell 2 percent last year alone. Traditional family breweries, also under pressure from double-digit rises in energy, glass and malt costs, are struggling, some dying. In a bid to move upmarket and charge more, some breweries are trying to tap into growing demand for speciality beer. Picture taken April 3, 2014. To match Feature GERMANY-BEER/ REUTERS/Michael Dalder (GERMANY - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY)
GERMANY-BEER/
RTR3LS06
April 18, 2014
The brew house of the Bavarian Weihenstephan brewery in Freising is pictured on April 3, 2014. A slump...
Freising, Germany
Picture shows the brew house of the Bavarian Weihenstephan brewery in Freising
The brew house of the Bavarian Weihenstephan brewery in Freising is pictured on April 3, 2014. A slump in consumption of more than a third in the last 25 years has hit Germany, Europe's biggest beer producer, triggering intense competition and price discounting. With young Germans turning to spirits and non-alcoholic fruit drinks, beer sales fell 2 percent last year alone. Traditional family breweries, also under pressure from double-digit rises in energy, glass and malt costs, are struggling, some dying.In a bid to move upmarket and charge more, some breweries are trying to tap into growing demand for speciality beer. Picture taken April 3, 2014. To match Feature GERMANY-BEER/ REUTERS/Michael Dalder (GERMANY - Tags: BUSINES S SOCIETY)
AUSTRIA-BEER/
RTX12QYG
August 19, 2013
Numbers on the wall mark the years when the house was founded in 1229 and when beer brewing started in...
Vienna, Austria
Numbers on the wall mark the years when the house was founded in 1229 and when beer brewing started in...
Numbers on the wall mark the years when the house was founded in 1229 and when beer brewing started in 1449 at the family-owned Hofstetten brewery in the Upper Austrian town of Saint Martin August 13, 2013. Hofstetten brewery is offering beer lovers a trip back in time by reviving a 300-year-old recipe it found in the town archives. The brewery recreated the "Neuhauser Herrschafts Pier" from ingredients listed in an invoice for the local Neuhaus castle in 1720, when Austria was one of Europe's big powers. Using small crops of emmer and malting barley grown from ancient seed varieties agricultural historians had preserved, owner Peter Krammer was able to reproduce the mix of barley, wheat and hops that marked the brew made three centuries ago. The traditional text reads: "God preserve hop and malt". Picture taken August 13, 2013. REUTERS/Heinz-Peter Bader (AUSTRIA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MKH1
May 18, 2011
Brand manager Ewan MacIntosh holds a measure of whisky in the Barrel Room of the Diageo-owned Dalwhinnie...
DALWHINNIE, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
Brand manager Ewan MacIntosh holds a measure of whisky in the Barrel Room of the Diageo-owned Dalwhinnie Distillery in Dalwhinnie in the Scottish Highlands May 16, 2011. Scotch whisky is making huge inroads in developing nations such as China, Russia, India, Brazil and Mexico, as the growing middle classes turn away from local drinks such as vodka and rum. Overall exports were up 10 percent in 2010 with eight out of the industry's top 10 export markets growing and only Spain and Greece, beset by severe economic problems and austerity measures, showing a decline. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds ($975.7 million) into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken May 16, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK TRAVEL)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MKH0
May 18, 2011
Brand manager Ewan MacIntosh holds a measure of whisky in the Barrel Room of the Diageo-owned Dalwhinnie...
DALWHINNIE, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
Brand manager Ewan MacIntosh holds a measure of whisky in the Barrel Room of the Diageo-owned Dalwhinnie Distillery in Dalwhinnie in the Scottish Highlands May 16, 2011. Scotch whisky is making huge inroads in developing nations such as China, Russia, India, Brazil and Mexico, as the growing middle classes turn away from local drinks such as vodka and rum. Overall exports were up 10 percent in 2010 with eight out of the industry's top 10 export markets growing and only Spain and Greece, beset by severe economic problems and austerity measures, showing a decline. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds ($975.7 million) into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken May 16, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK TRAVEL)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MKGS
May 18, 2011
Tourists take photographs outside the vistor centre of the Diageo-owned Dalwhinnie Distillery in Dalwhinnie...
DALWHINNIE, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
Tourists take photographs outside the vistor centre of the Diageo-owned Dalwhinnie Distillery in Dalwhinnie in the Scottish Highlands May 16, 2011. Scotch whisky is making huge inroads in developing nations such as China, Russia, India, Brazil and Mexico, as the growing middle classes turn away from local drinks such as vodka and rum. Overall exports were up 10 percent in 2010 with eight out of the industry's top 10 export markets growing and only Spain and Greece, beset by severe economic problems and austerity measures, showing a decline. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds ($975.7 million) into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken May 16, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK TRAVEL)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MKGR
May 18, 2011
Brand manager Ewan MacIntosh holds a measure of whisky in the Barrel Room of the Diageo-owned Dalwhinnie...
DALWHINNIE, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
Brand manager Ewan MacIntosh holds a measure of whisky in the Barrel Room of the Diageo-owned Dalwhinnie Distillery in Dalwhinnie in the Scottish Highlands May 16, 2011. Scotch whisky is making huge inroads in developing nations such as China, Russia, India, Brazil and Mexico, as the growing middle classes turn away from local drinks such as vodka and rum. Overall exports were up 10 percent in 2010 with eight out of the industry's top 10 export markets growing and only Spain and Greece, beset by severe economic problems and austerity measures, showing a decline. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds ($975.7 million) into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken May 16, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK TRAVEL)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MKGM
May 18, 2011
Brand manager Ewan MacIntosh pours a measure of whisky from a barrel at the Diageo-owned Dalwhinnie Distillery...
DALWHINNIE, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
Brand manager Ewan MacIntosh pours a measure of whisky from a barrel at the Diageo-owned Dalwhinnie Distillery in Dalwhinnie in the Scottish Highlands May 16, 2011. Scotch whisky is making huge inroads in developing nations such as China, Russia, India, Brazil and Mexico, as the growing middle classes turn away from local drinks such as vodka and rum. Overall exports were up 10 percent in 2010 with eight out of the industry's top 10 export markets growing and only Spain and Greece, beset by severe economic problems and austerity measures, showing a decline. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds ($975.7 million) into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken May 16, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK TRAVEL)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MKGJ
May 18, 2011
Brand manager Ewan MacIntosh pours a measure of whisky at the Diageo-owned Dalwhinnie Distillery in Dalwhinnie...
DALWHINNIE, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
Brand manager Ewan MacIntosh pours a measure of whisky at the Diageo-owned Dalwhinnie Distillery in Dalwhinnie in the Scottish Highlands May 16, 2011. Scotch whisky is making huge inroads in developing nations such as China, Russia, India, Brazil and Mexico, as the growing middle classes turn away from local drinks such as vodka and rum. Overall exports were up 10 percent in 2010 with eight out of the industry's top 10 export markets growing and only Spain and Greece, beset by severe economic problems and austerity measures, showing a decline. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds ($975.7 million) into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken May 16, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK TRAVEL)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MKGH
May 18, 2011
Tourists walk past the main building of the Diageo-owned Dalwhinnie Distillery in Dalwhinnie in the Scottish...
DALWHINNIE, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
Tourists walk past the main building of the Diageo-owned Dalwhinnie Distillery in Dalwhinnie in the Scottish Highlands May 16, 2011. Scotch whisky is making huge inroads in developing nations such as China, Russia, India, Brazil and Mexico, as the growing middle classes turn away from local drinks such as vodka and rum. Overall exports were up 10 percent in 2010 with eight out of the industry's top 10 export markets growing and only Spain and Greece, beset by severe economic problems and austerity measures, showing a decline. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds ($975.7 million) into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken May 16, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK TRAVEL)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MKGG
May 18, 2011
Tourists walk past the main building of the Diageo-owned Dalwhinnie Distillery in Dalwhinnie in the Scottish...
DALWHINNIE, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
Tourists walk past the main building of the Diageo-owned Dalwhinnie Distillery in Dalwhinnie in the Scottish Highlands May 16, 2011. Scotch whisky is making huge inroads in developing nations such as China, Russia, India, Brazil and Mexico, as the growing middle classes turn away from local drinks such as vodka and rum. Overall exports were up 10 percent in 2010 with eight out of the industry's top 10 export markets growing and only Spain and Greece, beset by severe economic problems and austerity measures, showing a decline. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds ($975.7 million) into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken May 16, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK TRAVEL)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MKGF
May 18, 2011
Tourists from India are shown bottles of whisky in the visitor centre of the Diageo-owned Dalwhinnie...
DALWHINNIE, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
Tourists from India are shown bottles of whisky in the visitor centre of the Diageo-owned Dalwhinnie Distillery in Dalwhinnie in the Scottish Highlands May 16, 2011. Scotch whisky is making huge inroads in developing nations such as China, Russia, India, Brazil and Mexico, as the growing middle classes turn away from local drinks such as vodka and rum. Overall exports were up 10 percent in 2010 with eight out of the industry's top 10 export markets growing and only Spain and Greece, beset by severe economic problems and austerity measures, showing a decline. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds ($975.7 million) into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken May 16, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK TRAVEL)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MKGE
May 18, 2011
Bottles of whisky are displayed in the visitor centre of the Diageo-owned Dalwhinnie Distillery in Dalwhinnie...
DALWHINNIE, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
Bottles of whisky are displayed in the visitor centre of the Diageo-owned Dalwhinnie Distillery in Dalwhinnie in the Scottish Highlands May 16, 2011. Scotch whisky is making huge inroads in developing nations such as China, Russia, India, Brazil and Mexico, as the growing middle classes turn away from local drinks such as vodka and rum. Overall exports were up 10 percent in 2010 with eight out of the industry's top 10 export markets growing and only Spain and Greece, beset by severe economic problems and austerity measures, showing a decline. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds ($975.7 million) into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken May 16, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK TRAVEL)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MKGC
May 18, 2011
A worker looks into one of the vats, used in the fermentation process of making whisky, in the Tun Room...
DALWHINNIE, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
A worker looks into one of the vats, used in the fermentation process of making whisky, in the Tun Room of the Diageo-owned Dalwhinnie Distillery in Dalwhinnie in the Scottish Highlands May 16, 2011. Scotch whisky is making huge inroads in developing nations such as China, Russia, India, Brazil and Mexico, as the growing middle classes turn away from local drinks such as vodka and rum. Overall exports were up 10 percent in 2010 with eight out of the industry's top 10 export markets growing and only Spain and Greece, beset by severe economic problems and austerity measures, showing a decline. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds ($975.7 million) into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken May 16, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK TRAVEL)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MKG9
May 18, 2011
A worker looks into one of the vats, used in the fermentation process of making whisky, in the Tun Room...
DALWHINNIE, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
A worker looks into one of the vats, used in the fermentation process of making whisky, in the Tun Room of the Diageo-owned Dalwhinnie Distillery in Dalwhinnie in the Scottish Highlands May 16, 2011. Scotch whisky is making huge inroads in developing nations such as China, Russia, India, Brazil and Mexico, as the growing middle classes turn away from local drinks such as vodka and rum. Overall exports were up 10 percent in 2010 with eight out of the industry's top 10 export markets growing and only Spain and Greece, beset by severe economic problems and austerity measures, showing a decline. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds ($975.7 million) into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken May 16, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK TRAVEL)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MKG7
May 18, 2011
A man looks at a computer screen showing the various types of whisky in the visitor centre of the Diageo-owned...
DALWHINNIE, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
A man looks at a computer screen showing the various types of whisky in the visitor centre of the Diageo-owned Dalwhinnie Distillery in Dalwhinnie in the Scottish Highlands May 16, 2011. Scotch whisky is making huge inroads in developing nations such as China, Russia, India, Brazil and Mexico, as the growing middle classes turn away from local drinks such as vodka and rum. Overall exports were up 10 percent in 2010 with eight out of the industry's top 10 export markets growing and only Spain and Greece, beset by severe economic problems and austerity measures, showing a decline. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds ($975.7 million) into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken May 16, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK TRAVEL)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MKFZ
May 18, 2011
Brand manager Ewan MacIntosh holds a measure of whisky in the barrel room of the Diageo-owned Dalwhinnie...
DALWHINNIE, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
Brand manager Ewan MacIntosh holds a measure of whisky in the barrel room of the Diageo-owned Dalwhinnie Distillery in Dalwhinnie in the Scottish Highlands May 16, 2011. Scotch whisky is making huge inroads in developing nations such as China, Russia, India, Brazil and Mexico, as the growing middle classes turn away from local drinks such as vodka and rum. Overall exports were up 10 percent in 2010 with eight out of the industry's top 10 export markets growing and only Spain and Greece, beset by severe economic problems and austerity measures, showing a decline. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds ($975.7 million) into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken May 16, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK TRAVEL)
BRITAIN
RTR2MKFU
May 18, 2011
A man holds a glass of whisky in the visitors centre of the Diageo-owned Dalwhinnie Distillery in Dalwhinnie...
DALWHINNIE, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
A man holds a glass of whisky in the visitors centre of the Diageo-owned Dalwhinnie Distillery in Dalwhinnie in the Scottish Highlands May 16, 2011. Scotch whisky is making huge inroads in developing nations such as China, Russia, India, Brazil and Mexico, as the growing middle classes turn away from local drinks such as vodka and rum. Overall exports were up 10 percent in 2010 with eight out of the industry's top 10 export markets growing and only Spain and Greece, beset by severe economic problems and austerity measures, showing a decline. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds ($975.7 million) into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken May 16, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK TRAVEL)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJGV
May 17, 2011
A worker looks on at the copper stills in the Roseisle distillery in Moray, northern Scotland March 1,...
Kinloss, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
A worker looks on at the copper stills in the Roseisle distillery in Moray, northern Scotland March 1, 2011. Whisky now accounts for 40 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold in China, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth close to 100 million pounds in 2010, from a mere 1 million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken March 1, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJGT
May 17, 2011
A worker walks among containers in the Roseisle distillery in Moray, northern Scotland March 1, 2011....
Kinloss, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
A worker walks among containers in the Roseisle distillery in Moray, northern Scotland March 1, 2011. Whisky now accounts for 40 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold in China, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth close to 100 million pounds in 2010, from a mere 1 million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken March 1, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJGR
May 17, 2011
A worker looks into one of the containers in the Roseisle distillery in Moray, northern Scotland March...
Kinloss, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
A worker looks into one of the containers in the Roseisle distillery in Moray, northern Scotland March 1, 2011. Whisky now accounts for 40 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold in China, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth close to 100 million pounds in 2010, from a mere 1 million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken March 1, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJGQ
May 17, 2011
The wooden fronted exterior of the Roseisle distillery in Moray, northern Scotland March 1, 2011. Whisky...
Kinloss, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
The wooden fronted exterior of the Roseisle distillery in Moray, northern Scotland March 1, 2011. Whisky now accounts for 40 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold in China, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth close to 100 million pounds in 2010, from a mere 1 million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken March 1, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJGO
May 17, 2011
The wooden fronted exterior of the Roseisle distillery in Moray, northern Scotland March 1, 2011. Whisky...
Kinloss, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
The wooden fronted exterior of the Roseisle distillery in Moray, northern Scotland March 1, 2011. Whisky now accounts for 40 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold in China, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth close to 100 million pounds in 2010, from a mere 1 million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken March 1, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJGL
May 17, 2011
The wooden fronted exterior of the Roseisle distillery in Moray, northern Scotland March 1, 2011. Whisky...
Kinloss, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
The wooden fronted exterior of the Roseisle distillery in Moray, northern Scotland March 1, 2011. Whisky now accounts for 40 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold in China, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth close to 100 million pounds in 2010, from a mere 1 million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken March 1, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJGI
May 17, 2011
A ventilation pipe sticks out from the wooden fronted exterior of the Roseisle distillery in Moray, northern...
Kinloss, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
A ventilation pipe sticks out from the wooden fronted exterior of the Roseisle distillery in Moray, northern Scotland March 1, 2011. Whisky now accounts for 40 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold in China, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth close to 100 million pounds in 2010, from a mere 1 million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken March 1, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJGF
May 17, 2011
A man cycles past the Roseisle distillery in Moray, northern Scotland March 1, 2011. Whisky now accounts...
Kinloss, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
A man cycles past the Roseisle distillery in Moray, northern Scotland March 1, 2011. Whisky now accounts for 40 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold in China, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth close to 100 million pounds in 2010, from a mere 1 million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken March 1, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJGE
May 17, 2011
A worker inspects one of the copper stills in the Roseisle distillery in Moray, northern Scotland March...
Kinloss, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
A worker inspects one of the copper stills in the Roseisle distillery in Moray, northern Scotland March 1, 2011. Whisky now accounts for 40 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold in China, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth close to 100 million pounds in 2010, from a mere 1 million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken March 1, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJGB
May 17, 2011
Workers inspect copper stills in the Roseisle distillery in Moray, northern Scotland March 1, 2011. Whisky...
Kinloss, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
Workers inspect copper stills in the Roseisle distillery in Moray, northern Scotland March 1, 2011. Whisky now accounts for 40 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold in China, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth close to 100 million pounds in 2010, from a mere 1 million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken March 1, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJG9
May 17, 2011
A worker inspects one of the copper stills in the Roseisle distillery in Moray, northern Scotland March...
Kinloss, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
A worker inspects one of the copper stills in the Roseisle distillery in Moray, northern Scotland March 1, 2011. Whisky now accounts for 40 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold in China, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth close to 100 million pounds in 2010, from a mere 1 million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken March 1, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJG7
May 17, 2011
Workers walk near some of the copper stills in the Roseisle distillery in Moray, northern Scotland March...
Kinloss, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
Workers walk near some of the copper stills in the Roseisle distillery in Moray, northern Scotland March 1, 2011. Whisky now accounts for 40 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold in China, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth close to 100 million pounds in 2010, from a mere 1 million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken March 1, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJG5
May 17, 2011
A worker looks into one of the containers in the Roseisle distillery in Moray, northern Scotland March...
Kinloss, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
A worker looks into one of the containers in the Roseisle distillery in Moray, northern Scotland March 1, 2011. Whisky now accounts for 40 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold in China, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth close to 100 million pounds in 2010, from a mere 1 million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken March 1, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJFM
May 17, 2011
Bottles of Johnnie Walker whisky move along on the production line at the Diageo owned Shieldhall bottling...
Glasgow, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
Bottles of Johnnie Walker whisky move along on the production line at the Diageo owned Shieldhall bottling plant in Glasgow, Scotland March 24, 2011. Shieldhall is the world's largest Scotch whisky bottling plant producing around 24 million cases of whisky per year. Whisky now accounts for 40 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold in China, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth close to 100 million pounds in 2010, from a mere 1 million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken March 24, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJFI
May 17, 2011
A worker looks at a bottle of Johnnie Walker whisky at the Diageo owned Shieldhall bottling plant in...
Glasgow, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
A worker looks at a bottle of Johnnie Walker whisky at the Diageo owned Shieldhall bottling plant in Glasgow, Scotland March 24, 2011. Shieldhall is the world's largest Scotch whisky bottling plant producing around 24 million cases of whisky per year. Whisky now accounts for 40 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold in China, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth close to 100 million pounds in 2010, from a mere 1 million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken March 24, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJFD
May 17, 2011
Bottles of whisky move along the production line at the Diageo owned Shieldhall bottling plant in Glasgow,...
Glasgow, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
Bottles of whisky move along the production line at the Diageo owned Shieldhall bottling plant in Glasgow, Scotland March 24, 2011. Shieldhall is the world's largest Scotch whisky bottling plant producing around 24 million cases of whisky per year. Whisky now accounts for 40 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold in China, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth close to 100 million pounds in 2010, from a mere 1 million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken March 24, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJF9
May 17, 2011
Bottles of Johnnie Walker whisky move along on the production line at the Diageo owned Shieldhall bottling...
Glasgow, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
Bottles of Johnnie Walker whisky move along on the production line at the Diageo owned Shieldhall bottling plant in Glasgow, Scotland March 24, 2011. Shieldhall is the world's largest Scotch whisky bottling plant producing around 24 million cases of whisky per year. Whisky now accounts for 40 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold in China, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth close to 100 million pounds in 2010, from a mere 1 million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken March 24, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJF8
May 17, 2011
Workers talk to each other on the production line at the Diageo owned Shieldhall bottling plant in Glasgow,...
Glasgow, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
Workers talk to each other on the production line at the Diageo owned Shieldhall bottling plant in Glasgow, Scotland March 24, 2011. Shieldhall is the world's largest Scotch whisky bottling plant producing around 24 million cases of whisky per year. Whisky now accounts for 40 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold in China, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth close to 100 million pounds in 2010, from a mere 1 million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken March 24, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJF6
May 17, 2011
A workman looks at boxes of Johnnie Walker whisky packed and ready for shipment in a warehouse at the...
Glasgow, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
A workman looks at boxes of Johnnie Walker whisky packed and ready for shipment in a warehouse at the Diageo owned Shieldhall bottling plant in Glasgow, Scotland March 24, 2011. Shieldhall is the world's largest Scotch whisky bottling plant producing around 24 million cases of whisky per year. Whisky now accounts for 40 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold in China, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth close to 100 million pounds in 2010, from a mere 1 million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken March 24, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJF5
May 17, 2011
A worker looks at bottles of Johnnie Walker whisky on the production line at the Diageo owned Shieldhall...
Glasgow, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
A worker looks at bottles of Johnnie Walker whisky on the production line at the Diageo owned Shieldhall bottling plant in Glasgow, Scotland March 24, 2011. Shieldhall is the world's largest Scotch whisky bottling plant producing around 24 million cases of whisky per year. Whisky now accounts for 40 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold in China, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth close to 100 million pounds in 2010, from a mere 1 million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken March 24, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJ8A
May 17, 2011
Brand manager Ewan MacIntosh holds a measure of whisky in the barrel room of the Diageo owned Dalwhinnie...
DALWHINNIE, United Kingdom
To match Reuters Life! FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
Brand manager Ewan MacIntosh holds a measure of whisky in the barrel room of the Diageo owned Dalwhinnie distillery in Dalwhinnie, in the Scottish highlands, May 16, 2011. Scotch whisky is muscling in at the expense of local tipples in China, where whisky exports were up 24 percent in 2010. It now accounts for 45 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold there, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth over 300 million pounds in 2010, from just a few million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken May 16, 2011. To match Reuters Life! FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD SOCIETY)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJ87
May 17, 2011
Workers walk near some of the copper stills in the Roseisle distillery in Moray, northern Scotland, in...
Kinloss, United Kingdom
To match Reuters Life! FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
Workers walk near some of the copper stills in the Roseisle distillery in Moray, northern Scotland, in this March 1, 2011 file photo. Scotch whisky is muscling in at the expense of local tipples in China, where whisky exports were up 24 percent in 2010. It now accounts for 45 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold there, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth over 300 million pounds in 2010, from just a few million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. To match Reuters Life! FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA To match Life! CHINA-WHISKY REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJ7Q
May 17, 2011
A worker looks at bottles of Johnnie Walker whisky on the production line at the Diageo owned Shieldhall...
Glasgow, United Kingdom
To match Reuters Life! FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
A worker looks at bottles of Johnnie Walker whisky on the production line at the Diageo owned Shieldhall bottling plant in Glasgow, Scotland, in this March 24, 2011 file photo. Shieldhall is the world's largest Scotch whisky bottling plant producing around 24 million cases of whisky per year. Scotch whisky is muscling in at the expense of local tipples in China, where whisky exports were up 24 percent in 2010. It now accounts for 45 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold there, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth over 300 million pounds in 2010, from just a few million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. To match Reuters Life! FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
USA/
RTX4GWE
December 06, 2007
A man looks at a glass of Single Malt Scotch during a preview for an auction of fine spirits at Christie's...
New York, UNITED STATES
Man looks at a glass of Single Malt Scotch during a preview for an auction of fine spirits at Christie's...
A man looks at a glass of Single Malt Scotch during a preview for an auction of fine spirits at Christie's Auction House in New York, December 6, 2007. New York's first liquor auction in nearly a century will take place on Saturday, with one bottle of scotch whiskey expected to fetch as much as $30,000. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid (UNITED STATES)
USA/
RTR1UZRI
October 16, 2007
Kathy Wand, Malt House Specialist, churns barley in a steeping tank at the Coors brewery in Golden, Colorado...
multiple cities, UNITED STATES
Kathy Wand, Malt House Specialist, churns barley in a steeping tank at the Coors brewery in Golden, Colorado...
Kathy Wand, Malt House Specialist, churns barley in a steeping tank at the Coors brewery in Golden, Colorado October 16, 2007. Brewers SABMiller and Molson Coors Brewing have agreed to combine their U.S. operations to create a business that will have annual sales of $6.6 billion and be the second-biggest market player behind Anheuser-Busch. REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES)
USA/
RTR1UZRH
October 16, 2007
Dennis Heldt, Malt House Senior Specialist, steeps out the barley at the Coors brewery in Golden, Colorado...
Golden, UNITED STATES
Dennis Heldt, Malt House Senior Specialist, steeps out the barley at the Coors brewery in Golden, Colorado...
Dennis Heldt, Malt House Senior Specialist, steeps out the barley at the Coors brewery in Golden, Colorado October 16, 2007. Brewers SABMiller and Molson Coors Brewing have agreed to combine their U.S. operations to create a business that will have annual sales of $6.6 billion and be the second-biggest market player behind Anheuser-Busch. REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES)
CLINTON
RTXICDP
May 15, 1998
US President Bill Clinton enjoys a pint of beer at "The Malt House" pub on the banks of the Worcester...
US President Bill Clinton enjoys a pint of beer at "The Malt House" pub on the banks of the Worceste.....
US President Bill Clinton enjoys a pint of beer at "The Malt House" pub on the banks of the Worcester and Birmingham canal May 15. [Clinton and other G8 leaders are expected to discuss the looming security crisis brought about by India's underground nuclear tests earlier this week].
??»
CLINTON
RTXICDL
May 15, 1998
US President Bill Clinton enjoys a beer while sitting on a patio at the Malt House Pub during a tour...
US President Bill Clinton enjoys a beer while sitting on a patio at the Malt House Pub during a tour.....
US President Bill Clinton enjoys a beer while sitting on a patio at the Malt House Pub during a tour of Birmingham May 15. Clinton is in Birmingham to attend the annual G8 summit.
??»
RTRE2KE
May 15, 1998
U.S. President Bill Clinton gives the thumbs up during a visit to the Malt House pub in Birmingham May...
United Kingdom
PRESIDENT CLINTON AT A PUB IN BIRMINGHAM.
U.S. President Bill Clinton gives the thumbs up during a visit to the Malt House pub in Birmingham May 15. Leaders of the Group of Eight are gathering in this central England city for their annual summit which is expected to include talks about India's underground nuclear tests which took place earlier this week and third world debt.

NS/GB
RTRE2K6
May 15, 1998
President Clinton eats some french fries while sitting on a patio at the Malt House Pub during a tour...
United Kingdom
PRESIDENT CLINTON EATS A FRENCH FRY AT A PUB IN BIRMINGHAM.
President Clinton eats some french fries while sitting on a patio at the Malt House Pub during a tour of Birmingham May 15. Clinton is in Birmingham to attend the annual G-8 summit.

GMH/GB
RTRE2K0
May 15, 1998
President Clinton enjoys a beer while sitting on a patio at the Malt House Pub during a tour of Birmingham...
United Kingdom
PRESIDENT CLINTON DRINKS A BEER AT A PUB IN BIRMINGHAM.
President Clinton enjoys a beer while sitting on a patio at the Malt House Pub during a tour of Birmingham May 15. Clinton is in Birmingham to attend the annual G-8 summit.

GMH/GB
RTRE2IU
May 15, 1998
President Bill Clinton waves as he walks to "The Malt House" pub on the banks of the Worcester and Birmingham...
United Kingdom
CLINTON WALKS ON CANALSIDE IN BIRMINGHAM.
President Bill Clinton waves as he walks to "The Malt House" pub on the banks of the Worcester and Birmingham canal May 15. Clinton stopped at the pub and enjoyed a pint of beer and some French fries.

NS/AA
RTRE2IG
May 15, 1998
President Bill Clinton enjoys a pint of beer at "The Malt House" pub on the banks of the Worcester and...
United Kingdom
CLINTON SIPS A PINT OF BEER IN BIRMINGHAM.
President Bill Clinton enjoys a pint of beer at "The Malt House" pub on the banks of the Worcester and Birmingham canal May 15. Clinton and other G8 leaders are expected to discuss the looming security crisis brought about by India's underground nuclear tests earlier this week.

NS/AA
RTRE2I9
May 15, 1998
President Bill Clinton east chips at "The Malt House" pub on the banks of the Worcester and Birmingham...
United Kingdom
CLINTON EATS CHIP AT MALT HOUSE PUB IN BIRMINGHAM.
President Bill Clinton east chips at "The Malt House" pub on the banks of the Worcester and Birmingham canal May 15. Clinton and other G8 leaders are expected to discuss the looming security crisis brought about by India's underground nuclear tests earlier this week.

NS/EB
RTRE2H5
May 15, 1998
President Bill Clinton enjoys a pint of beer at "The Malt House" pub on the banks of the Worcester and...
United Kingdom
CLINTON SIPS AT PINT OF BEER IN BIRMINGHAM.
President Bill Clinton enjoys a pint of beer at "The Malt House" pub on the banks of the Worcester and Birmingham canal May 15. Clinton and other G8 leaders are expected to discuss the looming security crisis brought about by India's underground nuclear tests earlier this week.

NS/KD/EB
RTRE2GZ
May 15, 1998
President Bill Clinton enjoys a pint of beer at "The Malt House" pub on the banks of the Worcester and...
United Kingdom
CLINTON SIPS AT PINT OF BEER IN BIRMINGHAM.
President Bill Clinton enjoys a pint of beer at "The Malt House" pub on the banks of the Worcester and Birmingham canal May 15. Clinton and other G8 leaders are expected to discuss the looming security crisis brought about by India's underground nuclear tests earlier this week.

NS/KD/EB
Sort by
Display
Items per page
Page
of 1