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Search results for: NORGAY-Tenzing

NEPAL-EVEREST/
RTX6WYOL
May 29, 2019
Minister for Information and Communication Technology Gokul Prasad Baskota along with the daughter of...
Kathmandu, Nepal
Minister for Information and Communication Technology Gokul Prasad Baskota along with the daughter of...
Minister for Information and Communication Technology Gokul Prasad Baskota along with the daughter of Edmund Hillary, Sarah Hillary offer garland to the statues of Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa, the first mountaineers to conquer Mount Everest in 1953, during the anniversary of their ascent as well as to mark the International Everest day in Kathmandu, Nepal May 29, 2019. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar
NEPAL-EVEREST/
RTX6WYOJ
May 29, 2019
Sherpa women in traditional attire pose for a picture during the anniversary of Edmund Hillary and Tenzing...
Kathmandu, Nepal
Sherpa women in traditional attire pose for a picture during the anniversary of Edmund Hillary and Tenzing...
Sherpa women in traditional attire pose for a picture during the anniversary of Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa's ascent of Mount Everest in 1953 as well as to mark the International Everest day in Kathmandu, Nepal May 29, 2019. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar
NEPAL-EVEREST/
RTX6WYOD
May 29, 2019
A man cleans the area near the statues of Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa, the first mountaineers...
Kathmandu, Nepal
A man cleans the area near the statues of Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa, the first mountaineers...
A man cleans the area near the statues of Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa, the first mountaineers to conquer Mount Everest in 1953, during the anniversary of their ascent as well as the International Everest day in Kathmandu, Nepal May 29, 2019. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar
NEPAL-EVEREST/
RTX6WYO7
May 29, 2019
A man wearing a t-shirt that reads "Our Priority Clean Sagarmatha (Mount Everest in Nepali)" during the...
Kathmandu, Nepal
A man wearing a t-shirt that reads "Our Priority Clean Sagarmatha (Mount Everest in Nepali)" during the...
A man wearing a t-shirt that reads "Our Priority Clean Sagarmatha (Mount Everest in Nepali)" during the anniversary of Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa's assent of Mount Everest in 1953 as well as to mark the International Everest day in Kathmandu, Nepal May 29, 2019. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar
NEPAL-EVEREST/
RTX66MFX
May 29, 2018
Nepalese mountaineers pose for a picture along the statues of Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa,...
Kathmandu, Nepal
Nepalese mountaineers pose for a picture along the statues of Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa,...
Nepalese mountaineers pose for a picture along the statues of Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa, the first mountaineers to conquer Mount Everest in 1953, during the anniversary of their ascent as well as to mark the International Everest day in Kathmandu, Nepal May 29, 2018. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar
NEPAL-HUMAN-INTEREST/
RTR4XYFR
May 29, 2015
A participant walks to place a garland on the statues of Edmund Hillary (L) and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa...
Kathmandu, Nepal
A participant walks to place a garland on the statues of Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa, the...
A participant walks to place a garland on the statues of Edmund Hillary (L) and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa (R), the first mountaineers to conquer Mount Everest in 1953, during the anniversary of their ascent as well as to mark the International Everest day in Kathmandu, Nepal May 29, 2015. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar
NEPAL-HUMAN-INTEREST/
RTR4XYFO
May 29, 2015
An attendee places garlands on the statues of Edmund Hillary (L) and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa (R), the first...
Kathmandu, Nepal
A attendee places garlands on the statues of Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa during the anniversary...
An attendee places garlands on the statues of Edmund Hillary (L) and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa (R), the first mountaineers to conquer Mount Everest in 1953, during the anniversary of their ascent as well as to mark the International Everest day in Kathmandu, Nepal May 29, 2015. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar
NEPAL-EVEREST/
RTR4XU91
April 18, 2015
A holy book is pictured as a monk recites it while performing religious rituals in memory of Aan Kaji...
Kathmandu, Nepal
Monk recites a holy book while performing religious rituals in memory of Aan Kaji Sherpa, one of the...
A holy book is pictured as a monk recites it while performing religious rituals in memory of Aan Kaji Sherpa, one of the 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were killed during an avalanche last year, at a monastery in Kathmandu April 18, 2015. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April 2014, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar
NEPAL-EVEREST/
RTR4XU90
April 18, 2015
A man lights butter lamp in front of the portraits of 16 Nepali Sherpa guides, who were killed during...
Kathmandu, Nepal
Man lights butter lamp in front of the portraits of 16 Nepali Sherpa guides, who were killed during an...
A man lights butter lamp in front of the portraits of 16 Nepali Sherpa guides, who were killed during an avalanche last year, during an event organised in memory of the Sherpas in Kathmandu April 18, 2015. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April 2014, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar
NEPAL-EVEREST/
RTR4XU8Q
April 18, 2015
A man offers flower in front of the portraits of 16 Nepali Sherpa guides, who were killed during an avalanche...
Kathmandu, Nepal
Man offers flower in front of the portraits of 16 Nepali Sherpa guides, who were killed during an avalanche...
A man offers flower in front of the portraits of 16 Nepali Sherpa guides, who were killed during an avalanche last year, during an event organised in memory of the Sherpas in Kathmandu April 18, 2015. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April 2014, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar
NEPAL-EVEREST/
RTR4XU3Q
April 18, 2015
Daughter of Aas Bahadur Gurung, whose body is still missing and is one of the 16 Nepali Sherpa guides...
Kathmandu, Nepal
Daughter of Aas Bahadur Gurung, whose body is still missing and is one of the 16 Nepali Sherpa guides...
Daughter of Aas Bahadur Gurung, whose body is still missing and is one of the 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were killed during an avalanche last year, rubs her eyes during an event organised in memory of the deceased sherpas in Kathmandu April 18, 2015. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April 2014, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar
NEPAL-EVEREST/
RTR4XU3P
April 18, 2015
A monk blows a conch while performing religious rituals in memory of Aan Kaji Sherpa, one of the 16 Nepali...
Kathmandu, Nepal
Monk performs religious rituals in memory of Aan Kaji Sherpa, one of the 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who...
A monk blows a conch while performing religious rituals in memory of Aan Kaji Sherpa, one of the 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were killed during an avalanche last year, at a monastery in Kathmandu April 18, 2015. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April 2014, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar
NEPAL-EVEREST/
RTR4XU3B
April 18, 2015
Monks performs religious rituals in memory of Aan Kaji Sherpa, one of the 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who...
Kathmandu, Nepal
Monks performs religious rituals in memory of Aan Kaji Sherpa, one of the 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who...
Monks performs religious rituals in memory of Aan Kaji Sherpa, one of the 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were killed during an avalanche last year, at a monastery in Kathmandu April 18, 2015. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April 2014, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar
NEPAL-EVEREST/
RTR4XTYQ
April 18, 2015
A monk recites a holy book while performing religious rituals in memory of Aan Kaji Sherpa, one of the...
Kathmandu, Nepal
Monk recites a holy book while performing religious rituals in memory of Aan Kaji Sherpa, one of the...
A monk recites a holy book while performing religious rituals in memory of Aan Kaji Sherpa, one of the 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were killed during an avalanche last year, at a monastery in Kathmandu April 18, 2015. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April 2014, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar
NEPAL-EVEREST/
RTR4XTYO
April 18, 2015
Daughters of Aan Kaji Sherpa, one of the 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were killed during an avalanche...
Kathmandu, Nepal
Daughters of Aan Kaji Sherpa, one of the 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were killed during an avalanche...
Daughters of Aan Kaji Sherpa, one of the 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were killed during an avalanche last year, light butter lamps in memory of their father at a monastery in Kathmandu April 18, 2015. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April 2014, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar
NEPAL-EVEREST/
RTR4XTYG
April 18, 2015
Family members of Aan Kaji Sherpa, one of the 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were killed during an avalanche...
Kathmandu, Nepal
Family members of Aan Kaji Sherpa, one of the 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were killed during an avalanche...
Family members of Aan Kaji Sherpa, one of the 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were killed during an avalanche last year, take part in a ritual in memory of their diseased family member at a monastery in Kathmandu April 18, 2015. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April 2014, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar
NEPAL-EVEREST/
RTR4XTYF
April 18, 2015
A family member of Aan Kaji Sherpa, one of the 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were killed during an avalanche...
Kathmandu, Nepal
Family member of Aan Kaji Sherpa, one of the 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were killed during an avalanche...
A family member of Aan Kaji Sherpa, one of the 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were killed during an avalanche last year, offers prayer in memory of Aan Kaji at a monastery in Kathmandu April 18, 2015. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April 2014, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar
NEPAL-EVEREST/
RTR4XTW1
April 18, 2015
Daughters of Aan Kaji Sherpa, one of the 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were killed during an avalanche...
Kathmandu, Nepal
Daughters of Aan Kaji Sherpa, one of the 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were killed during an avalanche...
Daughters of Aan Kaji Sherpa, one of the 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were killed during an avalanche last year, light butter lamps in memory of their father at a monastery in Kathmandu April 18, 2015. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April 2014, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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Highlight Edit
After the Avalanche - Ascent To Everest - 05 June 2014
32 PICTURES
Environment
Environment
After The Avalanche - Ascent To Everest - 05 June 2014
46 PICTURES
NEPAL-EVEREST/
RTR3SBJN
June 05, 2014
Light from a sunrise illuminates Mount Pumori, which is approximately 7,100 meters high, as trekkers...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
Light from a sunrise illuminates Mount Pumori
Light from a sunrise illuminates Mount Pumori, which is approximately 7,100 meters high, as trekkers look at the mountains from Kala Patthar in Solukhumbu District May 7, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken May 7, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 45 OF 45 FOR PACKAGE 'AFTER THE AVALANCHE - ASCENT TO EVEREST'
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NEPAL-EVEREST/
RTR3SBJM
June 05, 2014
A trekker stands in front of Mount Everest, which is 8,850 meters high (C), at Kala Patthar in Solukhumbu...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
A trekker stands in front of Mount Everest at Kala Patthar in Solukhumbu District
A trekker stands in front of Mount Everest, which is 8,850 meters high (C), at Kala Patthar in Solukhumbu District May 7, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken May 7, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 44 OF 45 FOR PACKAGE 'AFTER THE AVALANCHE - ASCENT TO EVEREST'
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NEPAL-EVEREST/
RTR3SBJK
June 05, 2014
Trekkers stand in Everest Base camp, approximately 5,300 meters above sea level, in Solukhumbu District...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
Trekkers stand in Everest Base camp, approximately 5,300 meters above sea level, in Solukhumbu District...
Trekkers stand in Everest Base camp, approximately 5,300 meters above sea level, in Solukhumbu District May 6, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken May 6, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 43 OF 45 FOR PACKAGE 'AFTER THE AVALANCHE - ASCENT TO EVEREST'
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NEPAL-EVEREST/
RTR3SBJH
June 05, 2014
Phurba Tenzing Sherpa, 24, who has reached the summit of Everest nine times, sits inside his tent at...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
Phurba Tenzing Sherpa sits inside his tent at Everest Base camp in Solukhumbu District
Phurba Tenzing Sherpa, 24, who has reached the summit of Everest nine times, sits inside his tent at Everest Base camp, approximately 5,300 meters above sea level in Solukhumbu District May 6, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken May 6, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 42 OF 45 FOR PACKAGE 'AFTER THE AVALANCHE - ASCENT TO EVEREST'
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NEPAL-EVEREST/
RTR3SBJF
June 05, 2014
Garbage collectors collect rubbish at the deserted Everest base camp, approximately 5,300 meters above...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
Garbage collectors collect rubbish at the Everest base camp in Solukhumbu District
Garbage collectors collect rubbish at the deserted Everest base camp, approximately 5,300 meters above sea level, in Solukhumbu District May 6, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken May 6, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 41 OF 45 FOR PACKAGE 'AFTER THE AVALANCHE - ASCENT TO EVEREST'
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NEPAL-EVEREST/
RTR3SBIF
June 05, 2014
A porter carries mattresses back from Everest base camp, approximately 5,300 meters above sea level,...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
A porter carries mattresses back from Everest base camp in Solukhumbu District
A porter carries mattresses back from Everest base camp, approximately 5,300 meters above sea level, in Solukhumbu District May 6, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken May 6, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 39 OF 45 FOR PACKAGE 'AFTER THE AVALANCHE - ASCENT TO EVEREST'
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NEPAL-EVEREST/
RTR3SBID
June 05, 2014
Trekkers walk in front of Mount Thamserku while on their way back from Everest base camp at Pheriche,...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
Trekkers walk in front of Mount Thamserku while on their way back from Everest base camp at Pheriche
Trekkers walk in front of Mount Thamserku while on their way back from Everest base camp at Pheriche, approximately 4,300 meters above sea level, in Solukhumbu District May 3, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken May 3, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 36 OF 45 FOR PACKAGE 'AFTER THE AVALANCHE - ASCENT TO EVEREST'
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NEPAL-EVEREST/
RTR3SBIB
June 05, 2014
Prayer flags flutter over the Lobuche River on the way to Everest base camp near Pheriche, approximately...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
Prayer flags flutter over the Lobuche River on the way to Everest base camp near Pheriche
Prayer flags flutter over the Lobuche River on the way to Everest base camp near Pheriche, approximately 4,300 meters above sea level, in Solukhumbu District May 3, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken May 3, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT RELIGION TRAVEL)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 37 OF 45 FOR PACKAGE 'AFTER THE AVALANCHE - ASCENT TO EVEREST'
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NEPAL-EVEREST/
RTR3SBI8
June 05, 2014
A trekker walks in front of Mount Thamserku while on his way back from Everest base camp near Pheriche...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
A trekker walks in front of Mount Thamserku while on his way back from Everest base camp near Pheriche...
A trekker walks in front of Mount Thamserku while on his way back from Everest base camp near Pheriche in Solukhumbu District May 3, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken May 3, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 35 OF 45 FOR PACKAGE 'AFTER THE AVALANCHE - ASCENT TO EVEREST'
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NEPAL-EVEREST/
RTR3SBI5
June 05, 2014
Yaks walk past prayer flags as they carry goods back from Everest base camp in Solukhumbu District May...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
Yaks walk past prayer flags as they carry goods back from Everest base camp in Solukhumbu District
Yaks walk past prayer flags as they carry goods back from Everest base camp in Solukhumbu District May 5, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken May 5, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT ANIMALS RELIGION TRAVEL)

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June 05, 2014
Everest base camp is seen approximately 5,300 meters above sea level in Solukhumbu District May 6, 2014....
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
Everest base camp is seen approximately 5,300 meters above sea level in Solukhumbu District
Everest base camp is seen approximately 5,300 meters above sea level in Solukhumbu District May 6, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken May 6, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL)

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June 05, 2014
Yaks head towards the Everest base camp in Solukhumbu District April 28, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
Yaks head towards the Everest base camp in Solukhumbu District
Yaks head towards the Everest base camp in Solukhumbu District April 28, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken April 28, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT ANIMALS TRAVEL)

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June 05, 2014
A Nepalese army personnel sits inside a check post as he waits to check permits for trekkers passing...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
A Nepalese army personnel sits inside a check post as he waits to check permits for trekkers, in Solukhumbu...
A Nepalese army personnel sits inside a check post as he waits to check permits for trekkers passing by, in Solukhumbu District April 26, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken April 26, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT MILITARY TRAVEL)

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June 05, 2014
A yak herder leads yaks near Pheriche, approximately 4,300 meters above sea level, in Solukhumbu District...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
A yak herder leads yaks near Pheriche
A yak herder leads yaks near Pheriche, approximately 4,300 meters above sea level, in Solukhumbu District May 3, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken May 3, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT ANIMALS TRAVEL)

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June 05, 2014
Trekking guide Birbal Thapa Magar makes an emergency phone call to check on his clients' health, in Pheriche,...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
A trekking guide makes an emergency phone call to check on his clients' health, in Pheriche
Trekking guide Birbal Thapa Magar makes an emergency phone call to check on his clients' health, in Pheriche, approximately 4,300 meters above sea level, in Solukhumbu District May 3, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken May 3, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL)

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June 05, 2014
Shoes are left out to dry after being washed, in Solukhumbu District April 26, 2014. More than 4,000...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
Shoes are left out to dry after being washed, in Solukhumbu District
Shoes are left out to dry after being washed, in Solukhumbu District April 26, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken April 26, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL)

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June 05, 2014
Trekkers have their oxygen level checked at the Himalayan Rescue Association Nepal post in Pheriche,...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
Trekkers have their oxygen level checked at the Himalayan Rescue Association Nepal post in Pheriche,...
Trekkers have their oxygen level checked at the Himalayan Rescue Association Nepal post in Pheriche, approximately 4,300 meters above sea level, in Solukhumbu District May 3, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken May 3, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL)

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June 05, 2014
A yak walks past a clothing store in Namche, approximately 3400 meters above sea level in Solukhumbu...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
A yak walks past a clothing store in Namche in Solukhumbu District
A yak walks past a clothing store in Namche, approximately 3400 meters above sea level in Solukhumbu District April 27, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken April 27, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL)

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June 05, 2014
Mount Everest, which is 8,850 meters high, is seen through the window of a monastery in Tengboche, Solukhumbu...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
Mount Everest is seen through the window of a monastery in Tengboche
Mount Everest, which is 8,850 meters high, is seen through the window of a monastery in Tengboche, Solukhumbu District May 2, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken May 2, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL)

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June 05, 2014
Water is boiled using solar power in Khumjung, approximately 3700 meters above sea level in Solukhumbu...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
Water is boiled using solar power in Khumjung in Solukhumbu District
Water is boiled using solar power in Khumjung, approximately 3700 meters above sea level in Solukhumbu District April 30, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken April 30, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL)

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June 05, 2014
A porter rests inside a porterhouse in Tengboche, approximately 3,800 meters above sea level, in Solukhumbu...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
A porter rests inside a porterhouse in Tengboche
A porter rests inside a porterhouse in Tengboche, approximately 3,800 meters above sea level, in Solukhumbu District May 1, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken May 1, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL)

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June 05, 2014
Nang Tashi Sherpa, 64, a witch doctor, sits inside his house in Khumjung, Solukhumbu District April 30,...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
Witch doctor Nang Tashi Sherpa sits inside his house in Khumjung, Solukhumbu District
Nang Tashi Sherpa, 64, a witch doctor, sits inside his house in Khumjung, Solukhumbu District April 30, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken April 30, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)


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June 05, 2014
A woman works on a field in front of Mount Thamserku in Khumjung, approximately 3700 meters above sea...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
A woman works on a field in front of Mount Thamserku in Khumjung in Solukhumbu District
A woman works on a field in front of Mount Thamserku in Khumjung, approximately 3700 meters above sea level in Solukhumbu District April 30, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken April 30, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL)

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June 05, 2014
Nima Doma Sherpa, 25, whose husband Lakpa Sherpa, 26, died in the avalanche on April 18 2014, holds her...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
Nima Doma Sherpa sits with her family in Khumjung, Solukhumbu District
Nima Doma Sherpa, 25, whose husband Lakpa Sherpa, 26, died in the avalanche on April 18 2014, holds her daughter Pasang Choti Sherpa as she poses for a photograph with her father-in-law Tenzing Sherpa, 56, (C) and mother-in-law Chamchi Phuti Sherpa, 55, (R) inside their house in Khumjung approximately 3700 meters above sea level in Solukhumbu District May 8, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken May 8, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL)

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June 05, 2014
50-day-old Pasang Choti Sherpa whose father, Lakpa Sherpa, died in the avalanche on April 18 2014, lies...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
Pasang Choti Sherpa, whose father died in the avalanche on April 18 2014, lies on her mother's lap in...
50-day-old Pasang Choti Sherpa whose father, Lakpa Sherpa, died in the avalanche on April 18 2014, lies on her mother's lap in Khumjung approximately 3700 meters above sea level in Solukhumbu District May 8, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken May 8, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

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June 05, 2014
A novice monk walks past the Kyamgon Tashi Chocling Monastery at Lukla, approximately 2800 meters above...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
A novice monk walks past the Kyabgon Tashi Choling Monastery at Lukla, in Solukhumbu district
A novice monk walks past the Kyamgon Tashi Chocling Monastery at Lukla, approximately 2800 meters above sea level in Solukhumbu district April 25, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken April 25, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT RELIGION TRAVEL TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

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June 05, 2014
Dr. Sagar Panthin sits inside the Kunde Hospital, founded in 1966 by Sir Edmund Hillary, one of the first...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
Dr. Sagar Panthin sits inside the Kunde Hospital in Khumjung, Solukhumbu District
Dr. Sagar Panthin sits inside the Kunde Hospital, founded in 1966 by Sir Edmund Hillary, one of the first climbers to reach the summit of Mount Everest, in Khumjung, Solukhumbu District April 30, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken April 30, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL)

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June 05, 2014
A statue of Sir Edmund Hillary, one of the first climbers to reach the summit of Mount Everest and the...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
A statue of Sir Edmund Hillary is seen in the school grounds in Khumjung in Solukhumbu District
A statue of Sir Edmund Hillary, one of the first climbers to reach the summit of Mount Everest and the founder of Khumjung High School, is seen in the school grounds in Khumjung, approximately 3700 meters above sea level in Solukhumbu District May 8, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken May 8, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL)

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June 05, 2014
A boy plays near a white board inside a classroom at Khumjung High School, which was founded in 1961...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
A boy plays near a white board inside a classroom at Khumjung High School in Solukhumbu District
A boy plays near a white board inside a classroom at Khumjung High School, which was founded in 1961 by Sir Edmund Hillary, the first climber to reach the summit of Mount Everest, in Khumjung, approximately 3700 meters above sea level in Solukhumbu District April 30, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken April 30, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL)

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June 05, 2014
Temba Sherpa, 45, who has reached the summit of Everest seven times, climbs to clean the mani (prayer)...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
Temba Sherpa climbs to clean the mani stone in Khumjung, in Solukhumbu District
Temba Sherpa, 45, who has reached the summit of Everest seven times, climbs to clean the mani (prayer) stone in Khumjung, approximately 3700 meters above sea level in Solukhumbu District May 8, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken May 8, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL)

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June 05, 2014
Porter Lakpa Sherpa, 42, is silhouetted as he stands in front of Mount Kongde, approximately 3400 meters...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
Porter Lakpa Sherpa stands in front of Mount Kongde in Solukhumbu District
Porter Lakpa Sherpa, 42, is silhouetted as he stands in front of Mount Kongde, approximately 3400 meters above sea level in Solukhumbu District April 27, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken April 27, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

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Porter Lakpa Sherpa, 42, walks along the tracks while on his way to Everest base camp in Solukhumbu District...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
Porter Lakpa Sherpa walks along the tracks on his way to Everest base camp in Solukhumbu District
Porter Lakpa Sherpa, 42, walks along the tracks while on his way to Everest base camp in Solukhumbu District April 26, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken April 26, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL)

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Mount Ama Dablam, which stands approximately 6800 meters above sea level, is seen behind Khumjung Village...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
Mount Ama Dablam, is seen in front of Khumjung Village in Solukhumbu District
Mount Ama Dablam, which stands approximately 6800 meters above sea level, is seen behind Khumjung Village in Solukhumbu District April 30, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken April 30, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL)

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A porter crosses a bridge while on his way back from Namche, approximately 3400 meters above sea level...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
A porter crosses a bridge while on his way back from Namche in Solukhumbu District
A porter crosses a bridge while on his way back from Namche, approximately 3400 meters above sea level in Solukhumbu District April 26, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken April 26, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL)

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June 05, 2014
Kedar Rai (R), 42, and his sons carry goods to their shop in Solukhumbu District April 26, 2014. More...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
A boy drinks drops of water as they drip from a public tap in Solukhumbu District
Kedar Rai (R), 42, and his sons carry goods to their shop in Solukhumbu District April 26, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken April 26, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL)

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June 05, 2014
Porter and climber Tenzing Bhotay Sherpa, 31, looks through the window of a lodge after arriving from...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
Porter and climber Tenzing Bhotay Sherpa after arriving from Everest base camp, in Phunki Tenga in Solukhumbu...
Porter and climber Tenzing Bhotay Sherpa, 31, looks through the window of a lodge after arriving from Everest base camp, in Phunki Tenga in Solukhumbu District April 30, 2014. According to Tenzing he crossed the Khumbu Icefall just five minutes before the April 18 avalanche struck. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken April 30, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL)

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June 05, 2014
Khunjung Sherpa, 90, who earned 0.09 USD a day when he worked as a porter, sits outside his house in...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
Khunjung Sherpa sits outside his house in Namche, Solukhumbu District
Khunjung Sherpa, 90, who earned 0.09 USD a day when he worked as a porter, sits outside his house in Namche, Solukhumbu District April 27, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken April 27, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL)

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June 05, 2014
A boy drinks drops of water dripping from a public tap in Solukhumbu District April 30, 2014. More than...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
A boy drinks water from a public tap in Solukhumbu District
A boy drinks drops of water dripping from a public tap in Solukhumbu District April 30, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken April 30, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL)

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June 05, 2014
Yak bells are seen outside a shop in Namche, approximately 3400 meters above sea level in Solukhumbu...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
Yak bells are seen outside a shop in Namche in Solukhumbu District
Yak bells are seen outside a shop in Namche, approximately 3400 meters above sea level in Solukhumbu District April 27, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken April 27, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL)

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June 05, 2014
A construction worker shows his torn gloves as he carves stones while building a hotel in Namche, approximately...
SOLUKHUMBU, Nepal
A construction worker shows his torn gloves as he carves stones while building a hotel in Namche in Solukhumbu...
A construction worker shows his torn gloves as he carves stones while building a hotel in Namche, approximately 3400 meters above sea level in Solukhumbu District April 27, 2014. More than 4,000 climbers have reached the summit of Everest, the world's highest peak, since it was first scaled by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953. In April, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali Sherpa guides who were fixing ropes and ferrying supplies for their foreign clients to climb the 8,850-metre (29,035-foot) peak. The accident - the deadliest in the history of Mount Everest - triggered a dispute between sherpa guides who wanted a climbing ban in honour of their colleagues and the Nepali government that refused to close the mountain. The sherpas staged a boycott, forcing hundreds of foreign climbers to call off their bids to climb Everest. Picture taken April 27, 2014. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TRAVEL)

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