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Search results for: Mercury-(Metal)

ENVIRONMENT-PERU/MINING
RTR2D3D2
April 21, 2010
A worker receives gold pieces from a machine invented by Peruvian engineer Carlos Villachica after the...
Lima, Peru
A worker receives gold pieces from a machine after the separation process at a laboratory in Lima
A worker receives gold pieces from a machine invented by Peruvian engineer Carlos Villachica after the separation process at a laboratory in Lima April 16, 2010. Villachica says he has come up with an environmentally sound way to isolate gold from clumps of sand without using toxic mercury that wildcat miners in the Amazon basin rely on to extract the precious metal, then dump into rivers. The small, cylindrical machine blends mineralized dirt with jets of pressurized air, water and biodegradable chemicals in a centrifugal motion that produces a cocktail of thousands of bubbles that rise to the surface attached to specks of gold. Picture taken April 16. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares(PERU - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCI TECH)
ENVIRONMENT-PERU/MINING
RTR2D3CZ
April 21, 2010
Pieces of gold are seen after being separated from sand with the use of a machine invented by Peruvian...
Lima, Peru
Pieces of gold are seen after being separated from sand with the use of a machine at a laboratory in...
Pieces of gold are seen after being separated from sand with the use of a machine invented by Peruvian engineer Carlos Villachica at a laboratory in Lima April 16, 2010. Villachica says he has come up with an environmentally sound way to isolate gold from clumps of sand without using toxic mercury that wildcat miners in the Amazon basin rely on to extract the precious metal, then dump into rivers. The small, cylindrical machine blends mineralized dirt with jets of pressurized air, water and biodegradable chemicals in a centrifugal motion that produces a cocktail of thousands of bubbles that rise to the surface attached to specks of gold. Picture taken April 16. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares(PERU - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCI TECH)
ENVIRONMENT-PERU/MINING
RTR2D3CY
April 21, 2010
A worker cleans bubbles that have risen to the surface attached to pebbles of gold from a machine invented...
Lima, Peru
A worker cleans bubbles that have risen to the surface attached to pebbles of gold from a machine at...
A worker cleans bubbles that have risen to the surface attached to pebbles of gold from a machine invented by Peruvian engineer Carlos Villachica at a laboratory in Lima April 16, 2010. Villachica says he has come up with an environmentally sound way to isolate gold from clumps of sand without using toxic mercury that wildcat miners in the Amazon basin rely on to extract the precious metal, then dump into rivers. The small, cylindrical machine blends mineralized dirt with jets of pressurized air, water and biodegradable chemicals in a centrifugal motion that produces a cocktail of thousands of bubbles that rise to the surface attached to specks of gold. Picture taken April 16. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares(PERU - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCI TECH)
ENVIRONMENT-PERU/MINING
RTR2D3CU
April 21, 2010
Peruvian engineer Carlos Villachica (R), accompanied by a worker, adds biodegradable chemicals mixed...
Lima, Peru
Peruvian engineer Villachica adds biodegradable chemicals mixed with water to a machine he has invented...
Peruvian engineer Carlos Villachica (R), accompanied by a worker, adds biodegradable chemicals mixed with water to a machine he has invented at his laboratory in Lima April 16, 2010. Villachica says he has come up with an environmentally sound way to isolate gold from clumps of sand without using toxic mercury that wildcat miners in the Amazon basin rely on to extract the precious metal, then dump into rivers. The small, cylindrical machine blends mineralized dirt with jets of pressurized air, water and biodegradable chemicals in a centrifugal motion that produces a cocktail of thousands of bubbles that rise to the surface attached to specks of gold. Picture taken April 16. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares(PERU - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCI TECH)
ARGENTINA/
RTXE7P2
April 21, 2009
Greenpeace activists place air balloons with the names of contaminants in Matanza-Riachuelo river, Argentina's...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Greenpeace activists place air balloons with the names of contaminants in the Matanza-Riachuelo river...
Greenpeace activists place air balloons with the names of contaminants in Matanza-Riachuelo river, Argentina's most polluted basin, in Buenos Aires, April 21, 2009. The Matanza-Riachuelo river sediments contains high concentrations of toxic metals such as copper, chrome, lead and mercury, potentially affecting the water, soil and air, according to a Greenpeace statement. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA ENVIRONMENT)
MINING/ILLEGAL-HONDURAS
RTX7YS7
July 16, 2008
Mineworkers search for gold inside a mine at El Corpus May 23, 2008. In the mountains of southern Honduras,...
EL CORPUS, Honduras
To match feature MINING/ILLEGAL HONDURAS
Mineworkers search for gold inside a mine at El Corpus May 23, 2008. In the mountains of southern Honduras, hundreds of small-scale miners are scraping out tiny quantities of increasingly precious gold but their fervour could be threatening their lives and the environment. Artisanal miners wielding pickaxes use diesel generators to illuminate narrow mine-shafts in one of Central America's poorest nations. Many then use dangerous amounts of toxic mercury to extract the metal from the rocks they chip out. Picture taken May 23, 2008. To match feature MINING/ILLEGAL HONDURAS. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (HONDURAS)
MINING/ILLEGAL-HONDURAS
RTX7YQO
July 16, 2008
An artisanal miner shows mercury used for processing gold on a handkerchief at El Corpus July 14, 2008....
EL CORPUS, Honduras
to match feature MINING/ILLEGAL-HONDURAS
An artisanal miner shows mercury used for processing gold on a handkerchief at El Corpus July 14, 2008. In the mountains of southern Honduras, hundreds of small-scale miners are scraping out tiny quantities of increasingly precious gold but their fervour could be threatening their lives and the environment. Artisanal miners wielding pickaxes use diesel generators to illuminate narrow mine-shafts in one of Central America's poorest nations. Many then use dangerous amounts of toxic mercury to extract the metal from the rocks they chip out. Picture taken July 14, 2008. To match feature MINING/ILLEGAL HONDURAS. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (HONDURAS)
MINING/ILLEGAL-HONDURAS
RTX7YQN
July 16, 2008
Mineworkers process gold with fire at El Corpus July 14, 2008. In the mountains of southern Honduras,...
EL CORPUS, Honduras
To match feature MINING/ILLEGAL-HONDURAS
Mineworkers process gold with fire at El Corpus July 14, 2008. In the mountains of southern Honduras, hundreds of small-scale miners are scraping out tiny quantities of increasingly precious gold but their fervour could be threatening their lives and the environment. Artisanal miners wielding pickaxes use diesel generators to illuminate narrow mine-shafts in one of Central America's poorest nations. Many then use dangerous amounts of toxic mercury to extract the metal from the rocks they chip out. Picture taken July 14, 2008. To match feature MINING/ILLEGAL HONDURAS. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (HONDURAS)
MINING/ILLEGAL-HONDURAS
RTX7YQI
July 16, 2008
Artisanal miners search for gold in a river at El Corpus July 14, 2008. In the mountains of southern...
EL CORPUS, Honduras
To match feature MINING/ILLEGAL-HONDURAS
Artisanal miners search for gold in a river at El Corpus July 14, 2008. In the mountains of southern Honduras, hundreds of small-scale miners are scraping out tiny quantities of increasingly precious gold but their fervour could be threatening their lives and the environment. Artisanal miners wielding pickaxes use diesel generators to illuminate narrow mine-shafts in one of Central America's poorest nations. Many then use dangerous amounts of toxic mercury to extract the metal from the rocks they chip out. Picture taken July 14, 2008. To match feature MINING/ILLEGAL-HONDURAS. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (HONDURAS)
MINING/ILLEGAL-HONDURAS
RTX7YQB
July 16, 2008
Miners dig as they search for gold at the top of a hill in El Corpus July 14, 2008. In the mountains...
EL CORPUS, Honduras
To match feature MINING/ILLEGAL HONDURAS
Miners dig as they search for gold at the top of a hill in El Corpus July 14, 2008. In the mountains of southern Honduras, hundreds of small-scale miners are scraping out tiny quantities of increasingly precious gold but their fervour could be threatening their lives and the environment. Artisanal miners wielding pickaxes use diesel generators to illuminate narrow mine-shafts in one of Central America's poorest nations. Many then use dangerous amounts of toxic mercury to extract the metal from the rocks they chip out. Picture taken July 14, 2008. To match feature MINING/ILLEGAL HONDURAS. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (HONDURAS)
MINING/ILLEGAL-HONDURAS
RTX7YQ9
July 16, 2008
A artisanal miner shows a piece of gold at El Corpus July 14, 2008. In the mountains of southern Honduras,...
EL CORPUS, Honduras
To match feature MINING/ILLEGAL HONDURAS
A artisanal miner shows a piece of gold at El Corpus July 14, 2008. In the mountains of southern Honduras, hundreds of small-scale miners are scraping out tiny quantities of increasingly precious gold but their fervour could be threatening their lives and the environment. Artisanal miners wielding pickaxes use diesel generators to illuminate narrow mine-shafts in one of Central America's poorest nations. Many then use dangerous amounts of toxic mercury to extract the metal from the rocks they chip out. Picture taken July 14, 2008. To match feature MINING/ILLEGAL HONDURAS. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (HONDURAS)
MINING/ILLEGAL-HONDURAS
RTX7YQ4
July 16, 2008
A mineworker searches for gold inside a mine at El Corpus May 23, 2008. In the mountains of southern...
EL CORPUS, Honduras
To match feature MINING/ILLEGAL-HONDURAS
A mineworker searches for gold inside a mine at El Corpus May 23, 2008. In the mountains of southern Honduras, hundreds of small-scale miners are scraping out tiny quantities of increasingly precious gold but their fervour could be threatening their lives and the environment. Artisanal miners wielding pickaxes use diesel generators to illuminate narrow mine-shafts in one of Central America's poorest nations. Many then use dangerous amounts of toxic mercury to extract the metal from the rocks they chip out. Picture taken May 23, 2008. To match feature MINING/ILLEGAL HONDURAS. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (HONDURAS)
ENVIRONMENT-UN/
RTR1M0WF
February 05, 2007
Fishermen walk in the shallow waters of the Indian Ocean in Bain Boeuf, northern Mauritius, February...
BAIN BOEUF, Mauritius
Fishermen walk in the shallow waters of the Indian Ocean in Bain Boeuf
Fishermen walk in the shallow waters of the Indian Ocean in Bain Boeuf, northern Mauritius, February 5, 2007. Industrialised nations should agree to binding rules to cut the use of the toxic heavy metal mercury and speed up plans to curb exports to the developing world, environmental activists said on Monday. REUTERS/Ed Harris (MAURITIUS)
ENVIRONMENT ARGENTINA RIACHUELO
RTR1GOMO
August 25, 2006
Children wave from the top of a rubbish dump on the banks of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires, Argentina,...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Children wave from the top of a rubbish dump on the banks of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires
Children wave from the top of a rubbish dump on the banks of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires, Argentina, August 17, 2006. The Matanza-Riachuelo river basin is home to nearly five million people, more than 10 percent of Argentina's total population. The public advocate's office has said heavy metals such as lead, chrome and mercury pollute the water, soil and air, and may be causing chronic health problems. The government is expected to be formally unveil next week its latest cleanup plan in response to an historic Supreme Court decision demanding the government work with local industry to detoxify the Riachuelo, citing the constitutional right to a healthy and clean environment. Photo taken August 17. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA)
ENVIRONMENT ARGENTINA RIACHUELO
RTR1GOMN
August 25, 2006
Locals walk near of a rubbish dump on the banks of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires, Argentina, August...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Locals walk near a rubbish dump on the banks of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires
Locals walk near of a rubbish dump on the banks of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires, Argentina, August 17, 2006. The Matanza-Riachuelo river basin is home to nearly five million people, more than 10 percent of Argentina's total population. The public advocate's office has said heavy metals such as lead, chrome and mercury pollute the water, soil and air, and may be causing chronic health problems. The government is expected to be formally unveil next week its latest cleanup plan in response to an historic Supreme Court decision demanding the government work with local industry to detoxify the Riachuelo, citing the constitutional right to a healthy and clean environment. Photo taken August 17. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA)
ENVIRONMENT ARGENTINA RIACHUELO
RTR1GOML
August 25, 2006
A boat sails by the waters of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires August 17, 2006. The Matanza-Riachuelo...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
A boat sails by the polluted waters of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires
A boat sails by the waters of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires August 17, 2006. The Matanza-Riachuelo river basin is home to nearly five million people, more than 10 percent of Argentina's total population. The public advocate's office has said heavy metals such as lead, chrome and mercury pollute the water, soil and air, and may be causing chronic health problems. The government is expected to be formally unveil next week its latest cleanup plan in response to an historic Supreme Court decision demanding the government work with local industry to detoxify the Riachuelo, citing the constitutional right to a healthy and clean environment. Photo taken August 17. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA)
ENVIRONMENT ARGENTINA RIACHUELO
RTR1GOMK
August 25, 2006
Residents walk on the top of a rubbish dump on the banks of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires August...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Residents walk on the top of a rubbish dump on the banks of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires
Residents walk on the top of a rubbish dump on the banks of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires August 17, 2006. The Matanza-Riachuelo river basin is home to nearly five million people, more than 10 percent of Argentina's total population. The public advocate's office has said heavy metals such as lead, chrome and mercury pollute the water, soil and air, and may be causing chronic health problems. The government is expected to be formally unveil next week its latest cleanup plan in response to an historic Supreme Court decision demanding the government work with local industry to detoxify the Riachuelo, citing the constitutional right to a healthy and clean environment. Photo taken August 17. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA)
ENVIRONMENT ARGENTINA RIACHUELO
RTR1GOMJ
August 25, 2006
Workers pile up garbage from the banks of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires August 17, 2006. The Matanza-Riachuelo...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Workers pile up garbage from the banks of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires
Workers pile up garbage from the banks of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires August 17, 2006. The Matanza-Riachuelo river basin is home to nearly five million people, more than 10 percent of Argentina's total population. The public advocate's office has said heavy metals such as lead, chrome and mercury pollute the water, soil and air, and may be causing chronic health problems. The government is expected to be formally unveil next week its latest cleanup plan in response to an historic Supreme Court decision demanding the government work with local industry to detoxify the Riachuelo, citing the constitutional right to a healthy and clean environment. Photo taken August 17. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA)
ENVIRONMENT ARGENTINA RIACHUELO
RTR1GOMH
August 25, 2006
Garbage floats on the waters of the Riachuelo River in Buenos Aires August 17, 2006. The Matanza-Riachuelo...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Garbage floats by the waters of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires
Garbage floats on the waters of the Riachuelo River in Buenos Aires August 17, 2006. The Matanza-Riachuelo river basin is home to nearly five million people, more than 10 percent of Argentina's total population. The public advocate's office has said heavy metals such as lead, chrome and mercury pollute the water, soil and air, and may be causing chronic health problems. The government is expected to be formally unveil next week its latest cleanup plan in response to an historic Supreme Court decision demanding the government work with local industry to detoxify the Riachuelo, citing the constitutional right to a healthy and clean environment. Photo taken August 17. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA)
ENVIRONMENT ARGENTINA RIACHUELO
RTR1GOMG
August 25, 2006
A man looks at a rubbish dump on the banks of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires August 17, 2006. The...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Man looks at a rubbish dump on the banks of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires
A man looks at a rubbish dump on the banks of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires August 17, 2006. The Matanza-Riachuelo river basin is home to nearly five million people, more than 10 percent of Argentina's total population. The public advocate's office has said heavy metals such as lead, chrome and mercury pollute the water, soil and air, and may be causing chronic health problems. The government is expected to be formally unveil next week its latest cleanup plan in response to an historic Supreme Court decision demanding the government work with local industry to detoxify the Riachuelo, citing the constitutional right to a healthy and clean environment. Photo taken August 17. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA)
ENVIRONMENT ARGENTINA RIACHUELO
RTR1GOME
August 25, 2006
A man and a dog walk on the top of a rubbish dump on the banks of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Man walks on the top of a rubbish dump on the banks of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires
A man and a dog walk on the top of a rubbish dump on the banks of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires August 17, 2006. The Matanza-Riachuelo river basin is home to nearly five million people, more than 10 percent of Argentina's total population. The public advocate's office has said heavy metals such as lead, chrome and mercury pollute the water, soil and air, and may be causing chronic health problems. The government is expected to be formally unveil next week its latest cleanup plan in response to an historic Supreme Court decision demanding the government work with local industry to detoxify the Riachuelo, citing the constitutional right to a healthy and clean environment. Photo taken August 17. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA)
ENVIRONMENT ARGENTINA RIACHUELO
RTR1GOMB
August 25, 2006
A rubbish dump is seen on the banks of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires August 17, 2006. The Matanza-Riachuelo...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Rubbish dump is seen on the banks of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires
A rubbish dump is seen on the banks of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires August 17, 2006. The Matanza-Riachuelo river basin is home to nearly 5 million people, more than 10 percent of Argentina's total population. The public advocate's office has said heavy metals such as lead, chrome and mercury pollute the water, soil and air, and may be causing chronic health problems. The government is expected to be formally unveil next week its latest cleanup plan in response to an historic Supreme Court decision demanding the government work with local industry to detoxify the Riachuelo, citing the constitutional right to a healthy and clean environment. Photo taken August 17. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA)
ENVIRONMENT ARGENTINA RIACHUELO
RTR1GOM2
August 25, 2006
Workers pile up garbage from the banks of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires August 17, 2006. The Matanza-Riachuelo...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Workers pile up garbage from the banks of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires
Workers pile up garbage from the banks of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires August 17, 2006. The Matanza-Riachuelo river basin is home to nearly five million people, more than 10 percent of Argentina's total population. The public advocate's office has said heavy metals such as lead, chrome and mercury pollute the water, soil and air, and may be causing chronic health problems. The government is expected to be formally unveil next week its latest cleanup plan in response to an historic Supreme Court decision demanding the government work with local industry to detoxify the Riachuelo, citing the constitutional right to a healthy and clean environment. Photo taken August 17. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA)
ENVIRONMENT ARGENTINA RIACHUELO
RTR1GOM1
August 25, 2006
Buidings are reflected in the waters of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires August 17, 2006. The Matanza-Riachuelo...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Buildings are reflected in the polluted waters of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires
Buidings are reflected in the waters of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires August 17, 2006. The Matanza-Riachuelo river basin is home to nearly five million people, more than 10 percent of Argentina's total population. The public advocate's office has said heavy metals such as lead, chrome and mercury pollute the water, soil and air, and may be causing chronic health problems. The government is expected to be formally unveil next week its latest cleanup plan in response to an historic Supreme Court decision demanding the government work with local industry to detoxify the Riachuelo, citing the constitutional right to a healthy and clean environment. Photo taken August 17. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA)
ENVIRONMENT-ARGENTINA-RIACHUELO
RTR1GOLZ
August 25, 2006
A boat sails by the waters of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires, Argentina, August 17, 2006. The Matanza-Riachuelo...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
A boat sails by the polluted waters of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires
A boat sails by the waters of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires, Argentina, August 17, 2006. The Matanza-Riachuelo river basin is home to nearly five million people, more than 10 percent of Argentina's total population. The public advocate's office has said heavy metals such as lead, chrome and mercury pollute the water, soil and air, and may be causing chronic health problems. The government is expected to be formally unveil next week its latest cleanup plan in response to an historic Supreme Court decision demanding the government work with local industry to detoxify the Riachuelo, citing the constitutional right to a healthy and clean environment. Photo taken August 17. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA)
ENVIRONMENT ARGENTINA RIACHUELO
RTR1GOLY
August 25, 2006
Residents walk a the top of a rubbish dump on the banks of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires August...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Residents walks on the top of a rubbish dump on the banks of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires
Residents walk a the top of a rubbish dump on the banks of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires August 17, 2006. The Matanza-Riachuelo river basin is home to nearly five million people, more than 10 percent of Argentina's total population. The public advocate's office has said heavy metals such as lead, chrome and mercury pollute the water, soil and air, and may be causing chronic health problems. The government is expected to be formally unveil next week its latest cleanup plan in response to an historic Supreme Court decision demanding the government work with local industry to detoxify the Riachuelo, citing the constitutional right to a healthy and clean environment. Photo taken August 17. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA)
ENVIRONMENT ARGENTINA RIACHUELO
RTR1GOLX
August 25, 2006
Children look from the top of a rubbish dump on the banks of the Riachuelo River in Buenos Aires August...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Children look on from the top of a rubbish dump on the banks of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires
Children look from the top of a rubbish dump on the banks of the Riachuelo River in Buenos Aires August 17, 2006. The Matanza-Riachuelo river basin is home to nearly five million people, more than 10 percent of Argentina's total population. The public advocate's office has said heavy metals such as lead, chrome and mercury pollute the water, soil and air, and may be causing chronic health problems. The government is expected to be formally unveil next week its latest cleanup plan in response to an historic Supreme Court decision demanding the government work with local industry to detoxify the Riachuelo, citing the constitutional right to a healthy and clean environment. Photo taken August 17. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA)
ENVIRONMENT ARGENTINA RIACHUELO
RTR1GOLU
August 25, 2006
A boat sails by the waters of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires August 17, 2006. The Matanza-Riachuelo...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
A boat sails by the polluted waters of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires
A boat sails by the waters of the Riachuelo river in Buenos Aires August 17, 2006. The Matanza-Riachuelo river basin is home to nearly five million people, more than 10 percent of Argentina's total population. The public advocate's office has said heavy metals such as lead, chrome and mercury pollute the water, soil and air, and may be causing chronic health problems. The government is expected to be formally unveil next week its latest cleanup plan in response to an historic Supreme Court decision demanding the government work with local industry to detoxify the Riachuelo, citing the constitutional right to a healthy and clean environment. Photo taken August 17. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA)
ARGENTINA POLLUTION
RTRJB04
March 03, 2003
A catamaran is moored on the dirty waters of the Riachuelo River where
sediments contain high concentrations...
Buenos Aires, Argentina (Argentine Republic)
CATAMARAN MOORED ON MURKY WATERS OF A BUENOS AIRES RIVER.
A catamaran is moored on the dirty waters of the Riachuelo River where
sediments contain high concentrations of toxic metals such as lead,
arsenic, mercury and even pesticides from industrial sources, in Buenos
Aires, Argentina, March 3, 2003. Some five millions inhabitants in
Greater Buenos Aires and the capital are at high risk of contamination
where pollution is so far the main environmental problem.
REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian FEATURE MATCHER ARGENTINA-POLLUTION

EM
ARGENTINA POLLUTION
RTRJAZY
March 03, 2003
Onlookers watch the dirty waters of the Riachuelo River where sediments
contain high concentrations...
Buenos Aires, Argentina (Argentine Republic)
RUSTY SHIPS LIE ON MURKY BUENOS AIRES RIVER.
Onlookers watch the dirty waters of the Riachuelo River where sediments
contain high concentrations of toxic metals such as lead, arsenic,
mercury and even pesticides from industrial sources, in Buenos Aires,
Argentina, March 3, 2003. Some five millions inhabitants in Greater
Buenos Aires and the capital are at high risk of contamination where
pollution is so far the main environmental problem. REUTERS/Enrique
Marcarian FEATURE MATCHER ARGENTINA-POLLUTION

EM
ARGENTINA POLLUTION
RTRJAZU
March 03, 2003
A boat sails by the murky waters of the Riachuelo River where sediments
contain high concentrations...
Buenos Aires, Argentina (Argentine Republic)
BOAT SAILS BY MURKY WATERS IN A BUENOS AIRES RIVER.
A boat sails by the murky waters of the Riachuelo River where sediments
contain high concentrations of toxic metals such as lead, arsenic,
mercury and even pesticides from industrial sources, in Buenos Aires,
Argentina, March 3, 2003. Some five millions inhabitants in Greater
Buenos Aires and the capital are at high risk of contamination where
pollution is so far the main environmental problem. REUTERS/Enrique
Marcarian FEATURE MATCHER ARGENTINA-POLLUTION

EM
ARGENTINA POLLUTION
RTRJAZQ
March 03, 2003
Rusty ships lie on the murky waters of the Riachuelo River where
sediments contain high concentrations...
Buenos Aires, Argentina (Argentine Republic)
RUSTY SHIPS LIE ON MURKY BUENOS AIRES RIVER.
Rusty ships lie on the murky waters of the Riachuelo River where
sediments contain high concentrations of toxic metals such as lead,
arsenic, mercury and even pesticides from industrial sources, in Buenos
Aires, Argentina, March 3, 2003. Some five millions inhabitants in
Greater Buenos Aires and the capital are at high risk of contamination
where pollution is so far the main environmental problem.
REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian FEATURE MATCHER ARGENTINA-POLLUTION

EM
CHINA
RTXL4JQ
March 12, 2002
- PHOTO 08MAR02 - Computer waste are left along a river bank at Yaocuowei village near Guiyu in China's...
Yaocuowei, China
- PHOTO 08MAR02 - Computer waste are left along a river bank at Yaocuowei village near Guiyu in Chin.....
- PHOTO 08MAR02 - Computer waste are left along a river bank at Yaocuowei village near Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province. Electonic waste, according to a recent report by pro-environment groups, contains 1,000 different substances such as lend, cadmium, chromium and mercury, heavy metals which are highly toxic. Residents around the area buy their drinking water from hawkers taken from the foot of a nearby mountain.
ENVIRONMENT CHINA TECHRUBBISH
RTR2KAF
March 08, 2002
Children aged four to eleven smash bits of electronic circuit
components with hammers to retrieve copper...
Yaocuowei, China - Peoples Republic of
TO GO WITH STORY ENVIRONMENT-CHINA-TECHRUBBISH.
Children aged four to eleven smash bits of electronic circuit
components with hammers to retrieve copper coil inside a hut at
Yaocuowei village near Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province.
Electronic waste, according to a recent report by pro-environment
groups, contains 1,000 different substances such as lead, cadmium,
chromium and mercury - heavy metals which are highly toxic. Picture
taken March 8, 2002. REUTERS/Bobby Yip TO ACCOMPANY FEATURE STORY
ENVIRONMENT-CHINA-TECHRUBBISH

BY
ENVIRONMENT CHINA TECHRUBBISH
RTR2IUB
March 08, 2002
Computer waste are left along a river bank at Yaocuowei village near
Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong...
Yaocuowei, China - Peoples Republic of
TO ACCOMPANY FEATURE STORY ENVIRONMENT-CHINA-TECHRUBBISH.
Computer waste are left along a river bank at Yaocuowei village near
Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province. Electonic waste,
according to a recent report by pro-environment groups, contains 1,000
different substances such as lend, cadmium, chromium and mercury -
heavy metals which are highly toxic. Residents around the area buy
their drinking water from hawkers taken from the foot of a nearby
mountain. Picture taken March 8, 2002. REUTERS/Bobby Yip TO ACCOMPANY
FEATURE STORY ENVIRONMENT-CHINA-TECHRUBBISH

BY/JD
THAILAND
RTXKLIJ
July 03, 2001
Steve Galster, co-director of the international environment watchdog "Wild Aid", shows a sharks' fin...
Bangkok, Thailand
Steve Galster, co-director of the international environment watchdog "Wild Aid", shows a sharks' fin.....
Steve Galster, co-director of the international environment watchdog "Wild Aid", shows a sharks' fin at a news conference in Bangkok July 3, 2001. The fin Galster holds has had multiple samples taken from it to prove the group's report that sharks' fins sold throughout Asia and the rest of the world contain dangerously high levels of mercury. Sharks are more dangerous to humans dead than alive claim Wild Aid, who warned that Asia's love affair with soup made from sharks' fins poses serious health risks, with levels of the poisonous heavy metal as high as 42 times the quantity acceptable to humans.
THAILAND
RTXKLII
July 03, 2001
Thais on their lunchbreak stroll past a Bangkok sharks' fin restaurant window displaying the popular...
Bangkok, Thailand
Thais on their lunchbreak stroll past a Bangkok sharks' fin restaurant window displaying the popular.....
Thais on their lunchbreak stroll past a Bangkok sharks' fin restaurant window displaying the popular delicacy July 3, 2001. The international environment watchdog group "Wild Aid" released a report on Tuesday warning that sharks' fins sold throughout Asia and the rest of the world contained dangerously high levels of mercury. Sharks are more dangerous to humans dead than alive claims Wild Aid, who warned that Asia's love affair with soup made from sharks' fins poses serious health risks, with levels of the poisonous heavy metal as high as 42 times the quantity acceptable to humans.
THAILAND
RTXKLIH
July 03, 2001
A Thai woman strolls past a Bangkok sharks' fin restaurant window displaying the popular delicacy July...
Bangkok, Thailand
A Thai woman strolls past a Bangkok sharks' fin restaurant window displaying the popular delicacy Ju.....
A Thai woman strolls past a Bangkok sharks' fin restaurant window displaying the popular delicacy July 3, 2001. The international environment watchdog group "Wild Aid" released a report on Tuesday warning that sharks' fins sold throughout Asia and the rest of the world contained dangerously high levels of mercury. Sharks are more dangerous to humans dead than alive claims Wild Aid, who warned that Asia's love affair with soup made from sharks' fins poses serious health risks, with levels of the poisonous heavy metal as high as 42 times the quantity acceptable to humans.
HEALTH ASIA SHARKSFIN
RTRKB3I
July 03, 2001
Steve Galster, co-director of the international environment watchdog "Wild Aid", shows a sharks' fin...
Bangkok, Thailand - Kingdom of
WILD AID SPOKESMAN GALSTER SHOWS A SHARKS FIN IN BANGKOK.
Steve Galster, co-director of the international environment watchdog "Wild Aid", shows a sharks' fin at a news conference in Bangkok July 3, 2001. The fin Galster holds has had multiple samples taken from it to prove the group's report that sharks' fins sold throughout Asia and the rest of the world contain dangerously high levels of mercury. Sharks are more dangerous to humans dead than alive claim Wild Aid, who warned that Asia's love affair with soup made from sharks' fins poses serious health risks, with levels of the poisonous heavy metal as high as 42 times the quantity acceptable to humans.

JIR/RCS
HEALTH ASIA SHARKSFIN
RTRKB36
July 03, 2001
Thais on their lunchbreak stroll past a Bangkok sharks' fin restaurant window displaying the popular...
Bangkok, Thailand - Kingdom of
RESTAURANT GOERS WALK PAST HUGE SHARKS FINS IN BANGKOK.
Thais on their lunchbreak stroll past a Bangkok sharks' fin restaurant window displaying the popular delicacy July 3, 2001. The international environment watchdog group "Wild Aid" released a report on Tuesday warning that sharks' fins sold throughout Asia and the rest of the world contained dangerously high levels of mercury. Sharks are more dangerous to humans dead than alive claims Wild Aid, who warned that Asia's love affair with soup made from sharks' fins poses serious health risks, with levels of the poisonous heavy metal as high as 42 times the quantity acceptable to humans.

JIR/RCS
HEALTH ASIA SHARKSFIN
RTRKB2S
July 03, 2001
A Thai woman strolls past a Bangkok sharks' fin restaurant window displaying the popular delicacy July...
Bangkok, Thailand - Kingdom of
A WOMAN WALKS PAST A SHARKS FIN RESTAURANT IN BANGKOK.
A Thai woman strolls past a Bangkok sharks' fin restaurant window displaying the popular delicacy July 3, 2001. The international environment watchdog group "Wild Aid" released a report on Tuesday warning that sharks' fins sold throughout Asia and the rest of the world contained dangerously high levels of mercury. Sharks are more dangerous to humans dead than alive claims Wild Aid, who warned that Asia's love affair with soup made from sharks' fins poses serious health risks, with levels of the poisonous heavy metal as high as 42 times the quantity acceptable to humans.

JIR/RCS
ARGENTINA ENVIRONMENT GREENPEACE
RTRC4VT
December 18, 2000
Activists from environmental group Greenpeace show bottles containing
samples of water allegedly contaminated...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
GREENPEACE ACTIVIST SHOWS SAMPLES OF WATER ALLEGEDLY CONTAMINATED
BY AN OIL COMPANY.
Activists from environmental group Greenpeace show bottles containing
samples of water allegedly contaminated by the Spanish-Argentine oil company
Repsol-YPF in front of the firm's headquarters in central Buenos Aires on
December 18, 2000. Greenpeace launched the second phase of their campaign
against pollution in South America by focusing on the River Plate running
between Argentina and Uruguay, whose sediments contain high concentrations
of toxic metals such as copper, lead and mercury that potentially affect
some three million people.

EM
ARGENTINA ENVIRONMENT GREENPEACE
RTRC4TZ
December 18, 2000
Activists from the environmental group Greenpeace show bottles containing
samples of water allegedly...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
GREENPEACE ACTIVIST SHOWS SAMPLES OF WATER ALLEGEDLY CONTAMINATED
BY AN OIL COMPANY.
Activists from the environmental group Greenpeace show bottles containing
samples of water allegedly contaminated by the Spanish-Argentine oil company
Repsol-YPF in front of the firm's headquarters in central Buenos Aires December 18, 2000. Greenpeace launched the second phase of their campaign against pollution in South America by focusing on the River Plate running between Argentina and Uruguay, whose sediments contain high concentrations of toxic metals such as copper, lead and mercury that potentially affect some three million people.

EM
ARGENTINA
RTXK59I
November 28, 2000
Styrofoam models of dead fish placed by Greenpeace environmental activists float in Argentina's most...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Styrofoam models of dead fish placed by Greenpeace environmental activists float in Argentina's most.....
Styrofoam models of dead fish placed by Greenpeace environmental activists float in Argentina's most polluted river, the heavy-metal laced, reeking Riachuelo, November 28, 2000. Greenpeace launched the second phase of their campaign against pollution in South America by focusing on this river whose sediments contain high concentrations of toxic metals such as copper, lead and mercury, potentially affecting some three million people.
ARGENTINA
RTXK59H
November 28, 2000
Styrofoam models of dead fish placed by Greenpeace environmental activists float near a ship moored in...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Styrofoam models of dead fish placed by Greenpeace environmental activists float near a ship moored .....
Styrofoam models of dead fish placed by Greenpeace environmental activists float near a ship moored in Argentina's most polluted river, the heavy-metal laced, reeking Riachuelo, November 28, 2000. Greenpeace launched the second phase of their campaign against pollution in South America by focusing on this river, whose sediments contain high concentrations of toxic metals such as copper, lead and mercury, potentially affecting some three million people.
ENVIRONMENT GREENPEACE ARGENTINA
RTRBDEL
November 28, 2000
Styrofoam models of dead fish placed by Greenpeace environmental activists float in Argentina's most...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
STYROFOAM DEAD FISH PLACED BY GREENPEACE FLOAT IN ARGENTINA'S MOST POLLUTED RIVER.
Styrofoam models of dead fish placed by Greenpeace environmental activists float in Argentina's most polluted river, the heavy-metal laced, reeking Riachuelo, November 28, 2000. Greenpeace launched the second phase of their campaign against pollution in South America by focusing on this river whose sediments contain high concentrations of toxic metals such as copper, lead and mercury, potentially affecting some three million people.

RR/MMR
ENVIRONMENT GREENPEACE ARGENTINA
RTRBDE0
November 28, 2000
Styrofoam models of dead fish placed by Greenpeace environmental activists float near a ship moored in...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
STYROFOAM DEAD FISH FLOAT IN ARGENTINA'S MOST POLLUTED RIVER.
Styrofoam models of dead fish placed by Greenpeace environmental activists float near a ship moored in Argentina's most polluted river, the heavy-metal laced, reeking Riachuelo, November 28, 2000. Greenpeace launched the second phase of their campaign against pollution in South America by focusing on this river, whose sediments contain high concentrations of toxic metals such as copper, lead and mercury, potentially affecting some three million people.

RR/RCS
CAMBODIA WASTE
RTRKM89
December 23, 1998
Cambodian soldiers load mercury-contaminated industrial waste into plastic lined metal drums in the southern...
Sihanoukville, Cambodia
A CAMBODIAN SOLDIER LOADS MERCURY-CONTAMINATED INDUSTRIAL WASTE IN SIHANOUKVILLE.
Cambodian soldiers load mercury-contaminated industrial waste into plastic lined metal drums in the southern province of Sihanoukville December 23. About 500 soldiers donned protective suits to clear thousands of tonnes of Taiwanese industrial waste that sparked a panicked exodus from Camboida's main port and surrounding province.

JO/JDP
CAMBODIA WASTE
RTRKM5N
December 23, 1998
Cambodians crowd a bus, bound for Phnom Penh, as they flee the southern province of Sihanoukville December...
Sihanoukville, Cambodia
CAMBODIANS FLEE TOXIC WASTE IN SIHANOUKVILLE.
Cambodians crowd a bus, bound for Phnom Penh, as they flee the southern province of Sihanoukville December 23, after 3,000 tonnes of mercury-contaminated waste was dumped in the town. Soldiers began to clean up the dumped Taiwanese industrial waste that sparked riots and a mass exodus from around the Cambodian town. About 500 soldiers, clad in chemical suits sent from neighbouring Vietnam and Singapore, began shovelling the waste into plastic lined metal drumps which were to be welded shut.

JO/JDP
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