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Search results for: OWN3

ISRAEL-CANCER/TECHNOLOGY-3D PRINTING
RTXFU7NO
August 17, 2021
Blood analog is pumped through vessel-like tubes for use in a 3D model of a tumour, as part of a brain...
Tel Aviv, Israel
Cancer patients' own cells used in 3D printed tumours to test treatments
Blood analog is pumped through vessel-like tubes for use in a 3D model of a tumour, as part of a brain cancer research that uses patients' cells to make 3D printed models of tumours, at Tel Aviv University, Israel August 17, 2021. Picture taken August 17, 2021. REUTERS/Nir Elias
ISRAEL-CANCER/TECHNOLOGY-3D PRINTING
RTXFU7NL
August 17, 2021
Israeli researcher Lena Neufeld examines a 3D model of a blood vessel-like tube, as part of a brain cancer...
Tel Aviv, Israel
Cancer patients' own cells used in 3D printed tumours to test treatments
Israeli researcher Lena Neufeld examines a 3D model of a blood vessel-like tube, as part of a brain cancer research that uses patients' cells to make 3D printed models of tumours, at Tel Aviv University, Israel August 17, 2021. Picture taken August 17, 2021. REUTERS/Nir Elias
ISRAEL-CANCER/TECHNOLOGY-3D PRINTING
RTXFU7NK
August 17, 2021
Israeli researcher Lena Neufeld examines a 3D model of a malignant tumour, as part of a brain cancer...
Tel Aviv, Israel
Cancer patients' own cells used in 3D printed tumours to test treatments
Israeli researcher Lena Neufeld examines a 3D model of a malignant tumour, as part of a brain cancer research that uses patients' cells to make 3D printed models of tumours, at Tel Aviv University, Israel August 17, 2021. Picture taken August 17, 2021. REUTERS/Nir Elias
ISRAEL-CANCER/TECHNOLOGY-3D PRINTING
RTXFU7NP
August 17, 2021
A 3D model of a tumour is made using bioprinting technology, as part of a brain cancer research that...
Tel Aviv, Israel
Cancer patients' own cells used in 3D printed tumours to test treatments
A 3D model of a tumour is made using bioprinting technology, as part of a brain cancer research that uses patients' cells to make 3D printed models of tumours, at Tel Aviv University, Israel August 17, 2021. Picture taken August 17, 2021. REUTERS/Nir Elias
ISRAEL-CANCER/TECHNOLOGY-3D PRINTING
RTXFU7NS
August 17, 2021
Israeli researcher Eilam Yeini examines a microscope image of a blood vessel tube surrounded by cancer...
Tel Aviv, Israel
Cancer patients' own cells used in 3D printed tumours to test treatments
Israeli researcher Eilam Yeini examines a microscope image of a blood vessel tube surrounded by cancer tissues, as part of a brain cancer research that uses patients' cells to make 3D printed models of tumours, at Tel Aviv University, Israel August 17, 2021. Picture taken August 17, 2021. REUTERS/Nir Elias
USA-WEATHER/WILDFIRES
RTXESX3K
July 26, 2021
Plumas County Sheriff’s Johnny Cervantes chats with Alfred William Huiddleston 3 who owns the Hideway...
Greenville, UNITED STATES
Dixie Fire is California’s largest active fire
Plumas County Sheriff’s Johnny Cervantes chats with Alfred William Huiddleston 3 who owns the Hideway hotel near the fire, as ash from the Dixie Fire blankets Greenville, California U.S. July 26, 2021. REUTERS/David Swanson
SOCCER-EUROU21-ESP-POR/REPORT
RTXCWSOJ
June 03, 2021
Soccer Football - UEFA Under 21 Championship - Semi Final - Spain v Portugal - Ljudski vrt, Maribor,...
Maribor, Slovenia
UEFA Under 21 Championship - Semi Final - Spain v Portugal
Soccer Football - UEFA Under 21 Championship - Semi Final - Spain v Portugal - Ljudski vrt, Maribor, Slovenia - June 3, 2021 Portugal players celebrate after Spain's Jorge Cuenca scored an own goal and their first goal REUTERS/Borut Zivulovic
SOCCER-EUROU21-ESP-POR/REPORT
RTXCWSIY
June 03, 2021
Soccer Football - UEFA Under 21 Championship - Semi Final - Spain v Portugal - Ljudski vrt, Maribor,...
Maribor, Slovenia
UEFA Under 21 Championship - Semi Final - Spain v Portugal
Soccer Football - UEFA Under 21 Championship - Semi Final - Spain v Portugal - Ljudski vrt, Maribor, Slovenia - June 3, 2021 Portugal players celebrate after Spain's Jorge Cuenca scored an own goal and their first goal REUTERS/Borut Zivulovic
SOCCER-EUROU21-ESP-POR/REPORT
RTXCWSIX
June 03, 2021
Soccer Football - UEFA Under 21 Championship - Semi Final - Spain v Portugal - Ljudski vrt, Maribor,...
Maribor, Slovenia
UEFA Under 21 Championship - Semi Final - Spain v Portugal
Soccer Football - UEFA Under 21 Championship - Semi Final - Spain v Portugal - Ljudski vrt, Maribor, Slovenia - June 3, 2021 Portugal players celebrate after Spain's Jorge Cuenca scored an own goal and their first goal REUTERS/Srdjan Zivulovic
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/TUNISIA-TOURISM
RTXCLUGR
May 20, 2021
Fathi Bouzayan, 53, who owns a camel that gives rides to tourists, speaks during an interview with Reuters...
El Jem, Tunisia
Fathi Bouzayan speaks during an interview with Reuters outside El Jem's amphitheatre
Fathi Bouzayan, 53, who owns a camel that gives rides to tourists, speaks during an interview with Reuters outside El Jem's amphitheatre, a UNESCO World Heritage Site built in the late 3rd century, in El Jem, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, Tunisia, May 20, 2021. Picture taken May 20, 2021. REUTERS/Angus McDowall
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/TUNISIA-TOURISM
RTXCLUGD
May 20, 2021
A camel owned by Fathi Bouzayan that gives rides to tourists, waits outside El Jem's amphitheatre, a...
El Jem, Tunisia
A camel that gives rides to tourists waits outside El Jem's amphitheatre
A camel owned by Fathi Bouzayan that gives rides to tourists, waits outside El Jem's amphitheatre, a UNESCO World Heritage Site built in the late 3rd century, in El Jem, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, Tunisia, May 20, 2021. Picture taken May 20, 2021. REUTERS/Angus McDowall TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
VENEZUELA-SPAIN/INVESTOR
RTXDKGPX
May 03, 2021
Office buildings of the thermoelectric plant of the Josefa Joaquina Sanchez Bastidas Complex are seen...
CATIA LA MAR, Venezuela
Office buildings of the thermoelectric plant of the Josefa Joaquina Sanchez Bastidas Complex are seen...
Office buildings of the thermoelectric plant of the Josefa Joaquina Sanchez Bastidas Complex are seen in Catia la Mar, Venezuela May 3, 2021. The plant was built by a company, Derwick Associates Corp, owned by Venezuelan businessman Alejandro Betancourt. Picture taken May 3, 2021. To match Special Report VENEZUELA-SPAIN/INVESTOR REUTERS/Leonardo Fernandez Viloria
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SPAIN-LONGCOVID
RTXBEOG5
April 12, 2021
Long COVID sufferer Nuria Sepulveda, a 44-year-old self-employed worker who co-owns a courier franchise,...
Pamplona, Spain
The Wider Image: The faces in the fog of 'long COVID'
Long COVID sufferer Nuria Sepulveda, a 44-year-old self-employed worker who co-owns a courier franchise, poses for a photograph taken through blue plastic, in Madrid, Spain, April 9, 2021. The photograph was taken through blue plastic to visualise the effects of long COVID. Sepulveda got sick on March 12, 2020, during the first wave of the disease, and she had to visit the emergency room on several occasions for symptoms that ended up being diagnosed as double pneumonia, bowel bleeding and urine infection among others. She tried to return to work in November, but the fatigue was so overwhelming that "3 hours of work felt like a 12-hour work day." An avid sports practitioner, she remembers the exact date her body gave her some relief to get back on the bicycle. "When I felt the fatigue that had been dragging me down for months was getting a bit better, I got my bike out. It was September, 28. I will never forget it, it was the first day I was able to practice sports again. I couldn't help crying," she said. Sepulveda believes we have two lives, the second one starts when we realise we only have one. REUTERS/Susana Vera SEARCH "SPAIN LONGCOVID" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SPAIN-LONGCOVID
RTXBEOG3
April 12, 2021
A wheel of a bicycle belonging to long COVID sufferer Nuria Sepulveda, a 44-year-old self-employed worker...
Pamplona, Spain
The Wider Image: The faces in the fog of 'long COVID'
A wheel of a bicycle belonging to long COVID sufferer Nuria Sepulveda, a 44-year-old self-employed worker who co-owns a courier franchise, is seen photographed through blue plastic, in Madrid, Spain, April 9, 2021. The photograph was taken through blue plastic to visualise the effects of long COVID. Sepulveda got sick on March 12, 2020, during the first wave of the disease, and she had to visit the emergency room on several occasions for symptoms that ended up being diagnosed as double pneumonia, bowel bleeding and urine infection among others. She tried to return to work in November, but the fatigue was so overwhelming that "3 hours of work felt like a 12-hour work day." An avid sports practitioner, she remembers the exact date her body gave her some relief to get back on the bicycle. "When I felt the fatigue that had been dragging me down for months was getting a bit better, I got my bike out. It was September, 28. I will never forget it, it was the first day I was able to practice sports again. I couldn't help crying," she said. Sepulveda believes we have two lives, the second one starts when we realise we only have one. REUTERS/Susana Vera SEARCH "SPAIN LONGCOVID" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SPAIN-LONGCOVID
RTXBEOF1
April 12, 2021
A combination picture shows long COVID sufferer Nuria Sepulveda, a 44-year-old self-employed worker who...
Pamplona, Spain
The Wider Image: The faces in the fog of 'long COVID'
A combination picture shows long COVID sufferer Nuria Sepulveda, a 44-year-old self-employed worker who co-owns a courier franchise, posing for a photograph taken through blue plastic, and a wheel of her bicycle photographed through blue plastic, in Madrid, Spain, April 9, 2021. The photographs were taken through blue plastic to visualise the effects of long COVID. Sepulveda got sick on March 12, 2020, during the first wave of the disease, and she had to visit the emergency room on several occasions for symptoms that ended up being diagnosed as double pneumonia, bowel bleeding and urine infection among others. She tried to return to work in November, but the fatigue was so overwhelming that "3 hours of work felt like a 12-hour work day." An avid sports practitioner, she remembers the exact date her body gave her some relief to get back on the bicycle. "When I felt the fatigue that had been dragging me down for months was getting a bit better, I got my bike out. It was September, 28. I will never forget it, it was the first day I was able to practice sports again. I couldn't help crying," she said. Sepulveda believes we have two lives, the second one starts when we realise we only have one. REUTERS/Susana Vera SEARCH "SPAIN LONGCOVID" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
SOCCER-SPAIN-SOC-ATB/REPORT
RTXB53UU
April 03, 2021
Athletic Bilbao and Real Sociedad fans talk as a person holds up his phone, screen reading "At last the...
Bilbao, Spain
Athletic Bilbao and Real Sociedad fans talk as a person holds up his phone, in Bilbao
Athletic Bilbao and Real Sociedad fans talk as a person holds up his phone, screen reading "At last the Basque flag, each with his own", ahead of their Copa Del Rey (King's Cup) final in Bilbao, Spain, April 3, 2021. REUTERS/Vincent West
WOMEN-ANTIVIOLENCE/BRAZIL
RTXA3Q6S
March 05, 2021
Paulo Cesar da Conceicao, who runs CR Homem, a rehabilitation center for men involved in domestic violence,...
Duque De Caxias, Brazil
The Wider Image: Brazil women suffer in silence as COVID-19 sparks domestic terror
Paulo Cesar da Conceicao, who runs CR Homem, a rehabilitation center for men involved in domestic violence, leads a group session in Duque de Caxias, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil, October 3, 2019. Conceicao said that, in group sessions, his team guides conversations to help men see their own responsibility for domestic abuse: "The men arrive in the group very closed and resistant, and we try to break that down." REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "BRAZIL FEMICIDE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. THE IMAGES SHOULD ONLY BE USED TOGETHER WITH THE STORY - NO STAND-ALONE USES
WOMEN-ANTIVIOLENCE/BRAZIL
RTXA3Q4G
March 05, 2021
Densso Simoes dos Santos, 24, shows his tattoo for a photograph, after attending a group session at CR...
Duque De Caxias, Brazil
The Wider Image: Brazil women suffer in silence as COVID-19 sparks domestic terror
Densso Simoes dos Santos, 24, shows his tattoo for a photograph, after attending a group session at CR Homem, a rehabilitation center for men involved in domestic violence, run by Paulo Cesar da Conceicao, in Duque de Caxias, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil, October 3, 2019. Conceicao said that, in group sessions, his team guides conversations to help men see their own responsibility for domestic abuse: "The men arrive in the group very closed and resistant, and we try to break that down." Men are referred to CR Homem after being convicted of domestic violence. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "BRAZIL FEMICIDE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. THE IMAGES SHOULD ONLY BE USED TOGETHER WITH THE STORY - NO STAND-ALONE USES
SOCCER-ITALY-FIO-ROM/REPORT
RTXA0VYC
March 03, 2021
Soccer Football - Serie A - Fiorentina v AS Roma - Stadio Artemio Franchi, Florence, Italy - March 3,...
Florence, Italy
Serie A - Fiorentina v AS Roma
Soccer Football - Serie A - Fiorentina v AS Roma - Stadio Artemio Franchi, Florence, Italy - March 3, 2021 Fiorentina's Dusan Vlahovic celebrates after AS Roma's Leonardo Spinazzola scored an own goal and Fiorentina's first goal REUTERS/Alberto Lingria
SOCCER-ITALY-FIO-ROM/REPORT
RTXA0VY6
March 03, 2021
Soccer Football - Serie A - Fiorentina v AS Roma - Stadio Artemio Franchi, Florence, Italy - March 3,...
Florence, Italy
Serie A - Fiorentina v AS Roma
Soccer Football - Serie A - Fiorentina v AS Roma - Stadio Artemio Franchi, Florence, Italy - March 3, 2021 AS Roma's Leonardo Spinazzola scores an own goal and Fiorentina's first goal REUTERS/Alberto Lingria
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/PHILIPPINES
RTX8VR7J
February 03, 2021
A man collects his own saliva sample in a vial at a drive-thru coronavirus disease (COVID-19) saliva...
Pasay, Philippines
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Philippines
A man collects his own saliva sample in a vial at a drive-thru coronavirus disease (COVID-19) saliva testing site, in Pasay city, Metro Manila, Philippines, February 3, 2021. REUTERS/Lisa Marie David
SOCCER-SPAIN-ALV-ATM/REPORT
RTX8K1IU
January 03, 2021
Soccer Football - La Liga Santander - Deportivo Alaves v Atletico Madrid - Mendizorrotza Stadium, Vitoria-Gasteiz,...
VITORIA-GASTEIZ, Spain
La Liga Santander - Deportivo Alaves v Atletico Madrid
Soccer Football - La Liga Santander - Deportivo Alaves v Atletico Madrid - Mendizorrotza Stadium, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain - January 3, 2021 Atletico Madrid's Luis Suarez looks dejected after Felipe scores an own goal REUTERS/Vincent West
SOCCER-SPAIN-ALV-ATM/REPORT
RTX8K1IE
January 03, 2021
Soccer Football - La Liga Santander - Deportivo Alaves v Atletico Madrid - Mendizorrotza Stadium, Vitoria-Gasteiz,...
VITORIA-GASTEIZ, Spain
La Liga Santander - Deportivo Alaves v Atletico Madrid
Soccer Football - La Liga Santander - Deportivo Alaves v Atletico Madrid - Mendizorrotza Stadium, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain - January 3, 2021 Atletico Madrid's Felipe scores an own goal REUTERS/Vincent West
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-BUSINESSES
RTX87BPE
November 05, 2020
Mandy Yin poses inside Nasi Economy Rice, the takeaway shop she owns, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
London, United Kingdom
Mandy Yin poses inside Nasi Economy Rice, the takeaway shop she owns, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Mandy Yin poses inside Nasi Economy Rice, the takeaway shop she owns, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in North London, Britain, November 3, 2020. Picture taken November 3, 2020. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-BUSINESSES
RTX87BPA
November 05, 2020
General view inside Token Studio, owned by Jing Xue, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak,...
London, United Kingdom
General view inside Token Studio, owned by Jing Xue, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak,...
General view inside Token Studio, owned by Jing Xue, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain, November 3, 2020. Picture taken November 3, 2020. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-BUSINESSES
RTX87BP7
November 05, 2020
General view of Nasi Economy Rice and Sambal Shiok, owned by Mandy Yin, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
General view of Nasi Economy Rice and Sambal Shiok, owned by Mandy Yin, amid the coronavirus disease...
General view of Nasi Economy Rice and Sambal Shiok, owned by Mandy Yin, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in North London, Britain, November 3, 2020. Picture taken November 3, 2020. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-BUSINESSES
RTX87BP6
November 05, 2020
Mandy Yin talks to a staff member inside Nasi Economy Rice, the takeaway shop she owns, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Mandy Yin talks to a staff member inside Nasi Economy Rice, the takeaway shop she owns, amid the coronavirus...
Mandy Yin talks to a staff member inside Nasi Economy Rice, the takeaway shop she owns, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in North London, Britain, November 3, 2020. Picture taken November 3, 2020. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-BUSINESSES
RTX87BP5
November 05, 2020
Mandy Yin poses inside Nasi Economy Rice, the takeaway shop she owns, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
London, United Kingdom
Mandy Yin poses inside Nasi Economy Rice, the takeaway shop she owns, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Mandy Yin poses inside Nasi Economy Rice, the takeaway shop she owns, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in North London, Britain, November 3, 2020. Picture taken November 3, 2020. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-BUSINESSES
RTX87BP4
November 05, 2020
People take part in a pottery class run by Jing Xeu inside Token Studio, the business she owns, amid...
London, United Kingdom
People take part in a pottery class run by Jing Xeu inside Token Studio, the business she owns, amid...
People take part in a pottery class run by Jing Xeu inside Token Studio, the business she owns, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain, November 3, 2020. Picture taken November 3, 2020. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-BUSINESSES
RTX87BP3
November 05, 2020
Mandy Yin poses outside Nasi Economy Rice, the takeaway shop she owns, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
London, United Kingdom
Mandy Yin poses outside Nasi Economy Rice, the takeaway shop she owns, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Mandy Yin poses outside Nasi Economy Rice, the takeaway shop she owns, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in North London, Britain, November 3, 2020. Picture taken November 3, 2020. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-BUSINESSES
RTX87BP2
November 05, 2020
Mandy Yin poses inside Sambal Shiok, the restaurant she owns, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
London, United Kingdom
Mandy Yin poses inside Sambal Shiok, the restaurant she owns, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Mandy Yin poses inside Sambal Shiok, the restaurant she owns, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in North London, Britain, November 3, 2020. Picture taken November 3, 2020. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-BUSINESSES
RTX87BP1
November 05, 2020
Jing Xeu teaches a pottery class inside Token Studio, the business she owns, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Jing Xeu teaches a pottery class inside Token Studio, the business she owns, amid the coronavirus disease...
Jing Xeu teaches a pottery class inside Token Studio, the business she owns, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain, November 3, 2020. Picture taken November 3, 2020. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-BUSINESSES
RTX87BP0
November 05, 2020
Mandy Yin poses inside Nasi Economy Rice, the takeaway shop she owns, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
London, United Kingdom
Mandy Yin poses inside Nasi Economy Rice, the takeaway shop she owns, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Mandy Yin poses inside Nasi Economy Rice, the takeaway shop she owns, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in North London, Britain, November 3, 2020. Picture taken November 3, 2020. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-BUSINESSES
RTX87BOZ
November 05, 2020
Jing Xeu teaches a pottery class inside Token Studio, the business she owns, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Jing Xeu teaches a pottery class inside Token Studio, the business she owns, amid the coronavirus disease...
Jing Xeu teaches a pottery class inside Token Studio, the business she owns, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain, November 3, 2020. Picture taken November 3, 2020. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-BUSINESSES
RTX87BOY
November 05, 2020
Mandy Yin poses outside Nasi Economy Rice, the takeaway shop she owns, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
London, United Kingdom
Mandy Yin poses outside Nasi Economy Rice, the takeaway shop she owns, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Mandy Yin poses outside Nasi Economy Rice, the takeaway shop she owns, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in North London, Britain, November 3, 2020. Picture taken November 3, 2020. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-BUSINESSES
RTX87BOX
November 05, 2020
Jing Xeu teaches a pottery class inside Token Studio, the business she owns, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Jing Xeu teaches a pottery class inside Token Studio, the business she owns, amid the coronavirus disease...
Jing Xeu teaches a pottery class inside Token Studio, the business she owns, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain, November 3, 2020. Picture taken November 3, 2020. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-BUSINESSES
RTX87BOW
November 05, 2020
Jing Xeu teaches a pottery class inside Token Studio, the business she owns, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Jing Xeu teaches a pottery class inside Token Studio, the business she owns, amid the coronavirus disease...
Jing Xeu teaches a pottery class inside Token Studio, the business she owns, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain, November 3, 2020. Picture taken November 3, 2020. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-BUSINESSES
RTX87BON
November 05, 2020
General view of Nasi Economy Rice and Sambal Shiok, owned by Mandy Yin, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
General view of Nasi Economy Rice and Sambal Shiok, owned by Mandy Yin, amid the coronavirus disease...
General view of Nasi Economy Rice and Sambal Shiok, owned by Mandy Yin, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in North London, Britain, November 3, 2020. Picture taken November 3, 2020. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-BUSINESSES
RTX87BOL
November 05, 2020
Mandy Yin poses inside Sambal Shiok, the restaurant she owns, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
London, United Kingdom
Mandy Yin poses inside Sambal Shiok, the restaurant she owns, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Mandy Yin poses inside Sambal Shiok, the restaurant she owns, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in North London, Britain, November 3, 2020. Picture taken November 3, 2020. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-BUSINESSES
RTX87BOM
November 05, 2020
People take part in a pottery class run by Jing Xeu inside Token Studio, the business she owns, amid...
London, United Kingdom
People take part in a pottery class run by Jing Xeu inside Token Studio, the business she owns, amid...
People take part in a pottery class run by Jing Xeu inside Token Studio, the business she owns, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain, November 3, 2020. Picture taken November 3, 2020. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
EMIRATES-LUXURY/SHOES
RTX87623
November 04, 2020
Mohamed al-Safar, who owns a shoe collection, which according to him, amounts to being worth millions...
Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Man in Dubai owns shoe collection amounting to 1 million USD
Mohamed al-Safar, who owns a shoe collection, which according to him, amounts to being worth millions of dollars, shows one of his shoes in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, November 3, 2020. Picture taken November 3, 2020. REUTERS/Abdel Hadi Ramahi
SOCCER-CHAMPIONS-RBS-BAY/REPORT
RTX86YJP
November 03, 2020
Soccer Football - Champions League - Group A - FC Red Bull Salzburg v Bayern Munich - Red Bull Arena...
Salzburg, Austria
Champions League - Group A - FC Red Bull Salzburg v Bayern Munich
Soccer Football - Champions League - Group A - FC Red Bull Salzburg v Bayern Munich - Red Bull Arena Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria - November 3, 2020 Bayern Munich's Thomas Muller celebrates after FC Salzburg's Rasmus Kristensen scored an own goal and the second for Bayern REUTERS/Andreas Gebert
SOCCER-CHAMPIONS-RBS-BAY/REPORT
RTX86YJJ
November 03, 2020
Soccer Football - Champions League - Group A - FC Red Bull Salzburg v Bayern Munich - Red Bull Arena...
Salzburg, Austria
Champions League - Group A - FC Red Bull Salzburg v Bayern Munich
Soccer Football - Champions League - Group A - FC Red Bull Salzburg v Bayern Munich - Red Bull Arena Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria - November 3, 2020 Bayern Munich's Thomas Muller celebrates after FC Salzburg's Rasmus Kristensen scored an own goal and the second for Bayern REUTERS/Andreas Gebert
SOCCER-CHAMPIONS-RBS-BAY/REPORT
RTX86YJI
November 03, 2020
Soccer Football - Champions League - Group A - FC Red Bull Salzburg v Bayern Munich - Red Bull Arena...
Salzburg, Austria
Champions League - Group A - FC Red Bull Salzburg v Bayern Munich
Soccer Football - Champions League - Group A - FC Red Bull Salzburg v Bayern Munich - Red Bull Arena Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria - November 3, 2020 Bayern Munich's Thomas Muller celebrates after FC Salzburg's Rasmus Kristensen scored an own goal and the second for Bayern REUTERS/Andreas Gebert
SOCCER-CHAMPIONS-RBS-BAY/REPORT
RTX86YJH
November 03, 2020
Soccer Football - Champions League - Group A - FC Red Bull Salzburg v Bayern Munich - Red Bull Arena...
Salzburg, Austria
Champions League - Group A - FC Red Bull Salzburg v Bayern Munich
Soccer Football - Champions League - Group A - FC Red Bull Salzburg v Bayern Munich - Red Bull Arena Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria - November 3, 2020 Bayern Munich's Thomas Muller celebrates after FC Salzburg's Rasmus Kristensen scored an own goal and the second for Bayern REUTERS/Andreas Gebert
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E9B
October 15, 2020
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E9A
October 15, 2020
Cravats and bow ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Cravats and bow ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Cravats and bow ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E99
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E98
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury looks at silk ties displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury looks at silk ties displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury looks at silk ties displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E97
October 15, 2020
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
London, United Kingdom
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E96
October 15, 2020
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E95
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E94
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E92
October 15, 2020
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E91
October 15, 2020
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E90
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8Z
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury holds a bespoke tailcoat in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row,...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury holds a bespoke tailcoat in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row,...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury holds a bespoke tailcoat in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8Y
October 15, 2020
Bunches of swatches are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Bunches of swatches are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Bunches of swatches are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8X
October 15, 2020
Handkerchiefs are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Handkerchiefs are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Handkerchiefs are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8W
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
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