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Search results for: Nopal-cactus

CALIFORNIA-WILDFLOWERS/
RTXBOQYO 
April 21, 2021 
A wildfire-charred cactus is seen in the burn zone of Chino Hills State Park, as the coronavirus disease... 
CHINO HILLS, UNITED STATES 
A wildfire-charred cactus is seen in the burn zone of Chino Hills State Park, as the coronavirus disease... 
A wildfire-charred cactus is seen in the burn zone of Chino Hills State Park, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic continues, in Chino Hills, California, U.S., April 21, 2021. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4ZB 
April 18, 2020 
Men work in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the... 
Mexico City, Mexico 
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico 
Men work in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 17, 2020. Picture taken April 17, 2020.REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4T1 
April 18, 2020 
People arrive with boxes containing nopal (prickly pear) cactus, one of the national staple foods, to... 
Mexico City, Mexico 
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico 
People arrive with boxes containing nopal (prickly pear) cactus, one of the national staple foods, to sell at the local market as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 16, 2020. Picture taken April 16, 2020.REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4SX 
April 18, 2020 
Local vendors sell nopal (prickly pear) cactus, one of the national staple foods and other products at... 
Mexico City, Mexico 
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico 
Local vendors sell nopal (prickly pear) cactus, one of the national staple foods and other products at the local market as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 17, 2020. Picture taken April 17, 2020.REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4RP 
April 18, 2020 
Local vendors clean the nopal (prickly pear) cactus, one of the national staple foods, to sell at the... 
Mexico City, Mexico 
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico 
Local vendors clean the nopal (prickly pear) cactus, one of the national staple foods, to sell at the local market as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 16, 2020. Picture taken April 16, 2020.REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4RO 
April 18, 2020 
A local vendor wearing a protective mask holds a couple of nopal (prickly pear) cactus, one of the national... 
Mexico City, Mexico 
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico 
A local vendor wearing a protective mask holds a couple of nopal (prickly pear) cactus, one of the national staple foods, while she sells them at the local market as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 16, 2020. Picture taken April 16, 2020. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4RE 
April 18, 2020 
Men put nopal (prickly pear) cactus, one of the national staple foods, in boxes at the local market as... 
Mexico City, Mexico 
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico 
Men put nopal (prickly pear) cactus, one of the national staple foods, in boxes at the local market as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 16, 2020. Picture taken April 16, 2020.REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4R0 
April 18, 2020 
Farmer Guillermo Pineda works in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods,... 
Mexico City, Mexico 
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico 
Farmer Guillermo Pineda works in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 17, 2020. Picture taken April 17, 2020.REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4QY 
April 18, 2020 
A farmer works in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread... 
Mexico City, Mexico 
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico 
A farmer works in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 16, 2020. Picture taken April 16, 2020.REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4QT 
April 18, 2020 
A farmer works in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread... 
Mexico City, Mexico 
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico 
A farmer works in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 17, 2020. Picture taken April 17, 2020.REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4PK 
April 18, 2020 
Women exercise near a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread... 
Mexico City, Mexico 
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico 
Women exercise near a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 17, 2020. Picture taken April 17, 2020. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4PJ 
April 18, 2020 
A farmer works in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread... 
Mexico City, Mexico 
Nopal farmers are finding themselves in an ever more precarious situation as the coronavirus pandemic... 
A farmer works in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 16, 2020. Picture taken April 16, 2020.REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4O7 
April 18, 2020 
Farmer Alejandro Rivera works in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods,... 
Mexico City, Mexico 
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico 
Farmer Alejandro Rivera works in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 17, 2020. Picture taken April 17, 2020.REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4N1 
April 18, 2020 
A child is seen in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread... 
Mexico City, Mexico 
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico 
A child is seen in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 17, 2020. Picture taken April 17, 2020.REUTERS/Carlos Jasso TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4LG 
April 18, 2020 
A youth works in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread... 
Mexico City, Mexico 
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico 
A youth works in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 16, 2020. Picture taken April 16, 2020.REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4LF 
April 18, 2020 
Men work in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the... 
Mexico City, Mexico 
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico 
Men work in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 16, 2020. Picture taken April 16, 2020.REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4LA 
April 18, 2020 
Men work in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the... 
Mexico City, Mexico 
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico 
Men work in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 17, 2020. Picture taken April 17, 2020. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4IX 
April 18, 2020 
The sun rises over a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread... 
Mexico City, Mexico 
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico 
The sun rises over a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 16, 2020. Picture taken April 16, 2020. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
CLIMATE-CHANGE/MEXICO
RTS32WE1 
February 21, 2020 
Prickly pear cactus plantation is seen in Tepeteopan, state of Puebla, Mexico January 16, 2020. Picture... 
TEPETEOPAN, Mexico 
Prickly pear cactus plantation is seen in Tepeteopan 
Prickly pear cactus plantation is seen in Tepeteopan, state of Puebla, Mexico January 16, 2020. Picture taken January 16, 2020. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
PALESTINIANS-EXHIBITION/CACTUS
RTX72DYL 
August 06, 2019 
Peeled prickly pears are displayed for people to taste during a cactus fruits exhibition in the village... 
Ramallah, Palestinian Territories 
Peeled prickly pears are displayed for people to taste during a cactus fruits exhibition in the village... 
Peeled prickly pears are displayed for people to taste during a cactus fruits exhibition in the village of Nilin near Ramallah, in the Israeli-occupied West Bank August 5, 2019. Picture taken August 5, 2019. REUTERS/Mohamad Torokman 
CHILE-ENVIRONMENT/TRASH
RTX5D2CR 
March 26, 2018 
A farmer uses rubber gloves to pick up prickly pears during harvest time in Til Til, Chile, February... 
Santiago, Chile 
The Wider Image: Chile's tiny Til Til faces big trash problem 
A farmer uses rubber gloves to pick up prickly pears during harvest time in Til Til, Chile, February 16, 2018. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado SEARCH "TIL TIL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. 
CHILE-ENVIRONMENT/TRASH
RTX5D2C1 
March 26, 2018 
A prickly pear plantation located next to a rail line used by a train to transport garbage, is seen in... 
Santiago, Chile 
The Wider Image: Chile's tiny Til Til faces big trash problem 
A prickly pear plantation located next to a rail line used by a train to transport garbage, is seen in a valley of Til Til, Chile, October 5, 2017. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado SEARCH "TIL TIL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. 
MEXICO-AGRICULTURE/RED
RTR48UHD 
October 03, 2014 
Cochineal insects are seen on a nopal cactus leaf in Nopaltepec, state of Mexico September 30, 2014.... 
Nopaltepec, Mexico 
Cochineal insects are seen on a nopal cactus leaf in Nopaltepec 
Cochineal insects are seen on a nopal cactus leaf in Nopaltepec, state of Mexico September 30, 2014. In the shadow of the massive El Popo volcano, cactus growers in Mexico are helping to revive an ancient dying tradition with the help of a tiny bug that feeds off the country's prickly pears. The humble cochineal insect once occupied a proud place in pre-Hispanic culture as a natural dye for clothes and art. But over the years synthetic colours and the bug's parasitic nature saw it lose favour with local farmers. But amidst worldwide demand for the bug that has come from unlikely sources such as Starbucks and fashionistas, growers of the bug are cashing in. Picture taken September 30, 2014. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS TEXTILE) 
MEXICO-AGRICULTURE/RED
RTR48UH8 
October 03, 2014 
Cochineal insects are seen on a nopal cactus leaf at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects... 
Nopaltepec, Mexico 
Cochineal insects are seen on a nopal cactus leaf at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects... 
Cochineal insects are seen on a nopal cactus leaf at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects in Nopaltepec, Mexican state of Puebla September 30, 2014. In the shadow of the massive El Popo volcano, cactus growers in Mexico are helping to revive an ancient dying tradition with the help of a tiny bug that feeds off the country's prickly pears. The humble cochineal insect once occupied a proud place in pre-Hispanic culture as a natural dye for clothes and art. But over the years synthetic colours and the bug's parasitic nature saw it lose favour with local farmers. But amidst worldwide demand for the bug that has come from unlikely sources such as Starbucks and fashionistas, growers of the bug are cashing in. Picture taken September 30, 2014. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS TEXTILE TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) 
MEXICO-AGRICULTURE/RED
RTR48UGP 
October 03, 2014 
Nopal cactus leafs, infested with cochineal insects, are seen hanging at a greenhouse in Huejotzingo,... 
Huejotzingo, Mexico 
Nopal cactus leafs, infested with cochineal insects, are seen hanging at a greenhouse in Huejotzingo 
Nopal cactus leafs, infested with cochineal insects, are seen hanging at a greenhouse in Huejotzingo, Mexican state of Puebla September 25, 2014. In the shadow of the massive El Popo volcano, cactus growers in Mexico are helping to revive an ancient dying tradition with the help of a tiny bug that feeds off the country's prickly pears. The humble cochineal insect once occupied a proud place in pre-Hispanic culture as a natural dye for clothes and art. But over the years synthetic colours and the bug's parasitic nature saw it lose favour with local farmers. But amidst worldwide demand for the bug that has come from unlikely sources such as Starbucks and fashionistas, growers of the bug are cashing in. Picture taken September 25, 2014. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS TEXTILE) 
MEXICO-AGRICULTURE/RED
RTR48UGJ 
October 03, 2014 
A man arranges nopal cactus leafs at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects in Huejotzingo,... 
Huejotzingo, Mexico 
Man arranges nopal cactus leafs at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects in Huejotzingo 
A man arranges nopal cactus leafs at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects in Huejotzingo, Mexican state of Puebla September 25, 2014. In the shadow of the massive El Popo volcano, cactus growers in Mexico are helping to revive an ancient dying tradition with the help of a tiny bug that feeds off the country's prickly pears. The humble cochineal insect once occupied a proud place in pre-Hispanic culture as a natural dye for clothes and art. But over the years synthetic colours and the bug's parasitic nature saw it lose favour with local farmers. But amidst worldwide demand for the bug that has come from unlikely sources such as Starbucks and fashionistas, growers of the bug are cashing in. Picture taken September 25, 2014. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS TEXTILE EMPLOYMENT) 
MEXICO-AGRICULTURE/RED
RTR48UGH 
October 03, 2014 
A man works at his nopal cactus field in Nopaltepec, state of Mexico September 30, 2014. In the shadow... 
Nopaltepec, Mexico 
Man works at his nopal cactus field in Nopaltepec 
A man works at his nopal cactus field in Nopaltepec, state of Mexico September 30, 2014. In the shadow of the massive El Popo volcano, cactus growers in Mexico are helping to revive an ancient dying tradition with the help of a tiny bug that feeds off the country's prickly pears. The humble cochineal insect once occupied a proud place in pre-Hispanic culture as a natural dye for clothes and art. But over the years synthetic colours and the bug's parasitic nature saw it lose favour with local farmers. But amidst worldwide demand for the bug that has come from unlikely sources such as Starbucks and fashionistas, growers of the bug are cashing in. Picture taken September 30, 2014. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS TEXTILE EMPLOYMENT) 
MEXICO-AGRICULTURE/RED
RTR48UGE 
October 03, 2014 
A man arranges nopal cactus leafs before hanging them at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects... 
Huejotzingo, Mexico 
Man arranges nopal cactus leafs before hanging them at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects... 
A man arranges nopal cactus leafs before hanging them at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects in Huejotzingo, Mexican state of Puebla September 25, 2014. In the shadow of the massive El Popo volcano, cactus growers in Mexico are helping to revive an ancient dying tradition with the help of a tiny bug that feeds off the country's prickly pears. The humble cochineal insect once occupied a proud place in pre-Hispanic culture as a natural dye for clothes and art. But over the years synthetic colours and the bug's parasitic nature saw it lose favour with local farmers. But amidst worldwide demand for the bug that has come from unlikely sources such as Starbucks and fashionistas, growers of the bug are cashing in. Picture taken September 25, 2014. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS TEXTILE EMPLOYMENT) 
MEXICO-AGRICULTURE/RED
RTR48UGA 
October 03, 2014 
A man looks for a place to hang nopal cactus leafs at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects... 
Huejotzingo, Mexico 
Man looks for a place to hang nopal cactus leafs at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects... 
A man looks for a place to hang nopal cactus leafs at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects in Huejotzingo, Mexican state of Puebla September 25, 2014. In the shadow of the massive El Popo volcano, cactus growers in Mexico are helping to revive an ancient dying tradition with the help of a tiny bug that feeds off the country's prickly pears. The humble cochineal insect once occupied a proud place in pre-Hispanic culture as a natural dye for clothes and art. But over the years synthetic colours and the bug's parasitic nature saw it lose favour with local farmers. But amidst worldwide demand for the bug that has come from unlikely sources such as Starbucks and fashionistas, growers of the bug are cashing in. Picture taken September 25, 2014. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS TEXTILE EMPLOYMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) 
MEXICO-AGRICULTURE/RED
RTR48UFE 
October 03, 2014 
A man brushes cochineal insects off a nopal cactus leaf at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects... 
Huejotzingo, Mexico 
A man brushes cochineal insects off a nopal cactus leaf at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects... 
A man brushes cochineal insects off a nopal cactus leaf at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects in Huejotzingo, Mexican state of Puebla September 25, 2014. In the shadow of the massive El Popo volcano, cactus growers in Mexico are helping to revive an ancient dying tradition with the help of a tiny bug that feeds off the country's prickly pears. The humble cochineal insect once occupied a proud place in pre-Hispanic culture as a natural dye for clothes and art. But over the years synthetic colours and the bug's parasitic nature saw it lose favour with local farmers. But amidst worldwide demand for the bug that has come from unlikely sources such as Starbucks and fashionistas, growers of the bug are cashing in. Picture taken September 25, 2014. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS TEXTILE EMPLOYMENT) 
EGYPT
RTR2GADK 
July 10, 2010 
A worker walks through a prickly pear farm in the Khanka area, about 30 km (18 mi) northeast of Cairo... 
Cairo, Egypt 
A worker walks through a prickly pear farm in the Khanka area, northeast of Cairo 
A worker walks through a prickly pear farm in the Khanka area, about 30 km (18 mi) northeast of Cairo July 10, 2010. REUTERS/Asmaa Waguih (EGYPT - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE) 
EGYPT
RTR2GAD5 
July 10, 2010 
A worker picks prickly pears at a farm in the Khanka area, about 30 km (18 mi) northeast of Cairo July... 
Cairo, Egypt 
A worker picks prickly pears at a farm in the Khanka area, northeast of Cairo 
A worker picks prickly pears at a farm in the Khanka area, about 30 km (18 mi) northeast of Cairo July 10, 2010. REUTERS/Asmaa Waguih (EGYPT - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE) 
FLU/
RTXEI0X 
April 28, 2009 
A man wears a protective mask as he sells nopales (opuntia) in downtown Monterrey, northern Mexico April... 
Monterrey, Mexico 
Man wears a protective mask as he sells nopales (opuntia) in downtown Monterrey 
A man wears a protective mask as he sells nopales (opuntia) in downtown Monterrey, northern Mexico April 28, 2009. A new swine flu virus that has killed 149 people in Mexico was found further around the world on Tuesday and the specter of a pandemic began to hit air travel. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO SOCIETY HEALTH ENVIRONMENT) 
MEXICO-CACTUS/
RTR1OPIW 
April 16, 2007 
Nopal cacti are seen at a market in Mexico City April 12, 2007. Production of a thorny, flat-leaved cactus... 
Mexico City, Mexico 
Nopal cacti are seen at a market in Mexico City 
Nopal cacti are seen at a market in Mexico City April 12, 2007. Production of a thorny, flat-leaved cactus that has been a Mexican food staple since Aztec times is rising fast as it wins a reputation as a natural remedy for maladies ranging from diabetes to hangovers. REUTERS/Jennifer Szymaszek (MEXICO) 
MEXICO-CACTUS/
RTR1OPIV 
April 16, 2007 
Isabel Garces removes thorns from "nopales" at a market in one of Mexico City's largest cacti producing... 
Mexico City, Mexico 
Isabel Garces removes thorns from "nopales" at a market in one of Mexico City's 
Isabel Garces removes thorns from "nopales" at a market in one of Mexico City's largest cacti producing suburbs in the south of the metropolis, April 12, 2007. Production of a thorny, flat-leaved cactus that has been a Mexican food staple since Aztec times is rising fast as it wins a reputation as a natural remedy for maladies ranging from diabetes to hangovers. Photo taken April 12, 2007. REUTERS/Jennifer Szymaszek (MEXICO) 
MEXICO-CACTUS/
RTR1OPIU 
April 16, 2007 
Sandra Aurelio removes thorns from "nopales" at a market in one of Mexico City's largest cacti producing... 
Mexico City, Mexico 
Aurelio removes thorns from "nopales" at a market in one of Mexico City's largest cacti producing suburbs... 
Sandra Aurelio removes thorns from "nopales" at a market in one of Mexico City's largest cacti producing suburbs in the south of the metropolis, April 12, 2007. Production of a thorny, flat-leaved cactus that has been a Mexican food staple since Aztec times is rising fast as it wins a reputation as a natural remedy for maladies ranging from diabetes to hangovers. REUTERS/Jennifer Szymaszek (MEXICO) 
MEXICO-CACTUS/
RTR1OPIQ 
April 16, 2007 
A man arranges buckets of "nopales" at a market in one of Mexico City's largest cacti producing suburbs... 
Mexico City, Mexico 
Man arranges buckets of "nopales" at a market in one of Mexico City's largest cacti producing suburbs... 
A man arranges buckets of "nopales" at a market in one of Mexico City's largest cacti producing suburbs in the south of the metropolis, April 12, 2007. Production of a thorny, flat-leaved cactus that has been a Mexican food staple since Aztec times is rising fast as it wins a reputation as a natural remedy for maladies ranging from diabetes to hangovers. REUTERS/Jennifer Szymaszek (MEXICO) 
MEXICO-CACTUS/
RTR1OPIM 
April 16, 2007 
Jose Castro removes thorns from "nopales" at a market in one of Mexico City's largest cacti producing... 
Mexico City, Mexico 
Jose Castro removes thorns from "nopales" at a market in one of Mexico City's largest cacti producing... 
Jose Castro removes thorns from "nopales" at a market in one of Mexico City's largest cacti producing suburbs in the south of the metropolis April 12, 2007. Production of a thorny, flat-leaved cactus that has been a Mexican food staple since Aztec times is rising fast as it wins a reputation as a natural remedy for maladies ranging from diabetes to hangovers. Photo taken April 12, 2007. REUTERS/Jennifer Szymaszek (MEXICO) 
MEXICO
RTXI9E4 
June 09, 1998 
A Mexican peasant walks through his nopales plantation, in a rural suburb of Mexico City June 6. At... 
A Mexican peasant walks through his nopales plantation, in a rural suburb of Mexico City June 6. At..... 
A Mexican peasant walks through his nopales plantation, in a rural suburb of Mexico City June 6. At least 10,200 families produce more than 250,000 tons of the cactus and Mexican food staple each year in the village of Milpa Alta south of the capital. An annual "Nopal Fair" from June 7 to June 22 promotes traditonal and exotic food made with the cactus, [including nopal ice cream, shampoos, medicines, soaps and lotions]. 
MEXICO
RTXI9E0 
June 09, 1998 
A Mexican peasant harvests "nopales," a kind of cactus and Mexican food staple, in a rural suburb of... 
A Mexican peasant harvests "nopales," a kind of cactus and Mexican food staple, in a rural suburb of..... 
A Mexican peasant harvests "nopales," a kind of cactus and Mexican food staple, in a rural suburb of Mexico City on June 6. At least 10,200 families produce more than 250,000 tons of nopales each year in the village of Milpa Alta south of the capital. An annual "Nopal Fair" from June 7 to June 22 promotes traditonal and exotic food made with the cactus, [including nopal ice cream, shampoos, medicines, soaps and lotions]. 
RTREQVE 
June 09, 1998 
A Mexican villager carry a hamper with nopales cactus, a Mexican food staple, in a rural suburb of Mexico... 
Mexico 
MEXICAN VILLAGER CARRY NOPALES CACTUS. 
A Mexican villager carry a hamper with nopales cactus, a Mexican food staple, in a rural suburb of Mexico City on June 6. At least 10,200 families produce more than 250,000 tons of nopales each year in the village of Milpa Alta south of the capital. An annual "Nopal Fair" from June 7 to June 22 promotes traditonal and exotic food made with the cactus, including nopal ice cream, shampoos, medicines, soaps and lotions.

HR/SV/WS 
RTREQV0 
June 09, 1998 
A Mexican peasant walks through his nopales plantation, in a rural suburb of Mexico City June 6. At least... 
Mexico 
MEXICAN PEASANT WALKS THROUGH NOPALES CACTUS PLANTATION. 
A Mexican peasant walks through his nopales plantation, in a rural suburb of Mexico City June 6. At least 10,200 families produce more than 250,000 tons of the cactus and Mexican food staple each year in the village of Milpa Alta south of the capital. An annual "Nopal Fair" from June 7 to June 22 promotes traditonal and exotic food made with the cactus, including nopal ice cream, shampoos, medicines, soaps and lotions.

HR/SV/ME 
RTREQUO 
June 09, 1998 
A Mexican peasant harvests "nopales," a kind of cactus and Mexican food staple, in a rural suburb of... 
Mexico 
MEXICAN PEASANT HARVESTS CACTUS. 
A Mexican peasant harvests "nopales," a kind of cactus and Mexican food staple, in a rural suburb of Mexico City on June 6. At least 10,200 families produce more than 250,000 tons of nopales each year in the village of Milpa Alta south of the capital. An annual "Nopal Fair" from June 7 to June 22 promotes traditonal and exotic food made with the cactus, including nopal ice cream, in addition to shampoos, medicines, soaps and lotions.

HR/SV/EB 
RTRENYE 
June 05, 1998 
An elderly woman arranges a cactus hamper June 5 in Mexico City's central market during an exhibition... 
Mexico 
AN ELDERLY WOMAN ARRANGES A CACTUS HAMPER. 
An elderly woman arranges a cactus hamper June 5 in Mexico City's central market during an exhibition to announce the "Feria del Nopal" cactus fair, which will be held beginning next weekend in the southern village of Milpa Alta. The nopal or cactus is one of the Mexican food staples which are harvested in Milpa Alta.

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