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Search results for: Patient-monitor

HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/JAPAN-HOSPITAL
RTX7H2YZ
May 04, 2020
A medical worker wearing a protective face mask monitors remotely the live footages of patients at the...
Kawasaki, Japan
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Kawasaki, Japan
A medical worker wearing a protective face mask monitors remotely the live footages of patients at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) ward for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients at St. Marianna Medical University Hospital in Kawasaki, south of Tokyo, Japan May 4, 2020. REUTERS/Issei Kato
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/JAPAN-HOSPITAL
RTX7H2YP
May 04, 2020
A medical worker wearing a protective face mask monitors remotely the live footages of patients at the...
Kawasaki, Japan
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Kawasaki, Japan
A medical worker wearing a protective face mask monitors remotely the live footages of patients at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) ward for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients at St. Marianna Medical University Hospital in Kawasaki, south of Tokyo, Japan May 4, 2020. REUTERS/Issei Kato TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/JAPAN-HOSPITAL
RTX7H2YF
May 04, 2020
A medical worker wearing a protective face mask monitors remotely the live footages of patients at the...
Kawasaki, Japan
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Kawasaki, Japan
A medical worker wearing a protective face mask monitors remotely the live footages of patients at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) ward for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients at St. Marianna Medical University Hospital in Kawasaki, south of Tokyo, Japan May 4, 2020. REUTERS/Issei Kato
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/THAILAND-ICU
RTX7G40A
April 28, 2020
Nurses wearing face masks monitor COVID-19 patients in the ICU at the Emerging Infectious Disease Clinic...
Bangkok, Thailand
Medical workers take care of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients in the ICU room in Bangkok
Nurses wearing face masks monitor COVID-19 patients in the ICU at the Emerging Infectious Disease Clinic in King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital in Bangkok, Thailand, April 22, 2020. Picture taken April 22, 2020. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GREECE
RTX7FWNV
April 27, 2020
An intubated patient is seen in a room of the intensive care unit (ICU) of the Sotiria hospital as the...
Athens, Greece
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Athens
An intubated patient is seen in a room of the intensive care unit (ICU) of the Sotiria hospital as the monitor of a ventilator that is not used on a patient reads "Stand by", following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Athens, Greece, April 25, 2020. Picture taken April 25, 2020. REUTERS/Giorgos Moutafis
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA
RTX7FLY7
April 25, 2020
The video feed on a baby monitor displays the interior of a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patient?s...
Seattle, UNITED STATES
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Seattle
The video feed on a baby monitor displays the interior of a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patient?s room in the COVID ICU at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake during the COVID-19 outbreak in Seattle, Washington, U.S. April 24, 2020. REUTERS/David Ryder
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA
RTX7F300
April 22, 2020
A doctor examines a patient being monitored for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in the emergency room...
Chicago, UNITED STATES
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Chicago, Illinois
A doctor examines a patient being monitored for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in the emergency room at Roseland Community Hospital on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois, U.S., April 22, 2020. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA
RTX7F2YV
April 22, 2020
A registered nurse takes blood from a patient being monitored for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Chicago, UNITED STATES
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Chicago, Illinois
A registered nurse takes blood from a patient being monitored for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in the emergency room at Roseland Community Hospital on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois, U.S., April 22, 2020. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA
RTX7F2YD
April 22, 2020
A patient being monitored for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) lays on a hospital bed in the emergency...
Chicago, UNITED STATES
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Chicago, Illinois
A patient being monitored for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) lays on a hospital bed in the emergency room at Roseland Community Hospital on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois, U.S., April 22, 2020. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA
RTX7F2YB
April 22, 2020
A doctor runs tests on a patient being monitored for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in the emergency...
Chicago, UNITED STATES
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Chicago, Illinois
A doctor runs tests on a patient being monitored for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in the emergency room at Roseland Community Hospital on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois, U.S., April 22, 2020. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA
RTX7F2X6
April 22, 2020
A doctor runs tests on a patient being monitored for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in the emergency...
Chicago, UNITED STATES
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Chicago, Illinois
A doctor runs tests on a patient being monitored for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in the emergency room at Roseland Community Hospital on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois, U.S., April 22, 2020. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA
RTX7ESTW
April 21, 2020
Sylvia Ramos-Britton, an endoscopy nurse who has been working as a nurse extender in telemetry, which...
Issaquah, UNITED STATES
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Issaquah
Sylvia Ramos-Britton, an endoscopy nurse who has been working as a nurse extender in telemetry, which includes monitoring vital signs, poses for a portrait at the Swedish Medical Center Issaquah campus during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Issaquah, Washington, U.S. April 21, 2020. "Don’t forget all the other patients. Patients who are no longer being accepted into skilled facilities. They too matter," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GERMANY-HOSPITAL
RTX7ENYJ
April 21, 2020
A monitor with the written word "dismissal" is pictured at an intensive care unit where patients suffering...
Berlin, Germany
COVID-19 intensive care unit at the Havelhoehe community hospital in Berlin
A monitor with the written word "dismissal" is pictured at an intensive care unit where patients suffering from the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) are treated at Havelhoehe community hospital in Berlin, Germany, April 20, 2020. Picture taken April 20, 2020. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/KENYA-EXERCISE
RTS38IW7
April 09, 2020
A monitor shows the vital signs of a mock coronavirus patient during an exercise simulating the treatment...
Nairobi, Kenya
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Nairobi
A monitor shows the vital signs of a mock coronavirus patient during an exercise simulating the treatment of a large number of patients due to the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) at the Aga Khan University Hospital in Nairobi, Kenya, April 9, 2020. REUTERS/Baz Ratner
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-SEATTLE-ARMY
RTS37YQJ
April 02, 2020
1st Lieutenant Lauryn Hudgins and Captain Stacey Johnson work to set up monitors and ventilators at a...
Seattle, UNITED STATES
1st Lieutenant Hudgins and Captain Johnson at a military field hospital for non-coronavirus patients...
1st Lieutenant Lauryn Hudgins and Captain Stacey Johnson work to set up monitors and ventilators at a military field hospital for non-coronavirus patients inside CenturyLink Field Event Center during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Seattle, Washington, U.S., April 1, 2020. Picture taken April 1, 2020. REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOSPITAL
RTS37EEF
March 27, 2020
A member of the medical staff in a protective suit watches a monitor to treat a patient suffering from...
Milan, Italy
COVID-19 intensive care unit at the San Raffaele hospital in Milan
A member of the medical staff in a protective suit watches a monitor to treat a patient suffering from coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in an intensive care unit at the San Raffaele hospital in Milan, Italy, March 27, 2020. REUTERS/Flavio Lo Scalzo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOSPITAL
RTS37EE5
March 27, 2020
Members of the medical staff in protective suits watch monitors of patients suffering from coronavirus...
Milan, Italy
COVID-19 intensive care unit at the San Raffaele hospital in Milan
Members of the medical staff in protective suits watch monitors of patients suffering from coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in an intensive care unit at the San Raffaele hospital in Milan, Italy, March 27, 2020. REUTERS/Flavio Lo Scalzo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-HOSPITAL
RTS37EE3
March 27, 2020
A member of the medical staff in a protective suit sits next to a monitor to treat a patient suffering...
Milan, Italy
COVID-19 intensive care unit at the San Raffaele hospital in Milan
A member of the medical staff in a protective suit sits next to a monitor to treat a patient suffering from coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in an intensive care unit at the San Raffaele hospital in Milan, Italy, March 27, 2020. REUTERS/Flavio Lo Scalzo
THAILAND-CANNABIS/CLINIC
RTS2XBZY
January 06, 2020
Patients enrol in a monitoring research program to receive free treatment during the launch of the first...
Bangkok, Thailand
The launch of the first official medical cannabis clinic in Bangkok
Patients enrol in a monitoring research program to receive free treatment during the launch of the first official medical cannabis clinic in Bangkok, Thailand January 6, 2020. REUTERS/Jorge SIlva
THAILAND-CANNABIS/CLINIC
RTS2XBWM
January 06, 2020
Patients enrol in a monitoring research program to receive free treatment during the launch of the first...
Bangkok, Thailand
The launch of the first official medical cannabis clinic in Bangkok
Patients enrol in a monitoring research program to receive free treatment during the launch of the first official medical cannabis clinic in Bangkok, Thailand January 6, 2020. REUTERS/Jorge SIlva
THAILAND-CANNABIS/CLINIC
RTS2XBWL
January 06, 2020
Patient waits to enrol in a monitoring research program to receive free treatment during the launch of...
Bangkok, Thailand
The launch of the first official medical cannabis clinic in Bangkok
Patient waits to enrol in a monitoring research program to receive free treatment during the launch of the first official medical cannabis clinic in Bangkok, Thailand January 6, 2020. REUTERS/Jorge SIlva
THAILAND-CANNABIS/CLINIC
RTS2XBWH
January 06, 2020
Patients wait to enrol in a monitoring research program to receive free treatment during the launch of...
Bangkok, Thailand
The launch of the first official medical cannabis clinic in Bangkok
Patients wait to enrol in a monitoring research program to receive free treatment during the launch of the first official medical cannabis clinic in Bangkok, Thailand January 6, 2020. REUTERS/Jorge SIlva
THAILAND-CANNABIS/CLINIC
RTS2XBTW
January 06, 2020
Cannabis oil products made in Thailand are seen on display during the launch of the first official medical...
Bangkok, Thailand
Cannabis oil products made in Thailand are seen on display during the launch of the first official medical...
Cannabis oil products made in Thailand are seen on display during the launch of the first official medical cannabis clinic to provide free treatment for the first batch of patients taking part in a monitoring research program in Bangkok, Thailand January 6, 2020. REUTERS/Jorge SIlva
RWANDA-DRONES/
RTX2PJSQ
October 19, 2016
Zipline engineer monitors drone's flight on a tablet at their operation base in Muhanga, south of Rwanda's...
MUHANGA, Rwanda
Zipline engineer monitors drone's flight on a tablet at their operation base in Muhanga, south of Rwanda's...
Zipline engineer monitors drone's flight on a tablet at their operation base in Muhanga, south of Rwanda's capital Kigali where Zipline, a California-based robotics company delivered their first blood to patients using a drone October 12, 2016. Picture taken October 12, 2016. REUTERS/James Akena
RUSSIA-HEALTH/
RTSQ505
September 30, 2016
REFILE - CORRECTING TYPO IN SURNAMEDmitry Stolyarov, a heart surgeon, looks at a monitor while he performs...
Krasnoyarsk, Russia
Heart surgeon Stolyarov performs surgery on patient with blood clot in carotid artery at Federal Center...
REFILE - CORRECTING TYPO IN SURNAMEDmitry Stolyarov, a heart surgeon, looks at a monitor while he performs a surgery on a patient with a blood clot in the carotid artery at the Federal Center of Cardiovascular Surgery in the Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk, Russia, September 28, 2016. Picture taken September 28, 2016. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin
RUSSIA-HEALTH/
RTSQ3M0
September 29, 2016
A medic monitors a patient during a cardio ultrasound examination at the Federal Center of Cardiovascular...
Krasnoyarsk, Russia
Medic monitors patient during cardio ultrasound examination at Federal Center of Cardiovascular Surgery...
A medic monitors a patient during a cardio ultrasound examination at the Federal Center of Cardiovascular Surgery in the Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk, Russia, September 28, 2016. Picture taken September 28, 2016. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin
RUSSIA-HEALTH/
RTSQ3LY
September 29, 2016
Dmitry Stolyariv, a heart surgeon, looks at a monitor while he performs a surgery on a patient with a...
Krasnoyarsk, Russia
Heart surgeon Stolyariv performs surgery on patient with blood clot in carotid artery at Federal Center...
Dmitry Stolyariv, a heart surgeon, looks at a monitor while he performs a surgery on a patient with a blood clot in the carotid artery at the Federal Center of Cardiovascular Surgery in the Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk, Russia, September 28, 2016. Picture taken September 28, 2016. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin
INDIA-HOSPITALS/
RTX25W01
February 07, 2016
A doctor remotely monitors live footage of patients inside an electronic intensive care unit (eICU) at...
New Delhi, India
A doctor remotely monitors live footage of patients inside an electronic intensive care unit at Fortis...
A doctor remotely monitors live footage of patients inside an electronic intensive care unit (eICU) at Fortis hospital in New Delhi, India, January 20, 2016. To match story INDIA-HOSPITALS/ Picture taken January 20, 2016. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi
INDIA-HOSPITALS/
RTX25W00
February 07, 2016
Doctors remotely monitor live footages of patients inside an electronic intensive care unit (eICU) at...
New Delhi, India
Doctors remotely monitor live footages of patients inside an electronic intensive care unit at Fortis...
Doctors remotely monitor live footages of patients inside an electronic intensive care unit (eICU) at Fortis hospital in New Delhi, India, January 20, 2016. Picture taken January 20, 2016. To match INDIA-HOSPITALS/ REUTERS/Adnan Abidi
HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA
RTX1Z79Q
December 18, 2015
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (R), CEO of Empatica,...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (R), CEO of Empatica,...
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (R), CEO of Empatica, wear the company's Embrace devices while talking at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts November 25, 2015. A new wave of wearable computing devices that detect and monitor serious diseases is moving from the laboratory to the market, potentially transforming the treatment of conditions ranging from epilepsy to diabetes and creating business opportunities estimated to be worth tens of billions of dollars. Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Empatica, is developing a wristband designed to alert epilepsy patients and their caregivers of seizures in the hope of averting a dangerous post-seizure condition that can cause sudden, unexpected death. Empatica founder Picard, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and inventor, told Reuters the company has just started large clinical trials using its wristband device on individuals with depression. Picture taken November 25, 2015. To match Insight HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA REUTERS/Brian Snyder
HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA
RTX1Z79N
December 18, 2015
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (R), CEO of Empatica,...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (R), CEO of Empatica,...
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (R), CEO of Empatica, wear the company's Embrace devices while talking at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts November 25, 2015. A new wave of wearable computing devices that detect and monitor serious diseases is moving from the laboratory to the market, potentially transforming the treatment of conditions ranging from epilepsy to diabetes and creating business opportunities estimated to be worth tens of billions of dollars. Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Empatica, is developing a wristband designed to alert epilepsy patients and their caregivers of seizures in the hope of averting a dangerous post-seizure condition that can cause sudden, unexpected death. Empatica founder Picard, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and inventor, told Reuters the company has just started large clinical trials using its wristband device on individuals with depression. Picture taken November 25, 2015. To match Insight HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA REUTERS/Brian Snyder
HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA
RTX1Z79H
December 18, 2015
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (L), CEO of Empatica,...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (L), CEO of Empatica,...
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (L), CEO of Empatica, wear the company's Embrace devices while talking at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts November 25, 2015. A new wave of wearable computing devices that detect and monitor serious diseases is moving from the laboratory to the market, potentially transforming the treatment of conditions ranging from epilepsy to diabetes and creating business opportunities estimated to be worth tens of billions of dollars. Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Empatica, is developing a wristband designed to alert epilepsy patients and their caregivers of seizures in the hope of averting a dangerous post-seizure condition that can cause sudden, unexpected death. Empatica founder Picard, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and inventor, told Reuters the company has just started large clinical trials using its wristband device on individuals with depression. Picture taken November 25, 2015. To match Insight HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA REUTERS/Brian Snyder
HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA
RTX1Z79F
December 18, 2015
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while...
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while talking to Matteo Lai, CEO of Empatica, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts November 25, 2015. A new wave of wearable computing devices that detect and monitor serious diseases is moving from the laboratory to the market, potentially transforming the treatment of conditions ranging from epilepsy to diabetes and creating business opportunities estimated to be worth tens of billions of dollars. Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Empatica, is developing a wristband designed to alert epilepsy patients and their caregivers of seizures in the hope of averting a dangerous post-seizure condition that can cause sudden, unexpected death. Empatica founder Picard, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and inventor, told Reuters the company has just started large clinical trials using its wristband device on individuals with depression. Picture taken November 25, 2015. To match Insight HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA REUTERS/Brian Snyder
HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA
RTX1Z79E
December 18, 2015
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (L), CEO of Empatica,...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (L), CEO of Empatica,...
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (L), CEO of Empatica, wear the company's Embrace devices while talking at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts November 25, 2015. A new wave of wearable computing devices that detect and monitor serious diseases is moving from the laboratory to the market, potentially transforming the treatment of conditions ranging from epilepsy to diabetes and creating business opportunities estimated to be worth tens of billions of dollars. Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Empatica, is developing a wristband designed to alert epilepsy patients and their caregivers of seizures in the hope of averting a dangerous post-seizure condition that can cause sudden, unexpected death. Empatica founder Picard, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and inventor, told Reuters the company has just started large clinical trials using its wristband device on individuals with depression. Picture taken November 25, 2015. To match Insight HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA REUTERS/Brian Snyder
HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA
RTX1Z79D
December 18, 2015
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while...
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while posing for a portrait at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts November 25, 2015. A new wave of wearable computing devices that detect and monitor serious diseases is moving from the laboratory to the market, potentially transforming the treatment of conditions ranging from epilepsy to diabetes and creating business opportunities estimated to be worth tens of billions of dollars. Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Empatica, is developing a wristband designed to alert epilepsy patients and their caregivers of seizures in the hope of averting a dangerous post-seizure condition that can cause sudden, unexpected death. Empatica founder Picard, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and inventor, told Reuters the company has just started large clinical trials using its wristband device on individuals with depression. Picture taken November 25, 2015. To match Insight HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA REUTERS/Brian Snyder
HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA
RTX1Z79C
December 18, 2015
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device at...
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while talking to Matteo Lai, CEO of Empatica, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts November 25, 2015. A new wave of wearable computing devices that detect and monitor serious diseases is moving from the laboratory to the market, potentially transforming the treatment of conditions ranging from epilepsy to diabetes and creating business opportunities estimated to be worth tens of billions of dollars. Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Empatica, is developing a wristband designed to alert epilepsy patients and their caregivers of seizures in the hope of averting a dangerous post-seizure condition that can cause sudden, unexpected death. Empatica founder Picard, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and inventor, told Reuters the company has just started large clinical trials using its wristband device on individuals with depression. Picture taken November 25, 2015. To match Insight HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA REUTERS/Brian Snyder
HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA
RTX1Z79B
December 18, 2015
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (L), CEO of Empatica,...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (L), CEO of Empatica,...
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, and Matteo Lai (L), CEO of Empatica, wear the company's Embrace devices while talking at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts November 25, 2015. A new wave of wearable computing devices that detect and monitor serious diseases is moving from the laboratory to the market, potentially transforming the treatment of conditions ranging from epilepsy to diabetes and creating business opportunities estimated to be worth tens of billions of dollars. Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Empatica, is developing a wristband designed to alert epilepsy patients and their caregivers of seizures in the hope of averting a dangerous post-seizure condition that can cause sudden, unexpected death. Empatica founder Picard, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and inventor, told Reuters the company has just started large clinical trials using its wristband device on individuals with depression. Picture taken November 25, 2015. To match Insight HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA REUTERS/Brian Snyder
HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA
RTX1Z79A
December 18, 2015
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while...
Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company's Embrace device while posing for a portrait at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts November 25, 2015. A new wave of wearable computing devices that detect and monitor serious diseases is moving from the laboratory to the market, potentially transforming the treatment of conditions ranging from epilepsy to diabetes and creating business opportunities estimated to be worth tens of billions of dollars. Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Empatica, is developing a wristband designed to alert epilepsy patients and their caregivers of seizures in the hope of averting a dangerous post-seizure condition that can cause sudden, unexpected death. Empatica founder Picard, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and inventor, told Reuters the company has just started large clinical trials using its wristband device on individuals with depression. Picture taken November 25, 2015. To match Insight HEALTH-WEARABLES/FDA REUTERS/Brian Snyder
HEALTH-MERS/TAIWAN
RTX1G6OJ
June 12, 2015
Medical personnel monitor the temperature of a woman acting as a patient during a drill as part of preparations...
Taipei, Taiwan
Medical personnel monitor temperature of woman acting as patient during drill as part of preparations...
Medical personnel monitor the temperature of a woman acting as a patient during a drill as part of preparations in the event of a Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) outbreak, at the New Taipei City Hospital Sanchung Branch in New Taipei City, Taiwan, June 12, 2015. REUTERS/Pichi Chuang
HEALTH-MERS/PHILIPPINES-WHO
RTX1FR53
June 09, 2015
A monitor connected to a body temperature scanner shows flight passengers arriving from South Korea,...
Manila, Philippines
A monitor connected to a body temperature scanner shows flight passengers arriving from South Korea,...
A monitor connected to a body temperature scanner shows flight passengers arriving from South Korea, at Ninoy Aquino International Airport in Manila, June 9, 2015. The World Health Organization said on Tuesday that the outbreak of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) in South Korea was the largest seen outside the Middle East, but it should not be a cause of concern. The South Korea's health ministry said on Tuesday there were eight new MERS cases reported, bringing the total of patients to 95. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco


TAIWAN-HEALTH/
RTX1F11C
June 04, 2015
Medical personnel send a simulated patient to a negative pressure isolation room (shown on the monitor)...
Taipei, Taiwan
Medical personnel send a simulated patient to a negative pressure isolation room during a drill, as part...
Medical personnel send a simulated patient to a negative pressure isolation room (shown on the monitor) during a drill, as part of preparations in the event of an outbreak of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), at the Taipei City Hospital Chunghsin Branch in Taipei, Taiwan, June 4, 2015. REUTERS/Pichi Chuang
ITALY-HEALTH/AWAKENINGS
RTR4RUNV
March 03, 2015
Wedding and family pictures of Giovannina Caprara, a coma patient taking part in the Oberon project,...
Cosenza, Italy
Wedding and family pictures of Giovannina Caprara, a coma patient taking part in the Oberon project,...
Wedding and family pictures of Giovannina Caprara, a coma patient taking part in the Oberon project, are seen in her home at Villa Piana di Cosenza, south of Italy, December 17, 2014. Sant'Anna's home-monitoring system uses technology and training of family members to give coma patients the same quality of care at home as they would receive in hospital. It costs the hospital less to oversee a patient remotely than to provide for his or her board at the clinic. Caprara, in a state that Dolce describes as "unresponsive wakeful system," sits in a wheelchair in her cottage adorned with pictures of saints, and she sometimes seems to smile and laugh. Under pressure to curb the euro zone's second-largest public debt, successive Italian governments have slashed funding for regions by 10 billion euros in the last five years. Regional authorities in turn have targeted the largest item on their own budget: health spending. In Calabria, where Sant'Anna is located, the health service deficit has fallen to 40 million euros from 250 million euros since 2009. Because cuts are politically difficult, they have hit all of Calabria's hospitals in the same way, regardless of medical or economic performance. That means the Sant'Anna ? whose success rate in reawakening people from comas is nearly 20 percent higher than the Italian average ? faces similar cuts to those in any other hospital in the region. To match Insight ITALY-HEALTH/AWAKENINGS Picture taken December 17, 2014. REUTERS/Max Rossi (ITALY - Tags: POLITICS HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS)
ITALY-HEALTH/AWAKENINGS
RTR4RUNT
March 03, 2015
Giovannina Caprara, a coma patient taking part in the Oberon project, is helped by her daughter to get...
Cosenza, Italy
Giovannina Caprara, a coma patient taking part in the Oberon project, is helped by her daughter to get...
Giovannina Caprara, a coma patient taking part in the Oberon project, is helped by her daughter to get into bed in their home at Villa Piana di Cosenza, south of Italy, December 17, 2014. Sant'Anna's home-monitoring system uses technology and training of family members to give coma patients the same quality of care at home as they would receive in hospital. It costs the hospital less to oversee a patient remotely than to provide for his or her board at the clinic. Caprara, in a state that Dolce describes as "unresponsive wakeful system," sits in a wheelchair in her cottage adorned with pictures of saints, and she sometimes seems to smile and laugh. Under pressure to curb the euro zone's second-largest public debt, successive Italian governments have slashed funding for regions by 10 billion euros in the last five years. Regional authorities in turn have targeted the largest item on their own budget: health spending. In Calabria, where Sant'Anna is located, the health service deficit has fallen to 40 million euros from 250 million euros since 2009. Because cuts are politically difficult, they have hit all of Calabria's hospitals in the same way, regardless of medical or economic performance. That means the Sant'Anna ? whose success rate in reawakening people from comas is nearly 20 percent higher than the Italian average ? faces similar cuts to those in any other hospital in the region. To match Insight ITALY-HEALTH/AWAKENINGS Picture taken December 17, 2014. REUTERS/Max Rossi (ITALY - Tags: POLITICS HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS)
ITALY-HEALTH/AWAKENINGS
RTR4RUNP
March 03, 2015
Giovannina Caprara, a coma patient taking part in the Oberon project, sits in a wheelchair at her home...
Cosenza, Italy
Giovannina Caprara, a coma patient taking part in the Oberon project, sits in a wheelchair at her home...
Giovannina Caprara, a coma patient taking part in the Oberon project, sits in a wheelchair at her home next to her husband at Villa Piana di Cosenza, south of Italy, December 17, 2014. Sant'Anna's home-monitoring system uses technology and training of family members to give coma patients the same quality of care at home as they would receive in hospital. It costs the hospital less to oversee a patient remotely than to provide for his or her board at the clinic. Caprara, in a state that Dolce describes as "unresponsive wakeful system," sits in a wheelchair in her cottage adorned with pictures of saints, and she sometimes seems to smile and laugh. Under pressure to curb the euro zone's second-largest public debt, successive Italian governments have slashed funding for regions by 10 billion euros in the last five years. Regional authorities in turn have targeted the largest item on their own budget: health spending. In Calabria, where Sant'Anna is located, the health service deficit has fallen to 40 million euros from 250 million euros since 2009. Because cuts are politically difficult, they have hit all of Calabria's hospitals in the same way, regardless of medical or economic performance. That means the Sant'Anna ? whose success rate in reawakening people from comas is nearly 20 percent higher than the Italian average ? faces similar cuts to those in any other hospital in the region. To match Insight ITALY-HEALTH/AWAKENINGS Picture taken December 17, 2014. REUTERS/Max Rossi (ITALY - Tags: POLITICS HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS)
ITALY-HEALTH/AWAKENINGS
RTR4RUNM
March 03, 2015
Giovannina Caprara, a coma patient taking part in the Oberon project, looks at her daughter in her home...
Cosenza, Italy
Giovannina Caprara, a coma patient taking part in the Oberon project, looks at her daughter in her home...
Giovannina Caprara, a coma patient taking part in the Oberon project, looks at her daughter in her home at Villa Piana di Cosenza, south of Italy, December 17, 2014. Sant'Anna's home-monitoring system uses technology and training of family members to give coma patients the same quality of care at home as they would receive in hospital. It costs the hospital less to oversee a patient remotely than to provide for his or her board at the clinic. Caprara, in a state that Dolce describes as "unresponsive wakeful system," sits in a wheelchair in her cottage adorned with pictures of saints, and she sometimes seems to smile and laugh. Under pressure to curb the euro zone's second-largest public debt, successive Italian governments have slashed funding for regions by 10 billion euros in the last five years. Regional authorities in turn have targeted the largest item on their own budget: health spending. In Calabria, where Sant'Anna is located, the health service deficit has fallen to 40 million euros from 250 million euros since 2009. Because cuts are politically difficult, they have hit all of Calabria's hospitals in the same way, regardless of medical or economic performance. That means the Sant'Anna ? whose success rate in reawakening people from comas is nearly 20 percent higher than the Italian average ? faces similar cuts to those in any other hospital in the region. To match Insight ITALY-HEALTH/AWAKENINGS Picture taken December 17, 2014. REUTERS/Max Rossi (ITALY - Tags: POLITICS HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS)
ZAMBIA-HEALTH/
RTR4QVCT
February 23, 2015
Caregiver Sister Abigail Mwaka Mazuba walks back to her vehicle after visiting an HIV-positive person...
Chikuni, Zambia
Caregiver Sister Abigail walks back to her vehicle after visiting an HIV-positive person in the village...
Caregiver Sister Abigail Mwaka Mazuba walks back to her vehicle after visiting an HIV-positive person in the village of Nedwmba, south of the Chikuni Mission in the south of Zambia February 23, 2015. The caregivers in the Jesuit-run home-based care project at the Chikuni Mission run a capacity-building and empowerment project at the household level, offering training and assistance in crop-growing and animal rearing, as well as offering companionship, pastoral care and monitoring of the antiretroviral treatment compliance of HIV-AIDS patients.
REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi (ZAMBIA - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
ZAMBIA-HEALTH/
RTR4QVCG
February 23, 2015
A child looks out from behind a curtain during a visit by a home-based care team to an HIV-positive person...
Chikuni, Zambia
Child looks out from behind a curtain during a visit by a home-based care team to an HIV-positive person...
A child looks out from behind a curtain during a visit by a home-based care team to an HIV-positive person in the village of Choongo, south of the Chikuni Mission in the south of Zambia February 23, 2015. The caregivers in the Jesuit-run home-based care project at the Chikuni Mission run a capacity-building and empowerment project at the household level, offering training and assistance in crop-growing and animal rearing, as well as offering companionship, pastoral care and monitoring of the antiretroviral treatment compliance of HIV-AIDS patients.
REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi (ZAMBIA - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
ZAMBIA-HEALTH/
RTR4QVC9
February 23, 2015
HIV-positive 71-year-old Sylverio Hachiploa (right) walks with caregivers Glandwel Muleya (L) and Sister...
Chikuni, Zambia
HIV-positive 71-year-old Hachiploa walks with caregivers Muleya and Sister Abigail during a visit by...
HIV-positive 71-year-old Sylverio Hachiploa (right) walks with caregivers Glandwel Muleya (L) and Sister Abigail Mwaka Mazuba (C) during a visit by a home-based care team in the village of Nedwmba, south of the Chikuni Mission in the south of Zambia February 23, 2015. The caregivers in the Jesuit-run home-based care project at the Chikuni Mission run a capacity-building and empowerment project at the household level, offering training and assistance in crop-growing and animal rearing, as well as offering companionship, pastoral care and monitoring of the antiretroviral treatment compliance of HIV-AIDS patients.
REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi (ZAMBIA - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
ZAMBIA-HEALTH/
RTR4QVBD
February 23, 2015
HIV-positive 71-year-old Sylverio Hachiploa reads in his thatched hut during a visit by a home-based...
Chikuni, Zambia
HIV-positive 71-year-old Hachiploa reads in his thatched hut during a visit by a home-based care team...
HIV-positive 71-year-old Sylverio Hachiploa reads in his thatched hut during a visit by a home-based care team in the village of Nedwmba, south of the Chikuni Mission in the south of Zambia February 23, 2015. The caregivers in the Jesuit-run home-based care project at the Chikuni Mission run a capacity-building and empowerment project at the household level, offering training and assistance in crop-growing and animal rearing, as well as offering companionship, pastoral care and monitoring of the antiretroviral treatment compliance of HIV-AIDS patients.
REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi (ZAMBIA - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
ZAMBIA-HEALTH/
RTR4QVBC
February 23, 2015
HIV-positive 71-year-old Sylverio Hachiploa reads in his thatched hut during a visit by a home-based...
Chikuni, Zambia
HIV-positive 71-year-old Hachiploa reads in his thatched hut during a visit by a home-based care team...
HIV-positive 71-year-old Sylverio Hachiploa reads in his thatched hut during a visit by a home-based care team in the village of Nedwmba, south of the Chikuni Mission in the south of Zambia February 23, 2015. The caregivers in the Jesuit-run home-based care project at the Chikuni Mission run a capacity-building and empowerment project at the household level, offering training and assistance in crop-growing and animal rearing, as well as offering companionship, pastoral care and monitoring of the antiretroviral treatment compliance of HIV-AIDS patients.
REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi (ZAMBIA - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
ZAMBIA-HEALTH/
RTR4QVBA
February 23, 2015
HIV-positive members of a self-help group leave after a meeting with a caregiver in the village of Michelo,...
Chikuni, Zambia
HIV-positive members of a self-help group leave after a meeting with a caregiver in the village of Michelo,...
HIV-positive members of a self-help group leave after a meeting with a caregiver in the village of Michelo, south of the Chikuni Mission in the south of Zambia February 23, 2015. The caregivers in the Jesuit-run home-based care project at the Chikuni Mission run a capacity-building and empowerment project at the household level, offering training and assistance in crop-growing and animal rearing, as well as offering companionship, pastoral care and monitoring of the antiretroviral treatment compliance of HIV-AIDS patients.
REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi (ZAMBIA - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
ZAMBIA-HEALTH/
RTR4QVAZ
February 23, 2015
HIV-positive members of a self-help group meet with a caregiver in the village of Michelo, south of the...
Chikuni, Zambia
HIV-positive members of a self-help group meet with a caregiver in the village of Michelo, south of the...
HIV-positive members of a self-help group meet with a caregiver in the village of Michelo, south of the Chikuni Mission in the south of Zambia February 23, 2015. The caregivers in the Jesuit-run home-based care project at the Chikuni Mission run a capacity-building and empowerment project at the household level, offering training and assistance in crop-growing and animal rearing, as well as offering companionship, pastoral care and monitoring of the antiretroviral treatment compliance of HIV-AIDS patients.
REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi (ZAMBIA - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
ZAMBIA-HEALTH/
RTR4QVAT
February 23, 2015
11-year-old Emery Phiri, who was born HIV-positive, attends a self-help group meeting with a caregiver...
Chikuni, Zambia
Phiri, 11, who was born HIV-positive, attends a self-help group meeting with a caregiver in the village...
11-year-old Emery Phiri, who was born HIV-positive, attends a self-help group meeting with a caregiver in the village of Michelo, south of the Chikuni Mission in the south of Zambia February 23, 2015. The caregivers in the Jesuit-run home-based care project at the Chikuni Mission run a capacity-building and empowerment project at the household level, offering training and assistance in crop-growing and animal rearing, as well as offering companionship, pastoral care and monitoring of the antiretroviral treatment compliance of HIV-AIDS patients.
REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi (ZAMBIA - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH DRUGS HEADSHOT)
ZAMBIA-HEALTH/
RTR4QVAP
February 23, 2015
HIV-positive 71-year-old Sylverio Hachiploa sits cross-legged during a visit by a home-based care team...
Chikuni, Zambia
HIV-positive 71-year-old Hachiploa sits cross-legged during a visit by a home-based care team in the...
HIV-positive 71-year-old Sylverio Hachiploa sits cross-legged during a visit by a home-based care team in the village of Nedwmba, south of the Chikuni Mission in the south of Zambia February 23, 2015. The caregivers in the Jesuit-run home-based care project at the Chikuni Mission run a capacity-building and empowerment project at the household level, offering training and assistance in crop-growing and animal rearing, as well as offering companionship, pastoral care and monitoring of the antiretroviral treatment compliance of HIV-AIDS patients.
REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi (ZAMBIA - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
ZAMBIA-HEALTH/
RTR4QVAJ
February 23, 2015
HIV-positive 71-year-old Sylverio Hachiploa (R) talks with caregivers Glandwel Muleya (L) and Sister...
Chikuni, Zambia
HIV-positive 71-year-old Hachiploa talks with caregivers Muleya and Sister Mwaka Mazuba in his thatched...
HIV-positive 71-year-old Sylverio Hachiploa (R) talks with caregivers Glandwel Muleya (L) and Sister Abigail Mwaka Mazuba (C) in his thatched hut during a visit by a home-based care team in the village of Nedwmba, south of the Chikuni Mission in the south of Zambia February 23, 2015. The caregivers in the Jesuit-run home-based care project at the Chikuni Mission run a capacity-building and empowerment project at the household level, offering training and assistance in crop-growing and animal rearing, as well as offering companionship, pastoral care and monitoring of the antiretroviral treatment compliance of HIV-AIDS patients.
REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi (ZAMBIA - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
ZAMBIA-HEALTH/
RTR4QVA8
February 23, 2015
11-year-old Emery Phiri (right), who was born HIV-positive, and her grandmother attend a self-help group...
Chikuni, Zambia
Phiri, 11, who was born HIV-positive, and her grandmother attend a self-help group meeting with a caregiver...
11-year-old Emery Phiri (right), who was born HIV-positive, and her grandmother attend a self-help group meeting with a caregiver in the village of Michelo, south of the Chikuni Mission in the south of Zambia February 23, 2015. The caregivers in the Jesuit-run home-based care project at the Chikuni Mission run a capacity-building and empowerment project at the household level, offering training and assistance in crop-growing and animal rearing, as well as offering companionship, pastoral care and monitoring of the antiretroviral treatment compliance of HIV-AIDS patients. REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi (ZAMBIA - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH DRUGS)
ZAMBIA-HEALTH/
RTR4QVA7
February 23, 2015
HIV-positive 71-year-old Sylverio Hachiploa reads in his thatched hut during a visit by a home-based...
Chikuni, Zambia
HIV-positive 71-year-old Hachiploa reads in his thatched hut during a visit by a home-based care team...
HIV-positive 71-year-old Sylverio Hachiploa reads in his thatched hut during a visit by a home-based care team in the village of Nedwmba, south of the Chikuni Mission in the south of Zambia February 23, 2015. The caregivers in the Jesuit-run home-based care project at the Chikuni Mission run a capacity-building and empowerment project at the household level, offering training and assistance in crop-growing and animal rearing, as well as offering companionship, pastoral care and monitoring of the antiretroviral treatment compliance of HIV-AIDS patients.
REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi (ZAMBIA - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
ZAMBIA-HEALTH/
RTR4QV9V
February 23, 2015
HIV-positive members of a self-help group meet with a caregiver in the village of Michelo, south of the...
Chikuni, Zambia
HIV-positive members of a self-help group meet with a caregiver in the village of Michelo, south of the...
HIV-positive members of a self-help group meet with a caregiver in the village of Michelo, south of the Chikuni Mission in the south of Zambia February 23, 2015. The caregivers in the Jesuit-run home-based care project at the Chikuni Mission run a capacity-building and empowerment project at the household level, offering training and assistance in crop-growing and animal rearing, as well as offering companionship, pastoral care and monitoring of the antiretroviral treatment compliance of HIV-AIDS patients.
REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi (ZAMBIA - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
ZAMBIA-HEALTH/
RTR4QV7J
February 23, 2015
HIV-positive members of a self-help group pray at the start of a meeting in the village of Michelo, south...
Chikuni, Zambia
HIV-positive members of a self-help group pray at the start of a meeting in the village of Michelo, south...
HIV-positive members of a self-help group pray at the start of a meeting in the village of Michelo, south of the Chikuni Mission in the south of Zambia February 23, 2015. The caregivers in the Jesuit-run home-based care project at the Chikuni Mission run a capacity-building and empowerment project at the household level, offering training and assistance in crop-growing and animal rearing, as well as offering companionship, pastoral care and monitoring antiretroviral treatment compliance of HIV-AIDS patients.
REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi (ZAMBIA - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH RELIGION)
ZAMBIA-HEALTH/
RTR4QV7G
February 23, 2015
11-year-old Sonia Matanga (L), who was born HIV-positive, attends a self-help group meeting with caregiver...
Chikuni, Zambia
Matanga, 11, who was born HIV-positive, attends a self-help group meeting with caregiver Mungoni in the...
11-year-old Sonia Matanga (L), who was born HIV-positive, attends a self-help group meeting with caregiver Davison Mungoni (R) in the village of Michelo, south of the Chikuni Mission in the south of Zambia February 23, 2015. The caregivers in the Jesuit-run home-based care project at the Chikuni Mission run a capacity-building and empowerment project at the household level, offering training and assistance in crop-growing and animal rearing, as well as offering companionship, pastoral care and monitoring antiretroviral treatment compliance of HIV-AIDS patients.
REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi (ZAMBIA - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH)
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