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Search results for: Petri-dish

KENYA-RHINOS/
RTS31NM7
February 11, 2020
PhD student Collins Kipkorir Kebeni holds a petri dish containing samples of black rhinos' excrements...
MASENO, Kenya
PhD student Collins Kipkorir Kebeni holds a petri dish containing samples of black rhinos' excrements...
PhD student Collins Kipkorir Kebeni holds a petri dish containing samples of black rhinos' excrements at the Zoology lab of the Maseno University, in Maseno, western Kenya, January 30, 2020. Picture taken January 30, 2020. REUTERS/Baz Ratner
FOOD-TECH/LABMEAT-SHRIMP
RTS2ZTZ3
January 28, 2020
Ka Yi Ling, co-founder and chief scientific officer at Shiok Meats, injects nutrient solution into a...
Singapore, Singapore
Ka Yi Ling, co-founder and chief scientific officer at Shiok Meats, injects nutrient solution into a...
Ka Yi Ling, co-founder and chief scientific officer at Shiok Meats, injects nutrient solution into a petri dish to grow stem cells of shrimp meat, in Singapore January 22, 2020. Picture taken January 22, 2020. REUTERS/Travis Teo
GERMANY-POLITICS/
RTX6OO31
February 26, 2019
German Chancellor Angela Merkel talks to Zoe Mendelsohn, Nikolaus Rajewsky and Martin Lohse beside seven-week-old...
Berlin, Germany
German Chancellor Merkel visits the new research building of the Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine...
German Chancellor Angela Merkel talks to Zoe Mendelsohn, Nikolaus Rajewsky and Martin Lohse beside seven-week-old "mini-brain" (organoid) in a petri dish under the microscope as she visits the new research building of the Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) in Berlin, Germany, February 26, 2019. Photo: Bernd von Jutrczenka/Pool via Reuters
GERMANY-POLITICS/
RTX6OO2X
February 26, 2019
German Chancellor Angela Merkel talks to Zoe Mendelsohn, Nikolaus Rajewsky and Martin Lohse beside seven-week-old...
Berlin, Germany
German Chancellor Merkel visits the new research building of the Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine...
German Chancellor Angela Merkel talks to Zoe Mendelsohn, Nikolaus Rajewsky and Martin Lohse beside seven-week-old "mini-brain" (organoid) in a petri dish under the microscope as she visits the new research building of the Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) in Berlin, Germany, February 26, 2019. Photo: Bernd von Jutrczenka/Pool via Reuters
OCEANS-TIDE/FUTURE
RTX6H608
October 30, 2018
Sea lice, parasites slowing the expansion of Norway's salmon-farming industry, are seen in a Petri dish...
DIRDAL, Norway
Sea lice, parasites slowing the expansion of Norway's salmon-farming industry, are seen in a Petri dish...
Sea lice, parasites slowing the expansion of Norway's salmon-farming industry, are seen in a Petri dish at Cargill's research centre in Dirdal, Norway, August 1, 2018. Picture taken August 1, 2018. To match Special Report OCEANS-TIDE/FUTURE REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne
POULTRY-DRUG/
RTX1DA0S
May 17, 2015
A researcher shows petri dishes containing Lactobacillus colonies forming at Otemchi Biotechnology's...
Singapore, Singapore
A researcher shows petri dishes containing Lactobacillus colonies forming at Otemchi Biotechnology's...
A researcher shows petri dishes containing Lactobacillus colonies forming at Otemchi Biotechnology's laboratory in Singapore April 24, 2015. In barns filled with classical music and lighting that changes to match the hues outside, rows of chickens are fed a diet rich in probiotics, a regimen designed to remove the need for the drugs and chemicals that have tainted the global food chain. The Lactobacillus is produced in the lab to mix with chicken feed for Kee Song Brothers' drug-free poultry farms. Picture taken April 24, 2015. To match POULTRY-DRUG/ REUTERS/Edgar Su
POULTRY-DRUG/
RTX1DA0K
May 17, 2015
A researcher counts Lactobacillus colonies forming in a petri dish at Otemchi Biotechnology's laboratory...
Singapore, Singapore
A researcher counts Lactobacillus colonies forming in a petri dish at Otemchi Biotechnology's laboratory...
A researcher counts Lactobacillus colonies forming in a petri dish at Otemchi Biotechnology's laboratory in Singapore April 24, 2015. In barns filled with classical music and lighting that changes to match the hues outside, rows of chickens are fed a diet rich in probiotics, a regimen designed to remove the need for the drugs and chemicals that have tainted the global food chain. The Lactobacillus is produced in the lab to mix with chicken feed for Kee Song Brothers' drug-free poultry farms. Picture taken April 24, 2015. To match POULTRY-DRUG/ REUTERS/Edgar Su
USA-AGRICULTURE-MONSANTO
RTR42TJ4
August 18, 2014
Lara Alpan, a Monsanto tour guide, shows how a plant grows in petri dishes in the Monsanto research facility...
Chesterfield, UNITED STATES
Lara Alpan, a Monsanto tour guide, shows how a plant grows in petri dishes in the Monsanto research facility...
Lara Alpan, a Monsanto tour guide, shows how a plant grows in petri dishes in the Monsanto research facility in Chesterfield, Missouri, July 28, 2014. Monsanto says their technology-driven plant breeding process is focused on improving the overall genetics of a crop, using parents with characteristics such as disease tolerance, size or baking qualities. Picture taken July 28, 2014. 10 of 25 Monsanto Stand Alone Picture Package. REUTERS/Tom Gannam (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT FOOD SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY AGRICULTURE)
USA-AGRICULTURE-MONSANTO
RTR42TIY
August 18, 2014
Lara Alpan, a Monsanto tour guide, shows how a plant grows in petri dishes in the Monsanto research facility...
Chesterfield, UNITED STATES
Lara Alpan, a Monsanto tour guide, shows how a plant grows in petri dishes in the Monsanto research facility...
Lara Alpan, a Monsanto tour guide, shows how a plant grows in petri dishes in the Monsanto research facility in Chesterfield, Missouri, July 28, 2014. Monsanto says their technology-driven plant breeding process is focused on improving the overall genetics of a crop, using parents with characteristics such as disease tolerance, size or baking qualities. Picture taken July 28, 2014. 9 of 25 Monsanto Stand Alone Picture Package. REUTERS/Tom Gannam (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT FOOD SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY AGRICULTURE)
USA-AGRICULTURE-MONSANTO
RTR42TIQ
August 18, 2014
Lara Alpan, a Monsanto tour guide, shows how a plant grows in petri dishes in the Monsanto research facility...
Chesterfield, UNITED STATES
Lara Alpan, a Monsanto tour guide, shows how a plant grows in petri dishes in the Monsanto research facility...
Lara Alpan, a Monsanto tour guide, shows how a plant grows in petri dishes in the Monsanto research facility in Chesterfield, Missouri, July 28, 2014. Monsanto says their technology-driven plant breeding process is focused on improving the overall genetics of a crop, using parents with characteristics such as disease tolerance, size or baking qualities. Picture taken July 28, 2014. 11 of 25 Monsanto Stand Alone Picture Package. REUTERS/Tom Gannam (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT FOOD SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY AGRICULTURE)
HEALTH-EBOLA/
RTR41ZI1
August 11, 2014
Doctor for tropical medicine Florian Steiner demonstrates the testing of a blood sample at the quarantine...
Berlin, Germany
Physician demonstrates testing of blood sample at quarantine station for patients with infectious diseases...
Doctor for tropical medicine Florian Steiner demonstrates the testing of a blood sample at the quarantine station for patients with infectious diseases at the Charite hospital in Berlin August 11, 2014. The isolation ward at the Charite is one of several centres in Germany equipped to treat patients suffering from ebola and other highly infectious diseases, the clinic's doctor for tropical medicine Florian Steiner said. Ebola is one of the deadliest diseases known to humanity. It has no proven cure and there is no vaccine to prevent infection. The most effective treatment involves alleviating symptoms that include fever, vomiting and diarrhoea. The rigorous use of quarantine is needed to prevent its spread, as well as high standards of hygiene for anyone who might come into contact with the disease. REUTERS/Thomas Peter (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH)
News
News
World's First In-Vitro Burger - 05 Aug 2013
14 PICTURES
SCIENCE-MEAT/IN-VITRO
RTX12B0Q
August 05, 2013
Professor Mark Post gestures during a launch event for the world's first lab-grown beef burger, in west...
London, United Kingdom
Professor Mark Post gestures during a launch event for the world's first lab-grown beef burger in west...
Professor Mark Post gestures during a launch event for the world's first lab-grown beef burger, in west London August 5, 2013. The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the first example of what its creator says could provide an answer to global food shortages and help combat climate change, was fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers. The burger is the result of years of research by Post, a vascular biologist at the University of Maastricht, who is working to show how meat grown in petri dishes might one day be a true alternative to meat from livestock.The meat in the burger has been made by knitting together around 20,000 strands of protein that has been cultured from cattle stem cells in Post's lab. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT FOOD SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
SCIENCE-MEAT/IN-VITRO
RTX12B07
August 05, 2013
Josh Schonwald, a US-based food writer, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch...
London, United Kingdom
Josh Schonwald, a US-based food writer, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch...
Josh Schonwald, a US-based food writer, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London August 5, 2013. The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the first example of what its creator says could provide an answer to global food shortages and help combat climate change, was fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers. The burger is the result of years of research by Dutch scientist Mark Post, a vascular biologist at the University of Maastricht, who is working to show how meat grown in petri dishes might one day be a true alternative to meat from livestock.The meat in the burger has been made by knitting together around 20,000 strands of protein that has been cultured from cattle stem cells in Post's lab. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY FOOD ANIMALS)
SCIENCE-MEAT/IN-VITRO
RTX12B01
August 05, 2013
Hanni Rutzler, a food researcher from Austria, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during...
London, United Kingdom
Hanni Rutzler, a food researcher from Austria, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during...
Hanni Rutzler, a food researcher from Austria, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London August 5, 2013. The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the first example of what its creator says could provide an answer to global food shortages and help combat climate change, was fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers. The burger is the result of years of research by Dutch scientist Mark Post, a vascular biologist at the University of Maastricht, who is working to show how meat grown in petri dishes might one day be a true alternative to meat from livestock.The meat in the burger has been made by knitting together around 20,000 strands of protein that has been cultured from cattle stem cells in Post's lab. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ANIMALS FOOD)
SCIENCE-MEAT/IN-VITRO
RTX12AZY
August 05, 2013
Chef Richard McGeown cooks the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London...
London, United Kingdom
Chef Richard McGeown cooks the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London...
Chef Richard McGeown cooks the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London August 5, 2013. The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the first example of what its creator says could provide an answer to global food shortages and help combat climate change, was fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers. The burger is the result of years of research by Dutch scientist Mark Post, a vascular biologist at the University of Maastricht, who is working to show how meat grown in petri dishes might one day be a true alternative to meat from livestock.The meat in the burger has been made by knitting together around 20,000 strands of protein that has been cultured from cattle stem cells in Post's lab. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT FOOD SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
SCIENCE-MEAT/IN-VITRO
RTX12AZC
August 05, 2013
Hanni Rutzler, a food researcher from Austria, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during...
London, United Kingdom
World's first in-vitro beef burger cooked and tasted in London
Hanni Rutzler, a food researcher from Austria, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London, August 5, 2013. The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the first example of what its creator says could provide an answer to global food shortages and help combat climate change, was fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers. The burger is the result of years of research by Dutch scientist Mark Post, a vascular biologist at the University of Maastricht, who is working to show how meat grown in petri dishes might one day be a true alternative to meat from livestock.The meat in the burger has been made by knitting together around 20,000 strands of protein that has been cultured from cattle stem cells in Post's lab. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ANIMALS FOOD)
SCIENCE-MEAT/IN-VITRO
RTX12AZ6
August 05, 2013
A photographer shoots in a television studio with a live screen view behind as the world's first lab-grown...
London, United Kingdom
World's first in-vitro beef burger cooked and tasted in London
A photographer shoots in a television studio with a live screen view behind as the world's first lab-grown beef burger is cooked during a launch event in west London, August 5, 2013. The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the first example of what its creator says could provide an answer to global food shortages and help combat climate change, was fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers. The burger is the result of years of research by Dutch scientist Mark Post, a vascular biologist at the University of Maastricht, who is working to show how meat grown in petri dishes might one day be a true alternative to meat from livestock.The meat in the burger has been made by knitting together around 20,000 strands of protein that has been cultured from cattle stem cells in Post's lab. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ANIMALS FOOD)
SCIENCE-MEAT/IN-VITRO
RTX12AZ5
August 05, 2013
Hanni Rutzler, a food researcher from Austria, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during...
London, United Kingdom
World's first in-vitro beef burger cooked and tasted in London
Hanni Rutzler, a food researcher from Austria, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London, August 5, 2013. The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the first example of what its creator says could provide an answer to global food shortages and help combat climate change, was fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers. The burger is the result of years of research by Dutch scientist Mark Post, a vascular biologist at the University of Maastricht, who is working to show how meat grown in petri dishes might one day be a true alternative to meat from livestock.The meat in the burger has been made by knitting together around 20,000 strands of protein that has been cultured from cattle stem cells in Post's lab. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ANIMALS FOOD)
SCIENCE-MEAT/IN-VITRO
RTX12AZ1
August 05, 2013
Josh Schonwald, a US-based food writer, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch...
London, United Kingdom
World's first in-vitro beef burger cooked and tasted in London
Josh Schonwald, a US-based food writer, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London, August 5, 2013. The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the first example of what its creator says could provide an answer to global food shortages and help combat climate change, was fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers. The burger is the result of years of research by Dutch scientist Mark Post, a vascular biologist at the University of Maastricht, who is working to show how meat grown in petri dishes might one day be a true alternative to meat from livestock.The meat in the burger has been made by knitting together around 20,000 strands of protein that has been cultured from cattle stem cells in Post's lab. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY FOOD ANIMALS)
SCIENCE-MEAT/IN-VITRO
RTX12AZ0
August 05, 2013
Josh Schonwald, a US-based food writer, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch...
London, United Kingdom
World's first in-vitro beef burger cooked and tasted in London
Josh Schonwald, a US-based food writer, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London, August 5, 2013. The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the first example of what its creator says could provide an answer to global food shortages and help combat climate change, was fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers. The burger is the result of years of research by Dutch scientist Mark Post, a vascular biologist at the University of Maastricht, who is working to show how meat grown in petri dishes might one day be a true alternative to meat from livestock.The meat in the burger has been made by knitting together around 20,000 strands of protein that has been cultured from cattle stem cells in Post's lab. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY FOOD ANIMALS)
SCIENCE-MEAT/IN-VITRO
RTX12AYY
August 05, 2013
Chef Rich McGeown prepares to cook the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west...
London, United Kingdom
World's first in-vitro beef burger cooked in London
Chef Rich McGeown prepares to cook the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London, August 5, 2013. The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the first example of what its creator says could provide an answer to global food shortages and help combat climate change, was fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers. The burger is the result of years of research by Dutch scientist Mark Post, a vascular biologist at the University of Maastricht, who is working to show how meat grown in petri dishes might one day be a true alternative to meat from livestock.The meat in the burger has been made by knitting together around 20,000 strands of protein that has been cultured from cattle stem cells in Post's lab. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ANIMALS FOOD)
SCIENCE-MEAT/IN-VITRO
RTX12AYX
August 05, 2013
Josh Schonwald, a US-based food writer, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch...
London, United Kingdom
World's first in-vitro beef burger cooked and tasted in London
Josh Schonwald, a US-based food writer, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London, August 5, 2013. The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the first example of what its creator says could provide an answer to global food shortages and help combat climate change, was fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers. The burger is the result of years of research by Dutch scientist Mark Post, a vascular biologist at the University of Maastricht, who is working to show how meat grown in petri dishes might one day be a true alternative to meat from livestock.The meat in the burger has been made by knitting together around 20,000 strands of protein that has been cultured from cattle stem cells in Post's lab. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY FOOD ANIMALS)
SCIENCE-MEAT/IN-VITRO
RTX12AYW
August 05, 2013
Josh Schonwald, a US-based food writer, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch...
London, United Kingdom
World's first in-vitro beef burger cooked and tasted in London
Josh Schonwald, a US-based food writer, tastes the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London, August 5, 2013. The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the first example of what its creator says could provide an answer to global food shortages and help combat climate change, was fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers. The burger is the result of years of research by Dutch scientist Mark Post, a vascular biologist at the University of Maastricht, who is working to show how meat grown in petri dishes might one day be a true alternative to meat from livestock.The meat in the burger has been made by knitting together around 20,000 strands of protein that has been cultured from cattle stem cells in Post's lab. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY FOOD ANIMALS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
SCIENCE-MEAT/IN-VITRO
RTX12AYV
August 05, 2013
Chef Rich McGeown prepares to cook the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west...
London, United Kingdom
World's first in-vitro beef burger cooked in London
Chef Rich McGeown prepares to cook the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London, August 5, 2013. The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the first example of what its creator says could provide an answer to global food shortages and help combat climate change, was fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers. The burger is the result of years of research by Dutch scientist Mark Post, a vascular biologist at the University of Maastricht, who is working to show how meat grown in petri dishes might one day be a true alternative to meat from livestock.The meat in the burger has been made by knitting together around 20,000 strands of protein that has been cultured from cattle stem cells in Post's lab. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ANIMALS FOOD)
SCIENCE-MEAT/IN-VITRO
RTX12AYS
August 05, 2013
Chef Rich McGeown prepares to cook the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west...
London, United Kingdom
World's first in-vitro beef burger cooked in London
Chef Rich McGeown prepares to cook the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London, August 5, 2013. The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the first example of what its creator says could provide an answer to global food shortages and help combat climate change, was fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers. The burger is the result of years of research by Dutch scientist Mark Post, a vascular biologist at the University of Maastricht, who is working to show how meat grown in petri dishes might one day be a true alternative to meat from livestock.The meat in the burger has been made by knitting together around 20,000 strands of protein that has been cultured from cattle stem cells in Post's lab. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ANIMALS FOOD)
SCIENCE-MEAT/IN-VITRO
RTX12AYJ
August 05, 2013
Chef Rich McGeown prepares to cook the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west...
London, United Kingdom
World's first in-vitro beef burger cooked in London
Chef Rich McGeown prepares to cook the world's first lab-grown beef burger during a launch event in west London, August 5, 2013. The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the first example of what its creator says could provide an answer to global food shortages and help combat climate change, was fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers. The burger is the result of years of research by Dutch scientist Mark Post, a vascular biologist at the University of Maastricht, who is working to show how meat grown in petri dishes might one day be a true alternative to meat from livestock.The meat in the burger has been made by knitting together around 20,000 strands of protein that has been cultured from cattle stem cells in Post's lab. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
EUROPE-SCIENCE/
RTR3BW9U
December 25, 2012
A scientist works in a laboratory at the Complutense Medicine University in Madrid December 4, 2012....
Madrid, Spain
A scientist works in a laboratory at the Complutense Medicine University in Madrid
A scientist works in a laboratory at the Complutense Medicine University in Madrid December 4, 2012. Picture taken December 4. REUTERS/Andrea Comas (SPAIN - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
USA-MENINGITIS/
RTR39C9S
October 19, 2012
Doris Ortiz, Medical Technician 2, prepares samples in the specimen set-up area of the Vanderbilt Clinical...
Nashville, UNITED STATES
Doris Ortiz, Medical Technician 2, prepares samples in the specimen set-up area of the Vanderbilt Clinical...
Doris Ortiz, Medical Technician 2, prepares samples in the specimen set-up area of the Vanderbilt Clinical Microbiology Lab for patient care, where the fungal meningitis outbreak was first diagnosed, in Nashville, Tennessee on October 19, 2012. 257 people in the United States have been diagnosed with this disease and 20 have died. REUTERS/Harrison McClary (UNITED STATES)
DOMINICANREPUBLIC/
RTR3917B
October 11, 2012
A Dominican doctor observes Aedes aegypti mosquitos, which can spread the dengue fever, at Centro Nacional...
Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
A Dominican doctor observes Aedes aegypti mosquitos at the National Centre for Tropical Diseases Control,...
A Dominican doctor observes Aedes aegypti mosquitos, which can spread the dengue fever, at Centro Nacional de Control de Enfermedades Tropicales (CENCET), or the National Centre for Tropical Diseases Control, in Santo Domingo October 8, 2012. The Dominican government has issued a public health warning against rising incidents of Aedes aegypti dengue disease, which has affected 6,000 people and killed more than 13 in 2012, local media reported. Picture taken October 8, 2012. REUTERS/Ricardo Rojas (DOMINICAN REPUBLIC - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
SCIENCE-MEAT/
RTR2TVD5
November 11, 2011
Samples of in-vitro meat, or cultured meat grown in a laboratory, are seen at the University of Maastricht...
Maastricht, Netherlands
To match Feature SCIENCE-MEAT/
Samples of in-vitro meat, or cultured meat grown in a laboratory, are seen at the University of Maastricht November 9, 2011. Scientists are cooking up new ways of feeding the world's ever growing hunger for meat that could save the environment and the lives of millions of animals. In-vitro meat or cultured meat is an animal flesh product that has never been part of a complete, living animal, and is quite different from imitation meat or meat substitutes, which are vegetarian foods made from vegetable proteins like soy. Picture taken November 9. To match Feature SCIENCE-MEAT/ REUTERS/Francois Lenoir (NETHERLANDS - Tags: FOOD SOCIETY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
LATVIA/
RTR2NHLG
June 09, 2011
A specialist arranges petri dishes for Escherichia coli (E.coli) tests at the Institute of Food Safety,...
Riga, United Kingdom
A specialist arranges petri dishes for E.coli tests in Riga
A specialist arranges petri dishes for Escherichia coli (E.coli) tests at the Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment in Riga June 9, 2011. More than 1,600 people have been infected by a toxic strain of E.coli bacteria that has killed at least 17 and may be the deadliest yet in human history. Latvian government officials on Thursday informed media of stringent monitoring and control over its food sources, and the country has yet to be hit with any E.coli related cases. REUTERS/Ints Kalnins (LATVIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT HEALTH SCI TECH)
LATVIA/
RTR2NHKS
June 09, 2011
Specialist Jelena Kovalkova looks at a petri dish as she works to isolate the Escherichia coli (E.coli)...
Riga, Latvia
Specialist Jelena Kovalkova works to isolate the Escherichia coli (E.coli) bacteria strain in Riga
Specialist Jelena Kovalkova looks at a petri dish as she works to isolate the Escherichia coli (E.coli) bacteria strain at the Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment in Riga June 9, 2011. More than 1,600 people have been infected by a toxic strain of E.coli bacteria that has killed at least 17 and may be the deadliest yet in human history. Latvian government officials on Thursday informed media of stringent monitoring and control over its food sources, and the country has yet to be hit with any E.coli related cases. REUTERS/Ints Kalnins (LATVIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT HEALTH SCI TECH)
AUSTRIA/
RTR2NH72
June 09, 2011
A petri dish with bacterial strains of EHEC bacteria (enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli.) is pictured...
Vienna, Austria
Petri dish with bacterial strains of EHEC bacteria is pictured in the microbiological laboratory of the...
A petri dish with bacterial strains of EHEC bacteria (enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli.) is pictured in the microbiological laboratory of the The Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety (AGES) in Vienna June 9 , 2011. The German government has been criticised at home and around Europe for failing so far to pin down the cause of the E.coli outbreak that has killed 27 and stricken more than 2,700 people in 12 countries. All cases have been traced back to near Hamburg in northern Germany. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger (AUSTRIA - Tags: SCI TECH HEALTH)
AUSTRIA/
RTR2NH6X
June 09, 2011
A petri dish with bacterial strains of EHEC bacteria (enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli.) is pictured...
Vienna, Austria
Petri dish with bacterial strains of EHEC bacteria is pictured in the microbiological laboratory of the...
A petri dish with bacterial strains of EHEC bacteria (enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli.) is pictured in the microbiological laboratory of the The Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety (AGES) in Vienna June 9 , 2011. The German government has been criticised at home and around Europe for failing so far to pin down the cause of the E.coli outbreak that has killed 27 and stricken more than 2,700 people in 12 countries. All cases have been traced back to near Hamburg in northern Germany. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger (AUSTRIA - Tags: SCI TECH HEALTH)
AUSTRIA/
RTR2NH6Q
June 09, 2011
An Austrian scientist points to a petri dish with bacterial strains of EHEC bacteria (enterohaemorrhagic...
Vienna, Austria
An Austrian scientist points to petri dish with bacterial strains of EHEC bacteria in the microbiological...
An Austrian scientist points to a petri dish with bacterial strains of EHEC bacteria (enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli.) in the microbiological laboratory of the The Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety (AGES) in Vienna June 9 , 2011. The German government has been criticised at home and around Europe for failing so far to pin down the cause of the E.coli outbreak that has killed 27 and stricken more than 2,700 people in 12 countries. All cases have been traced back to near Hamburg in northern Germany. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger (AUSTRIA - Tags: SCI TECH HEALTH)
AUSTRIA/
RTR2NH6P
June 09, 2011
An Austrian scientist prepares petri dishes with bacterial strains of EHEC bacteria (enterohaemorrhagic...
Vienna, Austria
An Austrian scientist prepares petri dishes with bacterial strains of EHEC bacteria in the microbiological...
An Austrian scientist prepares petri dishes with bacterial strains of EHEC bacteria (enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli.) in the microbiological laboratory of the The Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety (AGES) in Vienna June 9 , 2011. The German government has been criticised at home and around Europe for failing so far to pin down the cause of the E.coli outbreak that has killed 27 and stricken more than 2,700 people in 12 countries. All cases have been traced back to near Hamburg in northern Germany. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger (AUSTRIA - Tags: SCI TECH HEALTH)
AUSTRIA/
RTR2NH6O
June 09, 2011
An Austrian scientist holds a petri dish with bacterial strains of EHEC bacteria (enterohaemorrhagic...
Vienna, Austria
An Austrian scientist holds petri dish with bacterial strains of EHEC bacteria in the microbiological...
An Austrian scientist holds a petri dish with bacterial strains of EHEC bacteria (enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli.) in the microbiological laboratory of the The Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety (AGES) in Vienna June 9 , 2011. The German government has been criticised at home and around Europe for failing so far to pin down the cause of the E.coli outbreak that has killed 27 and stricken more than 2,700 people in 12 countries. All cases have been traced back to near Hamburg in northern Germany. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger (AUSTRIA - Tags: SCI TECH HEALTH IMAGES OF THE DAY)
AUSTRIA/
RTR2NH6M
June 09, 2011
An Austrian scientist holds a petri dish with bacterial strains of EHEC bacteria (enterohaemorrhagic...
Vienna, Austria
An Austrian scientist holds petri dish with bacterial strains of EHEC bacteria in the microbiological...
An Austrian scientist holds a petri dish with bacterial strains of EHEC bacteria (enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli.) in the microbiological laboratory of the The Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety (AGES) in Vienna June 9 , 2011. The German government has been criticised at home and around Europe for failing so far to pin down the cause of the E.coli outbreak that has killed 27 and stricken more than 2,700 people in 12 countries. All cases have been traced back to near Hamburg in northern Germany. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger (AUSTRIA - Tags: SCI TECH HEALTH)
AUSTRIA/
RTR2NH6J
June 09, 2011
An Austrian scientist holds petri dishes with bacterial strains of EHEC bacteria (enterohaemorrhagic...
Vienna, Austria
An Austrian scientist holds petri dishes with bacterial strains of EHEC bacteria in the microbiological...
An Austrian scientist holds petri dishes with bacterial strains of EHEC bacteria (enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli.) in the microbiological laboratory of the The Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety (AGES) in Vienna June 9 , 2011. The German government has been criticised at home and around Europe for failing so far to pin down the cause of the E.coli outbreak that has killed 27 and stricken more than 2,700 people in 12 countries. All cases have been traced back to near Hamburg in northern Germany. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger (AUSTRIA - Tags: HEALTH SCI TECH)
GERMANY/
RTR2N77B
June 02, 2011
An employee holds petri dishes with bacterial strains of EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.)...
Hamburg, Germany
An employee holds petri dishes with bacterial strains of EHEC bacteria in the microbiological laboratory...
An employee holds petri dishes with bacterial strains of EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) in the microbiological laboratory of the 'Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf ' (University Clinic Eppendorf- UKE) in the northern German town of Hamburg, June 2, 2011. REUTERS/Fabian Bimmer (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SCI TECH)
HEALTH-ECOLI/
RTR2N75K
June 02, 2011
A laboratory worker looks for strains of E.coli bacteria in vegetable cells placed in a petri dish, in...
La Mojonera, Spain
A laboratory worker looks for strains of E.coli bacteria in vegetable cells placed in a petri dish, in...
A laboratory worker looks for strains of E.coli bacteria in vegetable cells placed in a petri dish, in La Mojonera near Almeria in southeastern Spain June 2, 2011. A deadly outbreak of E.coli centred in Germany and spreading across Europe is caused by a dangerous new strain, Chinese scientists who analyzed the bacteria said. The scientists said the outbreak, which has killed 17 and made more than 1,500 others ill in at least 10 European countries and is thought to come from vegetables, carried genes making it resistant to several classes of antibiotics. REUTERS/Francisco Bonilla (SPAIN - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS AGRICULTURE SCI TECH)
HEALTH-SPAIN/
RTR2N75I
June 02, 2011
A laboratory worker looks for strains of E.coli bacteria in vegetable cells placed in a petri dish, in...
La Mojonera, Spain
A laboratory worker looks for strains of E.coli bacteria in vegetable cells placed in a petri dish, in...
A laboratory worker looks for strains of E.coli bacteria in vegetable cells placed in a petri dish, in La Mojonera near Almeria in southeastern Spain June 2, 2011. A deadly outbreak of E.coli centred in Germany and spreading across Europe is caused by a dangerous new strain, Chinese scientists who analyzed the bacteria said. The scientists said the outbreak, which has killed 17 and made more than 1,500 others ill in at least 10 European countries and is thought to come from vegetables, carried genes making it resistant to several classes of antibiotics. REUTERS/Francisco Bonilla (SPAIN - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS AGRICULTURE SCI TECH)
GERMANY-ECOLI/
RTR2MTUY
May 24, 2011
An employee displays EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in a petri dish containing agar...
Hamburg, Germany
Employee displays EHEC bacteria strain in petri dish in microbiological laboratory of UKE clinic in northern...
An employee displays EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in a petri dish containing agar jelly for bacterial culture in the microbiological laboratory of the 'Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf ' (University Cllinic Eppendorf- UKE) in the northern German town of Hamburg May 24, 2011. REUTERS/Morris Mac Matzen (GERMANY - Tags: SCI TECH HEALTH)
GERMANY-ECOLI/
RTR2MTUW
May 24, 2011
An employee displays EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in a petri dish containing agar...
Hamburg, Germany
Employee displays EHEC bacteria strain in petri dish in microbiological laboratory of UKE clinic in northern...
An employee displays EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in a petri dish containing agar jelly for bacterial culture in the microbiological laboratory of the 'Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf ' (University Cllinic Eppendorf- UKE) in the northern German town of Hamburg May 24, 2011. REUTERS/Morris Mac Matzen (GERMANY - Tags: SCI TECH HEALTH)
GERMANY-ECOLI/
RTR2MTUT
May 24, 2011
An employee displays EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in a petri dish containing agar...
Hamburg, Germany
Employee displays EHEC bacteria strain in petri dish in microbiological laboratory of UKE clinic in northern...
An employee displays EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in a petri dish containing agar jelly for bacterial culture in the microbiological laboratory of the 'Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf ' (University Cllinic Eppendorf- UKE) in the northern German town of Hamburg May 24, 2011. REUTERS/Morris Mac Matzen (GERMANY - Tags: SCI TECH HEALTH)
GERMANY-ECOLI/
RTR2MTUR
May 24, 2011
An employee displays EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in a petri dish containing agar...
Hamburg, Germany
Employee displays EHEC bacteria strain in petri dish in microbiological laboratory of UKE clinic in northern...
An employee displays EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in a petri dish containing agar jelly for bacterial culture in the microbiological laboratory of the 'Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf ' (University Cllinic Eppendorf- UKE) in the northern German town of Hamburg May 24, 2011. REUTERS/Morris Mac Matzen (GERMANY - Tags: SCI TECH HEALTH)
GERMANY-ECOLI/
RTR2MTUQ
May 24, 2011
An employee displays EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in a petri dish containing agar...
Hamburg, Germany
Employee displays EHEC bacteria strain in petri dish in microbiological laboratory of UKE clinic in northern...
An employee displays EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in a petri dish containing agar jelly for bacterial culture in the microbiological laboratory of the 'Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf ' (University Cllinic Eppendorf- UKE) in the northern German town of Hamburg May 24, 2011. REUTERS/Morris Mac Matzen (GERMANY - Tags: SCI TECH HEALTH)
GERMANY-ECOLI/
RTR2MTUM
May 24, 2011
An employee displays EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in a petri dish containing agar...
Hamburg, Germany
Employee displays EHEC bacteria strain in petri dish in microbiological laboratory of UKE clinic in northern...
An employee displays EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in a petri dish containing agar jelly for bacterial culture in the microbiological laboratory of the 'Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf ' (University Cllinic Eppendorf- UKE) in the northern German town of Hamburg May 24, 2011. REUTERS/Morris Mac Matzen (GERMANY - Tags: SCI TECH HEALTH)
GERMANY-ECOLI/
RTR2MTTF
May 24, 2011
An employee displays EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in a petri dish containing agar...
Hamburg, Germany
Employee display sEHEC bacteria strain in petri dish in microbiological laboratory of UKE clinic in northern...
An employee displays EHEC bacteria (bacterium Escherichia coli.) strain in a petri dish containing agar jelly for bacterial culture in the microbiological laboratory of the 'Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf ' (University Cllinic Eppendorf- UKE) in the northern German town of Hamburg May 24, 2011. REUTERS/Morris Mac Matzen (GERMANY - Tags: SCI TECH HEALTH)
ANTIBIOTICS
RTR2KMWV
March 31, 2011
Two plates which were coated with an antibiotic-resistant bacteria called Klebsiella with a mutation...
London, United Kingdom
To match Special Report ANTIBIOTICS/
Two plates which were coated with an antibiotic-resistant bacteria called Klebsiella with a mutation called NDM 1 and then exposed to various antibiotics are seen at the Health Protection Agency in north London March 9, 2011. The clear areas in the top left quarter of the plate on left show that the Klebsiella with NDM 1 was sensitive to the respective antibiotics tigecycline (manufactured by Pfizer under the trade name Tygacil) and colistin. For decades scientists have managed to develop new medicines to stay at least one step ahead of the ever-mutating enemy, bacteria. Now, though, we may be running out of road. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, commonly known as MRSA, alone is estimated to kill around 19,000 people every year in the United States -- far more than HIV and AIDS -- and a similar number in Europe, and other drug-resistant superbugs are spreading. Picture taken March 9, 2011. To match Special Report ANTIBIOTICS/ REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett (BRITAIN - Tags: HEALTH SCI TECH)
MARIJUANA/
RTR2GKUD
July 20, 2010
Marijuana buds, including their cost and degree of potency, are shown in a medical marijuana dispensary...
San Francisco, UNITED STATES
Marijuana buds are shown in a medical marijuana dispensary in Oakland
Marijuana buds, including their cost and degree of potency, are shown in a medical marijuana dispensary in Oakland, California June 30, 2010. Picture taken June 30, 2010. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY)
RUSSIA-STURGEON/
RTR2EXYO
June 09, 2010
An employee demonstrates sturgeon fries at the Sturgeon Research Centre outside Russia's southern city...
Astrakhan, Russia
To match feature RUSSIA-STURGEON/
An employee demonstrates sturgeon fries at the Sturgeon Research Centre outside Russia's southern city of Astrakhan May 31, 2010. The relentless hunt for the so-called "Tsar fish" or sturgeon and its precious eggs has acquired such huge proportions in post-Soviet Russia that the prehistoric creature, which outlived the dinosaurs, has itself now been pushed to the edge of extinction. Picture taken May 31, 2010. To match feature RUSSIA-STURGEON/ REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin (RUSSIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS FOOD)
USA-REGULATORS/GMOS
RTR2CRD4
April 13, 2010
Freshly-cut soybean root samples await culturing (R) besides another petri dish covered with fungus as...
Kansas City, UNITED STATES
To match Special Report USA-REGULATORS/GMOS
Freshly-cut soybean root samples await culturing (R) besides another petri dish covered with fungus as part of the research done by Robert Kremer, a U.S. government microbiologist who studies Midwestern farm soil at the University of Missouri, in Columbia, Missouri April 8, 2010. Kremer has spent two decades analyzing the rich dirt that yields billions of bushels of food each year and helps the United States retain its title as breadbasket of the world. Photo taken April 8, 2010. To match Special Report USA-REGULATORS/GMOS. REUTERS/Dave Kaup (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCI TECH FOOD POLITICS)
USA-GMOS/REGULATORS
RTR2CRCS
April 13, 2010
Robert Kremer, a U.S. government microbiologist who studies Midwestern farm soil at the University of...
Kansas City, UNITED STATES
To match Special Report USA-GMOS/REGULATORS
Robert Kremer, a U.S. government microbiologist who studies Midwestern farm soil at the University of Missouri, transfers a sample of Fusarium Fungus cultured from a soybean root onto another petri dish in Columbia, Missouri April 8, 2010. Kremer has spent two decades analyzing the rich dirt that yields billions of bushels of food each year and helps the United States retain its title as breadbasket of the world. Photo taken April 8, 2010. To match Special Report USA-GMOS/REGULATORS. REUTERS/Dave Kaup (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCI TECH FOOD POLITICS)
SCIENCE/GENOME
RTR2C9HL
March 30, 2010
Researchers work on pork at the "Cloning & Genetic Engineering" section of the Beijing Genomics Institute...
Hong Kong, China
To match SPECIAL REPORT SCIENCE/GENOME
Researchers work on pork at the "Cloning & Genetic Engineering" section of the Beijing Genomics Institute in Shenzhen, southern China March 3, 2010. Some experts say the world is on the cusp of a "golden age" of genomics, when a look at the DNA code will reveal your risk of cancer, diabetes or heart disease, and predict which drugs will work for you. Yet the $3 billion international Human Genome Project, whose first phase was completed a decade ago, has not led to a single blockbuster diagnosis or product. Picture taken March 3, 2010. To match SPECIAL REPORT SCIENCE/GENOME REUTERS/Bobby Yip (CHINA - Tags: SCI TECH HEALTH BUSINESS)
FOOD/CLONING
RTXQNUJ
November 13, 2009
A petri dish containing eggs harvested from cattle is seen during the second step of the cloning process...
Austin, UNITED STATES
To match Special Report FOOD/CLONING
A petri dish containing eggs harvested from cattle is seen during the second step of the cloning process in a cloning lab at ViaGen in Austin, Texas November 11, 2009. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2008 approved the sale of food from clones and their offspring, stating the products are indistinguishable from that of their non-clone counterparts. The moves have stirred controversy about whether tinkering with nature is safe, or even ethical, prompting major food companies to swear off food products from cloned animals. But consumers are likely already eating meat and drinking milk from the offspring of clones, which are technically not clones, without even knowing it. Picture taken November 11, 2009. To match Special Report FOOD/CLONING REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi (UNITED STATES SOCIETY HEALTH SCI TECH FOOD)
FOOD/
RTXQJT9
November 10, 2009
Italian farmer Giuseppe Oglio holds rice collected from his plantation at Belcreda Gambolo, 30 km (20...
BELCREDA GAMBOLO, Italy
To match Special Report FOOD/
Italian farmer Giuseppe Oglio holds rice collected from his plantation at Belcreda Gambolo, 30 km (20 miles) southwest of Milan in northern Italy November 6, 2009. Oglio, a third generation farmer eschews modern farming techniques -- chemicals, fertilizers, heavy machinery -- in favor of a purely natural approach. It is not just ecological, he says, but profitable, and he believes his system can be replicated in starving regions of the globe. Nearly 5,000 miles (8,000 km) away, in laboratories in St. Louis, Missouri, hundreds of scientists at the world's biggest seed company, Monsanto, also want to feed the world, only their tools of choice are laser beams and petri dishes. Picture taken November 6, 2009. To match Special Report FOOD/ REUTERS/Alessandro Garofalo (ITALY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS SCI TECH)
FOOD/
RTXQJT8
November 10, 2009
A worker collects rice at a plantation in Belcreda Gambolo, 30 km (20 miles) southwest of Milan in northern...
BELCREDA GAMBOLO, Italy
To match Special Report FOOD/
A worker collects rice at a plantation in Belcreda Gambolo, 30 km (20 miles) southwest of Milan in northern Italy November 6, 2009. Oglio, a third generation farmer eschews modern farming techniques -- chemicals, fertilizers, heavy machinery -- in favor of a purely natural approach. It is not just ecological, he says, but profitable, and he believes his system can be replicated in starving regions of the globe. Nearly 5,000 miles (8,000 km) away, in laboratories in St. Louis, Missouri, hundreds of scientists at the world's biggest seed company, Monsanto, also want to feed the world, only their tools of choice are laser beams and petri dishes. Picture taken November 6, 2009. To match Special Report FOOD/ REUTERS/Alessandro Garofalo (ITALY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS SCI TECH)
FOOD/
RTXQJT7
November 10, 2009
Packets of rice are pictured at the farm of Guiuseppe Ogli in Belcreda Gambolo, 30 km (20 miles) southwest...
BELCREDA GAMBOLO, Italy
To match Special Report FOOD/
Packets of rice are pictured at the farm of Guiuseppe Ogli in Belcreda Gambolo, 30 km (20 miles) southwest of Milan in northern Italy November 6, 2009. Oglio, a third generation farmer eschews modern farming techniques -- chemicals, fertilizers, heavy machinery -- in favor of a purely natural approach. It is not just ecological, he says, but profitable, and he believes his system can be replicated in starving regions of the globe. Nearly 5,000 miles (8,000 km) away, in laboratories in St. Louis, Missouri, hundreds of scientists at the world's biggest seed company, Monsanto, also want to feed the world, only their tools of choice are laser beams and petri dishes. Picture taken November 6, 2009. To match Special Report FOOD/ REUTERS/Alessandro Garofalo (ITALY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS SCI TECH)
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