Ajax loader
By using our website, you agree to our use of cookies as described in Cookie Policy.

Can't find what you're looking for?

 

Be sure to Sign in to see all available content.

 

If you don't have an account, Register here.

Search results for: Over-clothes

GLOBAL-POY/STORIES-2020
RTX8BCUT
November 23, 2020
Protesters on horseback rally against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, through...
Houston, UNITED STATES
Pictures of the Year: A Picture and its Story
Protesters on horseback rally against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, through downtown Houston, Texas, U.S., June 2, 2020. Reuters photographer Adrees Latif: "A week after the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police, tens of thousands of demonstrators poured into Floyd's hometown of Houston for an emotional and peaceful march to honor his life and protest police brutality. Driving into the city center, I saw thousands of Houstonians walking for miles to take part in the event. Many held signs and wore clothes bearing the image of George Floyd. As I raced towards the start of the march, I heard the distinctive sound of horses coming in my direction. With each trot along the brick-paved street, their approach echoed off the skyscrapers. A man wearing a red bandana with the words "Rap-A-Lot Records" took the lead in the procession, blocked the intersection and raised his fist in the air. Others followed in solidarity and before long, I was in the midst of a cavalry of Black Americans on horseback. With my senses overcome by the sounds, smells and splendor of the horses amid the towering buildings, I moved to compose and capture the moment before it was over. As quickly as the group appeared, the words 'Justice for George Floyd' and 'Black Lives Matter,' could be heard as the equestrians rode off into the distance." REUTERS/Adrees Latif/File photo SEARCH "POY STORIES 2020" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
GLOBAL-POY/STORIES-2020
RTX8BCUI
November 23, 2020
Samburu men attempt to fend-off a swarm of desert locusts flying over a grazing land in Lemasulani village,...
Samburu, Kenya
Pictures of the Year: A Picture and its Story
Samburu men attempt to fend-off a swarm of desert locusts flying over a grazing land in Lemasulani village, Samburu County, Kenya, January 17, 2020. Reuters photographer Monicah Mwangi: "Desert locusts have been recorded in the Horn of Africa since biblical times, but this year, unusual weather patterns exacerbated by climate change created the perfect circumstances for swarms to descend in northern Kenya. The entire grazing field where they had gathered in Samburu County was covered in yellow as the insects munched on grass meant for livestock. 'The locusts are in millions, they will finish all the vegetation, and then what will our animals feed on?' said one local trying to fend off the swarms by shouting and beating on empty containers. Being in the middle of the swarm of locusts was scary, as some would hit the camera with full force and die. I had to keep on wiping my camera lens, and my movement in the cloud was limited. If I had tried to talk, I would be eating flying locusts raw. I wanted to juxtapose the colourful modern clothes of the Samburu men using an old technique to try and disperse the swarm with the buzzing yellow locusts destroying the future by eating the grazing grass. Soon after I took this picture, a plane spraying pesticide flew over the swarm and they disappeared on their migratory path." REUTERS/Monicah Mwangi/File photo SEARCH "POY STORIES 2020" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
NIGERIA-PROTESTS/POLICE
RTX8389H
October 18, 2020
"End Sars" referring to the Special Anti-Robbery Squad police unit, reads on a demonstrator's cloth during...
Lagos, Nigeria
"End Sars" reads on a demonstrator's cloth during a protest over alleged police brutality in Lagos
"End Sars" referring to the Special Anti-Robbery Squad police unit, reads on a demonstrator's cloth during a protest over alleged police brutality in Lagos, Nigeria October 17, 2020. REUTERS/Temilade Adelaja
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E9B
October 15, 2020
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E97
October 15, 2020
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
London, United Kingdom
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8V
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8U
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8T
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8S
October 15, 2020
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8R
October 15, 2020
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8Q
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8O
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8N
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City,...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8K
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8E
October 15, 2020
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8F
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8D
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8C
October 15, 2020
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New...
New York, UNITED STATES
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E89
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-ANIMALS
RTX7TXNN
September 07, 2020
Xita, a tiny monkey with sad brown eyes, clutches her newborn tight. Both are fighting for their lives....
Porto Velho, Brazil
The Wider Image: The mission to save the Amazon's animals
Xita, a tiny monkey with sad brown eyes, clutches her newborn tight. Both are fighting for their lives. Vets working at the Clinidog clinic in the Amazon city of Porto Velho believe the mother and baby were run over by a car as they fled fires raging across the world's largest rainforest. "She arrived stressed, screaming and smeared with blood," said Carlos Henrique Tiburcio, the owner of the clinic, as he wrapped the pair in a small, white cloth. Creatures of the Amazon, one of the earth's most biodiverse habitats, face an ever-growing threat as loggers and farms advance further and further into the rainforest. In the dry season ranchers and land speculators set fires to clear deforested woodland for pasture. Blazes can rage out of control, fueled by the swirling wind and dry foliage. Wildlife flee from the smoke and flames. Weak and dying animals arrive at Tiburcio's clinic where four volunteers work tirelessly to save them. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino SEARCH "BRAZIL ANIMALS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-ANIMALS
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/EGYPT
RTX7NTP6
August 05, 2020
People wearing protective face masks, amid concerns over the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak,...
Cairo, Egypt
People wearing protective face masks, amid concerns over the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak,...
People wearing protective face masks, amid concerns over the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, walk past a clothing store with sale signs in the shop window in Cairo, Egypt, August 5, 2020. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/EGYPT
RTX7NTP7
August 05, 2020
A girl wearing a protective face mask, amid concerns over the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak,...
Cairo, Egypt
A girl wearing a protective face mask, amid concerns over the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak,...
A girl wearing a protective face mask, amid concerns over the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, walks next to a clothing store with sale signs in the shop window in Cairo, Egypt, August 5, 2020. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
EGYPT-ECONOMY/
RTX7NTOJ
August 05, 2020
A man wears a protective mask, amid concerns over the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, walks...
Cairo, Egypt
A man wears a protective mask, amid concerns over the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, walks...
A man wears a protective mask, amid concerns over the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, walks past a clothing store with sale signs in a shop window in Cairo, Egypt, August 5, 2020. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
MYANMAR-MARBLE/
RTS3H7Z6
July 02, 2020
The fine white dust that shrouds much of his northern Myanmar village also covers sculptor Chin Win as...
SAGYIN, Myanmar
The Wider Image: From statues to toothpaste, the Myanmar village 'blessed' with marble bounty
The fine white dust that shrouds much of his northern Myanmar village also covers sculptor Chin Win as he leans over a half-finished Buddha statue. "We are blessed to carve Buddha," he said at his stone workshop surrounded by the seven white hills that give Sagyin village its name, which means "marble" in Burmese. For generations, artisans in this part of Buddhist-majority Myanmar have carved out a living from the marble, fashioning mostly colossal Buddha statues to be sold in the nearby city of Mandalay or exported to neighbouring China and Thailand. Many of the several thousand villagers here earn a modest living from the marble mines, hauling the slabs down the hill, carving them into statues, or exporting them overseas. Burmese marble, which ranges from pure white to bluish grey, is prized for its hardness and texture. A 45-tonne slab can sell for $40,000. In Sagyin, specks of the stone are used for everything from brushing teeth to washing clothes. REUTERS/Ann Wang TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SEARCH "SAGYIN MARBLE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. MATCHING TEXT: MYANMAR-MARBLE/ TEMPLATE OUT
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/LEBANON
RTX7JWL0
May 21, 2020
A man wearing a face mask walks past displayed clothing for sale, ahead of the upcoming holiday of Eid...
Sidon, Lebanon
A man wearing a face mask walks past displayed clothing for sale
A man wearing a face mask walks past displayed clothing for sale, ahead of the upcoming holiday of Eid al-Fitr marking the end of Ramadan, amid concerns over the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Sidon, southern Lebanon May 21, 2020. REUTERS/Aziz Taher
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SOUTHASIA
RTX7IDNL
May 11, 2020
Customers are seen inside a clothing shop as limited number of shopping malls reopened after the government...
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Customers are seen inside a clothing shop as limited number of shopping malls reopened after the government...
Customers are seen inside a clothing shop as limited number of shopping malls reopened after the government has eased the restrictions amid concerns over the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Dhaka, Bangladesh May 11, 2020. REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SOUTHASIA
RTX7IDNI
May 11, 2020
Customers are seen inside a clothing shop as limited number of shopping malls reopened after the government...
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Customers are seen inside a clothing shop as limited number of shopping malls reopened after the government...
Customers are seen inside a clothing shop as limited number of shopping malls reopened after the government has eased the restrictions amid concerns over the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Dhaka, Bangladesh May 11, 2020. REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA
RTS3753E
March 25, 2020
Sheets of cloth are draped over the counters of a closed cafe, as New South Wales begins shutting down...
Sydney, Australia
New South Wales begins shutting down non-essential businesses and moving toward harsh penalties to enforce...
Sheets of cloth are draped over the counters of a closed cafe, as New South Wales begins shutting down non-essential businesses and moving toward harsh penalties to enforce self-isolation to avoid the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Sydney, Australia, March 25, 2020. REUTERS/Loren Elliott
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-CONGRESS
RTS36JZO
March 18, 2020
A U.S. Capitol rail car operator places his hand over a cloth-covered accelerator lever, as U.S. Senate...
Washington, UNITED STATES
U.S. Capitol rail car operator places his hand over a cloth-covered accelerator lever, in Washington
A U.S. Capitol rail car operator places his hand over a cloth-covered accelerator lever, as U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) sits inside, ahead of a series of votes on response to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., March 18, 2020. REUTERS/Tom Brenner
WOMENS-DAY/MEXICO
RTS35A6F
March 09, 2020
Women clothing are seen scattered over the floor during a protest to mark International Women's Day at...
Mexico City, Mexico
International Women's Day in Mexico City
Women clothing are seen scattered over the floor during a protest to mark International Women's Day at Zocalo square in Mexico City, Mexico, March 8, 2020. REUTERS/Mahe Elipe
BRITAIN-WEATHER/CIARA
RTS31DE1
February 09, 2020
A woman and a child look out to sea at Newgale, Pembrokeshire, Wales, Britain February 9, 2020. REUTERS/Rebecca...
NEWGALE, UK
A woman and a child look out to sea at Newgale, Pembrokeshire, Wales, Britain
A woman and a child look out to sea at Newgale, Pembrokeshire, Wales, Britain February 9, 2020. REUTERS/Rebecca Naden
GERMANY-WEATHER/SABINE
RTS31D5P
February 09, 2020
People walk through strong gusts of wind as storm Sabine is expected to hit the region in Cologne, Germany,...
Cologne, Germany
People walk through strong gusts of wind as storm Sabine is expected to hit the region in Cologne
People walk through strong gusts of wind as storm Sabine is expected to hit the region in Cologne, Germany, February 9, 2020. REUTERS/Thilo Schmuelgen
GERMANY-WEATHER/SABINE
RTS31D5N
February 09, 2020
People walk through strong gusts of wind as storm Sabine is expected to hit the region in Cologne, Germany,...
Cologne, Germany
People walk through strong gusts of wind as storm Sabine is expected to hit the region in Cologne
People walk through strong gusts of wind as storm Sabine is expected to hit the region in Cologne, Germany, February 9, 2020. REUTERS/Thilo Schmuelgen
GERMANY-WEATHER/SABINE
RTS31D1K
February 09, 2020
A woman holds a scarf in the wind as storm 'Sabine' is expected to hit the region in Cologne, Germany,...
Cologne, Germany
A woman holds a scarf in the wind as storm Sabine is expected to hit the region in Cologne
A woman holds a scarf in the wind as storm 'Sabine' is expected to hit the region in Cologne, Germany, February 9, 2020. REUTERS/Thilo Schmuelgen
THAILAND-ENVIRONMENT/TEMPLE
RTS3106M
February 06, 2020
A role of robe made from plastic bottles is seen at a monastery in Bangkok, Thailand February 6, 2020....
Bangkok, Thailand
A role of robe made from plastic bottles is seen at a monastery in Bangkok
A role of robe made from plastic bottles is seen at a monastery in Bangkok, Thailand February 6, 2020. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun
BELARUS-WEATHER/
RTS2ZEP0
January 22, 2020
A man carries a child during heavy snowfall and wind in Minsk, Belarus January 22, 2020. REUTERS/Vasily...
Minsk, Belarus
Man carries a child during heavy snowfall and wind in Minsk
A man carries a child during heavy snowfall and wind in Minsk, Belarus January 22, 2020. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko
BELARUS-WEATHER/
RTS2ZEOO
January 22, 2020
A man walks during heavy snowfall and wind in Minsk, Belarus January 22, 2020. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko...
Minsk, Belarus
Man walks during heavy snowfall and wind in Minsk
A man walks during heavy snowfall and wind in Minsk, Belarus January 22, 2020. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko
SPAIN-WEATHER/STORM-GLORIA
RTS2ZEMO
January 22, 2020
A woman walks during the storm 'Gloria' in Morella, Spain, January 22, 2020. REUTERS/Juan Medina
Morella, Spain
A woman walks during the storm 'Gloria' in Morella
A woman walks during the storm 'Gloria' in Morella, Spain, January 22, 2020. REUTERS/Juan Medina
SPAIN-WEATHER/STORM-GLORIA
RTS2ZEAW
January 22, 2020
A woman walks during the storm "Gloria" in Morella, Spain, January 22, 2020. REUTERS/Juan Medina
Morella, Spain
A woman walks during the storm "Gloria" in Morella
A woman walks during the storm "Gloria" in Morella, Spain, January 22, 2020. REUTERS/Juan Medina
SPAIN-WEATHER/STORM-GLORIA
RTS2ZEAV
January 22, 2020
A man walks during the storm "Gloria" in Morella, Spain, January 22, 2020. REUTERS/Juan Medina
Morella, Spain
A man walks during the storm "Gloria" in Morella
A man walks during the storm "Gloria" in Morella, Spain, January 22, 2020. REUTERS/Juan Medina
SPAIN-WEATHER/STORM-GLORIA
RTS2ZEAN
January 22, 2020
A woman walks during the storm "Gloria" in Morella, Spain, January 22, 2020. REUTERS/Juan Medina
Morella, Spain
A woman walks during the storm "Gloria" in Morella
A woman walks during the storm "Gloria" in Morella, Spain, January 22, 2020. REUTERS/Juan Medina
SPAIN-WEATHER/STORM-GLORIA
RTS2ZEAM
January 22, 2020
People walk during the storm "Gloria" in Morella, Spain, January 22, 2020. REUTERS/Juan Medina
Morella, Spain
People walk during the storm "Gloria" in Morella
People walk during the storm "Gloria" in Morella, Spain, January 22, 2020. REUTERS/Juan Medina
SPAIN-WEATHER/STORM-GLORIA
RTS2Z8PN
January 21, 2020
A woman is pictured during the storm "Gloria" on Maresme coast in Badalona, near Barcelona, Spain, January...
Badalona, Spain
Woman is pictured during the storm "Gloria" on Maresme coast in Badalona
A woman is pictured during the storm "Gloria" on Maresme coast in Badalona, near Barcelona, Spain, January 21, 2020. REUTERS/Nacho Doce TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
EUROPE-MIGRANTS/GREECE-LESBOS
RTS2UTBW
December 13, 2019
A migrant holding a child walks under heavy rainfall at a makeshift camp for refugees and migrants next...
LESBOS, Greece
A migrant holding a child walks under heavy rainfall at a makeshift camp for refugees and migrants next...
A migrant holding a child walks under heavy rainfall at a makeshift camp for refugees and migrants next to the Moria camp, on the island of Lesbos, Greece, December 13, 2019. REUTERS/Giorgos Moutafis
GLOBAL-POY/STORIES
RTS2UIQQ
December 11, 2019
A Turkana tribeswoman reacts after an accidental fire of a shelter in Turkana settlement in Ilemi Triangle,...
ILEMI TRIANGLE, Kenya
Pictures of the Year: A Picture and its Story
A Turkana tribeswoman reacts after an accidental fire of a shelter in Turkana settlement in Ilemi Triangle, Kenya, July 15, 2019. Reuters Photographer Goran Tomasevic: "First, the lookouts saw a footprint, then a suspected spy from a rival ethnic group, scuttling off into the bush. Expecting an attack, young men grabbed their guns and mothers grabbed their children - there are few state security forces in this remote area of northern Kenya. The Ilemi Triangle, a disputed sliver of land along the border with Ethiopia and South Sudan, is the northernmost tip of Turkana, Kenya's poorest county. A series of deadly clashes between the community and other ethnic groups that they said had crossed from South Sudan have put people on edge. Farmers and nomads frequently clash over limited resources. Livestock is the most important currency here. The danger is real. I saw several places scattered with skulls or bones with shredded clothing. Families drink from the same muddy pools as their livestock. There are few schools Ð children instead help herd cows to nearby watering holes. Chief Eipa Choro said the community felt abandoned by the government; clean water from an aid group's borehole was two hours' drive away. The nearest police station several hours away. We weren't attacked during the time I spent with them, but each time we moved, the community sent out scouts to secure the way and try to spot potential ambushes from cattle raiders. Raids can be a disaster for a community." REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic/File Photo SEARCH "POY STORIES 2019" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
EUROPE-MIGRANTS/GREECE
RTX7A17A
November 22, 2019
A migrant wearing a raincoat makes his way at a makeshift camp for refugees and migrants next to the...
LESBOS, Greece
A migrant wearing a raincoat makes his way at a makeshift camp for refugees and migrants next to the...
A migrant wearing a raincoat makes his way at a makeshift camp for refugees and migrants next to the Moria camp following rainfall, on the island of Lesbos, Greece, November 22, 2019. REUTERS/Elias Marcou
RUGBY-UNION-WORLDCUP/VETERANS
RTS2OVW5
September 02, 2019
Players of Fuwaku Rugby Club change their clothes at a friendly match in Fukaya, Saitama Prefecture,...
Fukaya, Japan
The Wider Image: Japan's veteran maulers happy to die in their boots
Players of Fuwaku Rugby Club change their clothes at a friendly match in Fukaya, Saitama Prefecture, Japan, June 16, 2019. Fuwaku, founded in 1948, is one of approximately 150 Japanese clubs that stage competitive, full-contact matches for players over the age of 40. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon SEARCH "RUGBY VETERANS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
GERMANY-RELIGION/
RTS2IVXX
June 20, 2019
Bavarian inhabitants of Seehausen, in traditional clothes take part in a Corpus Christi procession over...
Seehausen, Germany
Bavarian inhabitants of Seehausen, in traditional clothes take part in a Corpus Christi procession over...
Bavarian inhabitants of Seehausen, in traditional clothes take part in a Corpus Christi procession over the lake Staffelsee near Murnau, Germany, June 20, 2019. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
GERMANY-RELIGION/
RTS2IVWT
June 20, 2019
Bavarian inhabitants of Seehausen, in traditional clothes pray on boats as they take part in an Corpus...
Seehausen, Germany
Bavarian inhabitants of Seehausen, in traditional clothes pray on boats as they take part in an Corpus...
Bavarian inhabitants of Seehausen, in traditional clothes pray on boats as they take part in an Corpus Christi procession over the lake Staffelsee near Murnau, Germany, June 20, 2019. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
GERMANY-RELIGION/
RTS2IVSA
June 20, 2019
Bavarian inhabitants of Seehausen, wearing traditional clothes, pray on boats as they take part in a...
Seehausen, Germany
Bavarian inhabitants of Seehausen, wearing traditional clothes, pray on boats as they take part in a...
Bavarian inhabitants of Seehausen, wearing traditional clothes, pray on boats as they take part in a Corpus Christi procession over the lake Staffelsee near Murnau, Germany, June 20, 2019. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
GERMANY-RELIGION/
RTS2IVS1
June 20, 2019
Bavarian inhabitants of Seehausen, wearing traditional clothes, pray on boats as they take part in a...
Seehausen, Germany
Bavarian inhabitants of Seehausen, wearing traditional clothes, pray on boats as they take part in a...
Bavarian inhabitants of Seehausen, wearing traditional clothes, pray on boats as they take part in a Corpus Christi procession over the lake Staffelsee near Murnau, Germany, June 20, 2019. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
GERMANY-RELIGION/
RTS2IVS0
June 20, 2019
Bavarian inhabitants of Seehausen, wearing traditional clothes, pray on boats as they take part in a...
Seehausen, Germany
Bavarian inhabitants of Seehausen, wearing traditional clothes, pray on boats as they take part in a...
Bavarian inhabitants of Seehausen, wearing traditional clothes, pray on boats as they take part in a Corpus Christi procession over the lake Staffelsee near Murnau, Germany, June 20, 2019. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
GERMANY-RELIGION/
RTS2IVRW
June 20, 2019
Bavarian inhabitants of Seehausen, wearing traditional clothes, pray on boats as they take part in a...
Seehausen, Germany
Bavarian inhabitants of Seehausen, wearing traditional clothes, pray on boats as they take part in a...
Bavarian inhabitants of Seehausen, wearing traditional clothes, pray on boats as they take part in a Corpus Christi procession over the lake Staffelsee near Murnau, Germany, June 20, 2019. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
GERMANY-RELIGION/
RTS2IVRM
June 20, 2019
Bavarian inhabitants of Seehausen, wearing traditional clothes, pray on boats as they take part in a...
Seehausen, Germany
Bavarian inhabitants of Seehausen, wearing traditional clothes, pray on boats as they take part in a...
Bavarian inhabitants of Seehausen, wearing traditional clothes, pray on boats as they take part in a Corpus Christi procession over the lake Staffelsee near Murnau, Germany, June 20, 2019. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
GERMANY-RELIGION/
RTS2IVR5
June 20, 2019
Bavarian inhabitants of Seehausen, wearing traditional clothes, pray on boats as they take part in a...
Seehausen, Germany
Bavarian inhabitants of Seehausen, wearing traditional clothes, pray on boats as they take part in a...
Bavarian inhabitants of Seehausen, wearing traditional clothes, pray on boats as they take part in a Corpus Christi procession over the lake Staffelsee near Murnau, Germany, June 20, 2019. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
GERMANY-RELIGION/
RTS2IVQW
June 20, 2019
Bavarian inhabitants of Seehausen, wearing traditional clothes, pray on boats as they take part in a...
Seehausen, Germany
Bavarian inhabitants of Seehausen, wearing traditional clothes, pray on boats as they take part in a...
Bavarian inhabitants of Seehausen, wearing traditional clothes, pray on boats as they take part in a Corpus Christi procession over the lake Staffelsee near Murnau, Germany, June 20, 2019. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
USA-TRADE/WHEAT
RTX6Z5O1
June 13, 2019
A grain trailer empties wheat into the pit at the Farmers Cooperative Exchange in Bessie, Oklahoma, U.S.,...
BESSIE, UNITED STATES
A grain trailer empties wheat into the pit at the Farmers Cooperative Exchange in Bessie
A grain trailer empties wheat into the pit at the Farmers Cooperative Exchange in Bessie, Oklahoma, U.S., June 12, 2019. REUTERS/Nick Oxford
MEXICO-ACCIDENT/
RTX6Q9LC
March 08, 2019
A view shows clothing and items scattered on the site where a cargo truck careened off a road and turned...
FRANCISCO SARABIA, Mexico
A view shows clothing and items scattered on the site where a cargo truck careened off a road and turned...
A view shows clothing and items scattered on the site where a cargo truck careened off a road and turned over, killing at least 25 migrants from Central America, in Francisco Sarabia, Chiapas state, Mexico March 8, 2019. REUTERS/Jacob Garcia
MEXICO-ACCIDENT/
RTX6Q9L9
March 08, 2019
A view shows clothing and items scattered on the site where a cargo truck careened off a road and turned...
FRANCISCO SARABIA, Mexico
A view shows clothing and items scattered on the site where a cargo truck careened off a road and turned...
A view shows clothing and items scattered on the site where a cargo truck careened off a road and turned over, killing at least 25 migrants from Central America, in Francisco Sarabia, Chiapas state, Mexico March 8, 2019. REUTERS/Jacob Garcia
MEXICO-ACCIDENT/
RTX6Q9JO
March 08, 2019
A general view shows clothing and items scattered on the site where a cargo truck careened off a road...
FRANCISCO SARABIA, Mexico
A general view shows clothing and items scattered on the site where a cargo truck careened off a road...
A general view shows clothing and items scattered on the site where a cargo truck careened off a road and turned over, killing at least 25 migrants from Central America, in Francisco Sarabia, Chiapas state, Mexico March 8, 2019. REUTERS/Jacob Garcia
Sort by
Display
Items per page
Page
of 127