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Search results for: Most-(City)

HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BLACK BUSINESS
RTS3JPX3
July 14, 2020
Tren'ness Woods-Black (R), granddaughter of the late Sylvia Woods and a third generation heir of one...
New York, UNITED STATES
Tren'ness Woods-Black, granddaughter of the late Sylvia Woods, outside Sylvia's Restaurant in Harlem...
Tren'ness Woods-Black (R), granddaughter of the late Sylvia Woods and a third generation heir of one of Harlem's most iconic businesses, Sylvia's Restaurant, speaks with her cousin and COO Taniedra McFadden (L) and her sister Kendra Woods (C) outside a restaurant following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Manhattan in New York City, New York, U.S., July 7, 2020. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Segar
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BLACK BUSINESS
RTS3JPX0
July 14, 2020
Tren'ness Woods-Black, granddaughter of the late Sylvia Woods and a third generation heir of one of Harlem's...
New York, UNITED STATES
Tren'ness Woods-Black, granddaughter of the late Sylvia Woods, poses outside Sylvia's Restaurant in Harlem...
Tren'ness Woods-Black, granddaughter of the late Sylvia Woods and a third generation heir of one of Harlem's most iconic businesses, Sylvia's Restaurant, poses for a portrait outside its premises following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Manhattan in New York City, New York, U.S., July 7, 2020. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Segar
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BLACK BUSINESS
RTS3JPWX
July 14, 2020
Tren'ness Woods-Black, granddaughter of the late Sylvia Woods and a third generation heir of one of Harlem's...
New York, UNITED STATES
Tren'ness Woods-Black, granddaughter of the late Sylvia Woods, poses outside Sylvia's Restaurant in Harlem...
Tren'ness Woods-Black, granddaughter of the late Sylvia Woods and a third generation heir of one of Harlem's most iconic businesses, Sylvia's Restaurant, poses for a portrait outside its premises following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Manhattan in New York City, New York, U.S., July 7, 2020. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Segar
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BLACK BUSINESS
RTS3JPWV
July 14, 2020
Tren'ness Woods-Black, granddaughter of the late Sylvia Woods and a third generation heir of one of Harlem's...
New York, UNITED STATES
Tren'ness Woods-Black, granddaughter of the late Sylvia Woods, poses outside Sylvia's Restaurant in Harlem...
Tren'ness Woods-Black, granddaughter of the late Sylvia Woods and a third generation heir of one of Harlem's most iconic businesses, Sylvia's Restaurant, poses for a portrait outside its premises following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Manhattan in New York City, New York, U.S., July 7, 2020. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Segar
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BLACK BUSINESS
RTS3JPWT
July 14, 2020
A portrait of the late Sylvia Woods, founder of one of Harlem's most iconic businesses, Sylvia's Restaurant,...
New York, UNITED STATES
Tren'ness Woods-Black, granddaughter of the late Sylvia Woods, in Sylvia's Restaurant in Harlem in New...
A portrait of the late Sylvia Woods, founder of one of Harlem's most iconic businesses, Sylvia's Restaurant, hangs inside the restaurant as her granddaughter Tren'ness Woods-Black walks through following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Manhattan in New York City, New York, U.S., July 7, 2020. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Segar
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BLACK BUSINESS
RTS3JPWS
July 14, 2020
Tren'ness Woods-Black, granddaughter of the late Sylvia Woods and a third generation heir of one of Harlem's...
New York, UNITED STATES
Tren'ness Woods-Black, granddaughter of the late Sylvia Woods, poses outside Sylvia's Restaurant in Harlem...
Tren'ness Woods-Black, granddaughter of the late Sylvia Woods and a third generation heir of one of Harlem's most iconic businesses, Sylvia's Restaurant, poses for a portrait outside its premises following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Manhattan in New York City, New York, U.S., July 7, 2020. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Segar
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BLACK BUSINESS
RTS3JPWO
July 14, 2020
Customers order takeout food inside one of Harlem's most iconic businesses, Sylvia's Restaurant, following...
New York, UNITED STATES
Customers order from takeout menu inside Sylvia's Restaurant in Harlem in New York
Customers order takeout food inside one of Harlem's most iconic businesses, Sylvia's Restaurant, following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Manhattan in New York City, New York, U.S., July 7, 2020. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Segar
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BLACK BUSINESS
RTS3JPWN
July 14, 2020
A customer orders takeout food inside one of Harlem's most iconic businesses, Sylvia's Restaurant, following...
New York, UNITED STATES
Customer orders from takeout menu inside Sylvia's Restaurant in Harlem in New York
A customer orders takeout food inside one of Harlem's most iconic businesses, Sylvia's Restaurant, following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Manhattan in New York City, New York, U.S., July 7, 2020. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Segar
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BLACK BUSINESS
RTS3JPWL
July 14, 2020
Tren'ness Woods-Black (R), granddaughter of the late Sylvia Woods and a third generation heir of one...
New York, UNITED STATES
Tren'ness Woods-Black, granddaughter of the late Sylvia Woods, outside Sylvia's Restaurant in Harlem...
Tren'ness Woods-Black (R), granddaughter of the late Sylvia Woods and a third generation heir of one of Harlem's most iconic businesses, Sylvia's Restaurant, speaks with her cousin and COO Taniedra McFadden (L) and her sister Kendra Woods (C) outside a restaurant following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Manhattan in New York City, New York, U.S., July 7, 2020. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Segar
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BLACK BUSINESS
RTS3JPW3
July 14, 2020
A portrait of the late Sylvia Woods, founder of one of Harlem's most iconic businesses, Sylvia's Restaurant,...
New York, UNITED STATES
Man orders from takeout menu inside Sylvia's Restaurant in Harlem in New York
A portrait of the late Sylvia Woods, founder of one of Harlem's most iconic businesses, Sylvia's Restaurant, hangs inside the restaurant as a man orders from the takeout menu following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Manhattan in New York City, New York, U.S., July 7, 2020. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Segar
In the Headlines
In the Headlines
China converts Hong Kong hotel into national security office
30 PICTURES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOTELS
RTS3IGDZ
July 08, 2020
Five-star Grand Hotel Plaza remains closed due to a lack of tourists visiting Rome since the coronavirus...
Rome, Italy
Many of Rome's top five-star hotels remain closed despite easing of COVID-19 restrictions
Five-star Grand Hotel Plaza remains closed due to a lack of tourists visiting Rome since the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Rome, Italy, July 7, 2020. Rome's top five-star hotels would usually be fully booked, especially during the busiest summer season. But despite European countries reopening their borders and lockdowns easing, there are still very few people visiting the ancient city, and many of the luxury hotels have not yet reopened their doors. Tourism accounts for about an eighth of GDP in Italy, the world's fifth most visited country, and the industry has been one of the hardest hit by the pandemic. Grand Hotel Plaza is right in the centre of Rome on popular shopping street Via del Corso, and offers stunning views of the Spanish Steps and St. Peter's Basilica. Price of rooms normally starts at 290 euros, while a night in its most luxury presidential suite would cost around 1000 euros. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Remo Casilli
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOTELS
RTS3IGDX
July 08, 2020
Five-star Grand Hotel Plaza remains closed due to a lack of tourists visiting Rome since the coronavirus...
Rome, Italy
Many of Rome's top five-star hotels remain closed despite easing of COVID-19 restrictions
Five-star Grand Hotel Plaza remains closed due to a lack of tourists visiting Rome since the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Rome, Italy, July 7, 2020. Rome's top five-star hotels would usually be fully booked, especially during the busiest summer season. But despite European countries reopening their borders and lockdowns easing, there are still very few people visiting the ancient city, and many of the luxury hotels have not yet reopened their doors. Tourism accounts for about an eighth of GDP in Italy, the world's fifth most visited country, and the industry has been one of the hardest hit by the pandemic. Grand Hotel Plaza is right in the centre of Rome on popular shopping street Via del Corso, and offers stunning views of the Spanish Steps and St. Peter's Basilica. Price of rooms normally starts at 290 euros, while a night in its most luxury presidential suite would cost around 1000 euros. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Remo Casilli
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOTELS
RTS3IGDP
July 08, 2020
Five-star Hotel Bernini remains closed due to a lack of tourists visiting Rome since the coronavirus...
Rome, Italy
Many of Rome's top five-star hotels remain closed despite easing of COVID-19 restrictions
Five-star Hotel Bernini remains closed due to a lack of tourists visiting Rome since the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Rome, Italy, July 7, 2020. Rome's top five-star hotels would usually be fully booked, especially during the busiest summer season. But despite European countries reopening their borders and lockdowns easing, there are still very few people visiting the ancient city, and many of the luxury hotels have not yet reopened their doors. Tourism accounts for about an eighth of GDP in Italy, the world's fifth most visited country, and the industry has been one of the hardest hit by the pandemic. Sina Bernini Bristol opened in 1874, named after the first Baronet of Bristol and 17th century sculptor Gian Lorenzo Bernini, who sculpted the fountain at the centre of Piazza Barberini, where the hotel is located. A double room with a view of Rome costs around 310 euros. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Remo Casilli
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOTELS
RTS3IGDO
July 08, 2020
Five-star Grand Hotel Plaza remains closed due to a lack of tourists visiting Rome since the coronavirus...
Rome, Italy
Many of Rome's top five-star hotels remain closed despite easing of COVID-19 restrictions
Five-star Grand Hotel Plaza remains closed due to a lack of tourists visiting Rome since the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Rome, Italy, July 7, 2020. Rome's top five-star hotels would usually be fully booked, especially during the busiest summer season. But despite European countries reopening their borders and lockdowns easing, there are still very few people visiting the ancient city, and many of the luxury hotels have not yet reopened their doors. Tourism accounts for about an eighth of GDP in Italy, the world's fifth most visited country, and the industry has been one of the hardest hit by the pandemic. Grand Hotel Plaza is right in the centre of Rome on popular shopping street Via del Corso, and offers stunning views of the Spanish Steps and St. Peter's Basilica. Price of rooms normally starts at 290 euros, while a night in its most luxury presidential suite would cost around 1000 euros. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Remo Casilli
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOTELS
RTS3IGDN
July 08, 2020
Five-star Hotel Hassler remains closed due to a lack of tourists visiting Rome since the coronavirus...
Rome, Italy
Many of Rome's top five-star hotels remain closed despite easing of COVID-19 restrictions
Five-star Hotel Hassler remains closed due to a lack of tourists visiting Rome since the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Rome, Italy, July 7, 2020. Rome's top five-star hotels would usually be fully booked, especially during the busiest summer season. But despite European countries reopening their borders and lockdowns easing, there are still very few people visiting the ancient city, and many of the luxury hotels have not yet reopened their doors. Tourism accounts for about an eighth of GDP in Italy, the world's fifth most visited country, and the industry has been one of the hardest hit by the pandemic. One of the city's most famous hotels, 5-Star Hotel Hassler sits right on top of the Spanish Steps with a night in a room coming in just over 500 euro. Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes famously stayed here with all their wedding guests in November 2006 before their ceremony in Bracciano castle. Numerous celebrities and leading political figures have stayed in the hotel from Leonardo Di Caprio to Eleanor Roosevelt. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Remo Casilli
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOTELS
RTS3IGDM
July 08, 2020
Five-star Hotel Hassler remains closed due to a lack of tourists visiting Rome since the coronavirus...
Rome, Italy
Many of Rome's top five-star hotels remain closed despite easing of COVID-19 restrictions
Five-star Hotel Hassler remains closed due to a lack of tourists visiting Rome since the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Rome, Italy, July 7, 2020. Rome's top five-star hotels would usually be fully booked, especially during the busiest summer season. But despite European countries reopening their borders and lockdowns easing, there are still very few people visiting the ancient city, and many of the luxury hotels have not yet reopened their doors. Tourism accounts for about an eighth of GDP in Italy, the world's fifth most visited country, and the industry has been one of the hardest hit by the pandemic. One of the city's most famous hotels, 5-Star Hotel Hassler sits right on top of the Spanish Steps with a night in a room coming in just over 500 euro. Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes famously stayed here with all their wedding guests in November 2006 before their ceremony in Bracciano castle. Numerous celebrities and leading political figures have stayed in the hotel from Leonardo Di Caprio to Eleanor Roosevelt. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Remo Casilli
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOTELS
RTS3IGDK
July 08, 2020
Five-star Hotel Bernini remains closed due to a lack of tourists visiting Rome since the coronavirus...
Rome, Italy
Many of Rome's top five-star hotels remain closed despite easing of COVID-19 restrictions
Five-star Hotel Bernini remains closed due to a lack of tourists visiting Rome since the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Rome, Italy, July 7, 2020. Rome's top five-star hotels would usually be fully booked, especially during the busiest summer season. But despite European countries reopening their borders and lockdowns easing, there are still very few people visiting the ancient city, and many of the luxury hotels have not yet reopened their doors. Tourism accounts for about an eighth of GDP in Italy, the world's fifth most visited country, and the industry has been one of the hardest hit by the pandemic. Sina Bernini Bristol opened in 1874, named after the first Baronet of Bristol and 17th century sculptor Gian Lorenzo Bernini, who sculpted the fountain at the centre of Piazza Barberini, where the hotel is located. A double room with a view of Rome costs around 310 euros. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Remo Casilli
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOTELS
RTS3IGDJ
July 08, 2020
Five-star Hotel Bernini remains closed due to a lack of tourists visiting Rome since the coronavirus...
Rome, Italy
Many of Rome's top five-star hotels remain closed despite easing of COVID-19 restrictions
Five-star Hotel Bernini remains closed due to a lack of tourists visiting Rome since the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Rome, Italy, July 7, 2020. Rome's top five-star hotels would usually be fully booked, especially during the busiest summer season. But despite European countries reopening their borders and lockdowns easing, there are still very few people visiting the ancient city, and many of the luxury hotels have not yet reopened their doors. Tourism accounts for about an eighth of GDP in Italy, the world's fifth most visited country, and the industry has been one of the hardest hit by the pandemic. Sina Bernini Bristol opened in 1874, named after the first Baronet of Bristol and 17th century sculptor Gian Lorenzo Bernini, who sculpted the fountain at the centre of Piazza Barberini, where the hotel is located. A double room with a view of Rome costs around 310 euros. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Remo Casilli
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOTELS
RTS3IGDH
July 08, 2020
Five-star Westin Excelsior hotel remains closed due to a lack of tourists visiting Rome since the coronavirus...
Rome, Italy
Many of Rome's top five-star hotels remain closed despite easing of COVID-19 restrictions
Five-star Westin Excelsior hotel remains closed due to a lack of tourists visiting Rome since the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Rome, Italy, July 7, 2020. Rome's top five-star hotels would usually be fully booked, especially during the busiest summer season. But despite European countries reopening their borders and lockdowns easing, there are still very few people visiting the ancient city, and many of the luxury hotels have not yet reopened their doors. Tourism accounts for about an eighth of GDP in Italy, the world's fifth most visited country, and the industry has been one of the hardest hit by the pandemic. The Westin Excelsior opened in 1906 on Via Veneto, the street made famous by Federico Fellini's classic film "La Dolce Vita" in 1960. It has been visited by Hollywood royalty including Elizabeth Taylor and music legends like Frank Sinatra. A double room would normally costs around 600 euro during high season. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Remo Casilli
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOTELS
RTS3IGDG
July 08, 2020
Five-star Westin Excelsior hotel remains closed due to a lack of tourists visiting Rome since the coronavirus...
Rome, Italy
Many of Rome's top five-star hotels remain closed despite easing of COVID-19 restrictions
Five-star Westin Excelsior hotel remains closed due to a lack of tourists visiting Rome since the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Rome, Italy, July 7, 2020. Rome's top five-star hotels would usually be fully booked, especially during the busiest summer season. But despite European countries reopening their borders and lockdowns easing, there are still very few people visiting the ancient city, and many of the luxury hotels have not yet reopened their doors. Tourism accounts for about an eighth of GDP in Italy, the world's fifth most visited country, and the industry has been one of the hardest hit by the pandemic. The Westin Excelsior opened in 1906 on Via Veneto, the street made famous by Federico Fellini's classic film "La Dolce Vita" in 1960. It has been visited by Hollywood royalty including Elizabeth Taylor and music legends like Frank Sinatra. A double room would normally cost around 600 euro during high season. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Remo Casilli
In the Headlines
In the Headlines
China passes national security law in turning point for Hong Kong
24 PICTURES
LATVIA-ENTERTAINMENT/
RTS3G8YR
June 27, 2020
People walk past the sand sculpture "Castle of The Livonian Order - The Beginnings of Jelgava" as the...
JELGAVA, Latvia
People walk past sand sculpture in Jelgava
People walk past the sand sculpture "Castle of The Livonian Order - The Beginnings of Jelgava" as the sand sculpture park celebrates the city's 755th anniversary by depicting the most important moments in its history, in Jelgava, Latvia June 27, 2020. REUTERS/Ints Kalnins
LATVIA-ENTERTAINMENT/
RTS3G8XJ
June 27, 2020
People look at the sand sculpture depicting the members of the rock music band "Brainstorm" as the sand...
JELGAVA, Latvia
People look at sand sculpture in Jelgava
People look at the sand sculpture depicting the members of the rock music band "Brainstorm" as the sand sculpture park celebrates the city's 755th anniversary by depicting the most important moments in its history, in Jelgava, Latvia June 27, 2020. REUTERS/Ints Kalnins
LATVIA-ENTERTAINMENT/
RTS3G8XF
June 27, 2020
People look at the sand sculpture "Following The Reindeer" as the sand sculpture park celebrates the...
JELGAVA, Latvia
People look at sand sculpture in Jelgava
People look at the sand sculpture "Following The Reindeer" as the sand sculpture park celebrates the city's 755th anniversary by depicting the most important moments in its history, in Jelgava, Latvia June 27, 2020. REUTERS/Ints Kalnins
LATVIA-ENTERTAINMENT/
RTS3G8XC
June 27, 2020
A man walks past the sand sculpture "Trade settlement" as the sand sculpture park celebrates the city's...
JELGAVA, Latvia
A man walks past sand sculpture in Jelgava
A man walks past the sand sculpture "Trade settlement" as the sand sculpture park celebrates the city's 755th anniversary by depicting the most important moments in its history, in Jelgava, Latvia June 27, 2020. REUTERS/Ints Kalnins
LATVIA-ENTERTAINMENT/
RTS3G8XB
June 27, 2020
A woman walks past the sand sculpture "Following The Reindeer" as the sand sculpture park celebrates...
JELGAVA, Latvia
A woman walks past sand sculpture in Jelgava
A woman walks past the sand sculpture "Following The Reindeer" as the sand sculpture park celebrates the city's 755th anniversary by depicting the most important moments in its history, in Jelgava, Latvia June 27, 2020. REUTERS/Ints Kalnins
LATVIA-ENTERTAINMENT/
RTS3G8WZ
June 27, 2020
People look at sand sculptures as the sand sculpture park celebrates the city's 755th anniversary by...
JELGAVA, Latvia
People look at sand sculptures in Jelgava
People look at sand sculptures as the sand sculpture park celebrates the city's 755th anniversary by depicting the most important moments in its history, in Jelgava, Latvia June 27, 2020. REUTERS/Ints Kalnins
LATVIA-ENTERTAINMENT/
RTS3G8WW
June 27, 2020
A woman looks at the sand sculpture "Castle of The Livonian Order - The Beginnings of Jelgava" as the...
JELGAVA, Latvia
A woman looks at sand sculpture in Jelgava
A woman looks at the sand sculpture "Castle of The Livonian Order - The Beginnings of Jelgava" as the sand sculpture park celebrates the city's 755th anniversary by depicting the most important moments in its history, in Jelgava, Latvia June 27, 2020. REUTERS/Ints Kalnins
LATVIA-ENTERTAINMENT/
RTS3G8WV
June 27, 2020
A woman poses for a picture next to the sand sculpture "Duke Jacob and The Taste of The World" as the...
JELGAVA, Latvia
A woman poses for a picture next to the sand sculpture in Jelava
A woman poses for a picture next to the sand sculpture "Duke Jacob and The Taste of The World" as the sand sculpture park celebrates the city's 755th anniversary by depicting the most important moments in its history, in Jelgava, Latvia June 27, 2020. REUTERS/Ints Kalnins
LATVIA-ENTERTAINMENT/
RTS3G8WU
June 27, 2020
People look at the sand sculpture "Trade Settlement" as the sand sculpture park celebrates the city's...
JELGAVA, Latvia
People look on sand sculpture in Jelgava
People look at the sand sculpture "Trade Settlement" as the sand sculpture park celebrates the city's 755th anniversary by depicting the most important moments in its history, in Jelgava, Latvia June 27, 2020. REUTERS/Ints Kalnins
LATVIA-ENTERTAINMENT/
RTS3G8WN
June 27, 2020
People walk past the sand sculpture "Castle of The Livonian Order - The Beginnings of Jelgava" as the...
JELGAVA, Latvia
People walk past sand sculpture in Jelgava
People walk past the sand sculpture "Castle of The Livonian Order - The Beginnings of Jelgava" as the sand sculpture park celebrates the city's 755th anniversary by depicting the most important moments in its history, in Jelgava, Latvia June 27, 2020. REUTERS/Ints Kalnins
LATVIA-ENTERTAINMENT/
RTS3G8WK
June 27, 2020
People look at the sand sculpture "False Engineer Casanova" as the sand sculpture park celebrates the...
JELGAVA, Latvia
People look at sand sculpture in Jelgava
People look at the sand sculpture "False Engineer Casanova" as the sand sculpture park celebrates the city's 755th anniversary by depicting the most important moments in its history, in Jelgava, Latvia June 27, 2020. REUTERS/Ints Kalnins
LATVIA-ENTERTAINMENT/
RTS3G8RM
June 27, 2020
People look at sand sculptures at the sand sculpture park celebrating the city's 755th anniversary and...
JELGAVA, Latvia
People look at sand sculptures in Jelgava
People look at sand sculptures at the sand sculpture park celebrating the city's 755th anniversary and depicting the most important moments in its history, in Jelgava, Latvia June 27, 2020. REUTERS/Ints Kalnins REFILE - CORRECTING NUMBER OF ANNIVERSARY
LATVIA-ENTERTAINMENT/
RTS3G8RH
June 27, 2020
People look at sand sculpture "Duke Jacob and The Taste of The World" at the sand sculpture park celebrating...
JELGAVA, Latvia
People look at sand sculpture in Jelgava
People look at sand sculpture "Duke Jacob and The Taste of The World" at the sand sculpture park celebrating the city's 755th anniversary and depicting the most important moments in its history, in Jelgava, Latvia June 27, 2020. REUTERS/Ints Kalnins REFILE - CORRECTING NUMBER OF ANNIVERSARY
LATVIA-ENTERTAINMENT/
RTS3G8R7
June 27, 2020
A woman takes a picture of sand sculpture "Trade Settlement" as the sand sculpture park celebrates the...
JELGAVA, Latvia
A woman takes a picture of sand sculpture in Jelgava
A woman takes a picture of sand sculpture "Trade Settlement" as the sand sculpture park celebrates the city's 755th anniversary by depicting the most important moments in its history, in Jelgava, Latvia June 27, 2020. REUTERS/Ints Kalnins REFILE - CORRECTING NUMBER OF ANNIVERSARY
In the Headlines
In the Headlines
Mexico City police chief shot in assassination attempt
22 PICTURES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AMAZON-DOCTORS
RTS3FSD1
June 25, 2020
As the novel coronavirus outbreak in Brazil explodes past 1 million cases, more than anywhere outside...
PORTEL, Brazil
The Wider Image: "How many people are going to die?" - COVID-19 races up the Amazon
As the novel coronavirus outbreak in Brazil explodes past 1 million cases, more than anywhere outside the United States, the frontlines have shifted increasingly from modern hospitals in major cities to poor, remote corners of this massive country. The cities of Belem and Amapa at the mouth of the Amazon emerged as major coronavirus hotspots in April and May. The virus has since spread deep into surrounding rural areas. Reuters spent a week accompanying medical professionals in their battle with the pandemic near Marajo Island, which splits the Amazon in two as it approaches the Atlantic Ocean. In isolated settlements built on stilts along the river, most households survive on fishing and harvesting local fruits, earning just a few dollars a day. Social distancing is nearly impossible in wooden shacks built one next to the other. Many lack phones and it can take a day or more to reach health clinics. The coronavirus has taken root here, killing scores and infecting hundreds more, public health records show. Reuters saw that severe infections, like Silva's suspected case, are often identified and treated late, when odds are against the patients. Yet public health professionals put on a brave face, making house calls and ferrying patients on hours-long boat trips as they wonder like Silva's nephew how much longer it will go on. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino SEARCH "COVID-19 BRAZIL AMAZON" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGE OF THE DAY
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INSIDEOUT
RTS39AQP
May 28, 2020
Mohsin Rakha Al-meamar, 20, exercises as seen through the window into his home after gyms were closed,...
Karbala, Iraq
Mohsin Rakha Al-meamar exercises at home in the holy city of Karbala
Mohsin Rakha Al-meamar, 20, exercises as seen through the window into his home after gyms were closed, as authorities around the world impose various guidelines on lockdowns and social distancing to curb the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in the holy city of Karbala, Iraq, April 21, 2020. When asked, what will you miss most about being in lockdown? Mohsin Rakha Al-meamar replied: "What I will miss is time gained because going to the gym takes more time than exercising at home". Picture taken April 21, 2020. REUTERS/Abdullah Dhiaa Al-deen
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INSIDEOUT
RTS39APP
May 28, 2020
A combination picture shows Mohsin Rakha Al-meamar, 20, exercising as seen through the window into his...
Karbala, Iraq
The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in the holy city of Karbala
A combination picture shows Mohsin Rakha Al-meamar, 20, exercising as seen through the window into his home after gyms were closed, and a view from his window's home, as authorities around the world impose various guidelines on lockdowns and social distancing to curb the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in the holy city of Karbala, Iraq, April 21, 2020. When asked, what will you miss most about being in lockdown? Mohsin Rakha Al-meamar replied: "What I will miss is time gained because going to the gym takes more time than exercising at home". Picture taken April 21, 2020. REUTERS/Abdullah Dhiaa Al-deen TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
In the Headlines
In the Headlines
China moves to impose security laws on Hong Kong
11 PICTURES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CONGESTION C
RTX7IQ6H
May 13, 2020
Location data from Southeast Asian ride-hailing firm Grab shows lockdowns to curb the coronavirus brought...
Coronavirus eases traffic in major Southeast Asian cities C
Location data from Southeast Asian ride-hailing firm Grab shows lockdowns to curb the coronavirus brought a rare respite from transport mayhem in some of the world’s most congested cities, like Jakarta.
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CONGESTION C
RTX7IQ6F
May 13, 2020
Location data from Southeast Asian ride-hailing firm Grab shows lockdowns to curb the coronavirus brought...
Coronavirus eases traffic in major Southeast Asian cities C
Location data from Southeast Asian ride-hailing firm Grab shows lockdowns to curb the coronavirus brought a rare respite from transport mayhem in some of the world’s most congested cities and regions, like Singapore.
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CONGESTION C
RTX7IQ6E
May 13, 2020
Location data from Southeast Asian ride-hailing firm Grab shows lockdowns to curb the coronavirus brought...
Coronavirus eases traffic in major Southeast Asian cities C
Location data from Southeast Asian ride-hailing firm Grab shows lockdowns to curb the coronavirus brought a rare respite from transport mayhem in some of the world’s most congested cities, like Manila.
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CONGESTION C
RTX7IQ6D
May 13, 2020
Location data from Southeast Asian ride-hailing firm Grab shows lockdowns to curb the coronavirus brought...
Coronavirus eases traffic in major Southeast Asian cities C
Location data from Southeast Asian ride-hailing firm Grab shows lockdowns to curb the coronavirus brought a rare respite from transport mayhem in some of the world’s most congested cities, like Kuala Lumpur.
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CONGESTION C
RTX7IQ60
May 13, 2020
Location data from Southeast Asian ride-hailing firm Grab shows lockdowns to curb the coronavirus brought...
Coronavirus eases traffic in major Southeast Asian cities C
Location data from Southeast Asian ride-hailing firm Grab shows lockdowns to curb the coronavirus brought a rare respite from transport mayhem in some of the world’s most congested cities, like Ho Chi Minh.
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CONGESTION
RTX7IPUY
May 13, 2020
CORRECTION Corrects airport labeled in map of Jakarta to Halim Perdanakusuma airport. Strict lockdowns,...
Interactive Content
CORRECTION How coronavirus brought Southeast Asia’s megacities to a standstill
CORRECTION Corrects airport labeled in map of Jakarta to Halim Perdanakusuma airport. Strict lockdowns, school closures and restrictions on commerce to curb the coronavirus in Southeast Asian countries brought a rare respite from transport mayhem in some of the world’s most congested cities.
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRAZIL-INDIGENOUSNURSE
RTX7HV10
May 08, 2020
Vicente Piratapuia, 69, of the Piratapuia tribe had a high fever and could hardly breathe, but he refused...
Manaus, Brazil
The Wider Image: In the Amazon, an indigenous nurse volunteers in coronavirus fight
Vicente Piratapuia, 69, of the Piratapuia tribe had a high fever and could hardly breathe, but he refused to leave his home on the outskirts of the Amazon rainforest's biggest city. It took a stern word from a trained nurse in his community to convince him he would die if he refused a ride with her to the emergency room. Vanderlecia Ortega dos Santos, or Vanda to her neighbors, has volunteered to provide the only frontline care protecting her indigenous community of 700 families from the COVID-19 outbreak ravaging the Brazilian city of Manaus. It is an uphill battle. The ramshackle settlement of descendants from 35 different tribes, called Parque das Tribos, lacks plumbing and electricity in most homes. Ambulances regularly refuse to pick up the seriously ill because there is no public health clinic nearby. As the coronavirus pandemic has begun spreading across Brazil, indigenous people who live in and around cities have been caught in a dangerous limbo. The country's indigenous health service, Sesai, focuses its resources on those living on tribal reservations. Sesai has reported 10 indigenous deaths from the pandemic on native lands, but indigenous umbrella organization APIB estimated this week it has taken the life of at least 18 indigenous Brazilians if fatalities in urban areas are counted. The real number of cases in often remote villages across Brazil's vast hinterland is difficult to ascertain. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly SEARCH "CORONAVIRUS INDIGENOUS NURSE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRAZIL-INDIGENOUSNURSE
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-MANSION
RTX7HUTI
May 08, 2020
A part of the former presidential "Los Pinos" complex, which was for many decades the country's most...
Mexico City, Mexico
The spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Mexico City
A part of the former presidential "Los Pinos" complex, which was for many decades the country's most prestigious residence and is now the temporary home for healthcare workers battling the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, is seen in Mexico City, Mexico May 7, 2020. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-MANSION
RTX7HUTG
May 08, 2020
A health worker walks inside the former presidential "Los Pinos" complex, which was for many decades...
Mexico City, Mexico
The spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Mexico City
A health worker walks inside the former presidential "Los Pinos" complex, which was for many decades the country's most prestigious residence and now is the temporary home for healthcare workers battling the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Mexico City, Mexico May 7, 2020. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-MANSION
RTX7HUT2
May 07, 2020
Health workers walk inside the former presidential "Los Pinos" complex, which was for many decades the...
Mexico City, Mexico
The spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Mexico City
Health workers walk inside the former presidential "Los Pinos" complex, which was for many decades the country's most prestigious residence and now is the temporary home for healthcare workers battling the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Mexico City, Mexico May 7, 2020. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-MANSION
RTX7HUT3
May 07, 2020
A health worker walks inside the former presidential "Los Pinos" complex, which was for many decades...
Mexico City, Mexico
The spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Mexico City
A health worker walks inside the former presidential "Los Pinos" complex, which was for many decades the country's most prestigious residence and now is the temporary home for healthcare workers battling the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Mexico City, Mexico May 7, 2020. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-MANSION
RTX7HUT1
May 07, 2020
A part of the former presidential "Los Pinos" complex, which was for many decades the country's most...
Mexico City, Mexico
The spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Mexico City
A part of the former presidential "Los Pinos" complex, which was for many decades the country's most prestigious residence and is now the temporary home for healthcare workers battling the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, is seen in Mexico City, Mexico May 7, 2020. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRAZIL-INDIGENOUSNURSE
RTX7HRRY
May 07, 2020
Vicente Piratapuia, 69, of the Piratapuia tribe had a high fever and could hardly breathe, but he refused...
Manaus, Brazil
The Wider Image: In the Amazon, an indigenous nurse volunteers in coronavirus fight
Vicente Piratapuia, 69, of the Piratapuia tribe had a high fever and could hardly breathe, but he refused to leave his home on the outskirts of the Amazon rainforest's biggest city. It took a stern word from a trained nurse in his community to convince him he would die if he refused a ride with her to the emergency room. Vanderlecia Ortega dos Santos, or Vanda to her neighbors, has volunteered to provide the only frontline care protecting her indigenous community of 700 families from the COVID-19 outbreak ravaging the Brazilian city of Manaus. It is an uphill battle. The ramshackle settlement of descendants from 35 different tribes, called Parque das Tribos, lacks plumbing and electricity in most homes. Ambulances regularly refuse to pick up the seriously ill because there is no public health clinic nearby. As the coronavirus pandemic has begun spreading across Brazil, indigenous people who live in and around cities have been caught in a dangerous limbo. The country's indigenous health service, Sesai, focuses its resources on those living on tribal reservations. Sesai has reported 10 indigenous deaths from the pandemic on native lands, but indigenous umbrella organization APIB estimated this week it has taken the life of at least 18 indigenous Brazilians if fatalities in urban areas are counted. The real number of cases in often remote villages across Brazil's vast hinterland is difficult to ascertain. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly SEARCH "CORONAVIRUS INDIGENOUS NURSE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRAZIL-INDIGENOUSNURSE
Spotlight
Spotlight
Inside New York's subway system during the pandemic
55 PICTURES
Coronavirus
Coronavirus
Pollution declines amid coronavirus lockdown
16 PICTURES
Pictures Report
Pictures Report
Wuhan begins to lift its coronavirus lockdown
56 PICTURES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA
RTS37YL6
April 02, 2020
Despite coronavirus health measures which have shut down most of the city, a man jogs toward the U.S....
Washington, UNITED STATES
A man jogs along tthe National Mall in Washington
Despite coronavirus health measures which have shut down most of the city, a man jogs toward the U.S. Capitol on the National Mall in Washington, U.S., April 2, 2020. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA
RTS37YJH
April 02, 2020
Despite coronavirus health measures which have shut down most of the city, people jog and walk along...
Washington, UNITED STATES
People exercise along the National Mall in Washington
Despite coronavirus health measures which have shut down most of the city, people jog and walk along the National Mall in Washington , U.S., April 2, 2020. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/NORWAY-QUARANTINE
RTS37X9N
April 02, 2020
Reuters photographer Nora Savosnick: "When President Trump announced the ban on travel from Europe last...
Oslo, Norway
The Wider Image: Quarantine millennials face bedtimes and old rules as they move home
Reuters photographer Nora Savosnick: "When President Trump announced the ban on travel from Europe last month, I was more than 3,000 miles away from my Norwegian childhood home, a 24-year-old photographer creating a life of my own in New York City. I had to start thinking about whether I would risk my U.S. work visa ? and my newfound freedom ? to go home for nationalized health care and, most of all, to see my family. My mum recovered from cancer a few years ago: What if I couldn't see her if she became sick again? The next morning my parents called. "I want you to be here in case you should be sick," said my mum, Chava Savosnick. "It's kind of scary to have my daughter on the other side of the world in these times." In a panic, I bought a ticket back to Norway. I braced myself for a return to childhood, quarantined in my parents' basement." REUTERS/Nora Savosnick. SEARCH "SAVOSNICK QUARANTINE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. Matching Text: HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/NORWAY-QUARANTINE TEMPLATE OUT THE IMAGES SHOULD ONLY BE USED TOGETHER WITH THE STORY - NO STAND-ALONE USES.
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