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Search results for: Neutering

COSTA RICA-ANIMALS/
RTX2C5HO
April 29, 2016
Stray dogs poke their heads through the door of a truck as they are taken to a veterinarian for spaying...
Alajuela, Costa Rica
The Wider Image: Land of the Strays
Stray dogs poke their heads through the door of a truck as they are taken to a veterinarian for spaying and neutering, at Territorio de Zaguates or 'Land of the Strays' dog sanctuary in Carrizal de Alajuela, Costa Rica, April 22, 2016. In a lush, sprawling corner of Costa Rica, hundreds of dogs roam freely on a hillside - among the luckiest strays on earth. Fed, groomed and cared for by vets, more than 750 dogs rescued from the streets of Costa Rica inhabit Territorio de Zaguates or 'Land of the Strays', a pooch paradise. The 152-hectare sanctuary in the centre of the Central American country is funded by donations. Around 8,000 dogs have passed through the refuge. There are more than a million stray dogs in Costa Rica, where the government outlawed putting animals down in 2003. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate SEARCH "LUCKY STRAYS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
COSTA RICA-ANIMALS/
RTX2C5HL
April 29, 2016
Alvaro Saumet looks as a veterinarian neuters a stray dog at Territorio de Zaguates or 'Land of the Strays'...
Alajuela, Costa Rica
The Wider Image: Land of the Strays
Alvaro Saumet looks as a veterinarian neuters a stray dog at Territorio de Zaguates or 'Land of the Strays' dog sanctuary in Carrizal de Alajuela, Costa Rica, April 22, 2016. In a lush, sprawling corner of Costa Rica, hundreds of dogs roam freely on a hillside - among the luckiest strays on earth. Fed, groomed and cared for by vets, more than 750 dogs rescued from the streets of Costa Rica inhabit Territorio de Zaguates or 'Land of the Strays', a pooch paradise. The 152-hectare sanctuary in the centre of the Central American country is funded by donations. Around 8,000 dogs have passed through the refuge. There are more than a million stray dogs in Costa Rica, where the government outlawed putting animals down in 2003. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate SEARCH "LUCKY STRAYS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Animals
Animals
Dog Kidnappings in Mexico - 22 Jul 2013
14 PICTURES
MEXICO/
RTX11SI5
July 20, 2013
A veterinary doctor scans the spine of a dog after implanting a microchip of information into a dog in...
Mexico City, Mexico
A veterinary doctor scans the spine of a dog after implanting a microchip of information into a dog in...
A veterinary doctor scans the spine of a dog after implanting a microchip of information into a dog in Mexico City, July 18, 2013. . Robbery and kidnapping of breed dogs have quadrupled during the last few years in Mexico, according to animal care and control organizations. Criminal gangs which operate mostly in public parks threaten owners with guns or use dogs in heat to lure their pets and kidnap them. Ransoms for these breed dogs can go up to an estimate of sevenfold the value of the pet. Canine Advocacy Programs suggest that the average cost of having adopted pets spayed or neutered and implanted with an identification chip is around $50. Picture taken July 18, 2013. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)
MEXICO/
RTX11SI4
July 20, 2013
A dog looks out of a canine car in Mexico City, July 18, 2013. Robbery and kidnapping of breed dogs have...
Mexico City, Mexico
A dog looks out of a canine car in Mexico City
A dog looks out of a canine car in Mexico City, July 18, 2013. Robbery and kidnapping of breed dogs have quadrupled during the last few years in Mexico, according to animal care and control organizations. Criminal gangs which operate mostly in public parks threaten owners with guns or use dogs in heat to lure their pets and kidnap them. Ransoms for these breed dogs can go up to an estimate of sevenfold the value of the pet. Canine Advocacy Programs suggest that the average cost of having adopted pets spayed or neutered and implanted with an identification chip is around $50. Picture taken July 18, 2013. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)
MEXICO/
RTX11SI3
July 20, 2013
Mariam Luzcan, an advocate for dogs, drives a canine car as a dog stands on the dashboard in Mexico City,...
Mexico City, Mexico
Mariam Luzcan, an advocate for dogs, drives a canine car as a dog stands on the dashboard in Mexico City...
Mariam Luzcan, an advocate for dogs, drives a canine car as a dog stands on the dashboard in Mexico City, July 18, 2013. Robbery and kidnapping of breed dogs have quadrupled during the last few years in Mexico, according to animal care and control organizations. Criminal gangs which operate mostly in public parks threaten owners with guns or use dogs in heat to lure their pets and kidnap them. Ransoms for these breed dogs can go up to an estimate of sevenfold the value of the pet. Canine Advocacy Programs suggest that the average cost of having adopted pets spayed or neutered and implanted with an identification chip is around $50. Picture taken July 18, 2013. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)
MEXICO/
RTX11SI2
July 20, 2013
A handicapped dog is seen at public park in Mexico City, July 18, 2013. Robbery and kidnapping of breed...
Mexico City, Mexico
A handicapped dog is seen at public park in Mexico City
A handicapped dog is seen at public park in Mexico City, July 18, 2013. Robbery and kidnapping of breed dogs have quadrupled during the last few years in Mexico, according to animal care and control organizations. Criminal gangs which operate mostly in public parks threaten owners with guns or use dogs in heat to lure their pets and kidnap them. Ransoms for these breed dogs can go up to an estimate of sevenfold the value of the pet. Canine Advocacy Programs suggest that the average cost of having adopted pets spayed or neutered and implanted with an identification chip is around $50. Picture taken July 18, 2013. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)
MEXICO/
RTX11SI1
July 20, 2013
A dog barks next to a canine car in Mexico City, July 18, 2013. Robbery and kidnapping of breed dogs...
Mexico City, Mexico
A dog barks next to a canine car in Mexico City
A dog barks next to a canine car in Mexico City, July 18, 2013. Robbery and kidnapping of breed dogs have quadrupled during the last few years in Mexico, according to animal care and control organizations. Criminal gangs which operate mostly in public parks threaten owners with guns or use dogs in heat to lure their pets and kidnap them. Ransoms for these breed dogs can go up to an estimate of sevenfold the value of the pet. Canine Advocacy Programs suggest that the average cost of having adopted pets spayed or neutered and implanted with an identification chip is around $50. Picture taken July 18, 2013. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)
MEXICO/
RTX11SI0
July 20, 2013
Mariam Luzcan, an advocate for dogs, poses for a photograph with her dachshund "Doggie" in Mexico City,...
Mexico City, Mexico
Mariam Luzcan, an advocate for dogs, poses for a photograph with her dachshund "Doggie" in Mexico City...
Mariam Luzcan, an advocate for dogs, poses for a photograph with her dachshund "Doggie" in Mexico City, July 15, 2013. Robbery and kidnapping of breed dogs have quadrupled during the last few years in Mexico, according to animal care and control organizations. Criminal gangs which operate mostly in public parks threaten owners with guns or use dogs in heat to lure their pets and kidnap them. Ransoms for these breed dogs can go up to an estimate of sevenfold the value of the pet. Canine Advocacy Programs suggest that the average cost of having adopted pets spayed or neutered and implanted with an identification chip is around $50. Doggie was kidnapped four times amounting to a total of $800 in ransom. Picture taken July 15, 2013. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)
MEXICO/
RTX11SHV
July 20, 2013
A poster offering a reward for a dog is seen at a public park in Mexico City, July 12, 2013. Robbery...
Mexico City, Mexico
A poster offering a reward for a dog is seen at a public park in Mexico City
A poster offering a reward for a dog is seen at a public park in Mexico City, July 12, 2013. Robbery and kidnapping of breed dogs have quadrupled during the last few years in Mexico, according to animal care and control organizations. Criminal gangs which operate mostly in public parks threaten owners with guns or use dogs in heat to lure their pets and kidnap them. Ransoms for these breed dogs can go up to an estimate of sevenfold the value of the pet. Canine Advocacy Programs suggest that the average cost of having adopted pets spayed or neutered and implanted with an identification chip is around $50. The characters in red read, "lost". Picture taken July 12, 2013. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)
MEXICO/
RTX11SHQ
July 20, 2013
Dogs are seen inside a canine car in Mexico City, July 18, 2013. Robbery and kidnapping of breed dogs...
Mexico City, Mexico
Dogs are seen inside a protection canine car in Mexico City
Dogs are seen inside a canine car in Mexico City, July 18, 2013. Robbery and kidnapping of breed dogs have quadrupled during the last few years in Mexico, according to animal care and control organizations. Criminal gangs which operate mostly in public parks threaten owners with guns or use dogs in heat to lure their pets and kidnap them. Ransoms for these breed dogs can go up to an estimate of sevenfold the value of the pet. Canine Advocacy Programs suggest that the average cost of having adopted pets spayed or neutered and implanted with an identification chip is around $50. Picture taken July 18, 2013. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
MEXICO/
RTX11SHM
July 20, 2013
Dogs are seen inside a canine car in Mexico City, July 18, 2013. Robbery and kidnapping of breed dogs...
Mexico City, Mexico
Dogs are seen inside a protection canine car in Mexico City
Dogs are seen inside a canine car in Mexico City, July 18, 2013. Robbery and kidnapping of breed dogs have quadrupled during the last few years in Mexico, according to animal care and control organizations. Criminal gangs which operate mostly in public parks threaten owners with guns or use dogs in heat to lure their pets and kidnap them. Ransoms for these breed dogs can go up to an estimate of sevenfold the value of the pet. Canine Advocacy Programs suggest that the average cost of having adopted pets spayed or neutered and implanted with an identification chip is around $50. Picture taken July 18, 2013. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)
MEXICO/
RTX11SHI
July 20, 2013
"Doggie", a dachshund kidnapped four times amounting to a total of $800 of ransom, is seen with his collar...
Mexico City, Mexico
"Doggie", a dachshund kidnapped four times amounting to a total of $800 of ransom, is seen with his collar...
"Doggie", a dachshund kidnapped four times amounting to a total of $800 of ransom, is seen with his collar in Mexico City, July 15, 2013. Robbery and kidnapping of breed dogs have quadrupled during the last few years in Mexico, according to animal care and control organizations. Criminal gangs which operate mostly in public parks threaten owners with guns or use dogs in heat to lure their pets and kidnap them. Ransoms for these breed dogs can go up to an estimate of sevenfold the value of the pet. Canine Advocacy Programs suggest that the average cost of having adopted pets spayed or neutered and implanted with an identification chip is around $50. Picture taken July 15, 2013. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)
MEXICO/
RTX11SHB
July 20, 2013
A veterinary doctor prepares a scanner and microchip before implanting the chip into a dog in Mexico...
Mexico City, Mexico
A veterinary doctor prepares a scanner and microchip before implanting the chip into a dog in Mexico...
A veterinary doctor prepares a scanner and microchip before implanting the chip into a dog in Mexico City, July 18, 2013. ARobbery and kidnapping of breed dogs have quadrupled during the last few years in Mexico, according to animal care and control organizations. Criminal gangs which operate mostly in public parks threaten owners with guns or use dogs in heat to lure their pets and kidnap them. Ransoms for these breed dogs can go up to an estimate of sevenfold the value of the pet. Canine Advocacy Programs suggest that the average cost of having adopted pets spayed or neutered and implanted with an identification chip is around $50. Picture taken July 18, 2013. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)
MEXICO/
RTX11SH4
July 20, 2013
Mariam Luzcan, an advocate for dogs, poses for a photograph with her dogs and another group for adoption...
Mexico City, Mexico
Mariam Luzcan, an advocate for dogs, poses for a photograph with her dogs and another group for adoption...
Mariam Luzcan, an advocate for dogs, poses for a photograph with her dogs and another group for adoption in Mexico City, July 15, 2013. Robbery and kidnapping of breed dogs have quadrupled during the last few years in Mexico, according to animal care and control organizations. Criminal gangs which operate mostly in public parks threaten owners with guns or use dogs in heat to lure their pets and kidnap them. Ransoms for these breed dogs can go up to an estimate of sevenfold the value of the pet. Canine Advocacy Programs suggest that the average cost of having adopted pets spayed or neutered and implanted with an identification chip is around $50. Picture taken July 15, 2013. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)
MEXICO/
RTX11SH3
July 20, 2013
A man shows a serial number associated with an microchip of information implanted into a dog in Mexico...
Mexico City, Mexico
A man shows a serial number associated with an microchip of information implanted into a dog in Mexico...
A man shows a serial number associated with an microchip of information implanted into a dog in Mexico City, July 11, 2013. Robbery and kidnapping of breed dogs have quadrupled during the last few years in Mexico, according to animal care and control organizations. Criminal gangs which operate mostly in public parks threaten owners with guns or use dogs in heat to lure their pets and kidnap them. Ransoms for these breed dogs can go up to an estimate of sevenfold the value of the pet. Canine Advocacy Programs suggest that the average cost of having adopted pets spayed or neutered and implanted with an identification chip is around $50. Picture taken July 11, 2013. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)
MEXICO/
RTX11SH2
July 20, 2013
Dogs look out from a canine car in Mexico City, July 18, 2013. Robbery and kidnapping of breed dogs have...
Mexico City, Mexico
Dogs look out from a canine car in Mexico City
Dogs look out from a canine car in Mexico City, July 18, 2013. Robbery and kidnapping of breed dogs have quadrupled during the last few years in Mexico, according to animal care and control organizations. Criminal gangs which operate mostly in public parks threaten owners with guns or use dogs in heat to lure their pets and kidnap them. Ransoms for these breed dogs can go up to an estimate of sevenfold the value of the pet. Canine Advocacy Programs suggest that the average cost of having adopted pets spayed or neutered and implanted with an identification chip is around $50. Picture taken July 18, 2013. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
MEXICO/
RTX11SH1
July 20, 2013
A dog is seen inside a canine car in Mexico City, July 18, 2013. Robbery and kidnapping of breed dogs...
Mexico City, Mexico
A dog is seen inside a canine car in Mexico City
A dog is seen inside a canine car in Mexico City, July 18, 2013. Robbery and kidnapping of breed dogs have quadrupled during the last few years in Mexico, according to animal care and control organizations. Criminal gangs which operate mostly in public parks threaten owners with guns or use dogs in heat to lure their pets and kidnap them. Ransoms for these breed dogs can go up to an estimate of sevenfold the value of the pet. Canine Advocacy Programs suggest that the average cost of having adopted pets spayed or neutered and implanted with an identification chip is around $50. Picture taken July 18, 2013. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)
PHILIPPINES/
RTR34UVO
July 12, 2012
Activists from the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), with bodies covered in gold, silver...
Manila, Philippines
Activists from the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, with bodies covered in gold, silver and...
Activists from the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), with bodies covered in gold, silver and bronze body paint symbolising Olympic medals, display a banner as they march outside the British embassy in Taguig, Metro Manila July 12, 2012. The activists were protesting against the overpopulation of stray animals in the city, where many are suffering from injury, disease and starvation. A statement from PETA said, "Winning in the Olympics takes a monumental effort, but it's easy to be a champion for animals simply by having cats or dogs spayed or neutered." REUTERS/Erik De Castro (PHILIPPINES - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY CIVIL UNREST)
AFGHANISTAN-DOGS/SOLDIERS
RTR31LCA
May 04, 2012
Pen Farthing, founder of British charity Nowzad, an animal shelter, stands in front of a cage on the...
Kabul, Afghanistan
Pen Farthing, founder of animal shelter Nowzad, stands in front of a cage in Kabul
Pen Farthing, founder of British charity Nowzad, an animal shelter, stands in front of a cage on the outskirts of Kabul May 1, 2012. A former Royal Marine, Farthing adopted his dog Nowzad, named after a Helmand district, during his tour there in 2006. He then set up the charity, where dogs and some cats are neutered and vaccinated against rabies before their journeys abroad. Nowzad has given homes to over 330 dogs since it was founded, mostly to soldiers from the U.S. and Britain, but also from South Africa, Australia, Canada and the Netherlands. Picture taken May 1, 2012. REUTERS/Omar Sobhani (AFGHANISTAN - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY)
THAILAND/
RTR31HRT
May 02, 2012
A veterinarian prepares a cat for neutering at a mobile clinic, as part of a drive to reduce the growing...
Bangkok, Thailand
A veterinarian prepares a cat for neutering at a mobile clinic, as part of a drive to reduce the growing...
A veterinarian prepares a cat for neutering at a mobile clinic, as part of a drive to reduce the growing number of dogs and cats in Bangkok April 28, 2012. The Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA) launched a campaign to control the number of stray dogs and cats in the Thai capital by providing free birth control operations. The initiative also aims to work towards 'zero' strays in the capital. Picture taken April 28, 2012. REUTERS/Sukree Sukplang (THAILAND - Tags: ANIMALS HEALTH)
THAILAND/
RTR31HRR
May 02, 2012
A woman takes her dog to be neutered for free at a mobile clinic, as part of a drive to reduce the growing...
Bangkok, Thailand
A woman takes her dog to be neutered for free at a mobile clinic, as part of a drive to reduce the growing...
A woman takes her dog to be neutered for free at a mobile clinic, as part of a drive to reduce the growing number of dogs in Bangkok April 28, 2012. The Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA) launched a campaign to control the number of stray dogs and cats in the Thai capital by providing free birth control operations. The initiative also aims to work towards 'zero' stray dogs in the capital. Picture taken April 28, 2012. REUTERS/Sukree Sukplang (THAILAND - Tags: ANIMALS HEALTH)
THAILAND/
RTR31HRQ
May 02, 2012
A girl takes her dog to be neutered for free at a mobile clinic, as part of a drive to reduce the growing...
Bangkok, Thailand
A girl takes her dog to be neutered for free at a mobile clinic, as part of a drive to reduce the growing...
A girl takes her dog to be neutered for free at a mobile clinic, as part of a drive to reduce the growing number of dogs in Bangkok April 28, 2012. The Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA) launched a campaign to control the number of stray dogs and cats in the Thai capital by providing free birth control operations. The initiative also aims to work towards 'zero' stray dogs in the capital. Picture taken April 28, 2012. REUTERS/Sukree Sukplang (THAILAND - Tags: HEALTH ANIMALS)
THAILAND/
RTR31HRP
May 02, 2012
A veterinarian shaves a cat before neutering it at a mobile clinic, as part of a drive to reduce the...
Bangkok, Thailand
A veterinarian shaves a cat before neutering it at a mobile clinic, as part of a drive to reduce the...
A veterinarian shaves a cat before neutering it at a mobile clinic, as part of a drive to reduce the growing number of dogs and cats in Bangkok April 28, 2012. The Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA) launched a campaign to control the number of stray dogs and cats in the Thai capital by providing free birth control operations. The initiative also aims to work towards 'zero' strays in the capital. Picture taken April 28, 2012. REUTERS/Sukree Sukplang (THAILAND - Tags: HEALTH ANIMALS)
THAILAND/
RTR31HRL
May 02, 2012
Veterinarians neuter a dog for free at a mobile clinic, as part of a drive to reduce the growing number...
Bangkok, Thailand
Veterinarians neuter a dog for free at a mobile clinic, as part of a drive to reduce the growing number...
Veterinarians neuter a dog for free at a mobile clinic, as part of a drive to reduce the growing number of dogs in Bangkok April 28, 2012. The Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA) launched a campaign to control the number of stray dogs and cats in the Thai capital by providing free birth control operations. The initiative also aims to work towards 'zero' stray dogs in the capital. Picture taken April 28, 2012. REUTERS/Sukree Sukplang (THAILAND - Tags: ANIMALS HEALTH)
THAILAND/
RTR31HRF
May 02, 2012
A veterinarian prepares a cat for neutering at a mobile clinic, as part of a drive to reduce the growing...
Bangkok, Thailand
A veterinarian prepares a cat for neutering at a mobile clinic, as part of a drive to reduce the growing...
A veterinarian prepares a cat for neutering at a mobile clinic, as part of a drive to reduce the growing number of cats and dogs in Bangkok April 28, 2012. The Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA) launched a campaign to control the number of stray dogs and cats in the Thai capital by providing free birth control operations. The initiative also aims to work towards 'zero' stray dogs in the capital. Picture taken April 28, 2012. REUTERS/Sukree Sukplang (THAILAND - Tags: ANIMALS HEALTH)
THAILAND/
RTR31HR9
May 02, 2012
Veterinarians neuter a dog for free at a mobile clinic, as part of a drive to reduce the growing number...
Bangkok, Thailand
Veterinarians neuter a dog for free at a mobile clinic, as part of a drive to reduce the growing number...
Veterinarians neuter a dog for free at a mobile clinic, as part of a drive to reduce the growing number of dogs in Bangkok April 28, 2012. The Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA) launched a campaign to control the number of stray dogs and cats in the Thai capital by providing free birth control operations. The initiative also aims to work towards 'zero' stray dogs in the capital. Picture taken April 28, 2012. REUTERS/Sukree Sukplang (THAILAND - Tags: HEALTH ANIMALS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
UKRAINE/
RTR2XGN5
February 07, 2012
A dog undergoes an operation to be spayed in a veterinary clinic in Kiev February 7, 2012. European veterinary...
Kiev, Ukraine
A dog undergoes an operation to be spayed in a veterinary clinic in Kiev
A dog undergoes an operation to be spayed in a veterinary clinic in Kiev February 7, 2012. European veterinary surgeons performed several dozen neutering operations alongside local medical staff on Tuesday as a humane alternative to culling stray dogs as part of preparations for the forthcoming EURO 2012 football championship. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich (UKRAINE - Tags: ANIMALS)
UKRAINE/
RTR2XGMX
February 07, 2012
A stray dog looks on from its enclosure at a veterinary clinic in Kiev February 7, 2012. European veterinary...
Kiev, Ukraine
A stray dog looks on from its enclosure at a veterinary clinic in Kiev
A stray dog looks on from its enclosure at a veterinary clinic in Kiev February 7, 2012. European veterinary surgeons performed several dozen neutering operations alongside local medical staff on Tuesday as a humane alternative to culling stray dogs as part of preparations for the forthcoming EURO 2012 football championship. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich (UKRAINE - Tags: ANIMALS)
UKRAINE/
RTR2XGMR
February 07, 2012
A dog undergoes an operation to be spayed in a veterinary clinic in Kiev February 7, 2012. European veterinary...
Kiev, Ukraine
A dog undergoes an operation to be spayed in a veterinary clinic in Kiev,
A dog undergoes an operation to be spayed in a veterinary clinic in Kiev February 7, 2012. European veterinary surgeons performed several dozen neutering operations alongside local medical staff on Tuesday as a humane alternative to culling stray dogs as part of preparations for the forthcoming EURO 2012 football championship. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich (UKRAINE - Tags: ANIMALS)
UKRAINE/
RTR2XGFS
February 07, 2012
A stray dog looks from behind the bars of its cage at a veterinary clinic in Kiev February 7, 2012. European...
Kiev, Ukraine
A stray dog looks from behind the bars of its cage at a veterinary clinic in Kiev
A stray dog looks from behind the bars of its cage at a veterinary clinic in Kiev February 7, 2012. European veterinary surgeons performed several dozen neutering operations alongside local medical staff on Tuesday as a humane alternative to culling stray dogs. European Animal and Nature Protection Group (ETN) and animal rights campaigners are trying to bring attention to the culling of stray dogs as part of efforts to prepare Ukrainian cities for the EURO 2012 soccer championship. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich (UKRAINE - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY)
UKRAINE/
RTR2XGF2
February 07, 2012
A dog undergoes an operation to be spayed in a veterinary clinic in Kiev February 7, 2012. European veterinary...
Kiev, Ukraine
A dog undergoes an operation to be spayed in a veterinary clinic in Kiev
A dog undergoes an operation to be spayed in a veterinary clinic in Kiev February 7, 2012. European veterinary surgeons performed several dozen neutering operations alongside local medical staff on Tuesday as a humane alternative to culling stray dogs. European Animal and Nature Protection Group (ETN) and animal rights campaigners are trying to bring attention to the culling of stray dogs as part of efforts to prepare Ukrainian cities for the EURO 2012 soccer championship. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich (UKRAINE - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY)
UKRAINE/
RTR2XGE7
February 07, 2012
A stray dog looks from behind the bars of its cage at a veterinary clinic in Kiev February 7, 2012. European...
Kiev, Ukraine
A stray dog looks from behind the bars of its cage at a veterinary clinic in Kiev
A stray dog looks from behind the bars of its cage at a veterinary clinic in Kiev February 7, 2012. European veterinary surgeons performed several dozen neutering operations alongside local medical staff on Tuesday as a humane alternative to culling stray dogs. European Animal and Nature Protection Group (ETN) and animal rights campaigners are trying to bring attention to the culling of stray dogs as part of efforts to prepare Ukrainian cities for the EURO 2012 soccer championship. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich (UKRAINE - Tags: ANIMALS)
UKRAINE/
RTR2XGB2
February 07, 2012
Stray dogs recover after a neutering operation in a veterinary clinic in Kiev February 7, 2012. European...
Kiev, Ukraine
Stray dogs recover after a neutering operation in a veterinary clinic in Kiev
Stray dogs recover after a neutering operation in a veterinary clinic in Kiev February 7, 2012. European veterinary surgeons performed several dozen neutering operations alongside local medical staff on Tuesday as a humane alternative to culling stray dogs as part of preparations for the forthcoming EURO 2012 football championship. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich (UKRAINE - Tags: ANIMALS)
ISRAEL/
RTR2WJ2T
January 19, 2012
A zookeeper tends to Savanna, a two-year-old lioness, after she was anaesthetized for the implantation...
Ramat Gan, Israel
A zookeepers tends to Savanna, a lioness, after she was anaesthetized at Ramat Gan Safari near Tel Aviv...
A zookeeper tends to Savanna, a two-year-old lioness, after she was anaesthetized for the implantation of a temporary birth-control device, at Ramat Gan Safari near Tel Aviv January 19, 2012. A spokesperson for the Safari said the implant was a preferred method to control the lion population at the zoo as it does not require complicated surgery, stops working after 2 years without removal and does not disturb the lions natural social environment as happens when the male lions are neutered. REUTERS/Nir Elias (ISRAEL - Tags: ANIMALS)
ISRAEL/
RTR2WJ2N
January 19, 2012
Zookeepers treat Savanna, a two-year-old lioness, after she was anaesthetized for the implantation of...
Ramat Gan, Israel
Zookeepers treat Savanna, a lioness, after she was anaesthetized at Ramat Gan Safari near Tel Aviv
Zookeepers treat Savanna, a two-year-old lioness, after she was anaesthetized for the implantation of a temporary birth-control device, at Ramat Gan Safari near Tel Aviv January 19, 2012. A spokesperson for the Safari said the implant was a preferred method to control the lion population at the zoo as it does not require complicated surgery, stops working after 2 years without removal and does not disturb the lions natural social environment as happens when the male lions are neutered. REUTERS/Nir Elias (ISRAEL - Tags: ANIMALS)
ISRAEL/
RTR2WJ2J
January 19, 2012
Veterinarians work as they implant a temporary birth-control device in anaesthetized Savanna, a two-year-old...
Ramat Gan, Israel
Veterinarians work as they implant a temporary birth-control device in anaesthetized Savanna, a lioness,...
Veterinarians work as they implant a temporary birth-control device in anaesthetized Savanna, a two-year-old lioness, at Ramat Gan Safari near Tel Aviv January 19, 2012. A spokesperson for the Safari said the implant was a preferred method to control the lion population at the zoo as it does not require complicated surgery, stops working after 2 years without removal and does not disturb the lions natural social environment as happens when the male lions are neutered. REUTERS/Nir Elias (ISRAEL - Tags: ANIMALS)
ISRAEL/
RTR2WJ2C
January 19, 2012
A veterinarian implants a temporary birth-control device in anaesthetized Savanna, a two-year-old lioness,...
Ramat Gan, Israel
A veterinarian implants a temporary birth-control device in anaesthetized Savanna, a lioness, at Ramat...
A veterinarian implants a temporary birth-control device in anaesthetized Savanna, a two-year-old lioness, at Ramat Gan Safari near Tel Aviv January 19, 2012. A spokesperson for the Safari said the implant was a preferred method to control the lion population at the zoo as it does not require complicated surgery, stops working after 2 years without removal and does not disturb the lions natural social environment as happens when the male lions are neutered. REUTERS/Nir Elias (ISRAEL - Tags: ANIMALS)
Animals
Animals
Monkey Bounty Hunters in India - 24 Nov 2011
22 PICTURES
INDIA/
RTR2UEBI
November 24, 2011
A veterinarian sterilizes a monkey inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department...
Shimla, India
A veterinarian sterilizes a monkey inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department...
A veterinarian sterilizes a monkey inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 14, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 14, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEBG
November 24, 2011
Monkey trappers Raghunath, 28, (R) and Alok, 25, carry monkeys to the monkey rescue centre run by forest...
Shimla, India
Monkey trappers Raghunath and Alok carry monkeys to the monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
Monkey trappers Raghunath, 28, (R) and Alok, 25, carry monkeys to the monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 13, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 13, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEBE
November 24, 2011
A monkey looks at the trapped monkeys caught by trappers in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November...
Shimla, India
A monkey looks at the trapped monkeys caught by trappers in Shimla
A monkey looks at the trapped monkeys caught by trappers in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 13, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 13, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEBD
November 24, 2011
An attendant (L) and trapper Alok, 25, carry caught monkeys to the monkey rescue centre run by forest...
Shimla, India
An attendant and trapper Alok carry caught monkeys to the monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
An attendant (L) and trapper Alok, 25, carry caught monkeys to the monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 13, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 13, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEBC
November 24, 2011
A Langur monkey runs across a road in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 13, 2011. The...
Shimla, India
A Langur monkey runs across a road in Shimla
A Langur monkey runs across a road in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 13, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 13, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH TRANSPORT)
INDIA/
RTR2UEBA
November 24, 2011
Monkey trappers Raghunath, 28, (2nd R) carries a cage as Alok (R), 25, stands next to a cage with trapped...
Shimla, India
Monkey trappers Raghunath carries a cage as Alok stands next to a cage with trapped monkeys in Shimla...
Monkey trappers Raghunath, 28, (2nd R) carries a cage as Alok (R), 25, stands next to a cage with trapped monkeys in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 13, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 13, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEB8
November 24, 2011
A veterinarian sterilizes a monkey inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department...
Shimla, India
A veterinarian sterilizes a monkey inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department...
A veterinarian sterilizes a monkey inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 14, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 14, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEB5
November 24, 2011
An attendant examines monkeys before their sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and...
Shimla, India
An attendant examines monkeys before their sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and...
An attendant examines monkeys before their sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 14, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 14, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEB4
November 24, 2011
A monkey looks out from a cage before its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
Shimla, India
A monkey looks out from a cage before its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
A monkey looks out from a cage before its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 16, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 16, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEB2
November 24, 2011
Caught monkeys are pictured in their cages inside a van at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
Shimla, India
Caught monkeys are pictured in their cages inside a van at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
Caught monkeys are pictured in their cages inside a van at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 13, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 13, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEB0
November 24, 2011
A monkey looks out from a cage before its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
Shimla, India
A monkey looks out from a cage before its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
A monkey looks out from a cage before its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 13, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 13, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEAZ
November 24, 2011
A monkey eats a leftover apple from a garbage box in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November...
Shimla, India
A monkey eats a leftover apple from a garbage box in Shimla
A monkey eats a leftover apple from a garbage box in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 14, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 14, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEAS
November 24, 2011
Monkeys lie before their sterilization process to start at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
Shimla, India
Monkeys lie before their sterilization process to start at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
Monkeys lie before their sterilization process to start at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 14, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 14, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEAR
November 24, 2011
An attendant carries a monkey after its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
Shimla, India
An attendant carries a monkey after its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
An attendant carries a monkey after its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 14, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 14, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEAO
November 24, 2011
An attendant examines the teeth of an injured monkey at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
Shimla, India
An attendant examines the teeth of an injured monkey at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
An attendant examines the teeth of an injured monkey at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 14, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 14, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEAM
November 24, 2011
An attendant carries a monkey after its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
Shimla, India
An attendant carries a monkey after its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
An attendant carries a monkey after its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 14, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 14, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEAH
November 24, 2011
Attendants examine a monkey before its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
Shimla, India
Attendants examine a monkey before its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
Attendants examine a monkey before its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 14, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 14, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEAF
November 24, 2011
A veterinarian sterilizes a monkey through laparoscopy inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and...
Shimla, India
A veterinarian sterilizes a monkey through laparoscopy inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and...
A veterinarian sterilizes a monkey through laparoscopy inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 14, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 14, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEAD
November 24, 2011
An attendant tends to an injured monkey inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department...
Shimla, India
An attendant tends to an injured monkey inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department...
An attendant tends to an injured monkey inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 13, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 13, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEAB
November 24, 2011
An attendant tends to an injured monkey inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department...
Shimla, India
An attendant tends to an injured monkey inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department...
An attendant tends to an injured monkey inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 13, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 13, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEA8
November 24, 2011
An injured monkey reacts from a cage inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department...
Shimla, India
An injured monkey reacts from a cage inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department...
An injured monkey reacts from a cage inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 13, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 13, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH) FOR BEST QUALITY IMAGE: ALSO SEE GM1E7C40Y3N01
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