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Search results for: Middle-class

 QATAR-MIDDLECLASS/
RTX2Q1XZ
October 23, 2016
A view shows the exterior of DohaÕs Alhazm mall, developed by real estate tycoon Mohammed al-Emadi, in...
Doha, Qatar
View shows the exterior of DohaÕs Alhazm mall
A view shows the exterior of DohaÕs Alhazm mall, developed by real estate tycoon Mohammed al-Emadi, in Qatar October 22, 2016. Picture taken October 22, 2016. REUTERS/Naseem Zeitoon
ARGENTINA-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS
RTS5J1T
October 21, 2015
Pedestrians walk past a jewelry store in Buenos Aires' Recoleta neighborhood, in this picture taken October...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Pedestrians walk past a jewelry store in Buenos Aires' Recoleta neighborhood
Pedestrians walk past a jewelry store in Buenos Aires' Recoleta neighborhood, in this picture taken October 20, 2015. In the affluent Recoleta neighborhood of Buenos Aires, where grand 19th century buildings hark back to an era of prosperity, middle class voters fear a presidential election on Sunday will do nothing to halt Argentina's long decline. Picture taken on October 20, 2015. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci
ARGENTINA-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS
RTS5J1I
October 21, 2015
Supporters of presidential candidate Daniel Scioli stand next to a banner with images of late President...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Supporters of presidential candidate Scioli stand next to a banner outside the Alvear Palace Hotel, in...
Supporters of presidential candidate Daniel Scioli stand next to a banner with images of late President Nestor Kirchner and Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner outside the Alvear Palace Hotel, where a rally in support of Scioli was being held, in Buenos Aires' Recoleta neighborhood in this picture taken October 20, 2015. In the affluent Recoleta neighborhood of Buenos Aires, where grand 19th century buildings hark back to an era of prosperity, middle class voters fear a presidential election on Sunday will do nothing to halt Argentina's long decline. Picture taken on October 20, 2015. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci
ARGENTINA-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS
RTS5J1C
October 21, 2015
Supporters of presidential candidate Daniel Scioli stand outside the Alvear Palace Hotel, where a rally...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Supporters of presidential candidate Scioli stand outside the Alvear Palace Hotel, in Buenos Aires' Recoleta...
Supporters of presidential candidate Daniel Scioli stand outside the Alvear Palace Hotel, where a rally in support of Scioli was being held, in Buenos Aires' Recoleta neighborhood October 20, 2015. In the affluent Recoleta neighborhood of Buenos Aires, where grand 19th century buildings hark back to an era of prosperity, middle class voters fear a presidential election on Sunday will do nothing to halt Argentina's long decline. Picture taken on October 20, 2015. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci
AFRICA-MIDDLECLASS/
RTX1S2Y9
September 23, 2015
Shoppers push trolleys at an upmarket shopping mall in Sandton, Johannesburg, September 23, 2015. Whether...
Johannesburg, South Africa
Shoppers push trolleys at an upmarket shopping mall in Sandton, Johannesburg
Shoppers push trolleys at an upmarket shopping mall in Sandton, Johannesburg, September 23, 2015. Whether it's selling pensions, pasta or toothpicks, investors in Africa have been targeting the booming middle class. But a year of diving commodity prices has exposed how much the continent, and its consumers, still rely on exporting resources. A decade of growth above five percent in sub-Saharan African economies has drawn a wave of interest in selling consumer goods and providing services to a rapidly urbanizing population of 1 billion. To match Analysis AFRICA-MIDDLECLASS/ REUTERS/Mike Hutchings
AFRICA-MIDDLECLASS/
RTX1S2Y4
September 23, 2015
Shoppers push trolleys at an upmarket shopping mall in Sandton, Johannesburg, September 23, 2015. Whether...
Johannesburg, South Africa
Shoppers push trolleys at an upmarket shopping mall in Sandton, Johannesburg
Shoppers push trolleys at an upmarket shopping mall in Sandton, Johannesburg, September 23, 2015. Whether it's selling pensions, pasta or toothpicks, investors in Africa have been targeting the booming middle class. But a year of diving commodity prices has exposed how much the continent, and its consumers, still rely on exporting resources. A decade of growth above five percent in sub-Saharan African economies has drawn a wave of interest in selling consumer goods and providing services to a rapidly urbanizing population of 1 billion. To match Analysis AFRICA-MIDDLECLASS/ REUTERS/Mike Hutchings
BRAZIL-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS
RTR45GIP
September 09, 2014
Valeria Rocha talks to Reuters in her store at Jardim Sao Luis, near the edge of Sao Paulo August 28,...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Rocha talks to Reuters in her store at Jardim Sao Luis, near the edge of Sao Paulo
Valeria Rocha talks to Reuters in her store at Jardim Sao Luis, near the edge of Sao Paulo August 28, 2014. A faltering economy and mounting frustration over poor public services are dimming the outlook for Brazil's "new middle class." Leftist President Dilma Rousseff is watching a once-loyal base - and her chances of re-election next month - slip away. Her main rival, environmentalist Marina Silva, has surged in the polls and is favoured to win a likely second-round runoff against Rousseff. Silva, who grew up poor on a rubber plantation, has emerged as the anti-establishment candidate in this campaign. Within three weeks of entering the race late following the death of her party's original candidate, she is in striking distance of becoming the first Afro-Brazilian woman to lead Brazil. To match Insight BRAZIL-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS Picture taken August 28, 2014. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker (BRAZIL - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS ELECTIONS)
BRAZIL-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS
RTR45GIO
September 09, 2014
A general view of Jardim Sao Luis,near the edge of Sao Paulo, September 3, 2014. A faltering economy...
SAO PAUL0, Brazil
General view of Jardim Sao Luis,near the edge of Sao Paulo
A general view of Jardim Sao Luis,near the edge of Sao Paulo, September 3, 2014. A faltering economy and mounting frustration over poor public services are dimming the outlook for Brazil's "new middle class." Leftist President Dilma Rousseff is watching a once-loyal base - and her chances of re-election next month - slip away. Her main rival, environmentalist Marina Silva, has surged in the polls and is favoured to win a likely second-round runoff against Rousseff. Silva, who grew up poor on a rubber plantation, has emerged as the anti-establishment candidate in this campaign. Within three weeks of entering the race late following the death of her party's original candidate, she is in striking distance of becoming the first Afro-Brazilian woman to lead Brazil. To match Insight BRAZIL-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS Picture taken September 3, 2014. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker (BRAZIL - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS ELECTIONS)
BRAZIL-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS
RTR45GIB
September 09, 2014
Valeria Rocha talks to Reuters in her store at Jardim Sao Luis near the edge of Sao Paulo August 28,...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Rocha talks to Reuters in her store at Jardim Sao Luis near the edge of Sao Paulo
Valeria Rocha talks to Reuters in her store at Jardim Sao Luis near the edge of Sao Paulo August 28, 2014. Leftist President Dilma Rousseff is watching a once-loyal base - and her chances of re-election next month - slip away. Her main rival, environmentalist Marina Silva, has surged in the polls and is favoured to win a likely second-round runoff against Rousseff. Silva, who grew up poor on a rubber plantation, has emerged as the anti-establishment candidate in this campaign. Within three weeks of entering the race late following the death of her party's original candidate, she is in striking distance of becoming the first Afro-Brazilian woman to lead Brazil. To match Insight BRAZIL-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS Picture taken August 28, 2014. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker (BRAZIL - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS ELECTIONS)
BRAZIL-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS
RTR45GI4
September 09, 2014
Valeria Rocha talks to Reuters in her baby clothes store at Jardim Sao Luis, near the edge of Sao Paulo...
SAO PAUL0, Brazil
Rocha talks to Reuters in her baby clothes store at Jardim Sao Luis
Valeria Rocha talks to Reuters in her baby clothes store at Jardim Sao Luis, near the edge of Sao Paulo August 28, 2014. Leftist President Dilma Rousseff is watching a once-loyal base - and her chances of re-election next month - slip away. Her main rival, environmentalist Marina Silva, has surged in the polls and is favoured to win a likely second-round runoff against Rousseff. Silva, who grew up poor on a rubber plantation, has emerged as the anti-establishment candidate in this campaign. Within three weeks of entering the race late following the death of her party's original candidate, she is in striking distance of becoming the first Afro-Brazilian woman to lead Brazil. Picture taken August 28, 2014. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker (BRAZIL - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS ELECTIONS)
BRAZIL-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS
RTR45GI2
September 09, 2014
A general view of Jardim Sao Luis near the edge of Sao Paulo, September 6, 2014. A faltering economy...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
General view of Jardim Sao Luis near the edge of Sao Paulo
A general view of Jardim Sao Luis near the edge of Sao Paulo, September 6, 2014. A faltering economy and mounting frustration over poor public services are dimming the outlook for Brazil's "new middle class." Leftist President Dilma Rousseff is watching a once-loyal base - and her chances of re-election next month - slip away. Her main rival, environmentalist Marina Silva, has surged in the polls and is favoured to win a likely second-round runoff against Rousseff. Silva, who grew up poor on a rubber plantation, has emerged as the anti-establishment candidate in this campaign. Within three weeks of entering the race late following the death of her party's original candidate, she is in striking distance of becoming the first Afro-Brazilian woman to lead Brazil. To match Insight BRAZIL-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS Picture take September 6, 2014. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker (BRAZIL - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS ELECTIONS)
BRAZIL-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS
RTR45GI0
September 09, 2014
Presidential candidate Marina Silva of Brazilian Socialist Party (PSB) gestures as she attends a rally...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Presidential candidate Silva of Brazilian Socialist Party gestures as she attends a rally campaign in...
Presidential candidate Marina Silva of Brazilian Socialist Party (PSB) gestures as she attends a rally campaign in Guarulhos September 5, 2014. A faltering economy and mounting frustration over poor public services are dimming the outlook for Brazil's "new middle class." Leftist President Dilma Rousseff is watching a once-loyal base - and her chances of re-election next month - slip away. Her main rival, environmentalist Marina Silva, has surged in the polls and is favoured to win a likely second-round runoff against Rousseff. Silva, who grew up poor on a rubber plantation, has emerged as the anti-establishment candidate in this campaign. Within three weeks of entering the race late following the death of her party's original candidate, she is in striking distance of becoming the first Afro-Brazilian woman to lead Brazil. Picture taken September 5, 2014. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker (BRAZIL - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS ELECTIONS)
BRAZIL-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS
RTR45GHL
September 09, 2014
Presidential candidate Marina Silva of Brazilian Socialist Party (PSB) waves to supporters as she attends...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Presidential candidate Silva of Brazilian Socialist Party waves to supporters as she attends a rally...
Presidential candidate Marina Silva of Brazilian Socialist Party (PSB) waves to supporters as she attends a rally campaign in Guarulhos September 5, 2014. A faltering economy and mounting frustration over poor public services are dimming the outlook for Brazil's "new middle class." Leftist President Dilma Rousseff is watching a once-loyal base - and her chances of re-election next month - slip away. Her main rival, environmentalist Marina Silva, has surged in the polls and is favoured to win a likely second-round runoff against Rousseff. Silva, who grew up poor on a rubber plantation, has emerged as the anti-establishment candidate in this campaign. Within three weeks of entering the race late following the death of her party's original candidate, she is in striking distance of becoming the first Afro-Brazilian woman to lead Brazil. Picture taken September 5, 2014. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker (BRAZIL - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS ELECTIONS)
BRAZIL-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS
RTR45GHE
September 09, 2014
A woman walks along a street in Jardim Sao Luis near the edge of Sao Paulo September 4, 2014. A faltering...
SAO PAUL0, Brazil
Woman walks along a street in Jardim Sao Luis near the edge of Sao Paulo
A woman walks along a street in Jardim Sao Luis near the edge of Sao Paulo September 4, 2014. A faltering economy and mounting frustration over poor public services are dimming the outlook for Brazil's "new middle class." Leftist President Dilma Rousseff is watching a once-loyal base - and her chances of re-election next month - slip away. Her main rival, environmentalist Marina Silva, has surged in the polls and is favoured to win a likely second-round runoff against Rousseff. Silva, who grew up poor on a rubber plantation, has emerged as the anti-establishment candidate in this campaign. Within three weeks of entering the race late following the death of her party's original candidate, she is in striking distance of becoming the first Afro-Brazilian woman to lead Brazil. To match Insight BRAZIL-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS Picture taken September 4, 2014. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker (BRAZIL - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS ELECTIONS)
BRAZIL-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS
RTR45GHD
September 09, 2014
A woman enters in a butcher shop in Jardim Sao Luis near the edge of Sao Paulo September 4, 2014. A...
SAO PAUL0, Brazil
Woman enters in a butcher shop in Jardim Sao Luis near the edge of Sao Paulo
A woman enters in a butcher shop in Jardim Sao Luis near the edge of Sao Paulo September 4, 2014. A faltering economy and mounting frustration over poor public services are dimming the outlook for Brazil's "new middle class." Leftist President Dilma Rousseff is watching a once-loyal base - and her chances of re-election next month - slip away. Her main rival, environmentalist Marina Silva, has surged in the polls and is favoured to win a likely second-round runoff against Rousseff. Silva, who grew up poor on a rubber plantation, has emerged as the anti-establishment candidate in this campaign. Within three weeks of entering the race late following the death of her party's original candidate, she is in striking distance of becoming the first Afro-Brazilian woman to lead Brazil. To match Insight BRAZIL-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS Picture taken September 4, 2014. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker (BRAZIL - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS ELECTIONS)
BRAZIL-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS
RTR45GHB
September 09, 2014
Election posters are seen hanging on a pole on a street of Jardim Sao Luis near the edge of Sao Paulo,...
SAO PAUL0, Brazil
Election posters are seen hanging on a pole on a street of Jardim Sao Luis near the edge of Sao Paulo...
Election posters are seen hanging on a pole on a street of Jardim Sao Luis near the edge of Sao Paulo, September 3, 2014. A faltering economy and mounting frustration over poor public services are dimming the outlook for Brazil's "new middle class." Leftist President Dilma Rousseff is watching a once-loyal base - and her chances of re-election next month - slip away. Her main rival, environmentalist Marina Silva, has surged in the polls and is favoured to win a likely second-round runoff against Rousseff. Silva, who grew up poor on a rubber plantation, has emerged as the anti-establishment candidate in this campaign. Within three weeks of entering the race late following the death of her party's original candidate, she is in striking distance of becoming the first Afro-Brazilian woman to lead Brazil. To match Insight BRAZIL-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS Picture taken September 3, 2014. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker (BRAZIL - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS ELECTIONS)
BRAZIL-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS
RTR45GH4
September 09, 2014
A general view of Jardim Sao Luis near the edge of Sao Paulo, September 3, 2014. A faltering economy...
SAO PAUL0, Brazil
General view of Jardim Sao Luis near the edge of Sao Paulo
A general view of Jardim Sao Luis near the edge of Sao Paulo, September 3, 2014. A faltering economy and mounting frustration over poor public services are dimming the outlook for Brazil's "new middle class." Leftist President Dilma Rousseff is watching a once-loyal base - and her chances of re-election next month - slip away. Her main rival, environmentalist Marina Silva, has surged in the polls and is favoured to win a likely second-round runoff against Rousseff. Silva, who grew up poor on a rubber plantation, has emerged as the anti-establishment candidate in this campaign. Within three weeks of entering the race late following the death of her party's original candidate, she is in striking distance of becoming the first Afro-Brazilian woman to lead Brazil. To match Insight BRAZIL-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS Picture taken September 3, 2014. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker (BRAZIL - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS ELECTIONS)
BRAZIL-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS
RTR45GH3
September 09, 2014
A general view of Jardim Sao Luis near the edge of Sao Paulo, September 2, 2014. A faltering economy...
SAO PAUL0, Brazil
General view of Jardim Sao Luis near the edge of Sao Paulo
A general view of Jardim Sao Luis near the edge of Sao Paulo, September 2, 2014. A faltering economy and mounting frustration over poor public services are dimming the outlook for Brazil's "new middle class." Leftist President Dilma Rousseff is watching a once-loyal base - and her chances of re-election next month - slip away. Her main rival, environmentalist Marina Silva, has surged in the polls and is favoured to win a likely second-round runoff against Rousseff. Silva, who grew up poor on a rubber plantation, has emerged as the anti-establishment candidate in this campaign. Within three weeks of entering the race late following the death of her party's original candidate, she is in striking distance of becoming the first Afro-Brazilian woman to lead Brazil. To match Insight BRAZIL-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS Picture taken September 2, 2014. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker (BRAZIL - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS ELECTIONS)
BRAZIL-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS
RTR45GGZ
September 09, 2014
Brazil's President and Workers Party (PT) presidential candidate Dilma Rousseff attends a campaign rally...
Sao Bernardo Do Campo, Brazil
Brazil's President and Workers Party presidential candidate Rousseff attends a campaign rally in Sao...
Brazil's President and Workers Party (PT) presidential candidate Dilma Rousseff attends a campaign rally in Sao Bernardo do Campo September 2, 2014. A faltering economy and mounting frustration over poor public services are dimming the outlook for Brazil's "new middle class." Leftist President Dilma Rousseff is watching a once-loyal base - and her chances of re-election next month - slip away. Her main rival, environmentalist Marina Silva, has surged in the polls and is favoured to win a likely second-round runoff against Rousseff. Silva, who grew up poor on a rubber plantation, has emerged as the anti-establishment candidate in this campaign. Within three weeks of entering the race late following the death of her party's original candidate, she is in striking distance of becoming the first Afro-Brazilian woman to lead Brazil. To match Insight BRAZIL-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS Picture taken September 2, 2014. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker (BRAZIL - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS ELECTIONS)
BRAZIL-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS
RTR45GGY
September 09, 2014
A general view of Jardim Sao Luis near the edge of Sao Paulo, September 2, 2014. A faltering economy...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
General view of Jardim Sao Luis near the edge of Sao Paulo
A general view of Jardim Sao Luis near the edge of Sao Paulo, September 2, 2014. A faltering economy and mounting frustration over poor public services are dimming the outlook for Brazil's "new middle class." Leftist President Dilma Rousseff is watching a once-loyal base - and her chances of re-election next month - slip away. Her main rival, environmentalist Marina Silva, has surged in the polls and is favoured to win a likely second-round runoff against Rousseff. Silva, who grew up poor on a rubber plantation, has emerged as the anti-establishment candidate in this campaign. Within three weeks of entering the race late following the death of her party's original candidate, she is in striking distance of becoming the first Afro-Brazilian woman to lead Brazil. To match Insight BRAZIL-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS Picture taken September 2, 2014. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker (BRAZIL - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS ELECTIONS)
BRAZIL-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS
RTR45GGQ
September 09, 2014
Brazil's President and Workers Party (PT) presidential candidate Dilma Rousseff (L) talks to her predecessor...
SAO PAUL0, Brazil
Brazil's President and Workers Party presidential candidate Rousseff talks to her predecessor Inacio...
Brazil's President and Workers Party (PT) presidential candidate Dilma Rousseff (L) talks to her predecessor Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva during a campaign rally in Sao Bernardo do Campo September 2, 2014. A faltering economy and mounting frustration over poor public services are dimming the outlook for Brazil's "new middle class." Leftist President Dilma Rousseff is watching a once-loyal base - and her chances of re-election next month - slip away. Her main rival, environmentalist Marina Silva, has surged in the polls and is favoured to win a likely second-round runoff against Rousseff. Silva, who grew up poor on a rubber plantation, has emerged as the anti-establishment candidate in this campaign. Within three weeks of entering the race late following the death of her party's original candidate, she is in striking distance of becoming the first Afro-Brazilian woman to lead Brazil. To match Insight BRAZIL-ELECTION/MIDDLECLASS Picture taken September 2, 2014. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker (BRAZIL - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS ELECTIONS)
EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
RTR2UBFE
November 22, 2011
John Ougan (2nd R) and his wife Christine Goldsmith (L) pose for a photograph with their children Misty...
London, United Kingdom
To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
John Ougan (2nd R) and his wife Christine Goldsmith (L) pose for a photograph with their children Misty (R) and Aston (2nd L) at their home in London November 5, 2011. Like many other Britons, Christine Goldsmith and her family are in a holding pattern with no real prospects for a better life. Opportunities for employment have decreased since the government said it would slash 300,000 public sector jobs as part of austerity measures to reduce a record peacetime budget deficit. Goldsmith understands why the cuts are necessary, but says the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition government seems out of touch with ordinary people when it comes to how to go about them. Picture taken November 5, 2011. To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS REUTERS/Luke Macgregor (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)
EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
RTR2UBFD
November 22, 2011
John Ougan (R) and his wife Christine Goldsmith (2nd L) sit with their children Misty(R) and Aston (L)...
London, United Kingdom
To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
John Ougan (R) and his wife Christine Goldsmith (2nd L) sit with their children Misty(R) and Aston (L) at their home in London November 5, 2011. Like many other Britons, Christine Goldsmith and her family are in a holding pattern with no real prospects for a better life. Opportunities for employment have decreased since the government said it would slash 300,000 public sector jobs as part of austerity measures to reduce a record peacetime budget deficit. Goldsmith understands why the cuts are necessary, but says the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition government seems out of touch with ordinary people when it comes to how to go about them. Picture taken November 5, 2011. To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS REUTERS/Luke Macgregor (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)
EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
RTR2UBEC
November 22, 2011
Anna, a draughtswoman, poses for a photograph outside her home in Munich October 29, 2011. Two years...
Munich, Germany
To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
Anna, a draughtswoman, poses for a photograph outside her home in Munich October 29, 2011. Two years ago, the 40-year-old, who asked to be identified by her first name only, was put onto shorter working hours. The scheme, known as "Kurzarbeit", is Germany's answer to downturns and is based on the idea that it is better for all workers to take a bit of pain than for companies to start laying people off. Following the 2008 credit crunch more than 60,000 companies in Germany have used Kurzarbeit; at the height of the 2009 recession, more than 1 million workers were on reduced hours. Economists and politicians credit the system with allowing Europe's largest economy to emerge from the 2009 crisis more quickly than other parts of the continent.Picture taken October 29, 2011. To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)
EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
RTR2UBEB
November 22, 2011
Anna, a draughtswoman, poses for a photograph inside her kitchen at her home in Munich October 29, 2011....
Munich, Germany
To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
Anna, a draughtswoman, poses for a photograph inside her kitchen at her home in Munich October 29, 2011. Two years ago, the 40-year-old, who asked to be identified by her first name only, was put onto shorter working hours. The scheme, known as "Kurzarbeit", is Germany's answer to downturns and is based on the idea that it is better for all workers to take a bit of pain than for companies to start laying people off. Following the 2008 credit crunch more than 60,000 companies in Germany have used Kurzarbeit; at the height of the 2009 recession, more than 1 million workers were on reduced hours. Economists and politicians credit the system with allowing Europe's largest economy to emerge from the 2009 crisis more quickly than other parts of the continent.Picture taken October 29, 2011. To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)
EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
RTR2UBDZ
November 22, 2011
Anna, a draughtswoman, poses for a photograph outside her home in Munich October 29, 2011. Picture taken...
Munich, Germany
To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
Anna, a draughtswoman, poses for a photograph outside her home in Munich October 29, 2011. Picture taken October 29, 2011. Two years ago, the 40-year-old, who asked to be identified by her first name only, was put onto shorter working hours. The scheme, known as "Kurzarbeit", is Germany's answer to downturns and is based on the idea that it is better for all workers to take a bit of pain than for companies to start laying people off. Following the 2008 credit crunch more than 60,000 companies in Germany have used Kurzarbeit; at the height of the 2009 recession, more than 1 million workers were on reduced hours. Economists and politicians credit the system with allowing Europe's largest economy to emerge from the 2009 crisis more quickly than other parts of the continent. To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)
EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
RTR2UBDY
November 22, 2011
Anna, a draughtswoman, poses for a photograph outside her home in Munich October 29, 2011. Two years...
Munich, Germany
To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
Anna, a draughtswoman, poses for a photograph outside her home in Munich October 29, 2011. Two years ago, the 40-year-old, who asked to be identified by her first name only, was put onto shorter working hours. The scheme, known as "Kurzarbeit", is Germany's answer to downturns and is based on the idea that it is better for all workers to take a bit of pain than for companies to start laying people off. Following the 2008 credit crunch more than 60,000 companies in Germany have used Kurzarbeit; at the height of the 2009 recession, more than 1 million workers were on reduced hours. Economists and politicians credit the system with allowing Europe's largest economy to emerge from the 2009 crisis more quickly than other parts of the continent. Picture taken October 29, 2011. To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)
EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
RTR2UBDX
November 22, 2011
Anna, a draughtswoman, poses for a photograph outside her home in Munich October 29, 2011. Two years...
Munich, Germany
To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
Anna, a draughtswoman, poses for a photograph outside her home in Munich October 29, 2011. Two years ago, the 40-year-old, who asked to be identified by her first name only, was put onto shorter working hours. The scheme, known as "Kurzarbeit", is Germany's answer to downturns and is based on the idea that it is better for all workers to take a bit of pain than for companies to start laying people off. Following the 2008 credit crunch more than 60,000 companies in Germany have used Kurzarbeit; at the height of the 2009 recession, more than 1 million workers were on reduced hours. Economists and politicians credit the system with allowing Europe's largest economy to emerge from the 2009 crisis more quickly than other parts of the continent. Picture taken October 29, 2011. To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)
EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
RTR2UBDV
November 22, 2011
Anna, a draughtswoman, poses for a photograph at her home in Munich October 29, 2011. Two years ago,...
Munich, Germany
To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
Anna, a draughtswoman, poses for a photograph at her home in Munich October 29, 2011. Two years ago, the 40-year-old, who asked to be identified by her first name only, was put onto shorter working hours. The scheme, known as "Kurzarbeit", is Germany's answer to downturns and is based on the idea that it is better for all workers to take a bit of pain than for companies to start laying people off. Following the 2008 credit crunch more than 60,000 companies in Germany have used Kurzarbeit; at the height of the 2009 recession, more than 1 million workers were on reduced hours. Economists and politicians credit the system with allowing Europe's largest economy to emerge from the 2009 crisis more quickly than other parts of the continent. Picture taken October 29, 2011. To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)
EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
RTR2UBDT
November 22, 2011
Anna, a draughtswoman, poses for a photograph at her home in Munich October 29, 2011. Two years ago,...
Munich, Germany
To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
Anna, a draughtswoman, poses for a photograph at her home in Munich October 29, 2011. Two years ago, the 40-year-old, who asked to be identified by her first name only, was put onto shorter working hours. The scheme, known as "Kurzarbeit", is Germany's answer to downturns and is based on the idea that it is better for all workers to take a bit of pain than for companies to start laying people off. Following the 2008 credit crunch more than 60,000 companies in Germany have used Kurzarbeit; at the height of the 2009 recession, more than 1 million workers were on reduced hours. Economists and politicians credit the system with allowing Europe's largest economy to emerge from the 2009 crisis more quickly than other parts of the continent.Picture taken October 29, 2011. To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)
EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
RTR2UBDS
November 22, 2011
Anna, a draughtswoman, poses for a photograph outside her home in Munich October 29, 2011. Two years...
Munich, Germany
PLEASE HOLD - To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
Anna, a draughtswoman, poses for a photograph outside her home in Munich October 29, 2011. Two years ago, the 40-year-old, who asked to be identified by her first name only, was put onto shorter working hours. The scheme, known as "Kurzarbeit", is Germany's answer to downturns and is based on the idea that it is better for all workers to take a bit of pain than for companies to start laying people off. Following the 2008 credit crunch more than 60,000 companies in Germany have used Kurzarbeit; at the height of the 2009 recession, more than 1 million workers were on reduced hours. Economists and politicians credit the system with allowing Europe's largest economy to emerge from the 2009 crisis more quickly than other parts of the continent. Picture taken October 29, 2011. To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)
EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
RTR2UAI6
November 21, 2011
Greek protesters scuffle with policemen as they demonstrate against austerity policies during a students...
Athens, Greece
To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
Greek protesters scuffle with policemen as they demonstrate against austerity policies during a students parade at central Syntagma (Constitution) square in Athens October 28, 2011. Three years after the beginning of the worst economic crisis since World War Two, Europeans are questioning the political decisions that have brought them here. They wonder whether their hopes for themselves, their children and their countries will ever be met. Maybe, they have begun thinking, expectations were too high to begin with. Picture taken October 28, 2011. To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS REUTERS/Yiorgos Karahalis/Files (GREECE - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
RTR2UAI4
November 21, 2011
Amelia Thomas (L) and Gonzalo Acha (R) sit with their daughters Beatriz, Leonor and Isabel at their home...
Madrid, Spain
To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
Amelia Thomas (L) and Gonzalo Acha (R) sit with their daughters Beatriz, Leonor and Isabel at their home in Madrid, November 9, 2010. Gonzalo Acha and Amelia Thomas have eased into the roles the economic crisis has imposed on them: Acha as sole breadwinner with a salary frozen six years running, Thomas as what she calls "creative homemaker". They live with their three young daughters just blocks from Madrid's Puerta de Sol square where the "los indignados" (the indignant) protesting against government spending cuts have regularly gathered. So far, Gonzalo and Amelia have not joined. Picture taken November 9, 2010. To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS REUTERS/Andrea Comas/Files (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY EMPLOYMENT)
EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
RTR2UAI3
November 21, 2011
The Stefanescu family (L-R) Mariana, Dan, Andreea and Vlad gather in front of the television inside their...
Bucharest, Romania
To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
The Stefanescu family (L-R) Mariana, Dan, Andreea and Vlad gather in front of the television inside their apartment in Bucharest November 7, 2010. Mariana Stefanescu is concerned about deteriorating public services in areas like healthcare and education, and other signs of a social fabric wearing thin. For years before the crisis, Romania has been plagued by low productivity, particularly in its sprawling public sector, where the heavy hand of the centralised state lingered long after the demise of Romania?s pre-1989 communist institutions. The financial crisis exposed inefficiency and goaded the government into reforming its bloated public sector. By the end of last year, Romania had cut some 130,000 jobs, bringing the state sector down to 1.25 million people, still a quarter of its workforce. But the road to reform has been bumpy. Picture taken November 7, 2010. To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS REUTERS/Radu Sigheti/Files (ROMANIA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY EMPLOYMENT)
EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
RTR2UAHY
November 21, 2011
Christine Goldsmith (L) and her husband John Ougan (R) pose for a photograph with their children Misty...
London, United Kingdom
To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
Christine Goldsmith (L) and her husband John Ougan (R) pose for a photograph with their children Misty (bottom) and Aston (top) at their home in London November 5, 2011. Like many other Britons, Christine Goldsmith and her family are in a holding pattern with no real prospects for a better life. Opportunities for employment have decreased since the government said it would slash 300,000 public sector jobs as part of austerity measures to reduce a record peacetime budget deficit. Goldsmith understands why the cuts are necessary, but says the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition government seems out of touch with ordinary people when it comes to how to go about them. Picture taken November 5, 2011. To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS REUTERS/Luke Macgregor (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)
EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
RTR2UAHX
November 21, 2011
Christine Goldsmith (2nd R), her husband John Ougan (L), and children, six-year-old Aston (2nd L) and...
London, United Kingdom
To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
Christine Goldsmith (2nd R), her husband John Ougan (L), and children, six-year-old Aston (2nd L) and three-year-old Misty pose for a photograph in their London home October 30, 2010. Like many other Britons, Christine Goldsmith and her family are in a holding pattern with no real prospects for a better life. Opportunities for employment have decreased since the government said it would slash 300,000 public sector jobs as part of austerity measures to reduce a record peacetime budget deficit. Goldsmith understands why the cuts are necessary, but says the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition government seems out of touch with ordinary people when it comes to how to go about them. Picture taken October 30, 2010. To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett/Files (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY EMPLOYMENT)
EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
RTR2UAHV
November 21, 2011
John Ougan (L) and his wife Christine Goldsmith (2nd R) pose for a photograph with their children Misty...
London, United Kingdom
To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
John Ougan (L) and his wife Christine Goldsmith (2nd R) pose for a photograph with their children Misty (R) and Aston (2nd L) at their home in London November 5, 2011. Like many other Britons, Christine Goldsmith and her family are in a holding pattern with no real prospects for a better life. Opportunities for employment have decreased since the government said it would slash 300,000 public sector jobs as part of austerity measures to reduce a record peacetime budget deficit. Goldsmith understands why the cuts are necessary, but says the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition government seems out of touch with ordinary people when it comes to how to go about them. Picture taken November 5, 2011. To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS REUTERS/Luke Macgregor (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)
EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
RTR2UAHU
November 21, 2011
Anna, a draughtswoman, poses for a photograph in her kitchen in her home in Munich December 22, 2010....
Munich, Germany
To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
Anna, a draughtswoman, poses for a photograph in her kitchen in her home in Munich December 22, 2010. Two years ago, the 40-year-old, who asked to be identified by her first name only, was put onto shorter working hours. The scheme, known as "Kurzarbeit", is Germany's answer to downturns and is based on the idea that it is better for all workers to take a bit of pain than for companies to start laying people off. Following the 2008 credit crunch more than 60,000 companies in Germany have used Kurzarbeit; at the height of the 2009 recession, more than 1 million workers were on reduced hours. Economists and politicians credit the system with allowing Europe's largest economy to emerge from the 2009 crisis more quickly than other parts of the continent. Picture taken December 22, 2010. To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS REUTERS/Michaela Rehle/Files (GERMANY - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY EMPLOYMENT)
EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
RTR2UAHT
November 21, 2011
Anna, a draughtswoman, poses for a photograph inside her kitchen at her home in Munich October 29, 2011....
Munich, Germany
To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
Anna, a draughtswoman, poses for a photograph inside her kitchen at her home in Munich October 29, 2011. Two years ago, the 40-year-old, who asked to be identified by her first name only, was put onto shorter working hours. The scheme, known as "Kurzarbeit", is Germany's answer to downturns and is based on the idea that it is better for all workers to take a bit of pain than for companies to start laying people off. Following the 2008 credit crunch more than 60,000 companies in Germany have used Kurzarbeit; at the height of the 2009 recession, more than 1 million workers were on reduced hours. Economists and politicians credit the system with allowing Europe's largest economy to emerge from the 2009 crisis more quickly than other parts of the continent. Picture taken October 29, 2011. To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)
EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
RTR2UAHS
November 21, 2011
Anna, a draughtswoman, poses for a photograph outside her home in Munich December 22, 2010. Two years...
Munich, Germany
To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
Anna, a draughtswoman, poses for a photograph outside her home in Munich December 22, 2010. Two years ago, the 40-year-old, who asked to be identified by her first name only, was put onto shorter working hours. The scheme, known as "Kurzarbeit", is Germany's answer to downturns and is based on the idea that it is better for all workers to take a bit of pain than for companies to start laying people off. Following the 2008 credit crunch more than 60,000 companies in Germany have used Kurzarbeit; at the height of the 2009 recession, more than 1 million workers were on reduced hours. Economists and politicians credit the system with allowing Europe's largest economy to emerge from the 2009 crisis more quickly than other parts of the continent. Picture taken December 22, 2010. To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS REUTERS/Michaela Rehle/Files (GERMANY - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY EMPLOYMENT)
EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
RTR2UAHR
November 21, 2011
Anna, a draughtswoman, poses for a photograph outside her home in Munich October 29, 2011. Two years...
Munich, Germany
To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS
Anna, a draughtswoman, poses for a photograph outside her home in Munich October 29, 2011. Two years ago, the 40-year-old, who asked to be identified by her first name only, was put onto shorter working hours. The scheme, known as "Kurzarbeit", is Germany's answer to downturns and is based on the idea that it is better for all workers to take a bit of pain than for companies to start laying people off. Following the 2008 credit crunch more than 60,000 companies in Germany have used Kurzarbeit; at the height of the 2009 recession, more than 1 million workers were on reduced hours. Economists and politicians credit the system with allowing Europe's largest economy to emerge from the 2009 crisis more quickly than other parts of the continent.Picture taken October 29, 2011. To match Special Report EUROPE/MIDDLECLASS REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)
BRAZIL-ECONOMY/MIDDLECLASS
RTXPY18
October 23, 2009
A woman shops in a store in Rio de Janeiro October 23, 2009. Economic turmoil in the 1980s and '90s kept...
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
A woman shops in a store in Rio de Janeiro
A woman shops in a store in Rio de Janeiro October 23, 2009. Economic turmoil in the 1980s and '90s kept millions of Brazilians mired in poverty, as hyperinflation ate away at wages and made saving money difficult, not to say pointless. But an economic overhaul in 1994, followed by an inflation targeting system in 1999, gave Brazilians much-needed stability to start planning for their financial futures. More recently, economic growth and welfare programs have helped lift about 19 million people out of poverty since Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, Brazil's first working-class president, took office in 2003. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL BUSINESS SOCIETY EMPLOYMENT)
BRAZIL-ECONOMY/MIDDLECLASS
RTXPY13
October 23, 2009
A man shops in a store in Rio de Janeiro October 23, 2009. Economic turmoil in the 1980s and '90s kept...
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
A man shops in a store in Rio de Janeiro
A man shops in a store in Rio de Janeiro October 23, 2009. Economic turmoil in the 1980s and '90s kept millions of Brazilians mired in poverty, as hyperinflation ate away at wages and made saving money difficult, not to say pointless. But an economic overhaul in 1994, followed by an inflation targeting system in 1999, gave Brazilians much-needed stability to start planning for their financial futures. More recently, economic growth and welfare programs have helped lift about 19 million people out of poverty since Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, Brazil's first working-class president, took office in 2003. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL BUSINESS SOCIETY EMPLOYMENT)
BRAZIL-ECONOMY/MIDDLECLASS
RTXPY11
October 23, 2009
A woman shops in a store in Rio de Janeiro October 23, 2009. Economic turmoil in the 1980s and '90s kept...
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
A woman shops in a store in Rio de Janeiro
A woman shops in a store in Rio de Janeiro October 23, 2009. Economic turmoil in the 1980s and '90s kept millions of Brazilians mired in poverty, as hyperinflation ate away at wages and made saving money difficult, not to say pointless. But an economic overhaul in 1994, followed by an inflation targeting system in 1999, gave Brazilians much-needed stability to start planning for their financial futures. More recently, economic growth and welfare programs have helped lift about 19 million people out of poverty since Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, Brazil's first working-class president, took office in 2003. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL BUSINESS SOCIETY EMPLOYMENT)
UAW-MIDDLECLASS/
RTR2464Q
June 01, 2009
A man holds a sign as he participates in a labour activists march in Lansing, Michigan June 1, 2009....
Lansing, UNITED STATES
A man holds a sign as he participates in a labour activists march in Lansing
A man holds a sign as he participates in a labour activists march in Lansing, Michigan June 1, 2009. For decades, unionized manufacturing jobs have been considered the surest path to middle-class prosperity and realizing the vaunted American dream for blue-collar workers. REUTERS/Mark Blinch (UNITED STATES BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORT)
UAW-MIDDLECLASS/
RTR2464K
June 01, 2009
People hold signs as they participate in a labour activists march in Lansing, Michigan June 1, 2009....
Lansing, UNITED STATES
A man holds a sign as he participates in a labour activists march in Lansing
People hold signs as they participate in a labour activists march in Lansing, Michigan June 1, 2009. For decades, unionized manufacturing jobs have been considered the surest path to middle-class prosperity and realizing the vaunted American dream for blue-collar workers. REUTERS/Mark Blinch (UNITED STATES BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORT)
UAW-MIDDLECLASS/
RTR2464H
June 01, 2009
A man holds a sign as he participates in a labour activist march in Lansing, Michigan June 1, 2009. For...
Lansing, UNITED STATES
A man holds a sign as he participates in a labour activist march in Lansing
A man holds a sign as he participates in a labour activist march in Lansing, Michigan June 1, 2009. For decades, unionized manufacturing jobs have been considered the surest path to middle-class prosperity and realizing the vaunted American dream for blue-collar workers. REUTERS/Mark Blinch (UNITED STATES BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORT)
UAW-MIDDLECLASS/
RTR2464E
June 01, 2009
A woman wears a "Keep it Made in America" pin as she participates in a labour activists march in Lansing,...
Lansing, UNITED STATES
A woman wears a "Keep it Made in America" pin as she participates in a labour activists march in Lansing...
A woman wears a "Keep it Made in America" pin as she participates in a labour activists march in Lansing, Michigan June 1, 2009. For decades, unionized manufacturing jobs have been considered the surest path to middle-class prosperity and realizing the vaunted American dream for blue-collar workers. REUTERS/Mark Blinch (UNITED STATES BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORT IMAGES OF THE DAY)
UAW-MIDDLECLASS/
RTR2464C
June 01, 2009
Former United Auto Worker Local 909 president Al Benchich raises his hand as he participates in a labour...
Lansing, UNITED STATES
Former United Auto Worker Local 909 president Al Benchich raises his hand as he participates in a labour...
Former United Auto Worker Local 909 president Al Benchich raises his hand as he participates in a labour activists march in Lansing, Michigan June 1, 2009. For decades, unionized manufacturing jobs have been considered the surest path to middle-class prosperity and realizing the vaunted American dream for blue-collar workers. REUTERS/Mark Blinch (UNITED STATES BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORT)
UAW-MIDDLECLASS/
RTR24649
June 01, 2009
American labour activists from various unions march in the streets Lansing, Michigan June 1, 2009. For...
Lansing, UNITED STATES
American labour activists from various unions march in the streets Lansing
American labour activists from various unions march in the streets Lansing, Michigan June 1, 2009. For decades, unionized manufacturing jobs have been considered the surest path to middle-class prosperity and realizing the vaunted American dream for blue-collar workers. REUTERS/Mark Blinch (UNITED STATES BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORT)
UAW-MIDDLECLASS/
RTR24648
June 01, 2009
United Auto Worker member Charles Bell walks during a labour activists march in Lansing, Michigan June...
Lansing, UNITED STATES
United Auto Worker member Charles Bell walks during a labour activists march in Lansing
United Auto Worker member Charles Bell walks during a labour activists march in Lansing, Michigan June 1, 2009. For decades, unionized manufacturing jobs have been considered the surest path to middle-class prosperity and realizing the vaunted American dream for blue-collar workers. REUTERS/Mark Blinch (UNITED STATES BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRANSPORT)
AUSTRIA/
RTR21TDS
August 29, 2008
Heinz Christian Strache, the head of the right-wing Freedom party (FPOe), delivers speech in front of...
Vienna, Austria
Strache, the head of the right-wing Freedom party , delivers speech in front of an election poster which...
Heinz Christian Strache, the head of the right-wing Freedom party (FPOe), delivers speech in front of an election poster which says 'home country needs middle class' during a party election rally in Linz, August 29, 2008. REUTERS/Dominic Ebenbichler (AUSTRIA)
BRAZIL-ECONOMY/MIDDLECLASS
RTX7YQ2
July 16, 2008
A man stands in front of the television sets at Ponto Frio store in Rio de Janeiro July 15, 2008. At...
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
To match feature BRAZIL-ECONOMY/MIDDLECLASS
A man stands in front of the television sets at Ponto Frio store in Rio de Janeiro July 15, 2008. At a time when the United States, the world's largest economy, is suffering from excess borrowing gone awry, analysts fear the consequences could be worse in a country still marked by widespread poverty and inequality of income. In the past two years, more than 23 million people have risen into Brazil's class C from classes D and E, according to consumer research firm Cetelem, helped by a rise in the minimum wage and government programs as Brazil enjoys high commmodity prices, a stable currency, and tamer inflation. To match feature BRAZIL-ECONOMY/MIDDLECLASS. REUTERS/Bruno Domingos (BRAZIL)
BRAZIL-ECONOMY/MIDDLECLASS
RTX7YQ1
July 16, 2008
A man sits in front of a Ponto Frio store in Rio de Janeiro July 15, 2008. At a time when the United...
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
To match feature BRAZIL-ECONOMY/MIDDLECLASS
A man sits in front of a Ponto Frio store in Rio de Janeiro July 15, 2008. At a time when the United States, the world's largest economy, is suffering from excess borrowing gone awry, analysts fear the consequences could be worse in a country still marked by widespread poverty and inequality of income. In the past two years, more than 23 million people have risen into Brazil's class C from classes D and E, according to consumer research firm Cetelem, helped by a rise in the minimum wage and government programs as Brazil enjoys high commmodity prices, a stable currency, and tamer inflation. To match feature BRAZIL-ECONOMY/MIDDLECLASS. REUTERS/Bruno Domingos (BRAZIL)
BRAZIL-ECONOMY/MIDDLECLASS
RTX7YQ0
July 16, 2008
A man stands in front of the refrigerators at Ponto Frio store in Rio de Janeiro July 15, 2008. At a...
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
To match feature BRAZIL-ECONOMY/MIDDLECLASS
A man stands in front of the refrigerators at Ponto Frio store in Rio de Janeiro July 15, 2008. At a time when the United States, the world's largest economy, is suffering from excess borrowing gone awry, analysts fear the consequences could be worse in a country still marked by widespread poverty and inequality of income.
In the past two years, more than 23 million people have risen into Brazil's class C from classes D and E, according to consumer research firm Cetelem, helped by a rise in the minimum wage and government programs as Brazil enjoys high commmodity prices, a stable currency, and tamer inflation. To match feature BRAZIL-ECONOMY/MIDDLECLASS. REUTERS/Bruno Domingos (BRAZIL)
USA ELECTIONS MIDDLECLASS
RTR1IVTN
November 01, 2006
David and Kimberly Hicks and their children, son Dalton,13, and daughter Kelsey, 10, watch a television...
Evansville, UNITED STATES
To match feature USA ELECTIONS MIDDLECLASS
David and Kimberly Hicks and their children, son Dalton,13, and daughter Kelsey, 10, watch a television commercial at their home in Evansville, Indiana, October 31, 2006. David Hicks will still be paying back his student loans by the time his children, now aged 10 and 12, are in college, and he plans to refinance his modest home to help pay for their schooling. College, rising health care costs and higher prices for everything from food to fuel are the issues that Hicks and millions of other American middle-income families are up against. To match feature USA ELECTIONS MIDDLECLASS REUTERS/John Sommers II (UNITED STATES)
USA ELECTIONS MIDDLECLASS
RTR1IVTK
November 01, 2006
David Hicks and his wife Kimberly, their son Dalton, 13, and daughter Kelsey, 10, pose for a photo at...
Evansville, UNITED STATES
To match feature USA ELECTIONS MIDDLECLASS
David Hicks and his wife Kimberly, their son Dalton, 13, and daughter Kelsey, 10, pose for a photo at their home in Evansville, Indiana, October 31, 2006. David Hicks will still be paying back his student loans by the time his children, now aged 10 and 12, are in college, and he plans to refinance his modest home to help pay for their schooling. College, rising health care costs and higher prices for everything from food to fuel are the issues that Hicks and millions of other American middle-income families are up against. To match feature USA ELECTIONS MIDDLECLASS REUTERS/John Sommers II (UNITED STATES)
USA ELECTIONS MIDDLECLASS
RTR1IVTF
November 01, 2006
Photographs of the Hicks family hang on the wall at their home in Evansville, Indiana, October 31, 2006....
Evansville, UNITED STATES
To match feature USA ELECTIONS MIDDLECLASS
Photographs of the Hicks family hang on the wall at their home in Evansville, Indiana, October 31, 2006. David Hicks will still be paying back his student loans by the time his children, now aged 10 and 12, are in college, and he plans to refinance his modest home to help pay for their schooling. College, rising health care costs and higher prices for everything from food to fuel are the issues that Hicks and millions of other American middle-income families are up against. To match feature USA ELECTIONS MIDDLECLASS REUTERS/John Sommers II (UNITED STATES)
USA ELECTIONS MIDDLECLASS
RTR1IVTE
November 01, 2006
Dalton Hicks, 13, plays basketball in front of his families home in Evansville, Indiana, October 31,...
Evansville, UNITED STATES
To match feature USA ELECTIONS MIDDLECLASS
Dalton Hicks, 13, plays basketball in front of his families home in Evansville, Indiana, October 31, 2006. David Hicks, Dalton's father, will still be paying back his student loans by the time his children, now aged 10 and 12, are in college, and he plans to refinance his modest home to help pay for their schooling. College, rising health care costs and higher prices for everything from food to fuel are the issues that Hicks and millions of other American middle-income families are up against. To match feature USA ELECTIONS MIDDLECLASS REUTERS/John Sommers II (UNITED STATES)
USA ELECTIONS MIDDLECLASS
RTR1IVTC
November 01, 2006
Kimberly Hicks watches as her daughter Kelsey, 10, lights the family pumpkin at their home in Evansville,...
Evansville, UNITED STATES
To match feature USA ELECTIONS MIDDLECLASS
Kimberly Hicks watches as her daughter Kelsey, 10, lights the family pumpkin at their home in Evansville, Indiana, October 31, 2006. David Hicks, Kimberly's husband, will still be paying back his student loans by the time his children, now aged 10 and 12, are in college, and he plans to refinance his modest home to help pay for their schooling. College, rising health care costs and higher prices for everything from food to fuel are the issues that Hicks and millions of other American middle-income families are up against. To match feature USA ELECTIONS MIDDLECLASS REUTERS/John Sommers II (UNITED STATES)
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