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Search results for: Military-rating

HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/COLOMBIA
RTX7M5ZZ
July 27, 2020
A military police officer wearing a face mask patrols a street during the government-mandated quarantine...
Bogota, Colombia
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Bogota
A military police officer wearing a face mask patrols a street during the government-mandated quarantine to lower the rates of contagion from the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Bogota, Colombia July 27, 2020. REUTERS/Luisa Gonzalez
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/COLOMBIA
RTX7M5ZH
July 27, 2020
Military police officers wearing face masks patrol a street during the government-mandated quarantine...
Bogota, Colombia
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Bogota
Military police officers wearing face masks patrol a street during the government-mandated quarantine to lower the rates of contagion from the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Bogota, Colombia July 27, 2020. REUTERS/Luisa Gonzalez
JAPAN-DEFENCE/KAGA-WOMEN
RTX6EI3C
October 09, 2018
Women serving on Japan's biggest warship, the Kaga, are a tight-knit group on the frontline of a push...
Indian Ocean, Indonesia
The Wider Image: Japan's women sailors on frontline of gender equality
Women serving on Japan's biggest warship, the Kaga, are a tight-knit group on the frontline of a push to transform the Japanese navy into a mixed-gender fighting force, where men outnumber them more than 10 to one. The Maritime Self Defence Force needs more women because falling birth rates mean it has too few men to crew warships in home waters or on helicopter carriers such as the Kaga, sailing in foreign waters to counter China's growing regional influence. "Women all over the world are working in a wider number of areas and I think Japan needs to be a part of that," said petty officer Akiko Ihara, 31, standing beside one of the helicopters she helps to maintain. The proportion of women in the Kaga's 450-strong crew is about 9 percent, a level Japan is targeting for the military overall by 2030 from 6 percent now. That would still fall short of U.S., where 15 percent of people in uniform are women, and Britain with 10 percent. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon SEARCH "KAGA FEMALE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: JAPAN-DEFENCE/KAGA-WOMEN
NORTHKOREA-CHINA/BORDER-DEFECTORS
RTX5N7EI
April 12, 2018
A combination picture shows Kang, 28, posing for a photograph (top) and her dog fur coat, in Seoul, South...
Seoul, South Korea
The Wider Image: Escape from North Korea
A combination picture shows Kang, 28, posing for a photograph (top) and her dog fur coat, in Seoul, South Korea, August 8, 2017. The parents of Kang sent out a coat across the Chinese border after she reached the South in 2010. "I didn't ask my mother to send me this coat," said Kang, who wanted to be identified only by her surname. "But she knew I feel the cold easily and sent it to me. She sent some honey too, but it went missing on the way. The coat is made of dog fur. I don't know what kind of dog. In 2010, it cost about 700,000 North Korean won ($88 at the unofficial rate). It was really expensive. A North Korean friend went to China to pick it up for me. I liked this coat when I got it. I thought my mother must've spent quite a lot of money on it. My father was a party officer. Our family had a car and we lived in a special apartment. Ordinary people couldn't afford to wear this kind of coat, not even soldiers. Commissioned officers could afford them. Border guards would wear them. It wasn't easy to buy this kind of coat, but as time went on, fake ones began to appear. The state often clamped down on this item. It's technically military supplies so the state monitored people who altered the design of the coat. I know just from looking at this coat that it's a counterfeit one, not the official version. The counterfeit ones look quite different from the original ones. Military officials preferred the fakes to the original because the design looked much better. The children of rich families would wear them. I look too chubby in this, so don't wear it here. I thought I could probably wear it if I altered it." REUTERS/Kim Hong-ji SEARCH "DEFECTORS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
NORTHKOREA-CHINA/BORDER-DEFECTORS
RTX5N7CR
April 12, 2018
A dog fur coat belonging to Kang, who wanted to be identified only by her surname, is seen in Seoul,...
Seoul, South Korea
The Wider Image: Escape from North Korea
A dog fur coat belonging to Kang, who wanted to be identified only by her surname, is seen in Seoul, South Korea, August 8, 2017. The parents of Kang sent out a coat across the Chinese border after she reached the South in 2010. "I didn't ask my mother to send me this coat," said Kang. "But she knew I feel the cold easily and sent it to me. She sent some honey too, but it went missing on the way. The coat is made of dog fur. I don't know what kind of dog. In 2010, it cost about 700,000 North Korean won ($88 at the unofficial rate). It was really expensive. A North Korean friend went to China to pick it up for me. I liked this coat when I got it. I thought my mother must've spent quite a lot of money on it. My father was a party officer. Our family had a car and we lived in a special apartment. Ordinary people couldn't afford to wear this kind of coat, not even soldiers. Commissioned officers could afford them. Border guards would wear them. It wasn't easy to buy this kind of coat, but as time went on, fake ones began to appear. The state often clamped down on this item. It's technically military supplies so the state monitored people who altered the design of the coat. I know just from looking at this coat that it's a counterfeit one, not the official version. The counterfeit ones look quite different from the original ones. Military officials preferred the fakes to the original because the design looked much better. The children of rich families would wear them. I look too chubby in this, so don't wear it here. I thought I could probably wear it if I altered it." REUTERS/Kim Hong-ji SEARCH "DEFECTORS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
NORTHKOREA-CHINA/BORDER-DEFECTORS
RTX5N7C2
April 12, 2018
Kang, 28, who wanted to be identified only by her surname, poses for a photograph in Seoul, South Korea,...
Seoul, South Korea
The Wider Image: Escape from North Korea
Kang, 28, who wanted to be identified only by her surname, poses for a photograph in Seoul, South Korea, August 8, 2017. The parents of Kang sent out a coat across the Chinese border after she reached the South in 2010. "I didn't ask my mother to send me this coat," said Kang. "But she knew I feel the cold easily and sent it to me. She sent some honey too, but it went missing on the way. The coat is made of dog fur. I don't know what kind of dog. In 2010, it cost about 700,000 North Korean won ($88 at the unofficial rate). It was really expensive. A North Korean friend went to China to pick it up for me. I liked this coat when I got it. I thought my mother must've spent quite a lot of money on it. My father was a party officer. Our family had a car and we lived in a special apartment. Ordinary people couldn't afford to wear this kind of coat, not even soldiers. Commissioned officers could afford them. Border guards would wear them. It wasn't easy to buy this kind of coat, but as time went on, fake ones began to appear. The state often clamped down on this item. It's technically military supplies so the state monitored people who altered the design of the coat. I know just from looking at this coat that it's a counterfeit one, not the official version. The counterfeit ones look quite different from the original ones. Military officials preferred the fakes to the original because the design looked much better. The children of rich families would wear them. I look too chubby in this, so don't wear it here. I thought I could probably wear it if I altered it." REUTERS/Kim Hong-ji SEARCH "DEFECTORS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Wider Image
Wider Image
As West frowns on Putin, Russians learn the military way
36 PICTURES
RUSSIA-CADETS/
RTX3K67Y
November 28, 2017
President Vladimir Putin may be criticised by the West for the annexation of Crimea from Ukraine in 2014,...
Stavropol, Russia
The Wider Image: As West frowns on Putin, Russians learn the military way
President Vladimir Putin may be criticised by the West for the annexation of Crimea from Ukraine in 2014, but at home his public approval ratings have been boosted. The operation to seize the peninsula, hailed by Russian nationalists as "The Crimean Spring", led to an upsurge in what is called "military and patriotic education" of Russian youths. "Tomorrow begins today," reads the motto of a cadet school in Stavropol that was named after Alexei Yermolov, a 19th century Russian general who conquered the Caucasus for the Russian empire. Most cadets come from families of active Russian soldiers or officers from other security forces. REUTERS/Eduard Korniyenko SEARCH "KORNIYENKO TEENAGERS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: RUSSIA-CADETS/
MYANMAR-ROHINGYA/TRADERS
RTX3JPSW
November 23, 2017
Faruk, 17, a Rohingya refugee trader holds betel leaves which are on sale at a stall in Palong Khali...
Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh
The Wider Image: Trading inside the Rohingya camps
Faruk, 17, a Rohingya refugee trader holds betel leaves which are on sale at a stall in Palong Khali refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, November 3, 2017. He left his village in Myanmar when the military opened fire towards the Rohingya. "I buy this betel leaf from Palong Khali market, in one bundle there are 160 pieces, I buy it for 80 taka and I sell it for 100 taka. Bangladeshi's and I sell for the same rate in the camp. Outside in the local market it is 80 taka per bundle. My problem is that I don't have money so I can't buy anything to eat, I can't buy fish to eat," he said. REUTERS/Hannah McKay SEARCH "MCKAY TRADERS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
AL-BASEBALL/
RTX3855A
May 29, 2017
May 29, 2017; Chicago, IL, USA; Chicago White Sox right fielder Avisail Garcia (26) shakes hands with...
Chicago, UNITED STATES
MLB: Boston Red Sox at Chicago White Sox
May 29, 2017; Chicago, IL, USA; Chicago White Sox right fielder Avisail Garcia (26) shakes hands with an active military member before the game against the Boston Red Sox at Guaranteed Rate Field. Mandatory Credit: Caylor Arnold-USA TODAY Sports
THAILAND-RUBBER/
RTX226N7
January 13, 2016
Baskets filled with rubber are seen at the central rubber market in Nong Khai, Thailand, September 16,...
NONG KHAI, Thailand
Baskets filled with rubber are seen at the central rubber market in Nong Khai Thailand
Baskets filled with rubber are seen at the central rubber market in Nong Khai, Thailand, September 16, 2015. Steps announced this week by Thailand's ruling junta to help rubber producers grappling with plunging prices do not go far enough, some farmers said on January 13, 2016. The cabinet has promised to buy some rubber directly from farmers at rates above market levels and announced piecemeal measures including a plan to open up rubber processing factories. The moves came after protest threats by rubber farmers galvanized a military government that draws much of its support from Bangkok and the south, the country's main rubber-growing region. Picture taken September 16, 2015. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
THAILAND-RUBBER/
RTX226N5
January 13, 2016
Baskets filled with rubber are seen at the central rubber market in Nong Khai, Thailand, September 16,...
NONG KHAI, Thailand
Baskets filled with rubber are seen at the central rubber market in Nong Khai Thailand
Baskets filled with rubber are seen at the central rubber market in Nong Khai, Thailand, September 16, 2015. Steps announced this week by Thailand's ruling junta to help rubber producers grappling with plunging prices do not go far enough, some farmers said on January 13, 2016. The cabinet has promised to buy some rubber directly from farmers at rates above market levels and announced piecemeal measures including a plan to open up rubber processing factories. The moves came after protest threats by rubber farmers galvanized a military government that draws much of its support from Bangkok and the south, the country's main rubber-growing region. Picture taken September 16, 2015. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
THAILAND-RUBBER/
RTX226N4
January 13, 2016
Baskets filled with rubber are seen at the central rubber market in Nong Khai, Thailand, September 16,...
NONG KHAI, Thailand
Baskets filled with rubber are seen at the central rubber market in Nong Khai Thailand
Baskets filled with rubber are seen at the central rubber market in Nong Khai, Thailand, September 16, 2015. Steps announced this week by Thailand's ruling junta to help rubber producers grappling with plunging prices do not go far enough, some farmers said on January 13, 2016. The cabinet has promised to buy some rubber directly from farmers at rates above market levels and announced piecemeal measures including a plan to open up rubber processing factories. The moves came after protest threats by rubber farmers galvanized a military government that draws much of its support from Bangkok and the south, the country's main rubber-growing region. Picture taken September 16, 2015. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
THAILAND-RUBBER/
RTX226N3
January 13, 2016
Workers move baskets filled with rubber at the central rubber market in Nong Khai, Thailand, September...
NONG KHAI, Thailand
Workers move baskets filled with rubber at the central rubber market in Nong Khai Thailand
Workers move baskets filled with rubber at the central rubber market in Nong Khai, Thailand, September 16, 2015. Steps announced this week by Thailand's ruling junta to help rubber producers grappling with plunging prices do not go far enough, some farmers said on January 13, 2016. The cabinet has promised to buy some rubber directly from farmers at rates above market levels and announced piecemeal measures including a plan to open up rubber processing factories. The moves came after protest threats by rubber farmers galvanized a military government that draws much of its support from Bangkok and the south, the country's main rubber-growing region. Picture taken September 16, 2015. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
THAILAND-RUBBER/
RTX226N2
January 13, 2016
Baskets filled with rubber are seen at the central rubber market in Nong Khai, Thailand, September 16,...
NONG KHAI, Thailand
Baskets filled with rubber are seen at the central rubber market in Nong Khai Thailand
Baskets filled with rubber are seen at the central rubber market in Nong Khai, Thailand, September 16, 2015. Steps announced this week by Thailand's ruling junta to help rubber producers grappling with plunging prices do not go far enough, some farmers said on January 13, 2016. The cabinet has promised to buy some rubber directly from farmers at rates above market levels and announced piecemeal measures including a plan to open up rubber processing factories. The moves came after protest threats by rubber farmers galvanized a military government that draws much of its support from Bangkok and the south, the country's main rubber-growing region. Picture taken September 16, 2015. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
THAILAND-RUBBER/
RTX226N0
January 13, 2016
A man takes a picture of basket filled with rubber at the central rubber market in Nong Khai, Thailand,...
NONG KHAI, Thailand
A man takes a picture of basket filled with rubber at the central rubber market in Nong Khai Thailand...
A man takes a picture of basket filled with rubber at the central rubber market in Nong Khai, Thailand, September 16, 2015. Steps announced this week by Thailand's ruling junta to help rubber producers grappling with plunging prices do not go far enough, some farmers said on January 13, 2016. The cabinet has promised to buy some rubber directly from farmers at rates above market levels and announced piecemeal measures including a plan to open up rubber processing factories. The moves came after protest threats by rubber farmers galvanized a military government that draws much of its support from Bangkok and the south, the country's main rubber-growing region. Picture taken September 16, 2015. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
THAILAND-RUBBER/
RTX226MN
January 13, 2016
Workers move baskets filled with rubber at the central rubber market in Nong Khai, Thailand, September...
NONG KHAI, Thailand
Workers move baskets filled with rubber at the central rubber market in Nong Khai Thailand
Workers move baskets filled with rubber at the central rubber market in Nong Khai, Thailand, September 16, 2015. Steps announced this week by Thailand's ruling junta to help rubber producers grappling with plunging prices do not go far enough, some farmers said on January 13, 2016. The cabinet has promised to buy some rubber directly from farmers at rates above market levels and announced piecemeal measures including a plan to open up rubber processing factories. The moves came after protest threats by rubber farmers galvanized a military government that draws much of its support from Bangkok and the south, the country's main rubber-growing region. Picture taken September 16, 2015. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
THAILAND-ECONOMY/
RTS25E3
September 21, 2015
Thailand's Deputy Prime Minister Somkid Jatusripitak gestures during an interview with Reuters at Government...
Bangkok, Thailand
Thailand's Deputy Prime Minister Somkid gestures during an interview with Reuters at Government House...
Thailand's Deputy Prime Minister Somkid Jatusripitak gestures during an interview with Reuters at Government House in Bangkok, Thailand, September 21, 2015. Boosting rural incomes is an urgent priority for the new economic team of Thailand's military government and will do more to revive a flagging economy than a rate cut, the deputy prime minister said on Monday. To match Interview THAILAND-ECONOMY/REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha
THAILAND-ECONOMY/
RTS25E1
September 21, 2015
Thailand's Deputy Prime Minister Somkid Jatusripitak gestures during an interview with Reuters at Government...
Bangkok, Thailand
Thailand's Deputy Prime Minister Somkid gestures during an interview at Government House in Bangkok
Thailand's Deputy Prime Minister Somkid Jatusripitak gestures during an interview with Reuters at Government House in Bangkok, Thailand, September 21, 2015. Boosting rural incomes is an urgent priority for the new economic team of Thailand's military government and will do more to revive a flagging economy than a rate cut, the deputy prime minister said on Monday. To match Interview THAILAND-ECONOMY/ REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha
THAILAND-ECONOMY/
RTS25CX
September 21, 2015
Thailand's Deputy Prime Minister Somkid Jatusripitak gestures during an interview with Reuters at Government...
Bangkok, Thailand
Thailand's Deputy Prime Minister Somkid gestures during an interview at Government House in Bangkok
Thailand's Deputy Prime Minister Somkid Jatusripitak gestures during an interview with Reuters at Government House in Bangkok, Thailand, September 21, 2015. Boosting rural incomes is an urgent priority for the new economic team of Thailand's military government and will do more to revive a flagging economy than a rate cut, the deputy prime minister said on Monday. To match Interview THAILAND-ECONOMY/REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha
THAILAND-ECONOMY/
RTS25C5
September 21, 2015
Thailand's Deputy Prime Minister Somkid Jatusripitak gestures during an interview with Reuters at Government...
Bangkok, Thailand
Thailand's Deputy Prime Minister Somkid gestures during an interview at Government House in Bangkok
Thailand's Deputy Prime Minister Somkid Jatusripitak gestures during an interview with Reuters at Government House in Bangkok, Thailand, September 21, 2015. Boosting rural incomes is an urgent priority for the new economic team of Thailand's military government and will do more to revive a flagging economy than a rate cut, the deputy prime minister said on Monday. To match Interview THAILAND-ECONOMY/ REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha
THAILAND-ECONOMY/
RTS25BZ
September 21, 2015
Thailand's Deputy Prime Minister Somkid Jatusripitak speaks during an interview with Reuters at Government...
Bangkok, Thailand
Thailand's Deputy Prime Minister Somkid speaks during an interview with Reuters at Government House in...
Thailand's Deputy Prime Minister Somkid Jatusripitak speaks during an interview with Reuters at Government House in Bangkok, Thailand, September 21, 2015. Boosting rural incomes is an urgent priority for the new economic team of Thailand's military government and will do more to revive a flagging economy than a rate cut, the deputy prime minister said on Monday. To match Interview THAILAND-ECONOMY/REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha
THAILAND-ECONOMY/
RTS25BH
September 21, 2015
Thailand's Deputy Prime Minister Somkid Jatusripitak gestures during an interview with Reuters at Government...
Bangkok, Thailand
Thailand's Deputy Prime Minister Somkid gestures during an interview with Reuters at Government House...
Thailand's Deputy Prime Minister Somkid Jatusripitak gestures during an interview with Reuters at Government House in Bangkok, Thailand, September 21, 2015. Boosting rural incomes is an urgent priority for the new economic team of Thailand's military government and will do more to revive a flagging economy than a rate cut, the deputy prime minister said on Monday. To match Interview THAILAND-ECONOMY/REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha
INDIA-VETERANS/
RTX1R80I
September 05, 2015
Members of the Indian Ex Servicemen Movement take part in a sit-in protest in New Delhi, India, September...
New Delhi, India
Members of the Indian Ex Servicemen Movement take part in a sit-in protest in New Delhi
Members of the Indian Ex Servicemen Movement take part in a sit-in protest in New Delhi, India, September 5, 2015. The Indian government approved a long-awaited programme to equalise pension payments for retired military personnel despite it being a "huge fiscal burden," Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar said on Saturday. The programme, known as "One Rank One Pension", or OROP, will ensure uniform pension payments to ex-servicemen who served at the same rank and for the same amount of time, regardless of the year they retired, among other measures. OROP plans to reconcile the rate of payments of current and past pensioners every five years, disappointing some ex-servicemen who wanted the review to happen more frequently. REUTERS/Anindito Mukherjee
INDIA-VETERANS/
RTX1R7ZB
September 05, 2015
Members of the Indian Ex Servicemen Movement take part in a sit-in protest in New Delhi, India, September...
New Delhi, India
Members of the Indian Ex Servicemen Movement take part in a sit-in protest in New Delhi
Members of the Indian Ex Servicemen Movement take part in a sit-in protest in New Delhi, India, September 5, 2015. The Indian government approved a long-awaited programme to equalise pension payments for retired military personnel despite it being a "huge fiscal burden," Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar said on Saturday. The programme, known as "One Rank One Pension", or OROP, will ensure uniform pension payments to ex-servicemen who served at the same rank and for the same amount of time, regardless of the year they retired, among other measures. OROP plans to reconcile the rate of payments of current and past pensioners every five years, disappointing some ex-servicemen who wanted the review to happen more frequently. REUTERS/Anindito Mukherjee
JAPAN-SECURITY/ABE-BILLS
RTX1KH0Z
July 16, 2015
Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (R) talks with minister in charge of reviving local economies Shigeru...
Tokyo, Japan
Japan's PM Abe talks with minister in charge of reviving local economies Ishiba during the plenary session...
Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (R) talks with minister in charge of reviving local economies Shigeru Ishiba during the plenary session of the parliament in Tokyo July 16, 2015. Legislation for a dramatic change in Japan's defence policy that loosens constraints on the military was approved by parliament's lower house on Thursday, despite huge popular protests and a dent in Abe's ratings. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
JAPAN-SECURITY/ABE-BILLS
RTX1KGZW
July 16, 2015
Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (C) stands as the government-proposed security-related legislation...
Tokyo, Japan
Japan's Prime Minister Abe stands as the government-proposed security-related legislation is being passed...
Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (C) stands as the government-proposed security-related legislation is being passed in the lower house during the plenary session of the parliament in Tokyo July 16, 2015. Legislation for a dramatic change in Japan's defence policy that loosens constraints on the military was approved by parliament's lower house on Thursday, despite huge popular protests and a dent in Abe's ratings. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
JAPAN-SECURITY/ABE-BILLS
RTX1KGZM
July 16, 2015
Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (C) leaves with his party's lawmakers after the government-proposed...
Tokyo, Japan
Japan's Prime Minister Abe leaves with his party's lawmakers after the government-proposed security-related...
Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (C) leaves with his party's lawmakers after the government-proposed security-related legislation was passed in the lower house during the plenary session of the parliament in Tokyo July 16, 2015. Legislation for a dramatic change in Japan's defence policy that loosens constraints on the military was approved by parliament's lower house on Thursday, despite huge popular protests and a dent in Abe's ratings. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
JAPAN-SECURITY/ABE-BILLS
RTX1KGZ9
July 16, 2015
Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe bows after the government-proposed security-related legislation was...
Tokyo, Japan
Japan's Prime Minister Abe bows after the government-proposed security-related legislation was passed...
Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe bows after the government-proposed security-related legislation was passed in the lower house during the plenary session of the parliament in Tokyo July 16, 2015. Legislation for a dramatic change in Japan's defence policy that loosens constraints on the military was approved by parliament's lower house on Thursday, despite huge popular protests and a dent in Abe's ratings. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
JAPAN-SECURITY/ABE-BILLS
RTX1KGYT
July 16, 2015
Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (R) and minister in charge of reviving local economies Shigeru Ishiba...
Tokyo, Japan
Japan's PM Abe and minister in charge of reviving local economies Ishiba applaud after the government-proposed...
Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (R) and minister in charge of reviving local economies Shigeru Ishiba applaud after the government-proposed security-related legislation was passed in the lower house during the plenary session of the parliament in Tokyo July 16, 2015. Legislation for a dramatic change in Japan's defence policy that loosens constraints on the military was approved by parliament's lower house on Thursday, despite huge popular protests and a dent in Abe's ratings. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
JAPAN-SECURITY/ABE-BILLS
RTX1KGY9
July 16, 2015
Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe shakes hands with Finance Minister and Deputy Prime Minister Taro Aso...
Tokyo, Japan
Japan's Prime Minister Abe shakes hands with Finance Minister Aso after the government-proposed security-related...
Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe shakes hands with Finance Minister and Deputy Prime Minister Taro Aso (3rd R) after the government-proposed security-related legislation was passed in the lower house during the plenary session of the parliament in Tokyo July 16, 2015. Legislation for a dramatic change in Japan's defence policy that loosens constraints on the military was approved by parliament's lower house on Thursday, despite huge popular protests and a dent in Abe's ratings. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
JAPAN-SECURITY/ABE
RTX1KGY4
July 16, 2015
Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (C) bows after the government-proposed security-related legislation...
Tokyo, Japan
Japan's Prime Minister Abe bows after the government-proposed security-related legislation was passed...
Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (C) bows after the government-proposed security-related legislation was passed in the lower house during the plenary session of the parliament in Tokyo July 16, 2015. Legislation for a dramatic change in Japan's defence policy that loosens constraints on the military was approved by parliament's lower house on Thursday, despite huge popular protests and a dent in Abe's ratings. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
JAPAN-SECURITY/ABE-BILLS
RTX1KGY3
July 16, 2015
Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe bows after the government-proposed security-related legislation was...
Tokyo, Japan
Japan's Prime Minister Abe bows after the government-proposed security-related legislation was passed...
Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe bows after the government-proposed security-related legislation was passed in the lower house during the plenary session of the parliament in Tokyo July 16, 2015. Legislation for a dramatic change in Japan's defence policy that loosens constraints on the military was approved by parliament's lower house on Thursday, despite huge popular protests and a dent in Abe's ratings. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
HONDURAS-MILITARY/
RTX1JQLA
July 09, 2015
Members of the Military Police for Public Order (PMOP) search men for drugs and weapons during a patrol...
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Members of the Military Police for Public Order (PMOP) search men for drugs and weapons during a patrol...
Members of the Military Police for Public Order (PMOP) search men for drugs and weapons during a patrol at an impoverished neighbourhood in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, July 8, 2015. The militarization of Central America's violent Honduras has helped to stem gang bloodshed in a land known for the world's highest murder rate, but it has created another problem - an apparent spike in abuses blamed on soldiers. Picture taken July 8, 2015. To match Insight HONDURAS-MILITARY/REUTERS/Jorge Cabrera
HONDURAS-MILITARY/
RTX1JQKH
July 09, 2015
A child covers his face as a member of the Military Police for Public Order (PMOP) keeps watch during...
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Child covers his face as a member of the Military Police for Public Order (PMOP) keeps watch during a...
A child covers his face as a member of the Military Police for Public Order (PMOP) keeps watch during a patrol at an impoverished neighbourhood in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, July 8, 2015. The militarization of Central America's violent Honduras has helped to stem gang bloodshed in a land known for the world's highest murder rate, but it has created another problem - an apparent spike in abuses blamed on soldiers. Picture taken July 8, 2015. To match Insight HONDURAS-MILITARY/ REUTERS/Jorge Cabrera
HONDURAS-MILITARY/
RTX1JQKG
July 09, 2015
Members of the Military Police for Public Order (PMOP) look at a man distributing water during a patrol...
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Members of the Military Police for Public Order (PMOP) look at a man distributing water during a patrol...
Members of the Military Police for Public Order (PMOP) look at a man distributing water during a patrol at an impoverished neighbourhood in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, July 8, 2015. The militarization of Central America's violent Honduras has helped to stem gang bloodshed in a land known for the world's highest murder rate, but it has created another problem - an apparent spike in abuses blamed on soldiers. Picture taken July 8, 2015. To match Insight HONDURAS-MILITARY/ REUTERS/Jorge Cabrera
HONDURAS-MILITARY/
RTX1JQKD
July 09, 2015
Banknotes and cleaning rags are seen on the floor as a member of the Military Police for Public Order...
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Banknotes and cleaning rags are seen on the floor as a member of the Military Police for Public Order...
Banknotes and cleaning rags are seen on the floor as a member of the Military Police for Public Order (PMOP) searches a man for drugs and weapons during a patrol at an impoverished neighbourhood in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, July 8, 2015. The militarization of Central America's violent Honduras has helped to stem gang bloodshed in a land known for the world's highest murder rate, but it has created another problem - an apparent spike in abuses blamed on soldiers. Picture taken July 8, 2015. To match Insight HONDURAS-MILITARY/ REUTERS/Jorge Cabrera
HONDURAS-MILITARY/
RTX1JQKC
July 09, 2015
Members of the Military Police for Public Order (PMOP) patrol an impoverished neighbourhood in Tegucigalpa,...
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Members of the Military Police for Public Order (PMOP) patrol an impoverished neighbourhood in Tegucigalpa...
Members of the Military Police for Public Order (PMOP) patrol an impoverished neighbourhood in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, July 8, 2015. The militarization of Central America's violent Honduras has helped to stem gang bloodshed in a land known for the world's highest murder rate, but it has created another problem - an apparent spike in abuses blamed on soldiers. Picture taken July 8, 2015. To match Insight HONDURAS-MILITARY/ REUTERS/Jorge Cabrera
HONDURAS-MILITARY/
RTX1JQK0
July 09, 2015
A member of the Military Police for Public Order (PMOP) searches a man for drugs and weapons during a...
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Member of the Military Police for Public Order (PMOP) searches a man for drugs and weapons during a patrol...
A member of the Military Police for Public Order (PMOP) searches a man for drugs and weapons during a patrol at an impoverished neighbourhood in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, July 8, 2015. The militarization of Central America's violent Honduras has helped to stem gang bloodshed in a land known for the world's highest murder rate, but it has created another problem - an apparent spike in abuses blamed on soldiers. Picture taken July 8, 2015. To match Insight HONDURAS-MILITARY/ REUTERS/Jorge Cabrera
HONDURAS-MILITARY/
RTX1JQJX
July 09, 2015
A member of the Military Police for Public Order (PMOP) searches the bag of a man for drugs and weapons...
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Member of the Military Police for Public Order (PMOP) searches the bag of a man for drugs and weapons...
A member of the Military Police for Public Order (PMOP) searches the bag of a man for drugs and weapons during a patrol at an impoverished neighbourhood in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, July 8, 2015. The militarization of Central America's violent Honduras has helped to stem gang bloodshed in a land known for the world's highest murder rate, but it has created another problem - an apparent spike in abuses blamed on soldiers. Picture taken July 8, 2015. To match Insight HONDURAS-MILITARY/ REUTERS/Jorge Cabrera
PHILIPPINES-AQUINO/
RTR4TNFZ
March 17, 2015
Philippine Senator Grace Poe browses through an official report on the bungled police operation in Maguindanao...
Manila, Philippines
Philippine Senator Poe browses through an official report on the bungled police operation which led to...
Philippine Senator Grace Poe browses through an official report on the bungled police operation in Maguindanao province which led to the death of 44 police commandos in a clash with rebels in January, during a news conference at the Senate headquarters in Manila March 17, 2015. A senate panel has found Philippines' President Benigno Aquino responsible for allowing suspended police general Alan Purisima to oversee the secret mission that went wrong, putting at risk government efforts to forge peace with the country's largest Muslim rebel group. Aquino's approval and trust ratings have plunged to their lowest ever as public anger over the killing of the policemen has hurt his popularity, a pollster said on Tuesday. The president's poor ratings could have implications for a 2016 presidential election even though he will not be standing. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco (PHILIPPINES - Tags: POLITICS CRIME LAW MILITARY CIVIL UNREST)
PHILIPPINES-AQUINO/
RTR4TNFY
March 17, 2015
Philippine Senator Grace Poe holds up a official report on the bungled police operation in Maguindanao...
Manila, Philippines
Philippine Senator Poe holds up a official report on the bungled police operation which led to the death...
Philippine Senator Grace Poe holds up a official report on the bungled police operation in Maguindanao province which led to the death of 44 police commandos in a clash with rebels in January, during a news conference at the Senate headquarters in Manila March 17, 2015. A senate panel has found Philippines' President Benigno Aquino responsible for allowing suspended police general Alan Purisima to oversee the secret mission that went wrong, putting at risk government efforts to forge peace with the country's largest Muslim rebel group. Aquino's approval and trust ratings have plunged to their lowest ever as public anger over the killing of the policemen has hurt his popularity, a pollster said on Tuesday. The president's poor ratings could have implications for a 2016 presidential election even though he will not be standing. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco (PHILIPPINES - Tags: POLITICS CRIME LAW MILITARY CIVIL UNREST)
AFGHANISTAN-AIRFORCE/
RTR4MUV2
January 25, 2015
A military helicopter flies during an Afghan pilots training to use new rockets on the outskirts of Kabul...
Kabul, Afghanistan
A military helicopter flies during an Afghan pilots training to use new rockets on the outskirts of Kabul...
A military helicopter flies during an Afghan pilots training to use new rockets on the outskirts of Kabul December 18, 2014. With new planes capable of engaging Taliban insurgents delayed by over two years, and NATO air missions backing up troops on the ground now at a minimum, the fledgling Afghan Air Force is scrambling to provide even basic support. That is a worry for 350,000 police, soldiers and other security personnel fighting militants across the country and dying at a rate of around 100 every week in the heaviest fighting of a 13-year conflict. Picture taken on December 18, 2014. To match story AFGHANISTAN-AIRFORCE/ REUTERS/Mohammad Ismail (AFGHANISTAN - Tags: MILITARY TRANSPORT)
AFGHANISTAN-AIRFORCE/
RTR4MUV1
January 25, 2015
Afghan Air Force helicopters land at the military airport in Kabul December 18, 2014. With new planes...
Kabul, Afghanistan
Afghan Air Force helicopters land at the military airport in Kabul
Afghan Air Force helicopters land at the military airport in Kabul December 18, 2014. With new planes capable of engaging Taliban insurgents delayed by over two years, and NATO air missions backing up troops on the ground now at a minimum, the fledgling Afghan Air Force is scrambling to provide even basic support. That is a worry for 350,000 police, soldiers and other security personnel fighting militants across the country and dying at a rate of around 100 every week in the heaviest fighting of a 13-year conflict. Picture taken on December 18, 2014. To match story AFGHANISTAN-AIRFORCE/ REUTERS/Mohammad Ismail (AFGHANISTAN - Tags: MILITARY TRANSPORT)
AFGHANISTAN-AIRFORCE/
RTR4MUUZ
January 25, 2015
Members of the Afghan Air Force crew perform a system check on a helicopter before flight at the military...
Kabul, Afghanistan
Members of the Afghan Air Force crew perform a system check on a helicopter before flight at the military...
Members of the Afghan Air Force crew perform a system check on a helicopter before flight at the military airport in Kabul December 18, 2014. With new planes capable of engaging Taliban insurgents delayed by over two years, and NATO air missions backing up troops on the ground now at a minimum, the fledgling Afghan Air Force is scrambling to provide even basic support. That is a worry for 350,000 police, soldiers and other security personnel fighting militants across the country and dying at a rate of around 100 every week in the heaviest fighting of a 13-year conflict. Picture taken on December 18, 2014. To match story AFGHANISTAN-AIRFORCE/ REUTERS/Mohammad Ismail (AFGHANISTAN - Tags: MILITARY TRANSPORT)
AFGHANISTAN-AIRFORCE/
RTR4MUUY
January 25, 2015
Afghan Air Force crew loads ammunition on a helicopter before flight at the military airport in Kabul...
Kabul, Afghanistan
Afghan Air Force crew loads ammunition on a helicopter before flight at the military airport in Kabul...
Afghan Air Force crew loads ammunition on a helicopter before flight at the military airport in Kabul December 18, 2014. With new planes capable of engaging Taliban insurgents delayed by over two years, and NATO air missions backing up troops on the ground now at a minimum, the fledgling Afghan Air Force is scrambling to provide even basic support. That is a worry for 350,000 police, soldiers and other security personnel fighting militants across the country and dying at a rate of around 100 every week in the heaviest fighting of a 13-year conflict. Picture taken on December 18, 2014. To match story AFGHANISTAN-AIRFORCE/ REUTERS/Mohammad Ismail (AFGHANISTAN - Tags: MILITARY TRANSPORT)
AFGHANISTAN-AIRFORCE/
RTR4MUUU
January 25, 2015
A member of the Afghan Air Force crew prepares his machine gun on a helicopter before flight at the military...
Kabul, Afghanistan
A member of the Afghan Air Force crew prepares his machine gun on a helicopter before flight at the military...
A member of the Afghan Air Force crew prepares his machine gun on a helicopter before flight at the military airport in Kabul December 18, 2014. With new planes capable of engaging Taliban insurgents delayed by over two years, and NATO air missions backing up troops on the ground now at a minimum, the fledgling Afghan Air Force is scrambling to provide even basic support. That is a worry for 350,000 police, soldiers and other security personnel fighting militants across the country and dying at a rate of around 100 every week in the heaviest fighting of a 13-year conflict. Picture taken on December 18, 2014. To match story AFGHANISTAN-AIRFORCE/ REUTERS/Mohammad Ismail (AFGHANISTAN - Tags: MILITARY TRANSPORT)
AFGHANISTAN-AIRFORCE/
RTR4MUUT
January 25, 2015
A member of the Afghan Air Force crew performs a system check on a helicopter before flight at the military...
Kabul, Afghanistan
A member of the Afghan Air Force crew performs a system check on a helicopter before flight at the military...
A member of the Afghan Air Force crew performs a system check on a helicopter before flight at the military airport in Kabul December 18, 2014. With new planes capable of engaging Taliban insurgents delayed by over two years, and NATO air missions backing up troops on the ground now at a minimum, the fledgling Afghan Air Force is scrambling to provide even basic support. That is a worry for 350,000 police, soldiers and other security personnel fighting militants across the country and dying at a rate of around 100 every week in the heaviest fighting of a 13-year conflict. Picture taken on December 18, 2014. To match story AFGHANISTAN-AIRFORCE/ REUTERS/Mohammad Ismail (AFGHANISTAN - Tags: MILITARY TRANSPORT)
AFGHANISTAN-AIRFORCE/
RTR4MUUS
January 25, 2015
Members of the Afghan Air Force crew stand next to a helicopter at the military airport in Kabul December...
Kabul, Afghanistan
Members of the Afghan Air Force crew stand next to a helicopter at the military airport in Kabul
Members of the Afghan Air Force crew stand next to a helicopter at the military airport in Kabul December 18, 2014. With new planes capable of engaging Taliban insurgents delayed by over two years, and NATO air missions backing up troops on the ground now at a minimum, the fledgling Afghan Air Force is scrambling to provide even basic support. That is a worry for 350,000 police, soldiers and other security personnel fighting militants across the country and dying at a rate of around 100 every week in the heaviest fighting of a 13-year conflict. Picture taken on December 18, 2014. To match story AFGHANISTAN-AIRFORCE/ REUTERS/Mohammad Ismail (AFGHANISTAN - Tags: MILITARY TRANSPORT)
RUSSIA-MARKETS/ROUBLE
RTR4C6QX
October 30, 2014
A navy sailor looks on near a board showing currency exchange rates in St. Petersburg, October 30, 2014....
St. Petersburg, Russia
A navy sailor looks on near a board showing currency exchange rates in St. Petersburg
A navy sailor looks on near a board showing currency exchange rates in St. Petersburg, October 30, 2014. The rouble jumped on Thursday, bouncing off an all-time low against the dollar amid market talk of possible central bank intervention ahead of a monetary policy meeting and rumours of a deal with Ukraine over Crimea. REUTERS/Alexander Demianchuk (RUSSIA - Tags: BUSINESS MILITARY)
USA-ECONOMY/
RTR48UVK
October 03, 2014
Leaflets lie on a table at a booth at a military veterans' job fair in Carson, California October 3,...
Carson, UNITED STATES
Leaflets lie on a table at a booth at a military veterans' job fair in Carson
Leaflets lie on a table at a booth at a military veterans' job fair in Carson, California October 3, 2014. U.S. employers ramped up hiring in September and the jobless rate fell to a six-year low, bolstering bets the Federal Reserve will hike interest rates in mid-2015. Friday's report on employment is the most significant gauge of the economy's health ahead of Nov. 4 congressional elections. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT MILITARY)
USA-ECONOMY/
RTR48UVF
October 03, 2014
A man holds a leaflet at a military veterans' job fair in Carson, California October 3, 2014. U.S. employers...
California, UNITED STATES
Man holds a leaflet at a military veterans' job fair in Carson
A man holds a leaflet at a military veterans' job fair in Carson, California October 3, 2014. U.S. employers ramped up hiring in September and the jobless rate fell to a six-year low, bolstering bets the Federal Reserve will hike interest rates in mid-2015.
Friday's report on employment is the most significant gauge of the economy's health ahead of Nov. 4 congressional elections. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT MILITARY)
USA-ECONOMY/
RTR48UVD
October 03, 2014
A man walks past a booth at a military veterans' job fair in Carson, California October 3, 2014. U.S....
Carson, UNITED STATES
Man walks past a booth at a military veterans' job fair in Carson
A man walks past a booth at a military veterans' job fair in Carson, California October 3, 2014. U.S. employers ramped up hiring in September and the jobless rate fell to a six-year low, bolstering bets the Federal Reserve will hike interest rates in mid-2015.
Friday's report on employment is the most significant gauge of the economy's health ahead of Nov. 4 congressional elections. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT MILITARY)
USA-ECONOMY/
RTR48UV5
October 03, 2014
Recruiters wait at a booth at a military veterans' job fair in Carson, California October 3, 2014. U.S....
Carson, UNITED STATES
Recruiters wait at a booth at a military veterans' job fair in Carson
Recruiters wait at a booth at a military veterans' job fair in Carson, California October 3, 2014. U.S. employers ramped up hiring in September and the jobless rate fell to a six-year low, bolstering bets the Federal Reserve will hike interest rates in mid-2015.
Friday's report on employment is the most significant gauge of the economy's health ahead of Nov. 4 congressional elections. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT MILITARY)
USA-ECONOMY/
RTR48UV4
October 03, 2014
People browse booths at a military veterans' job fair in Carson, California October 3, 2014. U.S. employers...
Carson, UNITED STATES
People browse booths at a military veterans' job fair in Carson
People browse booths at a military veterans' job fair in Carson, California October 3, 2014. U.S. employers ramped up hiring in September and the jobless rate fell to a six-year low, bolstering bets the Federal Reserve will hike interest rates in mid-2015. Friday's report on employment is the most significant gauge of the economy's health ahead of Nov. 4 congressional elections. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT MILITARY)
USA-ECONOMY/
RTR48UUW
October 03, 2014
A man fills out a form at a booth at a military veterans' job fair in Carson, California October 3, 2014....
None, United Kingdom
Man fills out a form at a booth at a military veterans' job fair in Carson
A man fills out a form at a booth at a military veterans' job fair in Carson, California October 3, 2014. U.S. employers ramped up hiring in September and the jobless rate fell to a six-year low, bolstering bets the Federal Reserve will hike interest rates in mid-2015. Friday's report on employment is the most significant gauge of the economy's health ahead of Nov. 4 congressional elections. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT MILITARY)
USA-ECONOMY/
RTR48UUU
October 03, 2014
Elisa Dolojan, 43, and her husband Norman Dolojan, 30, pick up leaflets at a military veterans' job fair...
Carson, UNITED STATES
Elisa Dolojan and her husband Dolojan pick up leaflets at a military veterans' job fair in Carson
Elisa Dolojan, 43, and her husband Norman Dolojan, 30, pick up leaflets at a military veterans' job fair in Carson, California October 3, 2014. U.S. employers ramped up hiring in September and the jobless rate fell to a six-year low, bolstering bets the Federal Reserve will hike interest rates in mid-2015. Friday's report on employment is the most significant gauge of the economy's health ahead of Nov. 4 congressional elections. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT MILITARY)
USA-ECONOMY/
RTR48UUL
October 03, 2014
Marine Corps veteran Omar Vargas, 34, (R) browses booths at a military veterans' job fair in Carson,...
Carson, UNITED STATES
Marine Corps veteran Vargas browses booths at a military veterans' job fair in Carson
Marine Corps veteran Omar Vargas, 34, (R) browses booths at a military veterans' job fair in Carson, California October 3, 2014. U.S. employers ramped up hiring in September and the jobless rate fell to a six-year low, bolstering bets the Federal Reserve will hike interest rates in mid-2015.
Friday's report on employment is the most significant gauge of the economy's health ahead of Nov. 4 congressional elections. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT MILITARY)
USA-ECONOMY/
RTR48UUJ
October 03, 2014
A woman browses leaflets at a military veterans' job fair in Carson, California October 3, 2014. U.S....
Carson, UNITED STATES
Woman browses leaflets at a military veterans' job fair in Carson
A woman browses leaflets at a military veterans' job fair in Carson, California October 3, 2014. U.S. employers ramped up hiring in September and the jobless rate fell to a six-year low, bolstering bets the Federal Reserve will hike interest rates in mid-2015.
Friday's report on employment is the most significant gauge of the economy's health ahead of Nov. 4 congressional elections. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
ISRAEL-BUDGET/NETANYAHU
RTR45VOF
September 11, 2014
Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks during a conference on counter-terrorism at the Interdisciplinary...
Herzliya, Israel
Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks during a conference on counter-terrorism at the Interdisciplinary...
Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks during a conference on counter-terrorism at the Interdisciplinary Center in Herzliya, near Tel Aviv September 11, 2014. Netanyahu said on Thursday he would increase the defence budget to meet growing threats but not let the country's credit rating drop one notch through any excessive spending. REUTERS/Nir Elias (ISRAEL - Tags: POLITICS MILITARY BUSINESS)
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