Ajax loader
By using our website, you agree to our use of cookies as described in Cookie Policy.

Can't find what you're looking for?

 

Be sure to Sign in to see all available content.

 

If you don't have an account, Register here.

Search results for: One-parent-family

HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-NEWBORN
RTX7JQH9
May 20, 2020
Reuters photographer Hannah McKay, looks on as her father Jim McKay, puts up a tent for her to sleep...
Coventry, United Kingdom
A Picture and its Story: How photographer captured baby image in coronavirus lockdown
Reuters photographer Hannah McKay, looks on as her father Jim McKay, puts up a tent for her to sleep in, in the back garden of their family home, during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Coventry, Britain, May 13, 2020. Hannah McKay had the opportunity to travel north to cover medical workers in the cities of Blackburn and Burnley and divided the six-hour journey into two parts, sleeping in a tent in her parents' garden in Coventry before setting off the next morning. REUTERS/Hannah McKay SEARCH "COVID-19 BIRTH UK" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-NEWBORN
RTX7JQH6
May 20, 2020
Jim McKay, a father of Reuters photographer Hannah McKay, greets his daughter from a social distance,...
Coventry, United Kingdom
A Picture and its Story: How photographer captured baby image in coronavirus lockdown
Jim McKay, a father of Reuters photographer Hannah McKay, greets his daughter from a social distance, as he stands on the doorstep to the family home, during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Coventry, Britain, May 13, 2020. Hannah McKay had the opportunity to travel north to cover medical workers in the cities of Blackburn and Burnley and divided the six-hour journey into two parts, sleeping in a tent in her parents' garden in Coventry before setting off the next morning. "I couldn't go in the front door, I couldn't go in the house and we couldn't hug," she recalled. REUTERS/Hannah McKay SEARCH "COVID-19 BIRTH UK" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-NHS
RTX7JANX
May 17, 2020
Junior Doctors Jared Leggett and Amy Kitchen chat to one another whilst living in a temporary motorhome...
Blackburn, United Kingdom
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Britain
Junior Doctors Jared Leggett and Amy Kitchen chat to one another whilst living in a temporary motorhome in the hospital carpark. The married couple, who were living with parents and in the process of buying their first home, made the decision to isolate in the onsite accommodation to protect their families and be able to continue working at The Royal Blackburn Teaching Hospital in East Lancashire, following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Blackburn, Britain, May 14, 2020. Picture taken May 14, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay/Pool
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-NHS
RTX7JANW
May 17, 2020
Junior Doctor Amy Kitchen sits on the step of the temporary motorhome she is living in with her Junior...
Blackburn, United Kingdom
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Britain
Junior Doctor Amy Kitchen sits on the step of the temporary motorhome she is living in with her Junior Doctor husband in the hospital carpark. The married couple, who were living with parents and in the process of buying their first home, made the decision to isolate in the onsite accommodation to protect their families and be able to continue working at The Royal Blackburn Teaching Hospital in East Lancashire, following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Blackburn, Britain, May 14, 2020. Picture taken May 14, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay/Pool
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-NHS
RTX7JANV
May 17, 2020
Junior Doctors Jared Leggett and Amy Kitchen watch a film on an iPad, whilst living in a temporary motorhome...
Blackburn, United Kingdom
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Britain
Junior Doctors Jared Leggett and Amy Kitchen watch a film on an iPad, whilst living in a temporary motorhome in the hospital carpark. The married couple, who were living with parents and in the process of buying their first home, made the decision to isolate in the onsite accommodation to protect their families and be able to continue working at The Royal Blackburn Teaching Hospital in East Lancashire, following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Blackburn, Britain, May 14, 2020. Picture taken May 14, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay/Pool
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY
RTX7GASA
April 29, 2020
The Perrini family eat an Easter Monday lunch on a table set up in their courtyard, following social...
CISTERNINO, Italy
The Perrini family eat an Easter Monday lunch on a table set up in their courtyard in the small southern...
The Perrini family eat an Easter Monday lunch on a table set up in their courtyard, following social distancing guidelines, away from the Vanna Angelini's parents, grandmother and sister, who live in the same apartment block, in the small southern historical town of Cisternino, Italy, April 13, 2020. Picture taken April 13, 2020. Perrini family have dealt with Italy's strict lockdown measures to combat the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) with two young daughters studying at home, and owning three restaurants and a bar that can't fully open until June 1. REUTERS/Alessandro Garofalo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY
RTX7G97F
April 28, 2020
Martina Perrini, 5, jumps as her parents Daniele and Vanna and her sister Michela, 9, sit on a sofa in...
CISTERNINO, Italy
Martina Perrini, 5, jumps as her parents Daniele and Vanna and her sister Michela, 9, sit on a sofa in...
Martina Perrini, 5, jumps as her parents Daniele and Vanna and her sister Michela, 9, sit on a sofa in their home, in the small southern historical town of Cisternino, Italy, April 24, 2020. Picture taken April 24, 2020. Perrini family have dealt with Italy's strict lockdown measures to combat the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) with two young daughters studying at home, and owning three restaurants and a bar that can't fully open until June 1. REUTERS/Alessandro Garofalo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/NORWAY-QUARANTINE
RTS37XAT
April 02, 2020
Reuters photographer Nora Savosnick's parents Mats Haraldsson and Chava Savosnick greet Nora on the doorsteps...
Oslo, Norway
The Wider Image: Quarantine millennials face bedtimes and old rules as they move home
Reuters photographer Nora Savosnick's parents Mats Haraldsson and Chava Savosnick greet Nora on the doorsteps of their family home, as Nora prepares to complete 14-days of quarantine after arriving from New York, during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Oslo, Norway, March 16, 2020. "When you came from New York, you know, the natural thing for me is to go forward to you and kiss you and hug you, you know, my little girl," said Chava Savosnick. "That was more difficult in the beginning. But now, I mean, no one is hugging each other. It's just like the new normal." REUTERS/Nora Savosnick SEARCH "SAVOSNICK QUARANTINE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. THE IMAGES SHOULD ONLY BE USED TOGETHER WITH THE STORY - NO STAND-ALONE USES.
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/NORWAY-QUARANTINE
RTS37X9N
April 02, 2020
Reuters photographer Nora Savosnick: "When President Trump announced the ban on travel from Europe last...
Oslo, Norway
The Wider Image: Quarantine millennials face bedtimes and old rules as they move home
Reuters photographer Nora Savosnick: "When President Trump announced the ban on travel from Europe last month, I was more than 3,000 miles away from my Norwegian childhood home, a 24-year-old photographer creating a life of my own in New York City. I had to start thinking about whether I would risk my U.S. work visa ? and my newfound freedom ? to go home for nationalized health care and, most of all, to see my family. My mum recovered from cancer a few years ago: What if I couldn't see her if she became sick again? The next morning my parents called. "I want you to be here in case you should be sick," said my mum, Chava Savosnick. "It's kind of scary to have my daughter on the other side of the world in these times." In a panic, I bought a ticket back to Norway. I braced myself for a return to childhood, quarantined in my parents' basement." REUTERS/Nora Savosnick. SEARCH "SAVOSNICK QUARANTINE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. Matching Text: HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/NORWAY-QUARANTINE TEMPLATE OUT THE IMAGES SHOULD ONLY BE USED TOGETHER WITH THE STORY - NO STAND-ALONE USES.
Spotlight
Spotlight
Auschwitz survivor returns to death camp for final time
21 PICTURES
FOOTBALL-NCAA/
RTX7B3TI
November 30, 2019
Nov 23, 2019; Iowa City, IA, USA; Iowa Hawkeyes defensive back Devonte Young (17) is honored on senior...
Iowa City, UNITED STATES
NCAA Football: Illinois at Iowa
Nov 23, 2019; Iowa City, IA, USA; Iowa Hawkeyes defensive back Devonte Young (17) is honored on senior day before the game against the Illinois Fighting Illini and is greeted by head coach Kirk Ferentz and his wife Mary at Kinnick Stadium. Young's parents could not attend and the Ferentz family filled in to honor Young. Mandatory Credit: Jeffrey Becker-USA TODAY Sports
FOOTBALL-NCAA/
RTX7B3TG
November 30, 2019
Nov 23, 2019; Iowa City, IA, USA; Iowa Hawkeyes defensive back Devonte Young (17) is honored on senior...
Iowa City, UNITED STATES
NCAA Football: Illinois at Iowa
Nov 23, 2019; Iowa City, IA, USA; Iowa Hawkeyes defensive back Devonte Young (17) is honored on senior day before the game against the Illinois Fighting Illini and is greeted by Mary Ferentz (the wife of head coach Kirk Ferentz) at Kinnick Stadium. Young's parents could not attend and the Ferentz family filled in to honor Young. Mandatory Credit: Jeffrey Becker-USA TODAY Sports
ARGENTINA-ELECTION/TB
RTS2SMZF
October 24, 2019
Cristian Molina, 26, stands in the grocery store that he and his family own, which is part of the house...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
The Wider Image: 'White death' in Argentina: The hunger of poverty feeds tuberculosis
Cristian Molina, 26, stands in the grocery store that he and his family own, which is part of the house that they live in, in the shantytown of Lujan, in Buenos Aries, Argentina September 26, 2019. In the last two years, Molina's family have had to close the shop six times due to not being able to afford merchandise to stock the shop. Molina contracted tuberculosis earlier this year. He shares living spaces with his parents, six siblings and four nephews. Doctors think one brother contracted the disease in prison before spreading it around the family when he returned home. REUTERS/Magali Druscovich SEARCH "ARGENTINA TB" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
ARGENTINA-ELECTION/TB
RTS2SMZD
October 24, 2019
Cristian Molina, 26, takes his tuberculosis medication at his house in the shantytown of Lujan in Buenos...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
The Wider Image: 'White death' in Argentina: The hunger of poverty feeds tuberculosis
Cristian Molina, 26, takes his tuberculosis medication at his house in the shantytown of Lujan in Buenos Aires, Argentina, September 26, 2019. Molina is prescribed to take 11 tablets per day, seven in the morning and four in the afternoon, which often give him a stomachache. He contracted tuberculosis earlier this year. Molina shares living spaces with his parents, six siblings and four nephews. Doctors think one brother contracted the disease in prison before spreading it around the family when he returned home. REUTERS/Magali Druscovich SEARCH "ARGENTINA TB" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
ARGENTINA-ELECTION/TB
RTS2SMZC
October 24, 2019
Cristian Molina, 26, sits on a bus while traveling to visit his family in Buenos Aires, Argentina, August...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
The Wider Image: 'White death' in Argentina: The hunger of poverty feeds tuberculosis
Cristian Molina, 26, sits on a bus while traveling to visit his family in Buenos Aires, Argentina, August 17, 2019. Molina contracted tuberculosis earlier this year. He lives in the shantytown of Lujan and shares living spaces with his parents, six siblings and four nephews. Doctors think one brother contracted the disease in prison before spreading it around the family when he returned home. REUTERS/Magali Druscovich SEARCH "ARGENTINA TB" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
ARGENTINA-ELECTION/TB
RTS2SMYP
October 24, 2019
Tuberculosis medication belonging to Cristian Molina is laid out in Buenos Aires, Argentina, September...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
The Wider Image: 'White death' in Argentina: The hunger of poverty feeds tuberculosis
Tuberculosis medication belonging to Cristian Molina is laid out in Buenos Aires, Argentina, September 26, 2019. Molina is prescribed to take 11 tablets per day, seven in the morning and four in the afternoon, which often give him a stomachache. He contracted tuberculosis earlier this year. Molina lives in the shantytown of Lujan and shares living spaces with his parents, six siblings and four nephews. Doctors think one brother contracted the disease in prison before spreading it around the family when he returned home. REUTERS/Magali Druscovich REUTERS/Magali Druscovich SEARCH "ARGENTINA TB" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
ARGENTINA-ELECTION/TB
RTS2SMYD
October 24, 2019
Cristian Molina (R), 26, drinks a cup of mate with his siblings Xoana (L) and Manuel in the shantytown...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
The Wider Image: 'White death' in Argentina: The hunger of poverty feeds tuberculosis
Cristian Molina (R), 26, drinks a cup of mate with his siblings Xoana (L) and Manuel in the shantytown of Lujan, in Buenos Aires, Argentina August 17, 2019. Molina contracted tuberculosis earlier this year. He shares living spaces with his parents, six siblings and four nephews. Doctors think one brother contracted the disease in prison before spreading it around the family when he returned home. REUTERS/Magali Druscovich SEARCH "ARGENTINA TB" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
ARGENTINA-ELECTION/TB
RTS2SMYB
October 24, 2019
Cristian Molina, 26, prepares to go to church in Buenos Aires, Argentina, August 17, 2019. Molina contracted...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
The Wider Image: 'White death' in Argentina: The hunger of poverty feeds tuberculosis
Cristian Molina, 26, prepares to go to church in Buenos Aires, Argentina, August 17, 2019. Molina contracted tuberculosis earlier this year. He lives in the shantytown of Lujan and shares living spaces with his parents, six siblings and four nephews. Doctors think one brother contracted the disease in prison before spreading it around the family when he returned home. REUTERS/Magali Druscovich SEARCH "ARGENTINA TB" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
ARGENTINA-ELECTION/TB
RTS2SMYA
October 24, 2019
A meal consisting of bread and sugar is laid out on the table at Cristian Molina's family home in the...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
The Wider Image: 'White death' in Argentina: The hunger of poverty feeds tuberculosis
A meal consisting of bread and sugar is laid out on the table at Cristian Molina's family home in the shantytown of Lujan, Buenos Aires, Argentina, August 17, 2019. Molina contracted tuberculosis earlier this year. He shares living spaces with his parents, six siblings and four nephews. Doctors think one brother contracted the disease in prison before spreading it around the family when he returned home. REUTERS/Magali Druscovich SEARCH "ARGENTINA TB" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
ARGENTINA-ELECTION/TB
RTS2SMY2
October 24, 2019
In a poor Buenos Aires suburb, Cristian Molina's jeans and denim jacket hide his unhealthily slight frame,...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
The Wider Image: 'White death' in Argentina: The hunger of poverty feeds tuberculosis
In a poor Buenos Aires suburb, Cristian Molina's jeans and denim jacket hide his unhealthily slight frame, his legacy from years of a poor diet that left him susceptible to the tuberculosis infection he contracted earlier this year, a disease of poverty that is making a comeback in Argentina. Molina, 26, lives in the shantytown of Lujan near the wealthy capital with his parents, six siblings and four nephews. Doctors think one brother contracted the disease in prison before spreading it around the family when he returned home. Cases of the "white death" illness, closely linked to poverty, malnutrition and poor housing, have been on the rise since the turn of the decade as Latin America's third largest economy has been battered by repeat recessions and inflation. Currently, fast-rising prices and recession are driving more people below the poverty line. The poverty rate stood at above 35% in the first half of the year. REUTERS/Magali Druscovich SEARCH "ARGENTINA TB" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: ARGENTINA-ELECTION/TB
HEALTH-EBOLA/CONGO-SURVIVORS
RTS2RNZV
October 18, 2019
Kitambala Kavugho, 38, an Ebola survivor who works as a caregiver, takes care of one-year-old Chamim,...
Butembo, Congo, the Democratic Republic of the
The Wider Image: Ebola survivors battle grief and stigma in eastern Congo
Kitambala Kavugho, 38, an Ebola survivor who works as a caregiver, takes care of one-year-old Chamim, an orphan whose mother recently died of Ebola, at the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) creche for children whose families are suspected or confirmed Ebola cases, next to an Ebola treatment centre in Beni, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, October 7, 2019. "I give back the good that was given to me. They took a good care of me to heal, to survive the wicked virus; now, I feel it's my duty to do a good deed by taking care of children whose parents have Ebola," Kavugho said. "We have two children here, siblings. I care for them as I do for my own children. I give them the maternal affection they have lost. They are in the observation for 21 days to ensure that they will not be a danger to others before handing them over to their father," she added. "I refuse the idea of the possibility of relapse, I do everything necessary to protect myself, wearing a protection blouse is indisputable, I shower before returning home." REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "EBOLA ZOHRA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
MALTA-DAPHNE/ANNIVERSARY
RTS2RFFG
October 16, 2019
Friends, family members and Michael Vella and Rose Vella, parents of anti-corruption journalist Daphne...
multiple cities, Malta
2nd anniversary of assassination of journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia
Friends, family members and Michael Vella and Rose Vella, parents of anti-corruption journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia, take part in a protest march on the second anniversary of her murder, in Valletta, Malta October 16, 2019. The banner reads, "Truth and justice". REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi
USA-TRUMP/
RTS2N09J
August 18, 2019
Viktor Knavs and Amalija Knavs, parents of U.S. first lady Melania Trump, arrive with U.S. President...
Andrews Afb, UNITED STATES
Viktor Knavs and Amalija Knavs, parents of U.S. first lady Melania Trump, arrive with U.S. President...
Viktor Knavs and Amalija Knavs, parents of U.S. first lady Melania Trump, arrive with U.S. President Donald Trump and his family aboard Air Force One at Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, U.S. August 18, 2019. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
AFRICA-SLAVERY/DESCENDANTS
RTX72BB5
August 05, 2019
Descendants of William Tucker, whose parents were brought from Angola on the first ship carrying enslaved...
Hampton, UNITED STATES
Descendants of William Tucker pray at the Tucker family cemetery in Hampton, Virginia
Descendants of William Tucker, whose parents were brought from Angola on the first ship carrying enslaved Africans to Virginia in 1619, holds hands during a prayer over a grave at the Tucker family cemetery in Hampton, Virginia U.S., July 27, 2019. Picture taken July 27, 2019. REUTERS/Michael A. McCoy
AFRICA-SLAVERY/DESCENDANTS
RTX729UV
August 05, 2019
Descendants of William Tucker, whose parents were brought from Angola on the first ship to bring Africans...
Hampton, UNITED STATES
Descendants of William Tucker gather in family cemetery in Hampton, Virginia
Descendants of William Tucker, whose parents were brought from Angola on the first ship to bring Africans to Virginia in 1619, gather at the Tucker family cemetery in Hampton, Virginia, U.S., July 27, 2019. The Tucker family trace their ancestry to the 1624 census of the then English colony of Virginia. Picture taken July, 27, 2019. REUTERS/Michael A. McCoy
AFRICA-SLAVERY/DESCENDANTS
RTX729UT
August 05, 2019
A grave marker is seen in the Tucker family cemetery in Hampton, Virginia U.S., July 27, 2019, 400 years...
Hampton, UNITED STATES
A grave marker is seen in the Tucker family cemetery in Hampton, Virginia
A grave marker is seen in the Tucker family cemetery in Hampton, Virginia U.S., July 27, 2019, 400 years after William Tucker's parents were brought from Angola on the first ship carrying enslaved Africans to Virginia in 1619. The Tucker family trace their ancestry to the 1624 census of the then English colony of Virginia. Picture taken July 27, 2019. REUTERS/Michael A. McCoy
AFRICA-SLAVERY/DESCENDANTS
RTX729US
August 05, 2019
Brenda Tucker, a descendent of one of the first black Americans William Tucker whose parents were brought...
Hampton, UNITED STATES
Brenda Tucker visits grave in Tucker family cemetery in Hampton, Virginia
Brenda Tucker, a descendent of one of the first black Americans William Tucker whose parents were brought from Angola on the first ship carrying enslaved Africans to Virginia in 1619, visits a grave at the Tucker family cemetery in Hampton, Virginia, U.S., July 27, 2019. The Tucker family trace their ancestry to the 1624 census of the then English colony of Virginia. Picture taken July 27, 2019. REUTERS/Michael A. McCoy
AFRICA-SLAVERY/DESCENDANTS
RTX729UM
August 05, 2019
The entrance to the Tucker family cemetery is seen in Hampton, Virginia U.S., July 27, 2019, 400 years...
Hampton, UNITED STATES
The entrance to the Tucker family cemetery is seen in Hampton, Virginia
The entrance to the Tucker family cemetery is seen in Hampton, Virginia U.S., July 27, 2019, 400 years after William Tucker's parents were brought from Angola on the first ship carrying enslaved Africans to Virginia in 1619. The Tucker family trace their ancestry to the 1624 census of the then English colony of Virginia. Picture taken July 27, 2019. REUTERS/Michael A. McCoy
AFRICA-SLAVERY/DESCENDANTS
RTX729UL
August 05, 2019
Shirley Petteaway, a descendent of William Tucker whose parents were brought from Angola on the first...
Hampton, UNITED STATES
Tucker desendent Petteaway visits grave at the Tucker family cemetery in Hampton, Virginia
Shirley Petteaway, a descendent of William Tucker whose parents were brought from Angola on the first ship carrying enslaved Africans to Virginia in 1619, pays respects to a family member buried at the Tucker family cemetery in Hampton, Virginia, U.S., July 27, 2019. The Tucker family trace their ancestry to the 1624 census of the then English colony of Virginia. Picture taken July 27, 2019. REUTERS/Michael A. McCoy
AFRICA-SLAVERY/DESCENDANTS
RTX729UI
August 05, 2019
Verrandall S.Tucker, a descendent of William Tucker whose parents were brought from Angola on the first...
Hampton, UNITED STATES
Verrandall Tucker pauses while visiting gravesite in Tucker family cemetery in Hampton, Virginia
Verrandall S.Tucker, a descendent of William Tucker whose parents were brought from Angola on the first ship to bring enslaved Africans to Virginia in 1619, pays respects to a family member buried at the Tucker family cemetery in Hampton, Virginia, U.S., July 27, 2019. The Tucker family trace their ancestry to the 1624 census of the then English colony of Virginia. Picture taken July 27, 2019. REUTERS/Michael A. McCoy
AFRICA-SLAVERY/DESCENDANTS
RTX729UH
August 05, 2019
A flower lays on a grave in the Tucker family cemetery in Hampton, Virginia U.S., July 27, 2019, 400...
Hampton, UNITED STATES
A flower lays on a grave in the Tucker family cemetery in Hampton, Virginia
A flower lays on a grave in the Tucker family cemetery in Hampton, Virginia U.S., July 27, 2019, 400 years after William Tucker's parents were brought from Angola on the first ship carrying enslaved Africans to Virginia in 1619. The Tucker family trace their ancestry to the 1624 census of the then English colony of Virginia. Picture taken July 27, 2019. REUTERS/Michael A. McCoy
AFRICA-SLAVERY/DESCENDANTS
RTX729UB
August 05, 2019
A flower lays on a grave in the Tucker family cemetery in Hampton, Virginia U.S., July 27, 2019, 400...
Hampton, UNITED STATES
A flower lays on a grave in the Tucker family cemetery in Hampton, Virginia
A flower lays on a grave in the Tucker family cemetery in Hampton, Virginia U.S., July 27, 2019, 400 years after William Tucker's parents were brought from Angola on the first ship carrying enslaved Africans to Virginia in 1619. The Tucker family trace their ancestry to the 1624 census of the then English colony of Virginia. Picture taken July 27, 2019. REUTERS/Michael A. McCoy
AFRICA-SLAVERY/DESCENDANTS
RTX729UA
August 05, 2019
Vincent Tucker, a descendent of William Tucker and president of the William Tucker 1624 Society, stands...
Hampton, UNITED STATES
Vincent Tucker visits the Tucker family cemetery in Hampton, Virginia
Vincent Tucker, a descendent of William Tucker and president of the William Tucker 1624 Society, stands among grave markers at the Tucker family cemetery in Hampton, Virginia, U.S., July 27, 2019, 400 years after William Tucker's parents were brought from Angola on the first ship carrying enslaved Africans to Virginia in 1619. The Tucker family trace their ancestry to the 1624 census of the then English colony of Virginia. Picture taken July 27, 2019. REUTERS/Michael A. McCoy
AFRICA-SLAVERY/DESCENDANTS
RTX729U7
August 05, 2019
Shirley Petteaway, a descendent of William Tucker whose parents were brought from Angola on the first...
Hampton, UNITED STATES
Tucker desendent Petteaway visits grave at the Tucker family cemetery in Hampton, Virginia
Shirley Petteaway, a descendent of William Tucker whose parents were brought from Angola on the first ship carrying enslaved Africans to Virginia in 1619, pays respects to a family member buried at the Tucker family cemetery in Hampton, Virginia, U.S., July 27, 2019. The Tucker family trace their ancestry to the 1624 census of the then English colony of Virginia. Picture taken July 27, 2019. REUTERS/Michael A. McCoy
AFRICA-SLAVERY/DESCENDANTS
RTX729U5
August 05, 2019
Brenda Tucker, a descendent of one of the first black Americans William Tucker whose parents were brought...
Hampton, UNITED STATES
Brenda Tucker visits grave in Tucker family cemetery in Hampton, Virginia
Brenda Tucker, a descendent of one of the first black Americans William Tucker whose parents were brought from Angola on the first ship carrying enslaved Africans to Virginia in 1619, pays her respects at a family member's grave at the Tucker family cemetery in Hampton, Virginia, U.S., July 27, 2019. The Tucker family trace their ancestry to the 1624 census of the then English colony of Virginia. Picture taken July 27, 2019. REUTERS/Michael A. McCoy
AFRICA-SLAVERY/DESCENDANTS
RTX729U4
August 05, 2019
Verrandall Tucker and Brenda Tucker, descendants of William Tucker whose parents were brought from Angola...
Hampton, UNITED STATES
Desendants of William Tucker gather at the Tucker family cemetery in Hampton, Virginia
Verrandall Tucker and Brenda Tucker, descendants of William Tucker whose parents were brought from Angola on the first ship carrying enslaved Africans to Virginia in 1619, gather at the Tucker family cemetery in Hampton, Virginia, U.S., July 27, 2019. The Tucker family trace their ancestry to the 1624 census of the then English colony of Virginia. Picture taken July 27, 2019. REUTERS/Michael A. McCoy
BELGIUM-ANIMALS/
RTX71Y3G
August 02, 2019
Three-year-old orangutan of Sumatra, Berani, and his father Ujilan, are pictured at the Pairi Daiza wildlife...
Brugelette, Belgium
Three-year-old orangutan of Sumatra, Berani, and his father Ujilan, are pictured at the Pairi Daiza wildlife...
Three-year-old orangutan of Sumatra, Berani, and his father Ujilan, are pictured at the Pairi Daiza wildlife park, zoo and botanical garden in Brugelette, Belgium August 2, 2019. REUTERS/Yves Herman
HONGKONG-EXTRADITION/YOUNGPEOPLE
RTS2KUHJ
July 03, 2019
A combination picture shows native Hong Kong resident Ruka Tong, 21, a student, posing for a picture...
Hong Kong, China
The Wider Image: Frustration of surviving pricey Hong Kong stirs protest anger
A combination picture shows native Hong Kong resident Ruka Tong, 21, a student, posing for a picture in her bedroom of her family's apartment in Hong Kong, China June 28, 2019 and residential apartment blocks in Hong Kong, China, June 28, 2019. Tong shares her 11 sq meter room with two of her sisters. Their Parents live in the same apartment. Until last year, the family of five lived in a 28 sq meter room. "You see me always at work to earn more money to buy a flat. I work seven days a week in five jobs. One office job and four jobs giving tutorial classes. Just 2-3 hours resting time. I need to earn more money to save for academia and for my family," Tong said. "There are so many pressures in Hong Kong, price pressure, academic pressure.. I don't want the future generation to face this problem." REUTERS/Thomas Peter SEARCH "YOUNG HK" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HONGKONG-EXTRADITION/YOUNGPEOPLE
RTS2KUH6
July 03, 2019
Native Hong Kong resident Maisy Mok, 22, a student studying international journalism, poses for a picture...
Hong Kong, China
The Wider Image: Frustration of surviving pricey Hong Kong stirs protest anger
Native Hong Kong resident Maisy Mok, 22, a student studying international journalism, poses for a picture in her 9 sq meter bedroom of her family's apartment in Hong Kong, China June 29, 2019. Mok lives with her dad who sleeps on a couch as the apartment is too small. Her parents are divorced. "Recently I came back to live with my dad. Sometimes I feel bad that my dad has to sleep on the couch, because everybody deserves their own privacy," Mok said. "Us, who are born around the 1997 handover, we know that we are Hong Kong people. We don't have the sense that we are Chinese citizens until we get to secondary school. We have our own unique language. It's harder for us to transition because people of my generation we have this thought that we are Hong Kongers, this identity, we hold it very strongly," she added. "I feel I could never let go of freedom of speech. I feel like the judiciary system in Hong Kong is pretty good. And I love political satire, these are the things that got me into journalism and politics. If these were taken away, even with the money and benefits that the mainland can bring, or bigger housing, I wouldn't feel happy about it. Sometimes it feels like you are trapped. So for us, who are used to this kind of freedom, we might not get used to it." REUTERS/Thomas Peter SEARCH "YOUNG HK" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
HONGKONG-EXTRADITION/YOUNGPEOPLE
RTS2KUH5
July 03, 2019
Native Hong Kong resident Ruka Tong, 21, a student, poses for a picture in her bedroom of her family's...
Hong Kong, China
The Wider Image: Frustration of surviving pricey Hong Kong stirs protest anger
Native Hong Kong resident Ruka Tong, 21, a student, poses for a picture in her bedroom of her family's apartment in Hong Kong, China June 28, 2019. Tong shares her 11 sq meter room with two of her sisters. Their Parents live in the same apartment. Until last year, the family of five lived in a 28 sq meter room. "You see me always at work to earn more money to buy a flat. I work seven days a week in five jobs. One office job and four jobs giving tutorial classes. Just 2-3 hours resting time. I need to earn more money to save for academia and for my family," Tong said. "There are so many pressures in Hong Kong, price pressure, academic pressure.. I don't want the future generation to face this problem." REUTERS/Thomas Peter SEARCH "YOUNG HK" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
HONGKONG-EXTRADITION/YOUNGPEOPLE
RTS2KUH4
July 03, 2019
Native Hong Kong resident Eunice Wai, 30, a primary school teacher, who lives with her parents and a...
Hong Kong, China
The Wider Image: Frustration of surviving pricey Hong Kong stirs protest anger
Native Hong Kong resident Eunice Wai, 30, a primary school teacher, who lives with her parents and a brother, poses for a picture in her 7.4 sq metre bedroom of her family's apartment in Hong Kong, China, June 25, 2019. Wai explained how Hong Kong people felt stifled by Beijing: "They control people more and give us less freedom." But she said other problems made life increasingly difficult, in particular what she said was an unfair housing policy that only seemed to make the rich richer. "Housing is one of the most important ones. We have so little room in Hong Kong and people find it hard to buy a flat. The property companies control the market." REUTERS/Thomas Peter SEARCH "YOUNG HK" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
HONGKONG-EXTRADITION/YOUNGPEOPLE
RTS2KUGM
July 03, 2019
A combination picture shows native Hong Kong resident Maisy Mok, 22, a student studying international...
Hong Kong, China
The Wider Image: Frustration of surviving pricey Hong Kong stirs protest anger
A combination picture shows native Hong Kong resident Maisy Mok, 22, a student studying international journalism, posing for a picture in her 9 sq meter bedroom of her family's apartment in Hong Kong, China June 29, 2019 and a design feature in a staircase in a residential apartment block in Hong Kong, China, June 29, 2019. Mok lives with her dad who sleeps on a couch as the apartment is too small. Her parents are divorced. "Recently I came back to live with my dad. Sometimes I feel bad that my dad has to sleep on the couch, because everybody deserves their own privacy," Mok said. "Us, who are born around the 1997 handover, we know that we are Hong Kong people. We don't have the sense that we are Chinese citizens until we get to secondary school. We have our own unique language. It's harder for us to transition because people of my generation we have this thought that we are Hong Kongers, this identity, we hold it very strongly," she added. "I feel I could never let go of freedom of speech. I feel like the judiciary system in Hong Kong is pretty good. And I love political satire, these are the things that got me into journalism and politics. If these were taken away, even with the money and benefits that the mainland can bring, or bigger housing, I wouldn't feel happy about it. Sometimes it feels like you are trapped. So for us, who are used to this kind of freedom, we might not get used to it." REUTERS/Thomas Peter SEARCH "YOUNG HK" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
HONGKONG-EXTRADITION/YOUNGPEOPLE
RTS2KUGD
July 03, 2019
A combination picture shows native Hong Kong resident Eunice Wai, 30, a primary school teacher, who lives...
Hong Kong, China
The Wider Image: Frustration of surviving pricey Hong Kong stirs protest anger
A combination picture shows native Hong Kong resident Eunice Wai, 30, a primary school teacher, who lives with her parents and a brother, posing for a picture in her 7.4 sq metre bedroom of her family's apartment in Hong Kong, China, June 25, 2019 and laundry hanging out to dry in a residential apartment complex in Hong Kong, China, June 27, 2019. Wai explained how Hong Kong people felt stifled by Beijing: "They control people more and give us less freedom." But she said other problems made life increasingly difficult, in particular what she said was an unfair housing policy that only seemed to make the rich richer. "Housing is one of the most important ones. We have so little room in Hong Kong and people find it hard to buy a flat. The property companies control the market." REUTERS/Thomas Peter SEARCH "YOUNG HK" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
SWISS-ANIMAL/
RTX6WP1Q
May 27, 2019
A newly born cygnet falls in front of its pen, by the female swan, early morning at Bains des Paquis...
Geneva, Switzerland
A newly born cygnet falls in front of its pen, by the female swan, early morning at Bains des Paquis...
A newly born cygnet falls in front of its pen, by the female swan, early morning at Bains des Paquis in Geneva, Switzerland May 27, 2019. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse
SWISS-ANIMAL/
RTX6WP1P
May 27, 2019
A newly born cygnet falls in front of its pen, by the female swan, early morning at Bains des Paquis...
Geneva, Switzerland
A newly born cygnet falls in front of its pen, by the female swan, early morning at Bains des Paquis...
A newly born cygnet falls in front of its pen, by the female swan, early morning at Bains des Paquis in Geneva, Switzerland May 27, 2019. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse
AUSTRIA-ANIMALS/
RTS2H589
April 10, 2019
A black-and-white colobus monkey holds its 11 days old infant at its enclosure in Schoenbrunn Zoo in...
Vienna, Austria
A black-and-white colobus monkey holds its 11 days old infant at its enclosure in Schoenbrunn Zoo in...
A black-and-white colobus monkey holds its 11 days old infant at its enclosure in Schoenbrunn Zoo in Vienna, Austria April 10, 2019. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger
AUSTRIA-ANIMALS/
RTS2H584
April 10, 2019
A black-and-white colobus monkey holds its 11 days old infant at its enclosure in Schoenbrunn Zoo in...
Vienna, Austria
A black-and-white colobus monkey holds its 11 days old infant at its enclosure in Schoenbrunn Zoo in...
A black-and-white colobus monkey holds its 11 days old infant at its enclosure in Schoenbrunn Zoo in Vienna, Austria April 10, 2019. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger
BELARUS-WEATHER/
RTS2G73Q
April 03, 2019
People enjoy sunset at a lake on the outskirts of Minsk, Belarus April 3, 2019. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko...
Minsk, Belarus
People enjoy sunset at a lake on the outskirts of Minsk
People enjoy sunset at a lake on the outskirts of Minsk, Belarus April 3, 2019. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko
CHINA-WOMAN/BOXING
RTS2FXLW
April 01, 2019
Huang Wensi play-fights with her brother-in-law at home in Lianjiang, Guangdong province, China, June...
LIANJIANG, China
The Wider Image: Chinese boxer trounces stereotypes to become 'Queen of the Ring'
Huang Wensi play-fights with her brother-in-law at home in Lianjiang, Guangdong province, China, June 30, 2018. Due to a cultural preference for boys over girls, Huang's parents never cared much for her opinion, but her success as an athlete has improved her standing in the family. Huang is one of a small but growing number of women in China to embrace professional boxing, relishing its intense nature despite traditional stereotypes that steer women away from such activities. "A women is not just limited to being a wife or mother in the house," she said. REUTERS/Yue Wu SEARCH "WU BOXER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
CHINA-WOMAN/BOXING
RTS2FXLU
April 01, 2019
Huang Wensi and her father argue over family matters during a dinner at home in Lianjiang, Guangdong...
LIANJIANG, China
The Wider Image: Chinese boxer trounces stereotypes to become 'Queen of the Ring'
Huang Wensi and her father argue over family matters during a dinner at home in Lianjiang, Guangdong province, China, June 30, 2018. Due to a cultural preference for boys over girls, Huang's parents never cared much for her opinion, but her success as an athlete has improved her standing in the family. Huang is one of a small but growing number of women in China to embrace professional boxing, relishing its intense nature despite traditional stereotypes that steer women away from such activities. "A women is not just limited to being a wife or mother in the house," she said. REUTERS/Yue Wu SEARCH "WU BOXER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
GLOBAL-PARENTS/
RTX6PVO6
March 06, 2019
Public relations account director Peiru Ng, 32, poses with her husband, finance manager Kenny Lee, 33,...
Singapore, Singapore
The Wider Image: New mothers suffer nerves, guilt as maternity leave ends
Public relations account director Peiru Ng, 32, poses with her husband, finance manager Kenny Lee, 33, and their two-and-a-half year old daughter Faith and 12-week-old son Scott in her first week back at work, at their home in Singapore, February 17, 2019. Singaporean mothers are by and large entitled to 16 weeks of paid maternity leave while fathers are allowed two weeks of leave. Peiru chose to end her maternity leave after 12 weeks, four weeks earlier than she is entitled, because of a busy period at work. "Having my work is like having me time. I feel that work makes me a better mum. Of course, this is not to say that there's anything wrong with being a stay-at-home mum, but personally I like the sense of also leading a life for myself and not solely playing the role of a mother", she said, "It's better to have things more flexible and to see maternity leave in a more long-term way rather than a one-off, (and) to have a workplace more parent-friendly, allowing us to take leave as and when we need to. Kenny took five days off even though his company allows him two months. "I just take this as and when needed", he said, "I think, two weeks for dads is pathetic. One or two months would be great for the family bonding time. But practically and realistically, it's hard because it's difficult to detach from work." REUTERS/Feline Lim SEARCH "MOTHERS GLOBAL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
STORM-MICHAEL/RESCUE
RTX6GFIQ
October 25, 2018
After a fitful night of throbbing abdominal pain, curled up in a ball inside her hurricane-battered home...
FOUNTAIN, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: Volunteers rush to aid survivors after Hurricane Michael
After a fitful night of throbbing abdominal pain, curled up in a ball inside her hurricane-battered home trying to wish away the agony, 21-year-old Angelena Sawyer could barely function, let alone tend to her infant daughter. Writhing in misery, Sawyer had no idea she was suffering from acute appendicitis. Neither did her parents nor her husband, Jacob Sibilia, fully realize the gravity of the situation as they coped with the larger crisis of surviving the aftermath of a natural disaster. A week already had passed since Hurricane Michael laid waste to rural Bay County, Florida, leaving Sawyer's family, like many others, essentially stranded without electricity, phone service or running water. They had little if any gasoline, a 3-month-old to care for, and Sawyer's stepmother, Jessica Melvin, was suffering from an infected foot injury. The turning point was a random visit that day by three disaster volunteers - Zach Smith, John Basehore and Robert Pepper - checking on residents door to door in the sparsely populated Florida Panhandle community of Fountain, northeast of Panama City. REUTERS/Brian Snyder SEARCH "SNYDER SAWYER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: STORM-MICHAEL/RESCUE
STORM-MICHAEL/RESCUE
RTX6GCJ3
October 24, 2018
After a fitful night of throbbing abdominal pain, curled up in a ball inside her hurricane-battered home...
FOUNTAIN, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: Volunteers rush to aid survivors after Hurricane Michael
After a fitful night of throbbing abdominal pain, curled up in a ball inside her hurricane-battered home trying to wish away the agony, 21-year-old Angelena Sawyer could barely function, let alone tend to her infant daughter. Writhing in misery, Sawyer had no idea she was suffering from acute appendicitis. Neither did her parents nor her husband, Jacob Sibilia, fully realize the gravity of the situation as they coped with the larger crisis of surviving the aftermath of a natural disaster. A week already had passed since Hurricane Michael laid waste to rural Bay County, Florida, leaving Sawyer's family, like many others, essentially stranded without electricity, phone service or running water. They had little if any gasoline, a 3-month-old to care for, and Sawyer's stepmother, Jessica Melvin, was suffering from an infected foot injury. The turning point was a random visit that day by three disaster volunteers - Zach Smith, John Basehore and Robert Pepper - checking on residents door to door in the sparsely populated Florida Panhandle community of Fountain, northeast of Panama City. REUTERS/Brian Snyder SEARCH "SNYDER SAWYER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: STORM-MICHAEL/RESCUE
BRITAIN-ENVIRONMENT/
RTX6CVUU
July 26, 2018
An Atlantic Puffin stands next to its chick known as a "Puffling" on the island of Skomer, Pembrokeshire,...
SKOMER, United Kingdom
An Atlantic Puffin stands next to its chick known as a "Puffling" on the island of Skomer, Pembrokeshire,...
An Atlantic Puffin stands next to its chick known as a "Puffling" on the island of Skomer, Pembrokeshire, Wales, Britain July 24, 2018. Picture taken July 24, 2018. REUTERS/Rebecca Naden
USA-IMMIGRATION/REUNION
RTX6CPG4
July 25, 2018
Maria Marroquin Perdomo fretted as she waited with her 11-year-old son, Abisai, in the New Orleans International...
Brownsville, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: Reunited family's next challenge: fight for U.S. asylum
Maria Marroquin Perdomo fretted as she waited with her 11-year-old son, Abisai, in the New Orleans International Airport. A day earlier, the mother and son had been reunited in Texas after being separated by U.S. immigration officials for more than a month, an ordeal that followed a harrowing journey from Honduras. Now they awaited another reunion: With the father Abisai had not seen in person since he was an infant. For days, she had been consumed by a range of emotions: joy and relief at finding her son; anxiety over whether his father truly wanted her with him after a long estrangement; guilt over the terrors Abisai had suffered; and fear over how her asylum case would play out amid a sweeping U.S. immigration crackdown. Such anxieties are common as the administration of U.S. President Donald Trump scrambles to return as many as 2,500 immigrant children to their parents by a court-ordered deadline of July 26. The joyful reunions are by no means happy endings. Even as some of the parents get glimpses of the lives they had hoped for in America, they face new challenges in avoiding deportation and keeping their families together. For Marroquin Perdomo, that will mean trying to convince an immigration judge she fled Honduras for one of the specific reasons outlined in asylum laws. Making that case got much harder last month with an appellate decision issued by Attorney General Jeff Sessions that immigration attorneys say disallowed some of the asylum justifications most often cited by Central Americans, including fear of unchecked domestic or gang violence. Marroquin Perdomo has passed a first hurdle, convincing an asylum officer that she has a "credible fear" of returning home. Sessions, in his June 11 decision, sharply narrowed the circumstances under which immigrants can use violence at home as grounds for U.S. asylum. To qualify, applicants now need to show either that the government condoned the violence or that they were targeted because of their membership in
FLORIDA-SHOOTING/FAMILY
RTX68VI4
June 13, 2018
Hundreds of seniors in red caps and gowns at their Florida high school graduation ceremony on June 3...
PARKLAND, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: Parkland survivors keep memory of shooting alive
Hundreds of seniors in red caps and gowns at their Florida high school graduation ceremony on June 3 listened intently to speakers who told them what they could achieve. "Don't let anything stop you," one said. But when student Joaquin Oliver's name was read out by the principal, it was his parents Manuel Oliver and Patricia Padauy who walked onto the stage to receive his diploma. Joaquin, 17, was one of the 17 students and staff members killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, on February 14, 2018. The massacre by a former student who stormed classrooms on Valentine's Day with an assault rifle has spurred unprecedented activism by victims' families to prevent future gun violence. "This Should Be My Son," read the words on the bright yellow t-shirt Patricia wore for the ceremony at an indoor arena in the nearby city of Sunrise. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins SEARCH "RAWLINS PARKLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY Matching text: FLORIDA-SHOOTING/FAMILY
THAILAND-RELIGION/
RTX5Y7D9
April 25, 2018
Golden umbrellas draped in beads and flowers provide shade for boys as young as seven riding on their...
Mae Hong Son, Thailand
The Wider Image: Beloved princes become Buddhist novices in Thailand
Golden umbrellas draped in beads and flowers provide shade for boys as young as seven riding on their fathers' shoulders in a procession through the mountain town of Mae Hong Son on Thailand's northern border. Dressed in clothes dominated by neon pinks and greens with elaborate headgear, their lips and cheeks brightly rouged for the most important day of their short lives, about 50 boys advance to the lively beat of drums, cymbals and gongs. The event is a rite of passage to initiate the boys as Buddhist novices, the highlight of an annual celebration by the Shan ethnic group that lives mainly in neighbouring Myanmar, but is also spread through China, Laos and Thailand. To fulfil the dream of a son's participation in the prestigious event, parents willingly scrimp for a long time, others accept relatives' donations to defray costs, and the poorest may even send offspring to live with wealthier families. The rite of Poy Sang Long, as the celebration is known, represents the early childhood of the founder of Buddhism, Siddharta Gautama, who was born a prince about 2,600 years ago. He is said to have given up a life of royal splendour to live as a holy man after witnessing sickness and death outside the palace. REUTERS/Jorge Silva SEARCH "POY SANG" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: THAILAND-RELIGION/
NORTHKOREA-CHINA/BORDER-DEFECTORS
RTX5N7EI
April 12, 2018
A combination picture shows Kang, 28, posing for a photograph (top) and her dog fur coat, in Seoul, South...
Seoul, South Korea
The Wider Image: Escape from North Korea
A combination picture shows Kang, 28, posing for a photograph (top) and her dog fur coat, in Seoul, South Korea, August 8, 2017. The parents of Kang sent out a coat across the Chinese border after she reached the South in 2010. "I didn't ask my mother to send me this coat," said Kang, who wanted to be identified only by her surname. "But she knew I feel the cold easily and sent it to me. She sent some honey too, but it went missing on the way. The coat is made of dog fur. I don't know what kind of dog. In 2010, it cost about 700,000 North Korean won ($88 at the unofficial rate). It was really expensive. A North Korean friend went to China to pick it up for me. I liked this coat when I got it. I thought my mother must've spent quite a lot of money on it. My father was a party officer. Our family had a car and we lived in a special apartment. Ordinary people couldn't afford to wear this kind of coat, not even soldiers. Commissioned officers could afford them. Border guards would wear them. It wasn't easy to buy this kind of coat, but as time went on, fake ones began to appear. The state often clamped down on this item. It's technically military supplies so the state monitored people who altered the design of the coat. I know just from looking at this coat that it's a counterfeit one, not the official version. The counterfeit ones look quite different from the original ones. Military officials preferred the fakes to the original because the design looked much better. The children of rich families would wear them. I look too chubby in this, so don't wear it here. I thought I could probably wear it if I altered it." REUTERS/Kim Hong-ji SEARCH "DEFECTORS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
NORTHKOREA-CHINA/BORDER-DEFECTORS
RTX5N7CR
April 12, 2018
A dog fur coat belonging to Kang, who wanted to be identified only by her surname, is seen in Seoul,...
Seoul, South Korea
The Wider Image: Escape from North Korea
A dog fur coat belonging to Kang, who wanted to be identified only by her surname, is seen in Seoul, South Korea, August 8, 2017. The parents of Kang sent out a coat across the Chinese border after she reached the South in 2010. "I didn't ask my mother to send me this coat," said Kang. "But she knew I feel the cold easily and sent it to me. She sent some honey too, but it went missing on the way. The coat is made of dog fur. I don't know what kind of dog. In 2010, it cost about 700,000 North Korean won ($88 at the unofficial rate). It was really expensive. A North Korean friend went to China to pick it up for me. I liked this coat when I got it. I thought my mother must've spent quite a lot of money on it. My father was a party officer. Our family had a car and we lived in a special apartment. Ordinary people couldn't afford to wear this kind of coat, not even soldiers. Commissioned officers could afford them. Border guards would wear them. It wasn't easy to buy this kind of coat, but as time went on, fake ones began to appear. The state often clamped down on this item. It's technically military supplies so the state monitored people who altered the design of the coat. I know just from looking at this coat that it's a counterfeit one, not the official version. The counterfeit ones look quite different from the original ones. Military officials preferred the fakes to the original because the design looked much better. The children of rich families would wear them. I look too chubby in this, so don't wear it here. I thought I could probably wear it if I altered it." REUTERS/Kim Hong-ji SEARCH "DEFECTORS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
NORTHKOREA-CHINA/BORDER-DEFECTORS
RTX5N7C2
April 12, 2018
Kang, 28, who wanted to be identified only by her surname, poses for a photograph in Seoul, South Korea,...
Seoul, South Korea
The Wider Image: Escape from North Korea
Kang, 28, who wanted to be identified only by her surname, poses for a photograph in Seoul, South Korea, August 8, 2017. The parents of Kang sent out a coat across the Chinese border after she reached the South in 2010. "I didn't ask my mother to send me this coat," said Kang. "But she knew I feel the cold easily and sent it to me. She sent some honey too, but it went missing on the way. The coat is made of dog fur. I don't know what kind of dog. In 2010, it cost about 700,000 North Korean won ($88 at the unofficial rate). It was really expensive. A North Korean friend went to China to pick it up for me. I liked this coat when I got it. I thought my mother must've spent quite a lot of money on it. My father was a party officer. Our family had a car and we lived in a special apartment. Ordinary people couldn't afford to wear this kind of coat, not even soldiers. Commissioned officers could afford them. Border guards would wear them. It wasn't easy to buy this kind of coat, but as time went on, fake ones began to appear. The state often clamped down on this item. It's technically military supplies so the state monitored people who altered the design of the coat. I know just from looking at this coat that it's a counterfeit one, not the official version. The counterfeit ones look quite different from the original ones. Military officials preferred the fakes to the original because the design looked much better. The children of rich families would wear them. I look too chubby in this, so don't wear it here. I thought I could probably wear it if I altered it." REUTERS/Kim Hong-ji SEARCH "DEFECTORS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Sort by
Display
Items per page
Page
of 24