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Search results for: PRINCESS-SAYAKO

ROYALS
RTXO0WS 
November 23, 2005 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (L) and former princess Sayako Kuroda walk along a path at the Shinjuku Gyoen... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (L) and former princess Sayako Kuroda walk along a path at the Shinjuku Gyo..... 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (L) and former princess Sayako Kuroda walk along a path at the Shinjuku Gyoen park in central Tokyo November 23, 2005. Japan should give women the same right to inherit the imperial throne as men, a Japanese panel was quoted as saying on Monday, a choice that would break a male-only tradition in order to ensure its ancient monarchy does not die out. The panel also agreed on the need to remove a legal provision that requires a female member of the imperial family to leave the imperial household if she marries a commoner, [Kyodo said. The panel's conclusion came less than a week after Sayako married Yoshiki Kuroda, last Tuesday and gave up her privileges as a member of the imperial family, as now dictated by law.] 
ROYALS
RTXO0WR 
November 23, 2005 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (L) and former princess Sayako Kuroda smile at the media during a visit at the... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (L) and former princess Sayako Kuroda smile at the media during a visit at ..... 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (L) and former princess Sayako Kuroda smile at the media during a visit at the Shinjuku Gyoen park in central Tokyo November 23, 2005. Japan should give women the same right to inherit the imperial throne as men, a Japanese panel was quoted as saying on Monday, a choice that would break a male-only tradition in order to ensure its ancient monarchy does not die out. The panel also agreed on the need to remove a legal provision that requires a female member of the imperial family to leave the imperial household if she marries a commoner, [Kyodo said. The panel's conclusion came less than a week after Sayako married Yoshiki Kuroda, last Tuesday and gave up her privileges as a member of the imperial family, as now dictated by law.] 
ROYALS
RTXO0WQ 
November 23, 2005 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (R) and former princess Sayako Kuroda visit a rose garden at the Shinjuku Gyoen... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (R) and former princess Sayako Kuroda visit a rose garden at the Shinjuku G..... 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (R) and former princess Sayako Kuroda visit a rose garden at the Shinjuku Gyoen park in central Tokyo November 23, 2005. Japan should give women the same right to inherit the imperial throne as men, a Japanese panel was quoted as saying on Monday, a choice that would break a male-only tradition in order to ensure its ancient monarchy does not die out. The panel also agreed on the need to remove a legal provision that requires a female member of the imperial family to leave the imperial household if she marries a commoner, [Kyodo said. The panel's conclusion came less than a week after Sayako married Yoshiki Kuroda, last Tuesday and gave up her privileges as a member of the imperial family, as now dictated by law.] 
ROYALS
RTXO0WP 
November 23, 2005 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (R) and former princess Sayako Kuroda visit a rose garden at the Shinjuku Gyoen... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (R) and former princess Sayako Kuroda visit a rose garden at the Shinjuku G..... 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (R) and former princess Sayako Kuroda visit a rose garden at the Shinjuku Gyoen park in central Tokyo November 23, 2005. Japan should give women the same right to inherit the imperial throne as men, a Japanese panel was quoted as saying on Monday, a choice that would break a male-only tradition in order to ensure its ancient monarchy does not die out. The panel also agreed on the need to remove a legal provision that requires a female member of the imperial family to leave the imperial household if she marries a commoner, [Kyodo said. The panel's conclusion came less than a week after Sayako married Yoshiki Kuroda, last Tuesday and gave up her privileges as a member of the imperial family, as now dictated by law.] 
ROYALS
RTXO0WO 
November 23, 2005 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (R) and former princess Sayako Kuroda visit a rose garden at the Shinjuku Gyoen... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (R) and former princess Sayako Kuroda visit a rose garden at the Shinjuku G..... 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (R) and former princess Sayako Kuroda visit a rose garden at the Shinjuku Gyoen park in central Tokyo November 23, 2005. Japan should give women the same right to inherit the imperial throne as men, a Japanese panel was quoted as saying on Monday, a choice that would break a male-only tradition in order to ensure its ancient monarchy does not die out. The panel also agreed on the need to remove a legal provision that requires a female member of the imperial family to leave the imperial household if she marries a commoner, [Kyodo said. The panel's conclusion came less than a week after Sayako married Yoshiki Kuroda, last Tuesday and gave up her privileges as a member of the imperial family, as now dictated by law.] 
ROYALS
RTXO0W7 
November 23, 2005 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (R) and former princess Sayako Kuroda visit a rose garden at the Shinjuku Gyoen... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (R) and former princess Sayako Kuroda visit a rose garden at the Shinjuku G..... 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (R) and former princess Sayako Kuroda visit a rose garden at the Shinjuku Gyoen park in central Tokyo November 23, 2005. Japan should give women the same right to inherit the imperial throne as men, a Japanese panel was quoted as saying on Monday, a choice that would break a male-only tradition in order to ensure its ancient monarchy does not die out. The panel also agreed on the need to remove a legal provision that requires a female member of the imperial family to leave the imperial household if she marries a commoner, [Kyodo said. The panel's conclusion came less than a week after Sayako married Yoshiki Kuroda, last Tuesday and gave up her privileges as a member of the imperial family, as now dictated by law.] 
JAPAN SUCCESSION
RTR1BIL1 
November 23, 2005 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (L) and former princess Sayako Kuroda walk along a path at the Shinjuku Gyoen... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Newly wed Kuroda and former princess Sayako walk along path at Shinjuku Gyoen park in Tokyo 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (L) and former princess Sayako Kuroda walk along a path at the Shinjuku Gyoen park in central Tokyo November 23, 2005. Japan should give women the same right to inherit the imperial throne as men, a Japanese panel was quoted as saying on Monday, a choice that would break a male-only tradition in order to ensure its ancient monarchy does not die out. The panel also agreed on the need to remove a legal provision that requires a female member of the imperial family to leave the imperial household if she marries a commoner, Kyodo said. The panel's conclusion came less than a week after Sayako married Yoshiki Kuroda, last Tuesday and gave up her privileges as a member of the imperial family, as now dictated by law. REUTERS/Franck Robichon/Pool 
JAPAN SUCCESSION
RTR1BIDW 
November 23, 2005 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (R) and former princess Sayako Kuroda visit a rose garden at the Shinjuku Gyoen... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Newly wed Kuroda and former princess Sayako visit rose garden at Shinjuku Gyoen park in Tokyo 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (R) and former princess Sayako Kuroda visit a rose garden at the Shinjuku Gyoen park in central Tokyo November 23, 2005. Japan should give women the same right to inherit the imperial throne as men, a Japanese panel was quoted as saying on Monday, a choice that would break a male-only tradition in order to ensure its ancient monarchy does not die out. The panel also agreed on the need to remove a legal provision that requires a female member of the imperial family to leave the imperial household if she marries a commoner, Kyodo said. The panel's conclusion came less than a week after Sayako married Yoshiki Kuroda, last Tuesday and gave up her privileges as a member of the imperial family, as now dictated by law. REUTERS/Kaku Kurita/Pool 
JAPAN SUCCESSION
RTR1BIDN 
November 23, 2005 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (L) and former princess Sayako Kuroda smile at the media during a visit at the... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Newly wed Kuroda and former princess Sayako smile at the media during visit at Shinjuku Gyoen park in... 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (L) and former princess Sayako Kuroda smile at the media during a visit at the Shinjuku Gyoen park in central Tokyo November 23, 2005. Japan should give women the same right to inherit the imperial throne as men, a Japanese panel was quoted as saying on Monday, a choice that would break a male-only tradition in order to ensure its ancient monarchy does not die out. The panel also agreed on the need to remove a legal provision that requires a female member of the imperial family to leave the imperial household if she marries a commoner, Kyodo said. The panel's conclusion came less than a week after Sayako married Yoshiki Kuroda, last Tuesday and gave up her privileges as a member of the imperial family, as now dictated by law. REUTERS/Franck Robichon/Pool 
JAPAN SUCCESSION
RTR1BIDK 
November 23, 2005 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (R) and former princess Sayako Kuroda visit a rose garden at the Shinjuku Gyoen... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Newly wed Kuroda and former princess Sayako visit a rose garden at the Shinjuku Gyoen park in Tokyo 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (R) and former princess Sayako Kuroda visit a rose garden at the Shinjuku Gyoen park in central Tokyo November 23, 2005. Japan should give women the same right to inherit the imperial throne as men, a Japanese panel was quoted as saying on Monday, a choice that would break a male-only tradition in order to ensure its ancient monarchy does not die out. The panel also agreed on the need to remove a legal provision that requires a female member of the imperial family to leave the imperial household if she marries a commoner, Kyodo said. The panel's conclusion came less than a week after Sayako married Yoshiki Kuroda, last Tuesday and gave up her privileges as a member of the imperial family, as now dictated by law. REUTERS/Kaku Kurita/Pool 
JAPAN SUCCESSION
RTR1BIDE 
November 23, 2005 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (R) and former princess Sayako Kuroda visit a rose garden at the Shinjuku Gyoen... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Newly wed Kuroda and former princess Sayako visit rose garden at Shinjuku Gyoen park in Tokyo 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (R) and former princess Sayako Kuroda visit a rose garden at the Shinjuku Gyoen park in central Tokyo November 23, 2005. Japan should give women the same right to inherit the imperial throne as men, a Japanese panel was quoted as saying on Monday, a choice that would break a male-only tradition in order to ensure its ancient monarchy does not die out. The panel also agreed on the need to remove a legal provision that requires a female member of the imperial family to leave the imperial household if she marries a commoner, Kyodo said. The panel's conclusion came less than a week after Sayako married Yoshiki Kuroda, last Tuesday and gave up her privileges as a member of the imperial family, as now dictated by law. REUTERS/Franck Robichon/Pool 
JAPAN SUCCESSION
RTR1BIDB 
November 23, 2005 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (R) and former princess Sayako Kuroda visit a rose garden at the Shinjuku Gyoen... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Newly wed Kuroda and former princess Sayako visit rose garden at Shinjuku Gyoen park in Tokyo 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (R) and former princess Sayako Kuroda visit a rose garden at the Shinjuku Gyoen park in central Tokyo November 23, 2005. Japan should give women the same right to inherit the imperial throne as men, a Japanese panel was quoted as saying on Monday, a choice that would break a male-only tradition in order to ensure its ancient monarchy does not die out. The panel also agreed on the need to remove a legal provision that requires a female member of the imperial family to leave the imperial household if she marries a commoner, Kyodo said. The panel's conclusion came less than a week after Sayako married Yoshiki Kuroda, last Tuesday and gave up her privileges as a member of the imperial family, as now dictated by law. REUTERS/Kaku Kurita/Pool 
JAPAN SUCCESSION
RTR1BIBY 
November 23, 2005 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (R) and former princess Sayako Kuroda visit a rose garden at the Shinjuku Gyoen... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Newly wed Kuroda and former princess Sayako visit rose garden at the Shinjuku Gyoen park in central Tokyo... 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (R) and former princess Sayako Kuroda visit a rose garden at the Shinjuku Gyoen park in central Tokyo November 23, 2005. Japan should give women the same right to inherit the imperial throne as men, a Japanese panel was quoted as saying on Monday, a choice that would break a male-only tradition in order to ensure its ancient monarchy does not die out. The panel also agreed on the need to remove a legal provision that requires a female member of the imperial family to leave the imperial household if she marries a commoner, Kyodo said. The panel's conclusion came less than a week after Sayako married Yoshiki Kuroda, last Tuesday and gave up her privileges as a member of the imperial family, as now dictated by law. REUTERS/Kaku Kurita/Pool 
JAPAN SUCCESSION
RTR1BIBT 
November 23, 2005 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (L) and former princess Sayako Kuroda walk along a path at the Shinjuku Gyoen... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Newly wed Kuroda and former princess Sayako walk along a path at the Shinjuku Gyoen park in Tokyo 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (L) and former princess Sayako Kuroda walk along a path at the Shinjuku Gyoen park in central Tokyo November 23, 2005. Japan should give women the same right to inherit the imperial throne as men, a Japanese panel was quoted as saying on Monday, a choice that would break a male-only tradition in order to ensure its ancient monarchy does not die out. The panel also agreed on the need to remove a legal provision that requires a female member of the imperial family to leave the imperial household if she marries a commoner, Kyodo said. The panel's conclusion came less than a week after Sayako married Yoshiki Kuroda, last Tuesday and gave up her privileges as a member of the imperial family, as now dictated by law. REUTERS/Frank Robichon/Pool 
JAPAN SUCCESSION
RTR1BI75 
November 23, 2005 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (L) and former princess Sayako Kuroda visit Shinjuku Gyoen in Tokyo November... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda and former princess Sayako Kuroda visit Shinjuku Gyoen in Tokyo 
Newly wed Yoshiki Kuroda (L) and former princess Sayako Kuroda visit Shinjuku Gyoen in Tokyo November 23, 2005. Japan should give women the same right to inherit the imperial throne as men, a Japanese panel was quoted as saying on Monday, a choice that would break a male-only tradition in order to ensure its ancient monarchy does not die out. The panel also agreed on the need to remove a legal provision that requires a female member of the imperial family to leave the imperial household if she marries a commoner, Kyodo said. The panel's conclusion came less than a week after Sayako married Yoshiki Kuroda, last Tuesday and gave up her privileges as a member of the imperial family, as now dictated by law. REUTERS/Kaku Kurita/Pool 
ROYALS
RTXNZR6 
November 15, 2005 
Princess Sayako speaks to reporters at a news conference following her wedding ceremony at a Tokyo hotel... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Princess Sayako speaks to reporters at a news conference following her wedding ceremony at a Tokyo h..... 
Princess Sayako speaks to reporters at a news conference following her wedding ceremony at a Tokyo hotel November 15, 2005. Princess Sayako, 36, the only daughter of [Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, married urban planner Yoshiki Kuroda, 40, and bade farewell to her life as a privileged princess. The marriage means she will relinquish her title, swap the grandeur of the Imperial Palace for an ordinary apartment, and trade official duties for housework and the supermarket run.] 
ROYALS
RTXNZR5 
November 15, 2005 
Princess Sayako (R) and Yoshiyuki Kuroda smile during a news conference following their wedding ceremony... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Princess Sayako (R) and Yoshiyuki Kuroda smile during a news conference following their wedding cere..... 
Princess Sayako (R) and Yoshiyuki Kuroda smile during a news conference following their wedding ceremony at a Tokyo hotel November 15, 2005. Princess Sayako, 36, the only [daughter of Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, married urban planner Kuroda, 40, thus bidding farewell to her life as a privileged princess. The marriage means she will relinquish her title, swap the grandeur of the Imperial Palace for an ordinary apartment, and trade official duties for housework and the supermarket run.] 
ROYALS
RTXNZR4 
November 15, 2005 
Japan's Princess Sayako (L) and her fiance Yoshiyuki Kuroda arrive for their wedding ceremony at a Tokyo... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Japan's Princess Sayako (L) and her fiance Yoshiyuki Kuroda arrive for their wedding ceremony at a T..... 
Japan's Princess Sayako (L) and her fiance Yoshiyuki Kuroda arrive for their wedding ceremony at a Tokyo hotel November 15, 2005. Princess Sayako, the only daughter of [Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, married commoner Kuroda in a private ceremony on Tuesday, in the process abandoning her privileged status as a member of the Imperial family.] 
ROYALS
RTXNZR3 
November 15, 2005 
Princess Sayako of Japan smiles as she leaves the Imperial Palace in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Crowds... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Princess Sayako of Japan smiles as she leaves the Imperial Palace in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Crowds..... 
Princess Sayako of Japan smiles as she leaves the Imperial Palace in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Crowds of well-wishers shouted "banzai" (long life) and applauded as Princess Sayako left the royal palace on Tuesday and headed for a Tokyo hotel where she will wed her commoner fiance [Yoshiki Kuroda]. 
ROYALS
RTXNZQV 
November 15, 2005 
Princess Sayako of Japan leaves the Imperial Palace in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Crowds of well-wishers... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Princess Sayako of Japan leaves the Imperial Palace in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Crowds of well-wishe..... 
Princess Sayako of Japan leaves the Imperial Palace in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Crowds of well-wishers shouted "banzai" (long life) and applauded as Princess Sayako left the royal palace on Tuesday and headed for a Tokyo hotel where she will wed her commoner [fiance Yoshiki Kuroda]. 
ROYALS
RTXNZQU 
November 15, 2005 
Princess Sayako of Japan waves as she leaves the Imperial Palace in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Crowds of... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Princess Sayako of Japan waves as she leaves the Imperial Palace in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Crowds ..... 
Princess Sayako of Japan waves as she leaves the Imperial Palace in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Crowds of well-wishers shouted "banzai" (long life) and applauded as Princess Sayako left the royal palace on Tuesday and headed for a Tokyo hotel where she will wed her commoner [fiance Yoshiki Kuroda]. 
ROYALS
RTXNZQT 
November 15, 2005 
Japanese Empress Michiko leaves the Imperial Palace en route to a downtown hotel in Tokyo for the [wedding... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Japanese Empress Michiko leaves the Imperial Palace en route to a downtown hotel in Tokyo for the [w..... 
Japanese Empress Michiko leaves the Imperial Palace en route to a downtown hotel in Tokyo for the [wedding of her daughter Princess Sayako and commoner Yoshiki Kuroda] November 15, 2005. [Sayako, 36, the only daughter of Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, will marry urban planner Kuroda, 40, thus bidding farewell to her life as a privileged princess. The marriage means she will relinquish her title, swap the grandeur of the Imperial Palace for an ordinary apartment, and trade official duties for housework and the supermarket run.] 
ROYALS
RTXNZQS 
November 15, 2005 
Princess Sayako (R) bows as she lets her husband Yoshiki Kuroda leave a news conference following their... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Princess Sayako (R) bows as she lets her husband Yoshiki Kuroda leave a news conference following th..... 
Princess Sayako (R) bows as she lets her husband Yoshiki Kuroda leave a news conference following their wedding ceremony at a Tokyo hotel November 15, 2005. Princess Sayako, 36, the only daughter of [Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, married urban planner Kuroda, 40, thus bidding farewell to her life as a privileged princess. The marriage means she will relinquish her title, swap the grandeur of the Imperial Palace for an ordinary apartment, and trade official duties for housework and the supermarket run.] 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B17O 
November 15, 2005 
Mrs. Sayako Kuroda (R), the newlywed bride of Yoshiyuki Kuroda (L), smiles as the groom bows to reporters... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Japanese emperor's youngest daughter Sayako and her husband Yoshiyuki Kuroda attend a news conference... 
Mrs. Sayako Kuroda (R), the newlywed bride of Yoshiyuki Kuroda (L), smiles as the groom bows to reporters at a news conference following their wedding ceremony at a Tokyo hotel in Tokyo November 15, 2005. The youngest daughter of Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko married the Tokyo government official in a private ceremony on Tuesday. REUTERS/Issei Kato/Pool 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B0ZG 
November 15, 2005 
Princess Sayako (R) bows as she lets her husband Yoshiki Kuroda leave a news conference following their... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Princess Sayako bows as she lets her husband Kuroda leave a news conference following their wedding ceremony... 
Princess Sayako (R) bows as she lets her husband Yoshiki Kuroda leave a news conference following their wedding ceremony at a Tokyo hotel November 15, 2005. Princess Sayako, 36, the only daughter of Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, married urban planner Kuroda, 40, thus bidding farewell to her life as a privileged princess. The marriage means she will relinquish her title, swap the grandeur of the Imperial Palace for an ordinary apartment, and trade official duties for housework and the supermarket run. REUTERS/Shizuo Kambayashi/Pool 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B0YX 
November 15, 2005 
Princess Sayako, the newlywed bride of Yoshiyuki Kuroda (L), closes her eyes as they bow to reporters... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Princess Sayako and Kuroda attend a news conference following their wedding ceremony at a Tokyo hotel... 
Princess Sayako, the newlywed bride of Yoshiyuki Kuroda (L), closes her eyes as they bow to reporters at a news conference following their wedding ceremony at a Tokyo hotel November 15, 2005. Princess Sayako, 36, the only daughter of Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, married urban planner Kuroda, 40, and bade farewell to her life as a privileged princess. The marriage means she will relinquish her title, swap the grandeur of the Imperial Palace for an ordinary apartment, and trade official duties for housework and the supermarket run. REUTERS/Issei Kato 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B0YT 
November 15, 2005 
Princess Sayako (R) and Yoshiyuki Kuroda smile during a news conference following their wedding ceremony... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Princess Sayako and Kuroda smile during a news conference following their wedding ceremony at a Tokyo... 
Princess Sayako (R) and Yoshiyuki Kuroda smile during a news conference following their wedding ceremony at a Tokyo hotel November 15, 2005. Princess Sayako, 36, the only daughter of Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, married urban planner Kuroda, 40, thus bidding farewell to her life as a privileged princess. The marriage means she will relinquish her title, swap the grandeur of the Imperial Palace for an ordinary apartment, and trade official duties for housework and the supermarket run. REUTERS/Issei Kato 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B0YC 
November 15, 2005 
Princess Sayako and her husband Yoshiki Kuroda answer questions during a news conference following their... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Princess Sayako and her husband Kuroda answer questions during a news conference following their wedding... 
Princess Sayako and her husband Yoshiki Kuroda answer questions during a news conference following their wedding ceremony at a Tokyo hotel November 15, 2005. Princess Sayako, 36, the only daughter of Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, will marry urban planner Kuroda, 40, thus bidding farewell to her life as a privileged princess. The marriage means she will relinquish her title, swap the grandeur of the Imperial Palace for an ordinary apartment, and trade official duties for housework and the supermarket run. REUTERS/Shizuo Kambayashi/Pool 
JAPAN
RTR1B0Y9 
November 15, 2005 
Japanese Crown Prince Naruhito (R) and Crown Princess Masako arrive at the Imperial Hotel for Princess... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Japanese Crown Prince Naruhito and Crown Princess Masako arrive at the Imperial Hotel for Princess Sayako's... 
Japanese Crown Prince Naruhito (R) and Crown Princess Masako arrive at the Imperial Hotel for Princess Sayako's wedding reception in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Princess Sayako, the only daughter of Japan's Emperor Akihito, wed a commoner in a private ceremony at a Tokyo hotel on Tuesday, in the process abandoning her privileged status as a member of the imperial family. REUTERS/Toshifumi Kitamura/Pool 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B0NQ 
November 15, 2005 
Princess Sayako, the newlywed bride of Yoshiyuki Kuroda (L), smiles as the groom bows to reporters at... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Princess Sayako and Kuroda attend a news conference following their wedding ceremony at a Tokyo 
Princess Sayako, the newlywed bride of Yoshiyuki Kuroda (L), smiles as the groom bows to reporters at a news conference following their wedding ceremony at a Tokyo hotel November 15, 2005. Princess Sayako, 36, the only daughter of Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, married urban planner Kuroda, 40, and bade farewell to her life as a privileged princess. The marriage means she will relinquish her title, swap the grandeur of the Imperial Palace for an ordinary apartment, and trade official duties for housework and the supermarket run. REUTERS/Issei Kato 
JAPAN ROYAL WEDDING
RTR1B0IB 
November 15, 2005 
Emperor Akihito (2nd L) and Empress Michiko (2nd R) chat each other as Crown Prince Naruhito (R) and... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko chat each other during wedding banquet of daughter Sayako and her... 
Emperor Akihito (2nd L) and Empress Michiko (2nd R) chat each other as Crown Prince Naruhito (R) and Crown Princess Masako (L) look on at the main table during the wedding banquet of their daughter Sayako and her husband Yoshiki Kuroda at a Tokyo hotel November 15, 2005. The youngest daughter of Akihito and Michiko married the Tokyo government official in a private ceremony on Tuesday. Seated foreground in kimono is Princess Kiko. REUTERS/Koji Sasahara/Pool 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B0FK 
November 15, 2005 
The new bride and groom, Mrs. Sayako Kuroda (R) and Yoshiyuki Kuroda, attend a news conference following... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Japanese Emperor's youngest daughter Sayako and her husband Yoshiyuki Kuroda attend a news conference... 
The new bride and groom, Mrs. Sayako Kuroda (R) and Yoshiyuki Kuroda, attend a news conference following their wedding ceremony at a Tokyo hotel in Tokyo November 15, 2005. The youngest daughter of Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko married the Tokyo government official in a private ceremony on Tuesday. REUTERS/Issei Kato/Pool Pictures of the Month November 2005 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B0F5 
November 15, 2005 
Yoshiki Kuroda smiles as he arrives at the Imperial Hotel for his wedding ceremony with Princess Sayako... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Yoshiki Kuroda arrives at the Imperial Hotel for his wedding ceremony with Princess Sayako in Tokyo 
Yoshiki Kuroda smiles as he arrives at the Imperial Hotel for his wedding ceremony with Princess Sayako in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Sayako, 36, has chosen to marry the 40-year-old Tokyo urban planner, meaning she must give up her title, swap the grandeur of the Imperial Palace for an ordinary apartment, and trade official duties for housework and the supermarket run. Kuroda has said he is determined to help her adjust to her new life. REUTERS/Toshifumi Kitamura/Pool 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B0DU 
November 15, 2005 
Princess Sayako speaks to reporters at a news conference following her wedding ceremony at a Tokyo hotel... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Princess Sayako speaks to reporters at a news conference following her wedding ceremony at a Tokyo hotel... 
Princess Sayako speaks to reporters at a news conference following her wedding ceremony at a Tokyo hotel November 15, 2005. Princess Sayako, 36, the only daughter of Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, married urban planner Yoshiki Kuroda, 40, and bade farewell to her life as a privileged princess. The marriage means she will relinquish her title, swap the grandeur of the Imperial Palace for an ordinary apartment, and trade official duties for housework and the supermarket run. REUTERS/Issei Kato 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B0DP 
November 15, 2005 
Princess Sayako (R) and Yoshiyuki Kuroda attend a news conference following their wedding ceremony at... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Princess Sayako and Kuroda attend a news conference following their wedding ceremony at a Tokyo hotel... 
Princess Sayako (R) and Yoshiyuki Kuroda attend a news conference following their wedding ceremony at a Tokyo hotel November 15, 2005. Princess Sayako, 36, the only daughter of Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, married urban planner Kuroda, 40, and bade farewell to her life as a privileged princess. The marriage means she will relinquish her title, swap the grandeur of the Imperial Palace for an ordinary apartment, and trade official duties for housework and the supermarket run. REUTERS/Issei Kato 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B0A7 
November 15, 2005 
Japan's Princess Sayako's motorcade starts from the Imperial Palace to her wedding with Yoshiki Kuroda... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Japan's Princess Sayako's motorcade starts from the Imperial Palace in Tokyo 
Japan's Princess Sayako's motorcade starts from the Imperial Palace to her wedding with Yoshiki Kuroda in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Sayako, 36, the only daughter of Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, will marry urban planner Kuroda, 40, thus bidding farewell to her life as a privileged princess. The marriage means she will relinquish her title, swap the grandeur of the Imperial Palace for an ordinary apartment, and trade official duties for housework and the supermarket run. REUTERS/Yuzuru Oshihara/Pool 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B0A4 
November 15, 2005 
Japan's Princess Sayako's motorcade starts from the Imperial Palace to her wedding with Yoshiki Kuroda... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Japan's Princess Sayako's motorcade starts from the Imperial Palace in Tokyo 
Japan's Princess Sayako's motorcade starts from the Imperial Palace to her wedding with Yoshiki Kuroda in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Sayako, 36, the only daughter of Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, will marry urban planner Kuroda, 40, thus bidding farewell to her life as a privileged princess. The marriage means she will relinquish her title, swap the grandeur of the Imperial Palace for an ordinary apartment, and trade official duties for housework and the supermarket run. REUTERS/Yuzuru Oshihara/Pool 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B096 
November 15, 2005 
Yoshiki Kuroda (L, in car) leaves for his wedding ceremony with Japan's Princess Sayako in Tokyo November... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Yoshiki Kuroda leaves for his wedding ceremony with Princess Sayako in Tokyo 
Yoshiki Kuroda (L, in car) leaves for his wedding ceremony with Japan's Princess Sayako in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Sayako, 36, has chosen to marry the 40-year-old Tokyo town planner, meaning she must give up her title, swap the grandeur of the Imperial Palace for an ordinary apartment, and trade official duties for housework and the supermarket run. Kuroda has said he is determined to help her adjust to her new life. REUTERS/Noboru Hashimoto/Pool 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B08T 
November 15, 2005 
Imperial police wait for Japan's Princess Sayako at the Imperial Palace as she leaves for her wedding... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Imperial police wait for Japan's Princess Sayako as she leaves for her wedding at Imperial Palace in... 
Imperial police wait for Japan's Princess Sayako at the Imperial Palace as she leaves for her wedding in a hotel in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Japan's Princess Sayako, the only daughter of Emperor Akihito, wed Tokyo urban planner Yoshiki Kuroda, in the process abandoning her privileged status as a member of the imperial family. REUTERS/Toru Hanai 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B08P 
November 15, 2005 
Japan's Princess Sayako (L) and her fiance Yoshiyuki Kuroda arrive for their wedding ceremony at a Tokyo... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Japan's Princess Sayako and her fiance Kuroda arrive for their wedding ceremony in Tokyo 
Japan's Princess Sayako (L) and her fiance Yoshiyuki Kuroda arrive for their wedding ceremony at a Tokyo hotel November 15, 2005. Princess Sayako, the only daughter of Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, married commoner Kuroda in a private ceremony on Tuesday, in the process abandoning her privileged status as a member of the Imperial family. REUTERS/Issei Kato 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B08L 
November 15, 2005 
Well-wishers wave as Princess Sayako passes in a limousine in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Crowds of well-wishers... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Well-wishers wave as Princess Sayako passes in a limousine in Tokyo 
Well-wishers wave as Princess Sayako passes in a limousine in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Crowds of well-wishers shouted "banzai" (long life) and applauded as Princess Sayako left the royal palace on Tuesday and headed for a Tokyo hotel where she will wed her commoner fiance Yoshiki Kuroda. REUTERS/Everett Kennedy Brown/Pool 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B08G 
November 15, 2005 
Princess Sayako of Japan smiles as she leaves the Imperial Palace in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Crowds... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Princess Sayako of Japan smiles as she leaves the Imperial Palace in Tokyo 
Princess Sayako of Japan smiles as she leaves the Imperial Palace in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Crowds of well-wishers shouted "banzai" (long life) and applauded as Princess Sayako left the royal palace on Tuesday and headed for a Tokyo hotel where she will wed her commoner fiance Yoshiki Kuroda. REUTERS/Toru Hanai 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B084 
November 15, 2005 
Japan's Princess Sayako's motorcade leaves the Imperial Palace in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Crowds of... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Princess Sayako motorcade leaves the Imperial Palace in Tokyo 
Japan's Princess Sayako's motorcade leaves the Imperial Palace in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Crowds of well-wishers shouted "banzai" (long life) and applauded as Princess Sayako left the royal palace on Tuesday and headed for a Tokyo hotel where she will wed her commoner fiance Yoshiki Kuroda. REUTERS/Koji Sasahara/Pool 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B080 
November 15, 2005 
Japan's Princess Sayako motorcade leaves the Imperial Palace as officials of the Imperial Household Agency... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Princess Sayako's motorcade leaves the Imperial Palace as officials of the Imperial Household Agency... 
Japan's Princess Sayako motorcade leaves the Imperial Palace as officials of the Imperial Household Agency see her off in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Crowds of well-wishers shouted "banzai" (long life) and applauded as Princess Sayako left the royal palace on Tuesday and headed for a Tokyo hotel where she will wed her commoner fiance Yoshiki Kuroda. REUTERS/Toru Hanai 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B04T 
November 15, 2005 
Japan's Princess Sayako arrives at a room for with her fiance Yoshiyuki Kuroda (not in picture) for their... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Japan's Princess Sayako and her fiance Kuroda arrive at a room for their wedding ceremony in Tokyo 
Japan's Princess Sayako arrives at a room for with her fiance Yoshiyuki Kuroda (not in picture) for their wedding ceremony at a hotel in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Sayako, the only daughter of Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, married the Tokyo government official Kuroda in a private ceremony on Tuesday, in the process abandoning her privileged status as a member of the Imperial family. REUTERS/Issei Kato 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B04P 
November 15, 2005 
Well-wishers wave as Princess Sayako passes in a limousine in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Crowds of well-wishers... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Well-wishers wave as Princess Sayako passes in a limousine in Tokyo 
Well-wishers wave as Princess Sayako passes in a limousine in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Crowds of well-wishers shouted "banzai" (long life) and applauded as Princess Sayako left the royal palace on Tuesday and headed for a Tokyo hotel where she will wed her commoner fiance Yoshiki Kuroda. REUTERS/Everett Kennedy Brown/Pool 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B04L 
November 15, 2005 
Japan's Princess Sayako (L) and her fiance Yoshiyuki Kuroda arrive for their wedding ceremony at a Tokyo... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Japan's Princess Sayako and her fiance Kuroda arrive for their wedding ceremony in Tokyo 
Japan's Princess Sayako (L) and her fiance Yoshiyuki Kuroda arrive for their wedding ceremony at a Tokyo hotel November 15, 2005. Princess Sayako, the only daughter of Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, married commoner Kuroda in a private ceremony on Tuesday, in the process abandoning her privileged status as a member of the Imperial family. REUTERS/Issei Kato 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B04H 
November 15, 2005 
Well-wishers sign books in celebration of Japan's Princess Sayako's wedding at the Imperial Palace in... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Well-wishers sign books in celebration of Princess Sayako's wedding at Imperial Palace in Tokyo 
Well-wishers sign books in celebration of Japan's Princess Sayako's wedding at the Imperial Palace in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Sayako, 36, the only daughter of Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, will marry urban planner Kuroda, 40, thus bidding farewell to her life as a privileged princess. The marriage means she will relinquish her title, swap the grandeur of the Imperial Palace for an ordinary apartment, and trade official duties for housework and the supermarket run. REUTERS/Toru Hanai 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B04D 
November 15, 2005 
Japanese Empress Michiko (R) and Emperor Akihito wave as they leave the Imperial Palace en route to a... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Japanese Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko wave as they leave the Imperial Palace in Tokyo 
Japanese Empress Michiko (R) and Emperor Akihito wave as they leave the Imperial Palace en route to a downtown hotel in Tokyo for the wedding of their daughter Princess Sayako and commoner Yoshiki Kuroda November 15, 2005. Sayako, 36, the only daughter of Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, will marry urban planner Kuroda, 40, thus bidding farewell to her life as a privileged princess. The marriage means she will relinquish her title, swap the grandeur of the Imperial Palace for an ordinary apartment, and trade official duties for housework and the supermarket run. REUTERS/Everett Kennedy Brown/Pool 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B042 
November 15, 2005 
Japanese Prince Akishino (R) and Princess Kiko (L) arrive at the hotel for Princess Sayako's wedding... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Japanese Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko arrive at the hotel for Princess Sayako's wedding in Tokyo... 
Japanese Prince Akishino (R) and Princess Kiko (L) arrive at the hotel for Princess Sayako's wedding with Yoshiki Kuroda in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Sayako, 36, the only daughter of Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, will marry urban planner Kuroda, 40, thus bidding farewell to her life as a privileged princess. The marriage means she will relinquish her title, swap the grandeur of the Imperial Palace for an ordinary apartment, and trade official duties for housework and the supermarket run. REUTERS/Toshifumi Kitamura/Pool 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B02B 
November 15, 2005 
Japan's Emperor Akihito (L) and Empress Michiko arrive at a room for the wedding ceremony of their daughter,... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Japan's Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko arrive for wedding ceremony of Princess Sayako at hotel in... 
Japan's Emperor Akihito (L) and Empress Michiko arrive at a room for the wedding ceremony of their daughter, Princess Sayako, at a hotel in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Sayako wed a commoner in a private ceremony at a Tokyo hotel on Tuesday, in the process abandoning her privileged status as a member of the imperial family. REUTERS/Issei Kato 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B026 
November 15, 2005 
Imperial police lead well-wishers to sign books in celebration of Japan's Pricess Syako's wedding at... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Imperial police lead well-wishers to sign books in celebration of Japan's Pricess Syako's wedding at... 
Imperial police lead well-wishers to sign books in celebration of Japan's Pricess Syako's wedding at the Imperial Palace in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Sayako, 36, the only daughter of Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, will marry urban planner Kuroda, 40, thus bidding farewell to her life as a privileged princess. The marriage means she will relinquish her title, swap the grandeur of the Imperial Palace for an ordinary apartment, and trade official duties for housework and the supermarket run. REUTERS/Toru Hanai 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B021 
November 15, 2005 
Japanese Empress Michiko leaves the Imperial Palace en route to a downtown hotel in Tokyo for the wedding... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Japanese Empress Michiko leaves the Imperial Palace in Tokyo 
Japanese Empress Michiko leaves the Imperial Palace en route to a downtown hotel in Tokyo for the wedding of her daughter Princess Sayako and commoner Yoshiki Kuroda November 15, 2005. Sayako, 36, the only daughter of Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, will marry urban planner Kuroda, 40, thus bidding farewell to her life as a privileged princess. The marriage means she will relinquish her title, swap the grandeur of the Imperial Palace for an ordinary apartment, and trade official duties for housework and the supermarket run. REUTERS/Everett Kennedy Brown/Pool 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B01X 
November 15, 2005 
Princess Sayako of Japan leaves the Imperial Palace in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Crowds of well-wishers... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Princess Sayako of Japan leaves the Imperial Palace in Tokyo 
Princess Sayako of Japan leaves the Imperial Palace in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Crowds of well-wishers shouted "banzai" (long life) and applauded as Princess Sayako left the royal palace on Tuesday and headed for a Tokyo hotel where she will wed her commoner fiance Yoshiki Kuroda. REUTERS/Everett Kennedy Brown/Pool 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B01T 
November 15, 2005 
Princess Sayako of Japan waves as she leaves the Imperial Palace in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Crowds of... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Princess Sayako of Japan waves as she leaves the Imperial Palace in Tokyo 
Princess Sayako of Japan waves as she leaves the Imperial Palace in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Crowds of well-wishers shouted "banzai" (long life) and applauded as Princess Sayako left the royal palace on Tuesday and headed for a Tokyo hotel where she will wed her commoner fiance Yoshiki Kuroda. REUTERS/Koji Sasahara/Pool 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B01P 
November 15, 2005 
Princess Sayako of Japan waves as she leaves the Imperial Palace in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Crowds of... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Princess Sayako of Japan waves as she leaves the Imperial Palace in Tokyo 
Princess Sayako of Japan waves as she leaves the Imperial Palace in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Crowds of well-wishers shouted "banzai" (long life) and applauded as Princess Sayako left the royal palace on Tuesday and headed for a Tokyo hotel where she will wed her commoner fiance Yoshiki Kuroda. REUTERS/Everett Kennedy Brown/Pool 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B01B 
November 15, 2005 
Princess Sayako drives from the Imperial Palace in her motorcade to her wedding in Tokyo November 15,... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Princess Sayako drives from Imperial Palace in her motorcade to her wedding in Tokyo 
Princess Sayako drives from the Imperial Palace in her motorcade to her wedding in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Sayako, 36, has chosen to marry the 40-year-old Tokyo town planner, meaning she must give up her title, swap the grandeur of the Imperial Palace for an ordinary apartment, and trade official duties for housework and the supermarket run. Kuroda has said he is determined to help her adjust to her new life. REUTERS/Everett Kennedy Brown/Pool 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B017 
November 15, 2005 
Well-wishers wave as Princess Sayako passes in a limousine in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Crowds of well-wishers... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Well-wishers wave as Princess Sayako passes in a limousine in Tokyo 
Well-wishers wave as Princess Sayako passes in a limousine in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Crowds of well-wishers shouted "banzai" (long life) and applauded as Princess Sayako left the royal palace on Tuesday and headed for a Tokyo hotel where she will wed her commoner fiance Yoshiki Kuroda. REUTERS/Koji Sasahara/Pool 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B013 
November 15, 2005 
Japanese Princess Sayako arrives at the hotel where she will marry Yoshiki Kuroda in Tokyo November 15,... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Japanese Princess Sayako arrives at the hotel where she will marry Yoshiki Kuroda in Tokyo 
Japanese Princess Sayako arrives at the hotel where she will marry Yoshiki Kuroda in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Sayako, 36, the only daughter of Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, will marry urban planner Kuroda, 40, thus bidding farewell to her life as a privileged princess. The marriage means she will relinquish her title, swap the grandeur of the Imperial Palace for an ordinary apartment, and trade official duties for housework and the supermarket run. REUTERS/Toshifumi Kitamura/Pool 
JAPAN PRINCESS
RTR1B00Z 
November 15, 2005 
Japanese Crown Prince Naruhito (R) and Crown Princess Masako (L) arrive at the hotel for Princess Sayako's... 
Tokyo, Japan 
Japanese Crown Prince Naruhito and Crown Princess Masako arrive at the hotel for Princess Sayako's wedding... 
Japanese Crown Prince Naruhito (R) and Crown Princess Masako (L) arrive at the hotel for Princess Sayako's wedding with Yoshiki Kuroda in Tokyo November 15, 2005. Sayako, 36, the only daughter of Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, will marry urban planner Kuroda, 40, thus bidding farewell to her life as a privileged princess. The marriage means she will relinquish her title, swap the grandeur of the Imperial Palace for an ordinary apartment, and trade official duties for housework and the supermarket run. REUTERS/Toshifumi Kitamura/Pool 
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