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Search results for: Meerut-(City)

INDIA/
RTXZ840 
May 02, 2013 
Posters for a low budget Hindi film are pasted onto the wall of a cinema in Meerut in the northern Indian... 
Meerut, India 
Posters for a low budget Hindi film are pasted onto the wall of a cinema in Meerut in the northern Indian... 
Posters for a low budget Hindi film are pasted onto the wall of a cinema in Meerut in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh April 28, 2013. Indian cinema marks 100 years since Dhundiraj Govind Phalke's black-and-white silent film "Raja Harishchandra" (King Harishchandra) held audiences spellbound at its first public screening on May 3, 1913, in Mumbai. Indian cinema, with its subset of Bollywood for Hindi-language films, is now a billion-dollar industry that makes more than a thousand films a year in several languages. It is worth 112.4 billion rupees (over $2 billion) and leads the world in terms of films produced and tickets sold. Picture taken April 28, 2013. REUTERS/Anindito Mukherjee (INDIA - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT SOCIETY)


ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 10 OF 20 FOR PACKAGE 'BEHIND THE SCENES OF BOLLYWOOD'.
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INDIA/
RTXZ83Y 
May 02, 2013 
Actress Nainaa Jolly (2nd L) performs during the filming of a low budget Hindi movie in Meerut in the... 
Meerut, India 
Actress Nainaa Jolly performs during the filming of a low budget Hindi movie in Meerut in the northern... 
Actress Nainaa Jolly (2nd L) performs during the filming of a low budget Hindi movie in Meerut in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh April 28, 2013. Indian cinema marks 100 years since Dhundiraj Govind Phalke's black-and-white silent film "Raja Harishchandra" (King Harishchandra) held audiences spellbound at its first public screening on May 3, 1913, in Mumbai. Indian cinema, with its subset of Bollywood for Hindi-language films, is now a billion-dollar industry that makes more than a thousand films a year in several languages. It is worth 112.4 billion rupees (over $2 billion) and leads the world in terms of films produced and tickets sold. Picture taken April 28, 2013. REUTERS/Anindito Mukherjee (INDIA - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT SOCIETY)


ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 7 OF 20 FOR PACKAGE 'BEHIND THE SCENES OF BOLLYWOOD'.
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Sport
Sport 
Cricket Gear Factory in India - 07 Feb 2011 
37 PICTURES 
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK9L 
February 07, 2011 
A worker packs cricket bats before they are dispatched for sale at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles)... 
Meerut, India 
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS 
A worker packs cricket bats before they are dispatched for sale at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 31, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. The company produces an average of 150,000 bats and 220,000 balls every year, using willow from England and India's northern Kashmir region. Ten percent of its products are exported, mainly to the cricketing heartlands of the UK, Australia and neighbours Pakistan and Bangladesh. Picture taken January 31, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET) 
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK9K 
February 07, 2011 
A worker adjusts the grip on the handle of a cricket bat at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast... 
Meerut, India 
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS 
A worker adjusts the grip on the handle of a cricket bat at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 31, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. The company produces an average of 150,000 bats and 220,000 balls every year, using willow from England and India's northern Kashmir region. Ten percent of its products are exported, mainly to the cricketing heartlands of the UK, Australia and neighbours Pakistan and Bangladesh. Picture taken January 31, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET) 
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK9J 
February 07, 2011 
A worker packs bats into cardboard boxes at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi,... 
Meerut, India 
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS 
A worker packs bats into cardboard boxes at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 28, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. The company produces an average of 150,000 bats and 220,000 balls every year, using willow from England and India's northern Kashmir region. Ten percent of its products are exported, mainly to the cricketing heartlands of the UK, Australia and neighbours Pakistan and Bangladesh. Picture taken January 28, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET) 
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK99 
February 07, 2011 
Workers file the edges of cricket bats to a smooth finish and fit cane sticks onto the handles at a factory... 
Meerut, India 
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS 
Workers file the edges of cricket bats to a smooth finish and fit cane sticks onto the handles at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 28, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. The company produces an average of 150,000 bats and 220,000 balls every year, using willow from England and India's northern Kashmir region. Ten percent of its products are exported, mainly to the cricketing heartlands of the UK, Australia and neighbours Pakistan and Bangladesh. Picture taken January 28, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET) 
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK91 
February 07, 2011 
Workers file the edges of cricket bats to a smooth finish and fit cane sticks onto the handles at a factory... 
Meerut, India 
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS 
Workers file the edges of cricket bats to a smooth finish and fit cane sticks onto the handles at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 28, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. The company produces an average of 150,000 bats and 220,000 balls every year, using willow from England and India's northern Kashmir region. Ten percent of its products are exported, mainly to the cricketing heartlands of the UK, Australia and neighbours Pakistan and Bangladesh. Picture taken January 28, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET) 
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK90 
February 07, 2011 
Workers file the edges of cricket bats to a smooth finish and fit cane sticks onto the handles at a factory... 
Meerut, India 
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS 
Workers file the edges of cricket bats to a smooth finish and fit cane sticks onto the handles at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 28, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. The company produces an average of 150,000 bats and 220,000 balls every year, using willow from England and India's northern Kashmir region. Ten percent of its products are exported, mainly to the cricketing heartlands of the UK, Australia and neighbours Pakistan and Bangladesh. Picture taken January 28, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET) 
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8Z 
February 07, 2011 
Workers file the edges of cane sticks to form handles for cricket bats at a factory in Meerut, 80 km... 
Meerut, India 
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS 
Workers file the edges of cane sticks to form handles for cricket bats at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 31, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. The company produces an average of 150,000 bats and 220,000 balls every year, using willow from England and India's northern Kashmir region. Ten percent of its products are exported, mainly to the cricketing heartlands of the UK, Australia and neighbours Pakistan and Bangladesh. Picture taken January 31, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET) 
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8T 
February 07, 2011 
A worker cuts a pice of willow to make a bat at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi,... 
Meerut, India 
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS 
A worker cuts a pice of willow to make a bat at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 31, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. The company produces an average of 150,000 bats and 220,000 balls every year, using willow from England and India's northern Kashmir region. Ten percent of its products are exported, mainly to the cricketing heartlands of the UK, Australia and neighbours Pakistan and Bangladesh. Picture taken January 31, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET) 
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8S 
February 07, 2011 
A worker carves pieces of willow to make cricket bats at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast... 
Meerut, India 
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS 
A worker carves pieces of willow to make cricket bats at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 31, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. The company produces an average of 150,000 bats and 220,000 balls every year, using willow from England and India's northern Kashmir region. Ten percent of its products are exported, mainly to the cricketing heartlands of the UK, Australia and neighbours Pakistan and Bangladesh. Picture taken January 31, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SPORT CRICKET SOCIETY BUSINESS) 
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8M 
February 07, 2011 
A customer (L) buys a cricket ball at a shop in the old quarters of Delhi February 4, 2011. Picture taken... 
Meerut, India 
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS 
A customer (L) buys a cricket ball at a shop in the old quarters of Delhi February 4, 2011. Picture taken February 4, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET) 
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8L 
February 07, 2011 
A string-wrapped spherical core and two leather halves are weighed before they are made into a cricket... 
Meerut, India 
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS 
A string-wrapped spherical core and two leather halves are weighed before they are made into a cricket ball at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, February 3, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The cricket balls weigh between 155 and 163 gm (0.3 and 0.4 pounds). The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken January 31, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET) 
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8K 
February 07, 2011 
A worker wraps strings around a cork as part of the cricket ball making process at a factory in Meerut,... 
Meerut, India 
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS 
A worker wraps strings around a cork as part of the cricket ball making process at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, February 3, 2011 as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken February 3, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET) 
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8J 
February 07, 2011 
A worker cuts a piece of tanned leather which will be used to make cricket balls at a factory in Meerut,... 
Meerut, India 
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS 
A worker cuts a piece of tanned leather which will be used to make cricket balls at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, February 3, 2011 as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken February 3, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET) 
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8I 
February 07, 2011 
A worker uses a hammer to shape a cork wrapped in strings into a spherical core as part of the cricket... 
Meerut, India 
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS 
A worker uses a hammer to shape a cork wrapped in strings into a spherical core as part of the cricket ball making process at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, February 3, 2011 as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken February 3, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET) 
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8H 
February 07, 2011 
A worker stitches two leather halves together as part of the cricket ball making process at a factory... 
Meerut, India 
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS 
A worker stitches two leather halves together as part of the cricket ball making process at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, February 3, 2011 as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken February 3, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET) 
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8G 
February 07, 2011 
A worker colours pieces of leather which will be used to make cricket balls at a factory in Meerut, 80... 
Meerut, India 
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS 
A worker colours pieces of leather which will be used to make cricket balls at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 31, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken January 31, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET) 
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8F 
February 07, 2011 
Workers carry cricket balls to be packed at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi,... 
Meerut, India 
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS 
Workers carry cricket balls to be packed at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 31, 2011 as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken January 31, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET) 
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8E 
February 07, 2011 
A worker shines cricket balls before packing them at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast... 
Meerut, India 
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS 
A worker shines cricket balls before packing them at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 31, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken January 31, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET) 
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8D 
February 07, 2011 
Workers pack cricket balls at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 31, 2011... 
Meerut, India 
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS 
Workers pack cricket balls at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 31, 2011 as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken January 31, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET) 
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8C 
February 07, 2011 
A worker stamps balls before they are packed at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi,... 
Meerut, India 
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS 
A worker stamps balls before they are packed at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 31, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken January 31, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET) 
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8B 
February 07, 2011 
A worker shines cricket balls before packing them at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast... 
Meerut, India 
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS 
A worker shines cricket balls before packing them at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 31, 2011 as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken January 31, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET) 
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK8A 
February 07, 2011 
A worker stitches two leather halves together as part of the cricket ball making process at a factory... 
Meerut, India 
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS 
A worker stitches two leather halves together as part of the cricket ball making process at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 28, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken January 28, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET) 
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK89 
February 07, 2011 
A worker stitches two leather halves together with a spherical core inside the leather halves as part... 
Meerut, India 
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS 
A worker stitches two leather halves together with a spherical core inside the leather halves as part of a cricket ball making process at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 28, 2011 as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken January 28, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET) 
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK88 
February 07, 2011 
A worker uses a hammer to shape a cork wrapped with strings into a spherical core to make a cricket ball... 
Meerut, India 
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS 
A worker uses a hammer to shape a cork wrapped with strings into a spherical core to make a cricket ball at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 28, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket world Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken January 28, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET) 
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK87 
February 07, 2011 
A worker works on leather pieces which will be used to make cricket balls at a factory in Meerut, 80... 
Meerut, India 
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS 
A worker works on leather pieces which will be used to make cricket balls at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 28, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken January 28, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET) 
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK86 
February 07, 2011 
A worker sits behind bunches of cork core that are left on the ground to dry before being used to make... 
Meerut, India 
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS 
A worker sits behind bunches of cork core that are left on the ground to dry before being used to make cricket balls at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 28, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken January 28, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET) 
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK85 
February 07, 2011 
A worker stitches two leather halves together with a spherical core inside to form a cricket ball at... 
Meerut, India 
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS 
A worker stitches two leather halves together with a spherical core inside to form a cricket ball at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 28, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken January 28, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET) 
CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS
RTXXK83 
February 07, 2011 
A worker tans pieces of leather which will be used to make cricket balls at a factory in Meerut, 80 km... 
Meerut, India 
To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ 
A worker tans pieces of leather which will be used to make cricket balls at a factory in Meerut, 80 km (50 miles) northeast of Delhi, January 28, 2011, as cricket equipment makers race to meet a demand surge ahead of the Cricket World Cup. The factory produces around 600 balls a day, and each costs retailers 60-600 rupees ($1.30-$13). BDM, a family cricket equipment business for almost 90 years, has made bats, balls and other equipment for most of India's top cricketers, and international stars such as Sri Lanka's Sanath Jayasuriya and the West Indies legend Brian Lara. India's top cricketers are revered in a country where the sport is almost a religion. Devoid of heavy machinery, the workshop is filled with the thuds of hammers on leather, banging of cork into cores, and the tinkle of needle on steel as dozens of men furiously stitch together 600 balls every day. The workers are paid 5,000 rupees ($110) a month, plus performance-related bonuses. Picture taken January 28, 2011. To match CRICKET/INDIA-MANUFACTURERS/ REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS SPORT CRICKET) 
INDIA/
RTXX83O 
January 29, 2011 
A veterinary doctor treats a wild eagle suffering from sunstroke at an animal hospital at Meerut in the... 
Meerut, India 
A veterinary doctor treats a wild eagle suffering from sunstroke at an animal hospital at Meerut 
A veterinary doctor treats a wild eagle suffering from sunstroke at an animal hospital at Meerut in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, January 28, 2011. Picture taken January 28, 2011. REUTERS/Parivartan Sharma (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS HEALTH) 
INDIA/
RTR24068 
January 29, 2009 
M. Gulzar Saifi, who is suffering from polio and appears in the Oscar-nominated documentary "The Final... 
Meerut, India 
M. Gulzar Saifi holds a book while giving private tuitions at Meerut in the northern Indian state of... 
M. Gulzar Saifi, who is suffering from polio and appears in the Oscar-nominated documentary "The Final Inch", holds a book while giving private tuitions at Meerut in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh January 28, 2009. "The Final Inch", which is a 38-minute film about the historic global effort to eradicate polio and is directed by Irene Taylor Brodsky, has been nominated for Best Documentary (Short Film) Feature at the 2009 Academy Awards. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (INDIA) 
INDIA/
RTR23ZOE 
January 29, 2009 
M. Gulzar Saifi, who is suffering from polio and appears in the Oscar-nominated documentary "The Final... 
Meerut, India 
M. Gulzar Saifi moves down a street as children watch at Meerut in the northern Indian state of Uttar... 
M. Gulzar Saifi, who is suffering from polio and appears in the Oscar-nominated documentary "The Final Inch", moves down a street as children watch at Meerut in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh January 28, 2009. "The Final Inch", which is a 38-minute film about the historic global effort to eradicate polio and is directed by Irene Taylor Brodsky, has been nominated for Best Documentary (Short Film) Feature at the 2009 Academy Awards. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (INDIA) 
INDIA/
RTR23ZOC 
January 29, 2009 
M. Gulzar Saifi, who is suffering from polio and appears in the Oscar-nominated documentary "The Final... 
Meerut, India 
M. Gulzar Saifi gives private tuition to children at Meerut in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh... 
M. Gulzar Saifi, who is suffering from polio and appears in the Oscar-nominated documentary "The Final Inch", gives private tuition to children at Meerut in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh January 28, 2009. "The Final Inch", which is a 38-minute film about the historic global effort to eradicate polio and is directed by Irene Taylor Brodsky, has been nominated for Best Documentary (Short Film) Feature at the 2009 Academy Awards. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (INDIA) 
INDIA/
RTR23ZM7 
January 29, 2009 
M. Gulzar Saifi, who is suffering from polio and appears in the Oscar-nominated documentary "The Final... 
Meerut, India 
M. Gulzar Saifi speaks on his mobile phone on a street at Meerut in the northern Indian state of Uttar... 
M. Gulzar Saifi, who is suffering from polio and appears in the Oscar-nominated documentary "The Final Inch", speaks on his mobile phone on a street at Meerut in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh January 28, 2009. "The Final Inch", which is a 38-minute film about the global effort to eradicate polio and is directed by Irene Taylor Brodsky, has been nominated for Best Documentary (Short Film) Feature at the 2009 Academy Awards. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (INDIA) 
INDIA/
RTR23ZLZ 
January 29, 2009 
M. Gulzar Saifi, who is suffering from polio and appears in the Oscar-nominated documentary "The Final... 
Meerut, India 
M. Gulzar Saifi sits at a roadside eatery at Meerut in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh 
M. Gulzar Saifi, who is suffering from polio and appears in the Oscar-nominated documentary "The Final Inch", sits at a roadside eatery at Meerut in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh January 28, 2009. "The Final Inch", which is a 38-minute film about the historic global effort to eradicate polio and is directed by Irene Taylor Brodsky, has been nominated for Best Documentary (Short Film) Feature at the 2009 Academy Awards. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (INDIA) 
INDIA/
RTR23ZLK 
January 29, 2009 
M. Gulzar Saifi, who is suffering from polio and appears in the Oscar-nominated documentary "The Final... 
Meerut, India 
M. Gulzar Saifi leaves after a visit to his school at Meerut in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh... 
M. Gulzar Saifi, who is suffering from polio and appears in the Oscar-nominated documentary "The Final Inch", leaves after a visit to his school at Meerut in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh January 28, 2009. "The Final Inch", which is a 38-minute film about the historic global effort to eradicate polio and is directed by Irene Taylor Brodsky, has been nominated for Best Documentary (Short Film) Feature at the 2009 Academy Awards. The poster on left reads "Polio Sunday-1st February for polio vaccination". REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (INDIA) 
INDIA/
RTR23ZLE 
January 29, 2009 
M. Gulzar Saifi, who is suffering from polio and appears in the Oscar-nominated documentary "The Final... 
Meerut, India 
M. Gulzar Saifi stretches his leg inside a garment shop at Meerut in the northern Indian state of Uttar... 
M. Gulzar Saifi, who is suffering from polio and appears in the Oscar-nominated documentary "The Final Inch", stretches his leg inside a garment shop at Meerut in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh January 28, 2009. "The Final Inch", which is a 38-minute film about the historic global effort to eradicate polio and is directed by Irene Taylor Brodsky, has been nominated for Best Documentary (Short Film) Feature at the 2009 Academy Awards. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (INDIA) 
INDIA/
RTR23ZL1 
January 29, 2009 
M. Gulzar Saifi, who is suffering from polio and appearS in the Oscar-nominated documentary "The Final... 
Meerut, India 
M. Gulzar Saifi looks back during a visit to his school at Meerut in the northern Indian state of Uttar... 
M. Gulzar Saifi, who is suffering from polio and appearS in the Oscar-nominated documentary "The Final Inch", looks back during a visit to his school at Meerut in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh January 28, 2009. "The Final Inch", which is a 38-minute film about the global effort to eradicate polio and is directed by Irene Taylor Brodsky, has been nominated for Best Documentary (Short Film) Feature at the 2009 Academy Awards. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (INDIA) 
INDIA/
RTR23ZKU 
January 29, 2009 
M. Gulzar Saifi, who is suffering from polio and appears in the Oscar-nominated documentary "The Final... 
Meerut, India 
M. Gulzar Saifi moves out from his house at Meerut in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh 
M. Gulzar Saifi, who is suffering from polio and appears in the Oscar-nominated documentary "The Final Inch", moves out from his house at Meerut in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh January 28, 2009. "The Final Inch", which is a 38-minute film about the global effort to eradicate polio, is directed by Irene Taylor Brodsky and has been nominated for Best Documentary (Short Film) Feature at the 2009 Academy Awards. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (INDIA) 
INDIA/
RTR23ZN4 
January 28, 2009 
A boy stands next to a polio awareness poster on a street that reads "Polio Sunday-1st February for polio... 
Meerut, India 
A boy stands next to a polio awareness poster on a street at Meerut 
A boy stands next to a polio awareness poster on a street that reads "Polio Sunday-1st February for polio vaccination" at Meerut in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh January 28, 2009. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (INDIA) 
INDIA FIRE
RTR1CF94 
April 11, 2006 
An Indian victim who suffered severe burns when a fire broke out at a consumer fair is seen at a hospital... 
New Delhi, India 
Indian victim who suffered severe burns when fire broke out at consumer fair is seen at hospital in New... 
An Indian victim who suffered severe burns when a fire broke out at a consumer fair is seen at a hospital in New Delhi April 11, 2006. Angry residents of Meerut demanded action against local officials on Tuesday after a fire at a crowded consumer fair killed at least 51 people. REUTERS/B Mathur 
INDIA FIRE
RTR1CF90 
April 11, 2006 
An Indian victim who suffered severe burns when a fire broke out at a consumer fair is taken to a hospital... 
New Delhi, India 
Indian victim who suffered severe burns when fire broke out at consumer fair is taken to hospital in... 
An Indian victim who suffered severe burns when a fire broke out at a consumer fair is taken to a hospital in New Delhi April 11, 2006. Angry residents of Meerut demanded action against local officials on Tuesday after a fire at a crowded consumer fair killed at least 51 people. REUTERS/B Mathur 
INDIA FIRE
RTR1CF8V 
April 11, 2006 
An Indian victim who suffered severe burns when a fire broke out at a consumer fair is taken to a hospital... 
New Delhi, India 
Indian victim who suffered severe burns when fire broke out at consumer fair is taken to hospital in... 
An Indian victim who suffered severe burns when a fire broke out at a consumer fair is taken to a hospital in New Delhi April 11, 2006. Angry residents of Meerut demanded action against local officials on Tuesday after a fire at a crowded consumer fair killed at least 51 people. REUTERS/B Mathur 
GANDHI
RTXIKDU 
February 09, 1998 
Sonia Gandhi waves at the crowd during an election campaign rally for the Congress Party February 8 in... 
Sonia Gandhi waves at the crowd during an election campaign rally for the Congress Party February 8 ..... 
Sonia Gandhi waves at the crowd during an election campaign rally for the Congress Party February 8 in the northern Indian city of Meerut in Uttar Pradesh state. Sonia Gandhi, Italian-born widow of former Indian prime minister -Rajiv Gandhi, is campaigning for the party ahead of the February 16 - March 7 elections. Her decision to hit the campaign trail has been a morale booster for the beleaguered party, which has ruled India for all but five of its 50 years of independence. Opinion polls say Sonia's campaign is likely to boost Congress Party, but not dramatically. 
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