Ajax loader
By using our website, you agree to our use of cookies as described in Cookie Policy.

Can't find what you're looking for?

 

Be sure to Sign in to see all available content.

 

If you don't have an account, Register here.

Search results for: PATCH-Tim

GERMANY/
RTR39A9T
October 18, 2012
Australian artist Tim Patch, who calls himself "Pricasso" paints a portrait using his penis as a brush...
Berlin, Germany
Australian artist "Pricasso" paints a portrait during opening day of 16th "Venus" erotic fair in Berlin...
Australian artist Tim Patch, who calls himself "Pricasso" paints a portrait using his penis as a brush during the opening day of the 16th "Venus" erotic fair in Berlin October 18, 2012. The event represents the erotic business in the German capital and runs until October 21. REUTERS/Tobias Schwarz (GERMANY - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT BUSINESS)
AUSTRALIA/
RTR2ZIQW
March 18, 2012
Australian artist Tim Patch, who goes by the stage name "Pricasso" makes a portrait of two men using...
Sydney, Australia
Patch makes a portrait of two men using his penis dipped in paint at the Sexpo exposition in Sydney
Australian artist Tim Patch, who goes by the stage name "Pricasso" makes a portrait of two men using his penis dipped in paint at the Sexpo exposition in Sydney March 18, 2012. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne (AUSTRALIA - Tags: SOCIETY)
AUSTRALIA/
RTR2XNEE
February 11, 2012
A boat makes its way through a patch of sun up Georges River in southern Sydney February 11, 2011. Australia's...
Sydney, Australia
A boat makes its way through a patch of sun up Georges River in southern Sydney
A boat makes its way through a patch of sun up Georges River in southern Sydney February 11, 2011. Australia's largest city continues to endure an unusually cool and wet summer as it remains under the influence of a La Nina weather system according to the Bureau of Meteorology. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne (AUSTRALIA - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
TECH SUMMIT/AOL
RTR2MII8
May 16, 2011
Tim Armstrong, AOL Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, speaks during the Reuters Global Technology...
New York, UNITED STATES
AOL Chairman and CEO Armstrong speaks during the Reuters Global Technology Summit in New York
Tim Armstrong, AOL Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, speaks during the Reuters Global Technology Summit in New York, May 16, 2011. AOL is expanding its local news network, Patch, with the launch of 33 sites in targeted states as the United States gears up for a national election. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCI TECH HEADSHOT)
TECH SUMMIT/AOL
RTR2MII0
May 16, 2011
Tim Armstrong, AOL Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, speaks during the Reuters Global Technology...
New York, UNITED STATES
AOL Chairman and CEO Armstrong speaks during the Reuters Global Technology Summit in New York
Tim Armstrong, AOL Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, speaks during the Reuters Global Technology Summit in New York, May 16, 2011. AOL is expanding its local news network, Patch, with the launch of 33 sites in targeted states as the United States gears up for a national election. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCI TECH HEADSHOT)
TECH SUMMIT/AOL
RTR2MIHW
May 16, 2011
Tim Armstrong, AOL Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, speaks during the Reuters Global Technology...
New York, UNITED STATES
AOL Chairman and CEO Armstrong speaks during the Reuters Global Technology Summit in New York
Tim Armstrong, AOL Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, speaks during the Reuters Global Technology Summit in New York, May 16, 2011. AOL is expanding its local news network, Patch, with the launch of 33 sites in targeted states as the United States gears up for a national election. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCI TECH)
USA/
RTXP6M0
October 01, 2009
AOL Chairman and CEO Tim Armstrong refers to one of his company's new 'patch' websites during an interview...
Washington, UNITED STATES
AOL Chairman and CEO Tim Armstrong refers to one of his company's new 'patch' websites during an interview...
AOL Chairman and CEO Tim Armstrong refers to one of his company's new 'patch' websites during an interview at the Newseum in Washington, October 1, 2009. The interview is part of the first day of the First Draft of History event, held by the Atlantic Magazine and the Aspen Institute to bring together newsmakers, historians and journalists. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES BUSINESS SCI TECH)
ECONOMY/REPAIRS
RTXBU83
February 20, 2009
Used tire shop owner Andy Alexander stands in his workshop in Tucson, Arizona, February 2, 2009. His...
Tucson, UNITED STATES
To match feature ECONOMY/REPAIRS
Used tire shop owner Andy Alexander stands in his workshop in Tucson, Arizona, February 2, 2009. His business, which patches tires for $5 and sells sets of used tires from $60, is among a wide range of repair businesses across the United States doing well despite the economic recession, as many jittery U.S. consumers opt to repair items rather than buy new ones. Picture taken February 2, 2009. To match feature ECONOMY/REPAIRS REUTERS/Tim Gaynor (UNITED STATES)
SAFRICA/
RTX5J3N
May 09, 2008
Australian artist Tim Patch, who calls himself "Pricasso", paints a portrait using his penis during a...
Cape Town, South Africa
Australian artist Tim Patch, who calls himself "Pricasso", paints a portrait using his penis during a...
Australian artist Tim Patch, who calls himself "Pricasso", paints a portrait using his penis during a trade exhibition in Cape Town, May 9, 2008. Patch, who has used his technique to portray global political leaders, was performing at the Cape Town Sexpo. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings (SOUTH AFRICA)
SAFRICA/
RTX5J3K
May 09, 2008
Australian artist Tim Patch, who calls himself "Pricasso", paints a portrait using his penis during a...
Cape Town, South Africa
Australian artist Tim Patch, who calls himself "Pricasso", paints a portrait using his penis during a...
Australian artist Tim Patch, who calls himself "Pricasso", paints a portrait using his penis during a trade exhibition in Cape Town, May 9, 2008. Patch, who has used his technique to portray global political leaders, was performing at the Cape Town Sexpo. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings (SOUTH AFRICA)
SAFRICA/
RTX5J3H
May 09, 2008
Australian artist Tim Patch, who calls himself "Pricasso", paints a portrait using his penis during a...
Cape Town, South Africa
Australian artist Tim Patch, who calls himself "Pricasso", paints a portrait using his penis during a...
Australian artist Tim Patch, who calls himself "Pricasso", paints a portrait using his penis during a trade exhibition in Cape Town, May 9, 2008. Patch, who has used his technique to portray global political leaders, was performing at the Cape Town Sexpo. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings (SOUTH AFRICA)
SOUTH AFRICA
RTX4BZN
December 03, 2007
RNPS IMAGES OF THE YEAR 2007 - Artist Tim Patch (L), who calls himself 'Pricasso', paints a picture of...
Johannesburg, South Africa
RNPS IMAGES OF THE YEAR 2007 -
RNPS IMAGES OF THE YEAR 2007 - Artist Tim Patch (L), who calls himself 'Pricasso', paints a picture of Olga Braude (R) using his penis at the Sexpo in Johannesburg, September 28, 2007. Patch has painted portraits of some of the worlds most famous people including George Bush and Queen of England. REUTERS/Antony Kaminju (SOUTH AFRICA)
Oddly Enough
Oddly Enough
'Pricasso' in Johannesburg Sexpo - 28 Sep 2007
4 PICTURES
SOUTH AFRICA
RTR1UDCY
September 28, 2007
Olga Braude (R) looks on as artist Tim Patch (L), who calls himself 'Pricasso', paints her picture using...
Johannesburg, South Africa
Olga Braude looks on as Artist Tim Patch who calls himself 'Pricasso', paints her picture using his penis...
Olga Braude (R) looks on as artist Tim Patch (L), who calls himself 'Pricasso', paints her picture using his penis at the Sexpo in Johannesburg, September 28, 2007. Patch has painted portraits of some of the worlds most famous people including George Bush and Queen of England. REUTERS/Antony Kaminju (SOUTH AFRICA)
SOUTH AFRICA
RTR1UDCT
September 28, 2007
Artist Tim Patch who calls himself 'Pricasso', displays his painting tools at the Sexpo in Johannesburg,...
Johannesburg, South Africa
Artist Tim Patch who calls himself 'Pricasso', displays his painting tools at the Sexpo in Johannesburg...
Artist Tim Patch who calls himself 'Pricasso', displays his painting tools at the Sexpo in Johannesburg, September 28, 2007. Patch has painted portraits of some of the worlds most famous people including George Bush and Queen of England. REUTERS/Antony Kaminju (SOUTH AFRICA)
SOUTH AFRICA
RTR1UDCS
September 28, 2007
Artist Tim Patch (L), who calls himself 'Pricasso', paints a picture of Olga Braude (R) using his penis...
Johannesburg, South Africa
Artist Tim Patch who calls himself 'Pricasso', paints a picture of Olga Braude using his penis in Johannesburg...
Artist Tim Patch (L), who calls himself 'Pricasso', paints a picture of Olga Braude (R) using his penis at the Sexpo in Johannesburg, September 28, 2007. Patch has painted portraits of some of the worlds most famous people including George Bush and Queen of England. REUTERS/Antony Kaminju (SOUTH AFRICA)
SOUTHAFRICA/
RTR1UDCR
September 28, 2007
Artist Tim Patch (L), who calls himself 'Pricasso', shows off his portrait of Olga Braude (R) which he...
Johannesburg, South Africa
Artist Tim Patch who calls himself 'Pricasso', shows off his portrait of Olga Braude which he painted...
Artist Tim Patch (L), who calls himself 'Pricasso', shows off his portrait of Olga Braude (R) which he painted with his penis at the Sexpo in Johannesburg, September 28, 2007. Patch has painted portraits of some of the worlds most famous people including George Bush and Queen of England. REUTERS/Antony Kaminju (SOUTH AFRICA)
AUSTRALIA
RTR1FUZI
July 27, 2006
Artist Tim Patch, who calls himself 'Pricasso', holds his portrait of Alan Length (R) which he painted...
Sydney, Australia
Artist Tim Patch holds his portrait of Alan Length which he painted with his penis in Sydney
Artist Tim Patch, who calls himself 'Pricasso', holds his portrait of Alan Length (R) which he painted with his penis during the opening day of the annual Sexpo in Sydney July 27, 2006. Patch started painting with his penis when he was asked by a friend to do a portrait during last year's new years celebrations. He only uses water-based paints and sells his paintings for around A$300 (US$250). Sexpo, which is in it's tenth year, claims to be the largest adult sex exhibition in the world. REUTERS/ David Gray (AUSTRALIA)
AUSTRALIA
RTR1FUZH
July 27, 2006
Artist Tim Patch, who calls himself 'Pricasso', paints his portrait of Alan Length (L) with his penis...
Sydney, Australia
Artist Tim Patch paints his portrait of Alan Length with his penis in Sydney
Artist Tim Patch, who calls himself 'Pricasso', paints his portrait of Alan Length (L) with his penis during the opening day of the annual Sexpo in Sydney July 27, 2006. Patch started painting with his penis when he was asked by a friend to do a portrait during last year's new years celebrations. He only uses water-based paints and sells his paintings for around A$300 (US$250). Sexpo, which is in it's tenth year, claims to be the largest adult sex exhibition in the world. REUTERS/ David Gray (AUSTRALIA)
AUSTRALIA
RTR1FUZF
July 27, 2006
Artist Tim Patch (R), who calls himself 'Pricasso', shows off his portrait of Alan Length (L) which he...
Sydney, Australia
Artist Tim Patch shows off his portrait of Alan Length which he painted with his penis in Sydney
Artist Tim Patch (R), who calls himself 'Pricasso', shows off his portrait of Alan Length (L) which he painted with his penis during the opening day of the annual Sexpo in Sydney July 27, 2006. Patch started painting with his penis when he was asked by a friend to do a portrait during last year's new years celebrations. He only uses water-based paints and sells his paintings for around A$300 (US$250). Sexpo, which is in it's tenth year, claims to be the largest adult sex exhibition in the world. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA)
AUSTRALIA
RTR1FUYO
July 27, 2006
Artist Tim Patch, who calls himself 'Pricasso', uses his penis as a brush to paint a portrait of Alan...
Sydney, Australia
Artist Patch uses his penis to paint a portrait during the opening day of the annual Sexpo in Sydney
Artist Tim Patch, who calls himself 'Pricasso', uses his penis as a brush to paint a portrait of Alan Length (R) during the opening day of the annual Sexpo in Sydney July 27, 2006. Patch started painting with his penis when he was asked by a friend to do a portrait during last year's new years celebrations. He only uses water-based paints and sells his paintings for around A$300 (US$250). Sexpo, which is in it's tenth year, claims to be the largest adult sex exhibition in the world. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA)
AUSTRALIA
RTR1FUYL
July 27, 2006
Artist Tim Patch, who calls himself 'Pricasso', uses his penis as a brush to paint a portrait of Alan...
Sydney, Australia
Artist Patch uses his penis to paint a portrait during the opening day of the annual Sexpo in Sydney
Artist Tim Patch, who calls himself 'Pricasso', uses his penis as a brush to paint a portrait of Alan Length (rear) during the opening day of the annual Sexpo in Sydney July 27, 2006. Patch started painting with his penis when he was asked by a friend to do a portrait during last year's new years celebrations. He only uses water-based paints and sells his paintings for around A$300 (US$250). Sexpo, which is in it's tenth year, claims to be the largest adult sex exhibition in the world. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA)
AUSTRALIA
RTR1FUYI
July 27, 2006
Artist Tim Patch, who calls himself 'Pricasso', shows off his portrait of Alan Length (L) which he painted...
Sydney, Australia
Artist Patch shows off his portrait of Alan Length which he painted with his penis in Sydney
Artist Tim Patch, who calls himself 'Pricasso', shows off his portrait of Alan Length (L) which he painted with his penis during the opening day of the annual Sexpo in Sydney July 27, 2006. Patch started painting with his penis when he was asked by a friend to do a portrait during last year's new years celebrations. He only uses water-based paints and sells his paintings for around A$300 (US$250). Sexpo, which is in it's tenth year, claims to be the largest adult sex exhibition in the world. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA)
AUSTRALIA
RTR1FUYB
July 27, 2006
Artist Tim Patch, who calls himself 'Pricasso', gets more paint from his pallet while using his penis...
Sydney, Australia
Artist Patch uses his penis to paint a portrait during the opening day of the annual Sexpo in Sydney
Artist Tim Patch, who calls himself 'Pricasso', gets more paint from his pallet while using his penis as a brush to paint a portrait of Alan Length (R) during the opening day of the annual Sexpo in Sydney July 27, 2006. Patch started painting with his penis when he was asked by a friend to do a portrait during last year's new years celebrations. He only uses water-based paints and sells his paintings for around A$300 (US$250). Sexpo, which is in it's tenth year, claims to be the largest adult sex exhibition in the world. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA)
AUSTRALIA
RTR1FUY9
July 27, 2006
Artist Tim Patch, who calls himself 'Pricasso', uses his penis as a brush to paint a portrait of Alan...
Sydney, Australia
Artist Patch uses his penis to paint a portrait during the opening day of the annual Sexpo in Sydney
Artist Tim Patch, who calls himself 'Pricasso', uses his penis as a brush to paint a portrait of Alan Length (R) during the opening day of the annual Sexpo in Sydney July 27, 2006. Patch started painting with his penis when he was asked by a friend to do a portrait during last year's new years celebrations. He only uses water-based paints and sells his paintings for around A$300 (US$250). Sexpo, which is in it's tenth year, claims to be the largest adult sex exhibition in the world. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA)
ENVIRONMENT AUSTRALIA  SALINITY
RTR1FFSO
July 13, 2006
Australian farmer John Ive retrieves an underground water measuring device on his farm at Dick's Creek...
Dick's Creek, Australia
To match feature ENVIRONMENT AUSTRALIA SALINITY
Australian farmer John Ive retrieves an underground water measuring device on his farm at Dick's Creek about 35 kilometres (22 miles) north west of Canberra July 3, 2006. While Australia's central deserts are now seen as benign and starting to yield fruit, salination is turning once productive farmlands into lifeless patches of dirt and threatening the country's A$30 billion ($22 billion) agriculture export industry, one of the biggest in the world. To match feature ENVIRONMENT AUSTRALIA SALINITY Picture taken July 3. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne (AUSTRALIA)
ENVIRONMENT AUSTRALIA  SALINITY
RTR1FFSN
July 13, 2006
Australian farmer John Ive measures underground water levels on his farm at Dick's Creek about 35 kilometres...
Dick's Creek, Australia
To match feature ENVIRONMENT AUSTRALIA SALINITY
Australian farmer John Ive measures underground water levels on his farm at Dick's Creek about 35 kilometres (22 miles) north west of Canberra July 3, 2006. While Australia's central deserts are now seen as benign and starting to yield fruit, salination is turning once productive farmlands into lifeless patches of dirt and threatening the country's A$30 billion ($22 billion) agriculture export industry, one of the biggest in the world. To match feature ENVIRONMENT AUSTRALIA SALINITY Picture taken July 3. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne (AUSTRALIA)
ENVIRONMENT AUSTRALIA SALINITY
RTR1FFSM
July 13, 2006
The stump of a dead tree stands in a paddock severely affected by salination on a farm at Dick's Creek...
Dick's Creek, Australia
To match feature ENVIRONMENT AUSTRALIA SALINITY
The stump of a dead tree stands in a paddock severely affected by salination on a farm at Dick's Creek about 35 kilometres (22 miles) north west of Canberra July 3, 2006. While Australia's central deserts are now seen as benign and starting to yield fruit, salination is turning once productive farmlands into lifeless patches of dirt and threatening the country's A$30 billion ($22 billion) agriculture export industry, one of the biggest in the world. To match feature ENVIRONMENT AUSTRALIA SALINITY Picture taken July 3. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne (AUSTRALIA)
ENVIRONMENT AUSTRALIA SALINITY
RTR1FFSL
July 13, 2006
Australian farmer John Ive stands in a patch of seedlings he planted on his farm at Dick's Creek about...
Dick's Creek, Australia
To match feature ENVIRONMENT AUSTRALIA SALINITY
Australian farmer John Ive stands in a patch of seedlings he planted on his farm at Dick's Creek about 35 kilometres (22 miles) north west of Canberra July 3, 2006. While Australia's central deserts are now seen as benign and starting to yield fruit, salination is turning once productive farmlands into lifeless patches of dirt and threatening the country's A$30 billion ($22 billion) agriculture export industry, one of the biggest in the world. To match feature ENVIRONMENT AUSTRALIA SALINITY Picture taken July 3. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne (AUSTRALIA)
ENVIRONMENT AUSTRALIA SALINITY
RTR1FFSK
July 13, 2006
A paddock severely affected by salination is visible through a fence on a farm at Dick's Creek about...
Dick's Creek, Australia
To match feature ENVIRONMENT AUSTRALIA SALINITY
A paddock severely affected by salination is visible through a fence on a farm at Dick's Creek about 35 kilometres (22 miles) north west of Canberra July 3, 2006. While Australia's central deserts are now seen as benign and starting to yield fruit, salination is turning once productive farmlands into lifeless patches of dirt and threatening the country's A$30 billion ($22 billion) agriculture export industry, one of the biggest in the world. To match feature ENVIRONMENT AUSTRALIA SALINITY Picture taken July 3. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne (AUSTRALIA)
ENVIRONMENT AUSTRALIA SALINITY
RTR1FFSI
July 13, 2006
The sun shines above a paddock severely affected by salination on a farm at Dick's Creek about 35 kilometres...
Dick's Creek, Australia
To match feature ENVIRONMENT AUSTRALIA SALINITY
The sun shines above a paddock severely affected by salination on a farm at Dick's Creek about 35 kilometres (22 miles) north west of Canberra July 3, 2006. While Australia's central deserts are now seen as benign and starting to yield fruit, salination is turning once productive farmlands into lifeless patches of dirt and threatening the country's A$30 billion ($22 billion) agriculture export industry, one of the biggest in the world. To match feature ENVIRONMENT AUSTRALIA SALINITY Picture taken July 3, 2006. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne (AUSTRALIA)
WEATHER AUSTRALIA
RTR17HSH
March 22, 2006
A house damaged by a tree blown over by Cyclone Larry in Innisfail, about 100 km (62 miles) south of...
BABINDA, Australia
House is damaged by a tree blown over by Cyclone Larry in Innisfail
A house damaged by a tree blown over by Cyclone Larry in Innisfail, about 100 km (62 miles) south of Cairns, is visible from the air, March 22, 2006. Thousands of Australians on the cyclone-devastated far northeast coast patched up homes with tarpaulin on Wednesday as Prime Minister John Howard unveiled a multi-million dollar aid package. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne
WEATHER AUSTRALIA
RTR17HSF
March 22, 2006
Queensland state Premier Peter Beattie (L) stands in front of a house damaged by Cyclone Larry in Innisfail,...
BABINDA, Australia
Queensland state Premier Peter Beattie stands in front of a house damaged by Cyclone Larry in Innisfail...
Queensland state Premier Peter Beattie (L) stands in front of a house damaged by Cyclone Larry in Innisfail, about 100 km (62 miles) south of Cairns, March 22, 2006. Thousands of Australians on the cyclone-devastated far northeast coast patched up homes with tarpaulin on Wednesday as Prime Minister John Howard unveiled a multi-million dollar aid package. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne
WEATHER AUSTRALIA
RTR17HS9
March 22, 2006
Residents stand in front of the ruins of their house that was destroyed by Cyclone Larry in Innisfail,...
BABINDA, Australia
Residents stand in front of the ruins of their house destroyed by Cyclone Larry in Innisfail
Residents stand in front of the ruins of their house that was destroyed by Cyclone Larry in Innisfail, about 100 km (62 miles) south of Cairns, March 22, 2006. Thousands of Australians on the cyclone-devastated far northeast coast patched up homes with tarpaulin on Wednesday as Prime Minister John Howard unveiled a multi-million dollar aid package. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne
WEATHER AUSTRALIA
RTR17HS6
March 22, 2006
Residents affected by Cyclone Larry line up to collect food cooked by the Salvation Army in Innisfail,...
BABINDA, Australia
Residents affected by Cyclone Larry line up to collect food cooked by the Salvation Army in Innisfail...
Residents affected by Cyclone Larry line up to collect food cooked by the Salvation Army in Innisfail, about 100 km (62 miles) south of Cairns March 22, 2006. Thousands of Australians on the cyclone-devastated far northeast coast patched up homes with tarpaulin on Wednesday as Prime Minister John Howard unveiled a multi-million dollar aid package. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne
WEATHER AUSTRALIA
RTR17HS3
March 22, 2006
A building destroyed by Cyclone Larry lies as rubble on the main street of Innisfail, about 100 km (62...
BABINDA, Australia
Building destroyed by Cyclone Larry lies as rubble on the main street of Innisfail
A building destroyed by Cyclone Larry lies as rubble on the main street of Innisfail, about 100 km (62 miles) south of Cairns in northern Queensland March 22, 2006. Thousands of Australians on the cyclone-devastated far northeast coast patched up homes with tarpaulin on Wednesday as Prime Minister John Howard unveiled a multi-million dollar aid package. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne
WEATHER AUSTRALIA
RTR17HRZ
March 22, 2006
Insurance workers inspect buildings damaged by Cyclone Larry on the main street of Innisfail, about 100...
BABINDA, Australia
Insurance workers inspect buildings damaged by Cyclone Larry on the main street of Innisfail
Insurance workers inspect buildings damaged by Cyclone Larry on the main street of Innisfail, about 100 km (62 miles) south of Cairns in northern Queensland March 22, 2006. Thousands of Australians on the cyclone-devastated far northeast coast patched up homes with tarpaulin on Wednesday as Prime Minister John Howard unveiled a multi-million dollar aid package. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne
WEATHER AUSTRALIA
RTR17HRU
March 22, 2006
Australian soldiers remove debris from buildings damaged by Cyclone Larry in Innisfail, about 100 km...
BABINDA, Australia
Australian soldiers remove debris from buildings damaged by Cyclone Larry in Innisfail
Australian soldiers remove debris from buildings damaged by Cyclone Larry in Innisfail, about 100 km (62 miles) south of Cairns in northern Queensland March 22, 2006. Thousands of Australians on the cyclone-devastated far northeast coast patched up homes with tarpaulin on Wednesday as Prime Minister John Howard unveiled a multi-million dollar aid package. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne
WEATHER AUSTRALIA
RTR17HRM
March 22, 2006
Banana trees destroyed by Cyclone Larry lie on the ground near Babinda, about 80 km (48 miles) south...
BABINDA, Australia
Banana trees destroyed by Cyclone Larry lie on the ground near Babinda
Banana trees destroyed by Cyclone Larry lie on the ground near Babinda, about 80 km (48 miles) south of Cairns in Northern Queensland March 22, 2006. Thousands of Australians on the cyclone-devastated far northeast coast patched up homes with tarpaulin on Wednesday as Prime Minister John Howard unveiled a multi-million dollar aid package. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne
WEATHER AUSTRALIA
RTR17HRJ
March 22, 2006
Australia's Prime Minister John Howard (C) talks to banana growers in a field of banana trees destroyed...
BABINDA, Australia
Australia's PM Howard talks to banana growers in a field destroyed by Cyclone Larry near Babinda
Australia's Prime Minister John Howard (C) talks to banana growers in a field of banana trees destroyed by Cyclone Larry near Babinda, about 80 km (48 miles) south of Cairns in Northern Queensland March 22, 2006. Thousands of Australians on the cyclone-devastated far northeast coast patched up homes with tarpaulin on Wednesday as Howard unveiled a multi-million dollar aid package. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne
WEATHER AUSTRALIA
RTR17HRH
March 22, 2006
Banana trees destroyed by Cyclone Larry lie on the ground near Babinda, about 80 kilometres (48 miles)...
BABINDA, Australia
Banana trees destroyed by Cyclone Larry lie on ground near Babinda in Northern Queensland
Banana trees destroyed by Cyclone Larry lie on the ground near Babinda, about 80 kilometres (48 miles) south of Cairns in Northern Queensland March 22, 2006. Thousands of Australians on the cyclone-devastated far northeast coast patched up homes with tarpaulin on Wednesday as Prime Minister John Howard unveiled a multi-million dollar aid package. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne
WEATHER AUSTRALIA
RTR17HRF
March 22, 2006
Banana trees destroyed by Cyclone Larry lie on the ground near Babinda, about 80 km (48 miles) south...
BABINDA, Australia
Banana trees destroyed by Cyclone Larry lie on the ground near Babinda
Banana trees destroyed by Cyclone Larry lie on the ground near Babinda, about 80 km (48 miles) south of Cairns in northern Queensland, March 22, 2006. Thousands of Australians on the cyclone-devastated far northeast coast patched up homes with tarpaulin on Wednesday as Prime Minister John Howard unveiled a multi-million dollar aid package. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne
WEATHER AUSTRALIA
RTR17HRB
March 22, 2006
Australia's Prime Minister John Howard (L) talks to community recovery workers in cyclone damaged Babinda,...
BABINDA, Australia
Australia's Prime Minister Howard talks to community recovery workers in cyclone damaged Babinda
Australia's Prime Minister John Howard (L) talks to community recovery workers in cyclone damaged Babinda, about 80 km (48 miles) south of Cairns in northern Queensland, March 22, 2006. Thousands of Australians on the cyclone-devastated far northeast coast patched up homes with tarpaulin on Wednesday as Prime Minister John Howard unveiled a multi-million dollar aid package. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne
WEATHER AUSTRALIA
RTR17HR9
March 22, 2006
Australia's Prime Minister John Howard (C) talks to banana growers in a field of banana trees destroyed...
BABINDA, Australia
Australia's Prime Minister Howard talks to banana growers in a field destroyed by Cyclone Larry near...
Australia's Prime Minister John Howard (C) talks to banana growers in a field of banana trees destroyed by Cyclone Larry near Babinda, about 80 km (48 miles) south of Cairns in Northern Queensland March 22, 2006. Thousands of Australians on the cyclone-devastated far northeast coast patched up homes with tarpaulin on Wednesday as Prime Minister John Howard unveiled a multi-million dollar aid package. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne
WEATHER AUSTRALIA
RTR17HR3
March 22, 2006
A tarpaulin covers a house that was damaged by Cyclone Larry in Babinda, about 80 km (48 miles) south...
BABINDA, Australia
Tarpaulin covers a house that was damaged by Cyclone Larry in Babinda
A tarpaulin covers a house that was damaged by Cyclone Larry in Babinda, about 80 km (48 miles) south of Cairns in Northern Queensland March 22, 2006. Thousands of Australians on the cyclone-devastated far northeast coast patched up homes with tarpaulin on Wednesday as Prime Minister John Howard unveiled a multi-million dollar aid package. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne
WEATHER AUSTRALIA
RTR17HR0
March 22, 2006
A worker repairs power lines damaged by Cyclone Larry in Babinda, about 80 km (48 miles) south of Cairns...
BABINDA, Australia
Worker repairs power lines damaged by Cyclone Larry in Babinda
A worker repairs power lines damaged by Cyclone Larry in Babinda, about 80 km (48 miles) south of Cairns in Northern Queensland March 22, 2006. Thousands of Australians on the cyclone-devastated far northeast coast patched up homes with tarpaulin on Wednesday as Prime Minister John Howard unveiled a multi-million dollar aid package. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne
SPORT COMMONWEALTH
RTR175D2
March 14, 2006
Canadian Commonwealth Games team member Yannick Lupien crouches on the pool deck in a patch of sun during...
Melbourne, Australia
Canadian Commonwealth Games team member Lupien crouches down on pool deck in Melbourne
Canadian Commonwealth Games team member Yannick Lupien crouches on the pool deck in a patch of sun during a practice session in Melbourne March 14, 2006. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne
SPORT BASEBALL
RTR10EGB
September 09, 2005
Florida Marlins' Jeff Conine wears a red cross on his helmet in memory of the Hurricane Katrina disaster...
Philadelphia, USA
Marlins' Conine wears a red cross in memory of the Hurricane Katrina disaster in Philadelphia.
Florida Marlins' Jeff Conine wears a red cross on his helmet in memory of the Hurricane Katrina disaster as he returns to the bench during the first inning against the Philadelphia Phillies in Philadelphia, September 9, 2005. Major league baseball players will wear Red Cross patches and the bases on the field will display the Red Cross logo as well as a telephone number to call for contributions to the relief effort. REUTERS/Tim Shaffer TS/NL
SPORT BASEBALL
RTR10EG4
September 09, 2005
Philadelphia Phillies catcher Lieberthal wears a red cross in memory of the Hurricane Katrina disaster...
Philadelphia, USA
Philadelphia Phillies catcher Lieberthal wears a red cross in memory of the Hurricane Katrina disaster...
Philadelphia Phillies catcher Lieberthal wears a red cross in memory of the Hurricane Katrina disaster in Philadelphia. Philadelphia Phillies catcher Mike Lieberthal wears a red cross on his helmet in memory of the Hurricane Katrina disaster as he returns to the bench during the third inning against the Florida Marlins in Philadelphia September 9, 2005. Major league baseball players will wear Red Cross patches and the bases on the field will display the Red Cross logo as well as a telephone number to call for contributions to the relief effort. REUTERS/Tim Shaffer
ECONOMY AUSTRALIA RUGBY
RTR7C62
November 13, 2003
Former World Cup winning Australian Rugby Union captain John Eales (L),
signs clothing for fans in a...
Sydney, Australia
FORMER AUSTRALIAN RUGBY UNION CAPTAIN JOHN EALES SIGNS A RUGBY
JERSEY IN SYDNEY.
Former World Cup winning Australian Rugby Union captain John Eales (L),
signs clothing for fans in a Rugby World Cup promotional store in Sydney on
November 13, 2003. Beer, food, sight-seeing and rain were the order of last
weekend's 2003 Rugby World Cup semi-finals, all of which is good news for an
Australian economy already sprinting out of a soft patch in the first half
of 2003. Photograph taken on November 13, 2003. REUTERS/Tim Wimborne

TBW/TW
Sort by
Display
Items per page
Page
of 1