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Wider Image 
Inside a Ukrainian village where farmers stay for the wheat harvest but fear Russian attack 
38 PICTURES 
UKRAINE-CRISIS/VILLAGE
RTS6Z2W4 
April 10, 2022 
The wheat has been sown for the coming season but nobody in Yakovlivka, a small farming village outside... 
YAKOVLIVKA, Ukraine 
The Wider Image: Inside a Ukrainian village where farmers stay for the wheat harvest but fear Russian... 
The wheat has been sown for the coming season but nobody in Yakovlivka, a small farming village outside Kharkiv, in north-eastern Ukraine, knows if it will be harvested. A week after Russian forces launched their invasion on February 24, the village was bombed. "We were sitting in our cellar for four hours and read the Lord's Prayer. We wrapped the kids into blankets and just couldn't fall asleep until three or four in the morning," said Nina Bonderenko, who works on her cousin's farm. Since the village was bombed, residents say all certainty has been lost. "We have planted all the wheat. But will we be able to grow anything and harvest it under the current circumstances?" said Vadim Aleksandrovich, director of Granary of Sloboda, a farming company that emerged from a former Soviet-era collective farm. "Only God knows. We are doing our best." With the country at war, the uncertainty facing Yakovlivka is shared across the country by farmers who produce the grain that has historically made Ukraine, the world's fifth biggest wheat exporter, one of the great breadbaskets of the world. REUTERS/Thomas Peter SEARCH "YAKOVLIVKA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY 
UKRAINE-CRISIS/VILLAGE
RTS6Z2W9 
April 06, 2022 
An aerial view shows destroyed houses in the village of Yakovlivka after it was hit by an aerial bombardment... 
YAKOVLIVKA, Ukraine 
The Wider Image: Inside a Ukrainian village where farmers stay for the wheat harvest but fear Russian... 
An aerial view shows destroyed houses in the village of Yakovlivka after it was hit by an aerial bombardment outside Kharkiv, as Russia's attack on Ukraine continues, April 6, 2022. The wheat has been sown for the coming season but nobody in the farming village knows if it will be harvested. "We have planted all the wheat. But will we be able to grow anything and harvest it under the current circumstances?" said Vadim Aleksandrovich, director of Granary of Sloboda, a farming company that emerged from a former Soviet-era collective farm. Picture taken with a drone. REUTERS/Thomas Peter SEARCH "YAKOVLIVKA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
UKRAINE-CRISIS/VILLAGE
RTS6Z2W0 
April 06, 2022 
An aerial view shows destroyed houses in the village of Yakovlivka after it was hit by an aerial bombardment... 
YAKOVLIVKA, Ukraine 
The Wider Image: Inside a Ukrainian village where farmers stay for the wheat harvest but fear Russian... 
An aerial view shows destroyed houses in the village of Yakovlivka after it was hit by an aerial bombardment outside Kharkiv, as Russia's attack on Ukraine continues, April 6, 2022. The wheat has been sown for the coming season but nobody in the farming village knows if it will be harvested. "We have planted all the wheat. But will we be able to grow anything and harvest it under the current circumstances?" said Vadim Aleksandrovich, director of Granary of Sloboda, a farming company that emerged from a former Soviet-era collective farm. Picture taken with a drone. REUTERS/Thomas Peter SEARCH "YAKOVLIVKA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
UKRAINE-CRISIS/VILLAGE
RTS6Z2WA 
April 05, 2022 
Farm worker Vitaliy drives a tractor pulling a plow on a field near the village of Yakovlivka after it... 
YAKOVLIVKA, Ukraine 
The Wider Image: Inside a Ukrainian village where farmers stay for the wheat harvest but fear Russian... 
Farm worker Vitaliy drives a tractor pulling a plow on a field near the village of Yakovlivka after it was hit by an aerial bombardment outside Kharkiv, as Russia's attack on Ukraine continues, April 5, 2022. The wheat has been sown for the coming season but nobody in the farming village knows if it will be harvested. "We have planted all the wheat. But will we be able to grow anything and harvest it under the current circumstances?" said Vadim Aleksandrovich, director of Granary of Sloboda, a farming company that emerged from a former Soviet-era collective farm. REUTERS/Thomas Peter SEARCH "YAKOVLIVKA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
UKRAINE-CRISIS/VILLAGE
RTS6Z2W6 
April 05, 2022 
An aerial view shows a tractor spreading fertiliser on a wheat field near the village of Yakovlivka after... 
YAKOVLIVKA, Ukraine 
The Wider Image: Inside a Ukrainian village where farmers stay for the wheat harvest but fear Russian... 
An aerial view shows a tractor spreading fertiliser on a wheat field near the village of Yakovlivka after it was hit by an aerial bombardment outside Kharkiv, as Russia's attack on Ukraine continues, April 5, 2022. The wheat has been sown for the coming season but nobody in the farming village knows if it will be harvested. "We have planted all the wheat. But will we be able to grow anything and harvest it under the current circumstances?" said Vadim Aleksandrovich, director of Granary of Sloboda, a farming company that emerged from a former Soviet-era collective farm. Picture taken with a drone. REUTERS/Thomas Peter SEARCH "YAKOVLIVKA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
UKRAINE-CRISIS/VILLAGE
RTS6Z2W8 
April 04, 2022 
A local farm worker unloads Ukrainian-made fertiliser from a truck to use on a wheat field near the village... 
YAKOVLIVKA, Ukraine 
The Wider Image: Inside a Ukrainian village where farmers stay for the wheat harvest but fear Russian... 
A local farm worker unloads Ukrainian-made fertiliser from a truck to use on a wheat field near the village of Yakovlivka after it was hit by an aerial bombardment outside Kharkiv, as Russia's attack on Ukraine continues, April 5, 2022. The wheat has been sown for the coming season but nobody in the farming village knows if it will be harvested. "We have planted all the wheat. But will we be able to grow anything and harvest it under the current circumstances?" said Vadim Aleksandrovich, director of Granary of Sloboda, a farming company that emerged from a former Soviet-era collective farm. REUTERS/Thomas Peter SEARCH "YAKOVLIVKA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
UKRAINE-CRISIS/VILLAGE
RTS6Z2VN 
April 03, 2022 
A farm worker looks at a rocket that had landed in a field, at a tractor yard in the village of Yakovlivka,... 
YAKOVLIVKA, Ukraine 
The Wider Image: Inside a Ukrainian village where farmers stay for the wheat harvest but fear Russian... 
A farm worker looks at a rocket that had landed in a field, at a tractor yard in the village of Yakovlivka, after it was hit by an aerial bombardment outside Kharkiv, as Russia's attack on Ukraine continues, April 3, 2022. The wheat has been sown for the coming season but nobody in the farming village knows if it will be harvested. "We have planted all the wheat. But will we be able to grow anything and harvest it under the current circumstances?" said Vadim Aleksandrovich, director of Granary of Sloboda, a farming company that emerged from a former Soviet-era collective farm. REUTERS/Thomas Peter SEARCH "YAKOVLIVKA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
USA-WEATHER/TORNADOES
RTS3ORKG 
December 12, 2021 
A search and rescue worker marks a home with a Red Cross, to indicate that there is nobody left inside,... 
MAYFIELD, UNITED STATES 
Devastating outbreak of tornadoes ripped through several U.S. states 
A search and rescue worker marks a home with a Red Cross, to indicate that there is nobody left inside, after a devastating outbreak of tornadoes ripped through several U.S. states in Mayfield, Kentucky, U.S. December 12, 2021. REUTERS/Cheney Orr 
AFGHANISTAN-CONFLICT/SPAIN-TRANSLATOR
RTXFQMHC 
August 16, 2021 
Afghan Daryuosh Mohammadi, 29, who worked as a translator for Spanish troops in Afghanistan until 2014,... 
Madrid, Spain 
Former Afghan translator for Spanish troops says "nobody should be left behind\ 
Afghan Daryuosh Mohammadi, 29, who worked as a translator for Spanish troops in Afghanistan until 2014, and his wife Sunita Sarwari, 23, are pictured inside their home, as they look at news on their mobile phone during an interview with Reuters TV in Madrid, Spain, August 16, 2021. REUTERS/Elena Rodriguez 
AFGHANISTAN-CONFLICT/SPAIN-TRANSLATOR
RTXFQMH7 
August 16, 2021 
Afghan Daryuosh Mohammadi, 29, who worked as a translator for Spanish troops in Afghanistan until 2014,... 
Madrid, Spain 
Former Afghan translator for Spanish troops says "nobody should be left behind\ 
Afghan Daryuosh Mohammadi, 29, who worked as a translator for Spanish troops in Afghanistan until 2014, and his wife Sunita Sarwari, 23, are pictured inside their home, as they look at news on their mobile phone during an interview with Reuters TV in Madrid, Spain, August 16, 2021. REUTERS/Elena Rodriguez 
AWARDS-CMT/
RTXD4CM4 
June 10, 2021 
Singer Dylan Scott reacts as he accepts an award for Breakthrough Video of the Year for "Nobody" during... 
Nashville, UNITED STATES 
The 2021 CMT Music Awards at Bridgestone Arena in Nashville 
Singer Dylan Scott reacts as he accepts an award for Breakthrough Video of the Year for "Nobody" during the 2021 CMT Music Awards at Bridgestone Arena in Nashville, Tennessee, U.S. June 9, 2021. REUTERS/Harrison Mcclary 
AWARDS-CMT/
RTXD4CM3 
June 10, 2021 
Singer Dylan Scott accepts an award for Breakthrough Video of the Year for "Nobody" during the 2021 CMT... 
Nashville, UNITED STATES 
The 2021 CMT Music Awards at Bridgestone Arena in Nashville 
Singer Dylan Scott accepts an award for Breakthrough Video of the Year for "Nobody" during the 2021 CMT Music Awards at Bridgestone Arena in Nashville, Tennessee, U.S. June 9, 2021. REUTERS/Harrison Mcclary 
OLYMPICS-2020/TOKYO-PORTRAITS
RTXCHB51 
May 10, 2021 
Takashi Yonehana, 49, the owner and chef of the sushi restaurant Yonehana, poses for a portrait during... 
Tokyo, Japan 
The Wider Image: From the streets of Tokyo, 22 residents weigh up the Olympic Games 
Takashi Yonehana, 49, the owner and chef of the sushi restaurant Yonehana, poses for a portrait during an interview with Reuters at the restaurant, which is currently temporarily closed amidst the state of emergency that was declared during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Tokyo, Japan, May 10, 2021. For Yonehana, Japan's international reputation is at stake. "If Japan becomes the first country to cancel the Olympics due to a pandemic, nobody will say it but everyone will think it ... it will damage our image," he said. "I think Japan will regret it if they give up. If things change for the better in two months, those 'We could have done it' opinions will emerge. Better to try and regret it rather than give up and regret it." REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon SEARCH "KYUNG-HOON PORTRAITS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
SPAIN-EUTHANASIA/
RTXAKD06 
March 18, 2021 
Supporters of a law to legalise euthanasia gather as Spanish Parliament votes to approve it in Madrid,... 
Madrid, Spain 
Supporters of a law to legalise euthanasia gather as Spanish Parliament votes to approve it in Madrid... 
Supporters of a law to legalise euthanasia gather as Spanish Parliament votes to approve it in Madrid, Spain, March 18, 2021. The banner reads:" Nobody decides for you" .REUTERS/Susana Vera 
GLOBAL-POY/STORIES-2021
RTXKVSX4 
December 30, 2020 
U.S. President Donald Trump plays golf at the Trump International Golf Club in West Palm Beach, Florida,... 
West Palm Beach, UNITED STATES 
Pictures of the Year: A Picture and its Story 
U.S. President Donald Trump plays golf at the Trump International Golf Club in West Palm Beach, Florida, U.S., December 30, 2020. Reuters photographer Marco Bello: "As President Donald Trump traveled to Mar-a-Lago for the Christmas holiday, President-elect Joe Biden had won enough electoral votes to win the U.S. presidency, but Trump hadn't conceded. Nobody had access to him, not even the press pool traveling with him. The news was dominated by the election, but there weren't any recent photos of Trump himself. Photographer Tom Brenner, embedded in the pool, knew through a colleague about a spot in the fence of the Trump International Golf Club, from where it was possible to see Trump playing golf. I arrived at the site early Boxing Day morning on Dec. 26 and thought: "This is an impossible shot!". There were a few holes in the thick foliage wall to see through to the golf course, but it was hard to focus the camera as any slight breeze moved the leaves and changed the focus point. The shot all depended on where the ball would land on the green, and where the Secret Service agents and other players would stand. This photo was taken on my third day of shooting. By then, a couple TV crews and photographers had joined me. I learned a few things about golf from them while we spent long hours waiting. What I love about this photo is Trump's unkempt appearance, he just looks like a normal, regular person without the baggage of the institution that he represented. After Trump left the White House and moved to Florida, new palm trees were seeded to fully blockade the view of the club." REUTERS/Marco Bello/File Photo SEARCH "POY STORIES 2021" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY 
JAPAN-TATTOOS/
RTX859C2 
October 26, 2020 
Construction worker Hiroshi Yoshimura, 44, takes household goods stored on the balcony at his home in... 
Tokyo, Japan 
The Wider Image: Breaking taboos: Japan's tattoo fans bare their ink 
Construction worker Hiroshi Yoshimura, 44, takes household goods stored on the balcony at his home in Tokyo, Japan, October 2, 2020. "I usually cover it up, so nobody even in the neighbourhood can say that guy has tattoos. But if I'm walking somewhere or using the train or something, police stop me a lot and ask me to roll up my sleeves to see if I'm using drugs, or if I'm in a gang", said Yoshimura. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon SEARCH "KYUNG-HOON TATTOOS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8V 
October 15, 2020 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8U 
October 15, 2020 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8T 
October 15, 2020 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8S 
October 15, 2020 
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier 
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8R 
October 15, 2020 
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier 
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8Q 
October 15, 2020 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8O 
October 15, 2020 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8N 
October 15, 2020 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City,... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8K 
October 15, 2020 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8E 
October 15, 2020 
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier 
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8F 
October 15, 2020 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his... 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8D 
October 15, 2020 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his... 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8C 
October 15, 2020 
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier 
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E89 
October 15, 2020 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his... 
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDIA-VICTIMS
RTX7Z82Z 
October 01, 2020 
Humera Ulfat, 42, a housewife, shows a picture on her phone of her father Mohammad Ashraf Baba, a shopkeeper,... 
Srinagar, India 
The Wider Image: Indians share the stories of loved ones they lost to the pandemic 
Humera Ulfat, 42, a housewife, shows a picture on her phone of her father Mohammad Ashraf Baba, a shopkeeper, who died due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), as she poses for a photograph, in Srinagar, September 26, 2020. "It pains me whenever I recall my dad lying on a hospital bed helplessly. Doctors did not fulfil their duty the way that they're supposed to. They never came close to my father to examine him. Eventually he died. Authorities should educate not only the public, but healthcare professionals as well. My father would have been alive, as we speak, had he been given proper medical aid in the hospital. His absence is something that nobody can fill. My life won't be like before, never," said Ulfat. REUTERS/Sanna Irshad Mattoo SEARCH "COVID DEATHS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
GERMANY-PROTESTS/
RTX7N0B9 
August 01, 2020 
Demonstrators hold a banner reading "Nobody has the right to obey" during a protest against the government's... 
Berlin, Germany 
Demonstration against the government's restrictions amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak,... 
Demonstrators hold a banner reading "Nobody has the right to obey" during a protest against the government's restrictions amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Berlin, Germany, August 1, 2020. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GERMANY-BROTHELS
RTS3J8UR 
July 11, 2020 
Prostitutes wearing masks hold a sign reading "We pay taxes and nobody helps us now" during a rally of... 
Hamburg, Germany 
Prostitutes hold a rally in Hamburg demanding the reopening of Germany's brothels 
Prostitutes wearing masks hold a sign reading "We pay taxes and nobody helps us now" during a rally of prostitutes demanding the reopening of Germany's brothels, amid the the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in the famous red light district Reeperbahn in Hamburg, Germany July 11, 2020. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer 
Wider Image
Wider Image 
Rural Ecuador faces coronavirus outbreak without doctors 
34 PICTURES 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-MEDICS
RTX7D3F4 
April 15, 2020 
Cheryll Mack, 46, a registered nurse who is caring for COVID-19 patients in the emergency department,... 
UNITED STATES 
Wider Image: A day fighting the coronavirus: US hospital staff share hardest moments on shift 
Cheryll Mack, 46, a registered nurse who is caring for COVID-19 patients in the emergency department, poses for a photograph after a 12-hour shift outside the hospital where she works, during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, Maryland, U.S., April 10, 2020. "The COVID-19 spread has affected a lot of livelihood, a lot of people's lives. It has created a crisis, death in general. So I would like to ask not one single person, but all people worldwide, to converge and join the platform that this is something that nobody can fight individually," said Mack. REUTERS/Rosem Morton SEARCH "MARYLAND COVID-19 HEALTH WORKERS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. 
Coronavirus
Coronavirus 
Rome's homeless at risk in coronavirus crisis 
26 PICTURES 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOMELESS
RTS36IX7 
March 18, 2020 
A homeless person sleeps on a street in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis, Red... 
Rome, Italy 
A homeless person sleeps on a street in Rome 
A homeless person sleeps on a street in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis, Red Cross workers have been increasing their daily activities to meet the growing needs of the homeless in Rome. With nobody around on the streets to give them food or money, and restaurants that would usually donate leftovers closed, homeless are struggling to find food and other supplies to keep them going. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOMELESS
RTS36IX5 
March 18, 2020 
Homeless people sleep on a street in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis, Red Cross... 
Rome, Italy 
Homeless people sleep on a street in Rome 
Homeless people sleep on a street in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis, Red Cross workers have been increasing their daily activities to meet the growing needs of the homeless in Rome. With nobody around on the streets to give them food or money, and restaurants that would usually donate leftovers closed, homeless are struggling to find food and other supplies to keep them going. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOMELESS
RTS36IX3 
March 18, 2020 
A homeless person talks to Red Cross workers in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis,... 
Rome, Italy 
A homeless person talks to Red Cross workers in Rome 
A homeless person talks to Red Cross workers in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis, Red Cross workers have been increasing their daily activities to meet the growing needs of the homeless in Rome. With nobody around on the streets to give them food or money, and restaurants that would usually donate leftovers closed, homeless are struggling to find food and other supplies to keep them going. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOMELESS
RTS36IX0 
March 18, 2020 
Red Cross workers check on a homeless person sleeping near the Colosseum in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020.... 
Rome, Italy 
Red Cross workers check on a homeless person sleeping near the Colosseum in Rome 
Red Cross workers check on a homeless person sleeping near the Colosseum in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis, Red Cross workers have been increasing their daily activities to meet the growing needs of the homeless in Rome. With nobody around on the streets to give them food or money, and restaurants that would usually donate leftovers closed, homeless are struggling to find food and other supplies to keep them going. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOMELESS
RTS36IWX 
March 18, 2020 
A homeless person sleeps on a street in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis, Red... 
Rome, Italy 
A homeless person sleeps on a street in Rome 
A homeless person sleeps on a street in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis, Red Cross workers have been increasing their daily activities to meet the growing needs of the homeless in Rome. With nobody around on the streets to give them food or money, and restaurants that would usually donate leftovers closed, homeless are struggling to find food and other supplies to keep them going. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOMELESS
RTS36IWO 
March 18, 2020 
Red Cross workers check on a homeless person sleeping on the street in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since... 
Rome, Italy 
Red Cross workers check on a homeless person sleeping on the street in Rome 
Red Cross workers check on a homeless person sleeping on the street in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis, Red Cross workers have been increasing their daily activities to meet the growing needs of the homeless in Rome. With nobody around on the streets to give them food or money, and restaurants that would usually donate leftovers closed, homeless are struggling to find food and other supplies to keep them going. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOMELESS
RTS36IWM 
March 18, 2020 
A Red Cross worker checks on a homeless person lying on a step near the Colosseum in Rome, Italy, March... 
Rome, Italy 
A Red Cross worker checks on a homeless person lying on a step near the Colosseum in Rome 
A Red Cross worker checks on a homeless person lying on a step near the Colosseum in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis, Red Cross workers have been increasing their daily activities to meet the growing needs of the homeless in Rome. With nobody around on the streets to give them food or money, and restaurants that would usually donate leftovers closed, homeless are struggling to find food and other supplies to keep them going. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOMELESS
RTS36IWL 
March 18, 2020 
Red Cross worker Giorgio Vacirca, 43, gets out of a van after spotting a homeless person in Rome, Italy,... 
Rome, Italy 
Red Cross worker Giorgio Vacirca, 43, gets out of a van after spotting a homeless person in Rome 
Red Cross worker Giorgio Vacirca, 43, gets out of a van after spotting a homeless person in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis, Red Cross workers have been increasing their daily activities to meet the growing needs of the homeless in Rome. With nobody around on the streets to give them food or money, and restaurants that would usually donate leftovers closed, homeless are struggling to find food and other supplies to keep them going. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOMELESS
RTS36IT9 
March 18, 2020 
A homeless person smokes a cigarette as he lies on a pavement in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the... 
Rome, Italy 
A homeless person smokes a cigarette as he lies on a pavement in Rome 
A homeless person smokes a cigarette as he lies on a pavement in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis, Red Cross workers have been increasing their daily activities to meet the growing needs of the homeless in Rome. With nobody around on the streets to give them food or money, and restaurants that would usually donate leftovers closed, homeless are struggling to find food and other supplies to keep them going. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOMELESS
RTS36IT6 
March 18, 2020 
A homeless person shows pictures of his three daughters in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus... 
Rome, Italy 
A homeless person shows pictures of his three daughters in Rome 
A homeless person shows pictures of his three daughters in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis, Red Cross workers have been increasing their daily activities to meet the growing needs of the homeless in Rome. With nobody around on the streets to give them food or money, and restaurants that would usually donate leftovers closed, homeless are struggling to find food and other supplies to keep them going. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOMELESS
RTS36IT3 
March 18, 2020 
A homeless person sleeps near to the Colosseum in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus... 
Rome, Italy 
A homeless person sleeps near to the Colosseum in Rome 
A homeless person sleeps near to the Colosseum in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis, Red Cross workers have been increasing their daily activities to meet the growing needs of the homeless in Rome. With nobody around on the streets to give them food or money, and restaurants that would usually donate leftovers closed, homeless are struggling to find food and other supplies to keep them going. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOMELESS
RTS36ISW 
March 18, 2020 
A homeless person stands next to a Red Cross worker in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus... 
Rome, Italy 
A homeless person stands next to a Red Cross worker in Rome 
A homeless person stands next to a Red Cross worker in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis, Red Cross workers have been increasing their daily activities to meet the growing needs of the homeless in Rome. With nobody around on the streets to give them food or money, and restaurants that would usually donate leftovers closed, homeless are struggling to find food and other supplies to keep them going. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOMELESS
RTS36IST 
March 18, 2020 
A homeless person is treated by a Red Cross worker in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus... 
Rome, Italy 
A homeless person is treated by a Red Cross worker in Rome 
A homeless person is treated by a Red Cross worker in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis, Red Cross workers have been increasing their daily activities to meet the growing needs of the homeless in Rome. With nobody around on the streets to give them food or money, and restaurants that would usually donate leftovers closed, homeless are struggling to find food and other supplies to keep them going. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOMELESS
RTS36ISR 
March 18, 2020 
A homeless person sits on a pavement in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis, Red... 
Rome, Italy 
A homeless person sits on a pavement in Rome 
A homeless person sits on a pavement in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis, Red Cross workers have been increasing their daily activities to meet the growing needs of the homeless in Rome. With nobody around on the streets to give them food or money, and restaurants that would usually donate leftovers closed, homeless are struggling to find food and other supplies to keep them going. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOMELESS
RTS36IRW 
March 18, 2020 
A homeless person stands outside a church in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis,... 
Rome, Italy 
A homeless person stands outside a church in Rome 
A homeless person stands outside a church in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis, Red Cross workers have been increasing their daily activities to meet the growing needs of the homeless in Rome. With nobody around on the streets to give them food or money, and restaurants that would usually donate leftovers closed, homeless are struggling to find food and other supplies to keep them going. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOMELESS
RTS36IRN 
March 18, 2020 
A homeless person looks inside his tent in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis,... 
Rome, Italy 
A homeless person looks inside his tent in Rome 
A homeless person looks inside his tent in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis, Red Cross workers have been increasing their daily activities to meet the growing needs of the homeless in Rome. With nobody around on the streets to give them food or money, and restaurants that would usually donate leftovers closed, homeless are struggling to find food and other supplies to keep them going. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOMELESS
RTS36IRJ 
March 18, 2020 
A piece of bread and a stack of lottery tickets are seen outside a tent where a homeless person lives... 
Rome, Italy 
A piece of bread and a stack of lottery tickets are seen outside a tent where a homeless person lives... 
A piece of bread and a stack of lottery tickets are seen outside a tent where a homeless person lives in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis, Red Cross workers have been increasing their daily activities to meet the growing needs of the homeless in Rome. With nobody around on the streets to give them food or money, and restaurants that would usually donate leftovers closed, homeless are struggling to find food and other supplies to keep them going. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOMELESS
RTS36IRH 
March 18, 2020 
Red Cross worker Giorgio Vacirca, 43, looks out of van to spot homeless people in Rome, Italy, March... 
Rome, Italy 
Red Cross worker Giorgio Vacirca, 43, looks out of van to spot homeless people in Rome 
Red Cross worker Giorgio Vacirca, 43, looks out of van to spot homeless people in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis, Red Cross workers have been increasing their daily activities to meet the growing needs of the homeless in Rome. With nobody around on the streets to give them food or money, and restaurants that would usually donate leftovers closed, homeless are struggling to find food and other supplies to keep them going. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOMELESS
RTS36IRC 
March 18, 2020 
Red Cross worker Patrizia Latini, 56, looks out from a van in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the... 
Rome, Italy 
Red Cross worker Patrizia Latini, 56, looks out from a van in Rome 
Red Cross worker Patrizia Latini, 56, looks out from a van in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis, Red Cross workers have been increasing their daily activities to meet the growing needs of the homeless in Rome. With nobody around on the streets to give them food or money, and restaurants that would usually donate leftovers closed, homeless are struggling to find food and other supplies to keep them going. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOMELESS
RTS36IR6 
March 18, 2020 
Red Cross worker Giorgio Vacirca, 43, delivers food to a homeless person in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020.... 
Rome, Italy 
Red Cross worker Giorgio Vacirca, 43, delivers food to a homeless person in Rome 
Red Cross worker Giorgio Vacirca, 43, delivers food to a homeless person in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis, Red Cross workers have been increasing their daily activities to meet the growing needs of the homeless in Rome. With nobody around on the streets to give them food or money, and restaurants that would usually donate leftovers closed, homeless are struggling to find food and other supplies to keep them going. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOMELESS
RTS36IQQ 
March 18, 2020 
Boxes of pasta that will be delivered to homeless people are seen inside a Red Cross emergency kitchen... 
Rome, Italy 
Boxes of pasta that will be delivered to homeless people are seen inside a Red Cross emergency kitchen... 
Boxes of pasta that will be delivered to homeless people are seen inside a Red Cross emergency kitchen in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis, Red Cross workers have been increasing their daily activities to meet the growing needs of the homeless in Rome. With nobody around on the streets to give them food or money, and restaurants that would usually donate leftovers closed, homeless are struggling to find food and other supplies to keep them going. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOMELESS
RTS36IQL 
March 18, 2020 
A homeless person is given bottles containing hot tea by the Red Cross in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020.... 
Rome, Italy 
A homeless person is given bottles containing hot tea by the Red Cross in Rome 
A homeless person is given bottles containing hot tea by the Red Cross in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis, Red Cross workers have been increasing their daily activities to meet the growing needs of the homeless in Rome. With nobody around on the streets to give them food or money, and restaurants that would usually donate leftovers closed, homeless are struggling to find food and other supplies to keep them going. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOMELESS
RTS36IQI 
March 18, 2020 
Red Cross worker Giorgio Vacirca, 43, pushes a cart containing a tea flask to be delivered to homeless... 
Rome, Italy 
Red Cross worker Giorgio Vacirca, 43, pushes a cart containing a tea flask to be delivered to homeless... 
Red Cross worker Giorgio Vacirca, 43, pushes a cart containing a tea flask to be delivered to homeless people living on the streets in Rome, Italy, March 17, 2020. Since the coronavirus crisis, Red Cross workers have been increasing their daily activities to meet the growing needs of the homeless in Rome. With nobody around on the streets to give them food or money, and restaurants that would usually donate leftovers closed, homeless are struggling to find food and other supplies to keep them going. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane 
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