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Search results for: Pictures-of-the-Month

BURKINA-ELECTION/
RTX8APWL
November 20, 2020
Maiga Radiatou, 21, who fled from attacks of armed militants in Sahel region of Soum and who will not...
Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Maiga Radiatou, 21, who fled from attacks of armed militants in Sahel region of Soum carries her seven...
Maiga Radiatou, 21, who fled from attacks of armed militants in Sahel region of Soum and who will not be able to vote in Burkina Faso's presidential election on Sunday carries her seven months daughter Sameuna as she stands at a courtyard of the house in an informal camp for displaced people on the outskirts of Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso November 19, 2020. Picture taken November 19, 2020. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra
BURKINA-ELECTION/
RTX8APWB
November 20, 2020
Maiga Radiatou, 21, who fled from attacks of armed militants in Sahel region of Soum and who will not...
Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Maiga Radiatou, 21, who fled from attacks of armed militants in Sahel region of Soum carries her seven...
Maiga Radiatou, 21, who fled from attacks of armed militants in Sahel region of Soum and who will not be able to vote in Burkina Faso's presidential election on Sunday carries her seven months daughter Sameuna as she stands at a courtyard of the house in an informal camp for displaced people on the outskirts of Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso November 19, 2020. Picture taken November 19, 2020. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GERMANY-RESTRICTIONS
RTX86P4E
November 02, 2020
The empty RAW nightlife area with closed bars, clubs and restaurants is pictured in the Friedrichshain...
Berlin, Germany
The empty RAW nightlife area with closed bars, clubs and restaurants is pictured in the Friedrichshain...
The empty RAW nightlife area with closed bars, clubs and restaurants is pictured in the Friedrichshain district of Berlin, Germany, November 2, 2020, before a month-long lockdown in Germany due to the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak. REUTERS/Joachim Herrmann
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GERMANY-LOCKDOWN
RTX86G15
November 01, 2020
Chairs are pictured on tables at Lacor for Tacos restaurant, ahead of the month-long lockdown in Germany...
Berlin, Germany
COVID-19 lockdown in Berlin
Chairs are pictured on tables at Lacor for Tacos restaurant, ahead of the month-long lockdown in Germany which begins on November 2 due to the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Berlin, Germany, November 1, 2020. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GERMANY-LOCKDOWN
RTX86G0Z
November 01, 2020
A table full of glasses and bottles is pictured, ahead of the month-long lockdown in Germany which begins...
Berlin, Germany
COVID-19 lockdown in Berlin
A table full of glasses and bottles is pictured, ahead of the month-long lockdown in Germany which begins on November 2 due to the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Berlin, Germany, November 1, 2020. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GERMANY-LOCKDOWN
RTX86G0Y
November 01, 2020
Chairs are pictured on tables at Lacor for Tacos restaurant, ahead of the month-long lockdown in Germany...
Berlin, Germany
COVID-19 lockdown in Berlin
Chairs are pictured on tables at Lacor for Tacos restaurant, ahead of the month-long lockdown in Germany which begins on November 2 due to the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Berlin, Germany, November 1, 2020. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GERMANY-LOCKDOWN
RTX86G0X
November 01, 2020
A table full of glasses and bottles are pictured, ahead of the month-long lockdown in Germany which begins...
Berlin, Germany
COVID-19 lockdown in Berlin
A table full of glasses and bottles are pictured, ahead of the month-long lockdown in Germany which begins on November 2 due to the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Berlin, Germany, November 1, 2020. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GERMANY-RESTRICTIONS
RTX86DVH
November 01, 2020
Empty chairs are pictured at Gendarmenmarkt square in Berlin, Germany, November 1, 2020, one day before...
Berlin, Germany
Empty chairs are pictured at Gendarmenmarkt square in Berlin
Empty chairs are pictured at Gendarmenmarkt square in Berlin, Germany, November 1, 2020, one day before a month-long lockdown in Germany from November 2, 2020, due to the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak. REUTERS/Joachim Herrmann
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GERMANY-RESTRICTIONS
RTX86DVG
November 01, 2020
Empty chairs are pictured at Gendarmenmarkt square in Berlin, Germany, November 1, 2020, one day before...
Berlin, Germany
Empty chairs are pictured at Gendarmenmarkt square in Berlin
Empty chairs are pictured at Gendarmenmarkt square in Berlin, Germany, November 1, 2020, one day before a month-long lockdown in Germany from November 2, 2020, due to the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak. REUTERS/Joachim Herrmann
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GERMANY-RESTRICTIONS
RTX86DVF
November 01, 2020
Empty chairs are pictured at Gendarmenmarkt square in Berlin, Germany, November 1, 2020, one day before...
Berlin, Germany
Empty chairs are pictured at Gendarmenmarkt square in Berlin
Empty chairs are pictured at Gendarmenmarkt square in Berlin, Germany, November 1, 2020, one day before a month-long lockdown in Germany from November 2, 2020, due to the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak. REUTERS/Joachim Herrmann
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GERMANY-RESTRICTIONS
RTX862PR
October 31, 2020
Waitresses of the Bonn Pantheon, one of Germany's most prestigious revue theatres clean and disinfect...
Bonn, Germany
Pantheon revue theatre before a one-month lock-down in Bonn
Waitresses of the Bonn Pantheon, one of Germany's most prestigious revue theatres clean and disinfect the tables in the empty hall following the next to last cabaret performance before a one month lock-down in Germany due to the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Bonn, Germany October 30, 2020. Picture taken October 30, 2020. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GERMANY-RESTRICTIONS
RTX862PP
October 31, 2020
Rainer Pause, cabaret artist and founder of the Bonn Pantheon, one of Germany's most prestigious revue...
Bonn, Germany
Pantheon revue theatre before a one-month lock-down in Bonn
Rainer Pause, cabaret artist and founder of the Bonn Pantheon, one of Germany's most prestigious revue theatres talks to Reuters following the next to last cabaret performance before a one month lock-down in Germany due to the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Bonn, Germany October 30, 2020. Picture taken October 30, 2020. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GERMANY-RESTRICTIONS
RTX862PE
October 31, 2020
A covered piano stands on the stage of the Bonn Pantheon, one of Germany's most prestigious revue theatres...
Bonn, Germany
Pantheon revue theatre before a one-month lock-down in Bonn
A covered piano stands on the stage of the Bonn Pantheon, one of Germany's most prestigious revue theatres following the next to last cabaret performance before a one month lock-down in Germany due to the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Bonn, Germany October 30, 2020. Picture taken October 30, 2020. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay REFILE - CORRECTING TYPO IN HEADLINE
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GERMANY-RESTRICTIONS
RTX862NT
October 31, 2020
Rainer Pause, cabarettist and founder of the Bonn Pantheon, one of Germany's most prestigious revue theatres...
Bonn, Germany
Pantheon revue theatre before a one-month lock-down in Bonn
Rainer Pause, cabarettist and founder of the Bonn Pantheon, one of Germany's most prestigious revue theatres talks to Reuters following the next to last cabaret performance before a one month lock-down in Germany due to the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Bonn, Germany October 30, 2020. Picture taken October 30, 2020. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GERMANY-RESTRICTIONS
RTX862L3
October 31, 2020
The empty hall of the Bonn Pantheon, one of Germany's most prestigious revue theatres is seen following...
Bonn, Germany
Pantheon revue theatre before a one-month lock-down in Bonn
The empty hall of the Bonn Pantheon, one of Germany's most prestigious revue theatres is seen following the next to last cabaret performance before a one month lock-down in Germany due to the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Bonn, Germany October 30, 2020. Picture taken October 30, 2020. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GERMANY-RESTRICTIONS
RTX862L1
October 31, 2020
A waitress of the Bonn Pantheon, one of Germany's most prestigious revue theatres disinfects the tables...
Bonn, Germany
Pantheon revue theatre before a one-month lock-down in Bonn
A waitress of the Bonn Pantheon, one of Germany's most prestigious revue theatres disinfects the tables in the empty hall following the next to last cabaret performance before a one month lock-down in Germany due to the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Bonn, Germany October 30, 2020. Picture taken October 30, 2020. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay REFILE - CORRECTING TYPO IN HEADLINE
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GERMANY-RESTRICTIONS
RTX862KR
October 31, 2020
A waitress of the Bonn Pantheon, one of Germany's most prestigious revue theatres, is seen in the empty...
Bonn, Germany
Pantheon revue theatre before a one-month lock-down in Bonn
A waitress of the Bonn Pantheon, one of Germany's most prestigious revue theatres, is seen in the empty hall following the next to last cabaret performance before a one month lock-down in Germany due to the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Bonn, Germany October 30, 2020. Picture taken October 30, 2020. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay REFILE - CORRECTING TYPO IN HEADLINE
Pictures of the month
Pictures of the month
Pictures of the month: October
90 PICTURES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SOUTHKOREA-CONSCRIPTION
RTX85ILH
October 28, 2020
Nam Ha-jong, a public health doctor serving a 36-month duty after medical school as part of the country's...
OKCHEON, South Korea
Nam Ha-jong, a public health doctor serving a 36-month duty after medical school as part of the country's...
Nam Ha-jong, a public health doctor serving a 36-month duty after medical school as part of the country's conscription instead of regular military service, works at a coronavirus testing clinic in Okcheon, South Korea, October 18, 2020. Picture taken October 18, 2020. REUTERS/Ju-min Park
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SOUTHKOREA-CONSCRIPTION
RTX85IH0
October 28, 2020
Nam Ha-jong, a public health doctor serving a 36-month duty after medical school as part of the country's...
OKCHEON, South Korea
Nam Ha-jong, a public health doctor serving a 36-month duty after medical school as part of the country's...
Nam Ha-jong, a public health doctor serving a 36-month duty after medical school as part of the country's conscription instead of regular military service, works at a coronavirus testing clinic in Okcheon, South Korea, October 18, 2020. Picture taken October 18, 2020. REUTERS/Ju-min Park
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SOUTHKOREA-CONSCRIPTION
RTX85IH2
October 28, 2020
Nam Ha-jong, a public health doctor serving a 36-month duty after medical school as part of the country's...
OKCHEON, South Korea
Nam Ha-jong, a public health doctor serving a 36-month duty after medical school as part of the country's...
Nam Ha-jong, a public health doctor serving a 36-month duty after medical school as part of the country's conscription instead of regular military service, works at a coronavirus testing clinic in Okcheon, South Korea, October 18, 2020. Picture taken October 18, 2020. REUTERS/Ju-min Park
THAILAND-PROTESTS/PROTESTER
RTX85E9Z
October 27, 2020
Head down, arms spread, one man pushes with all his strength against rows of Thai riot police behind...
Bangkok, Thailand
A Picture and Its Story: 'Danger was coming': lone protester who defied Thai police
Head down, arms spread, one man pushes with all his strength against rows of Thai riot police behind their shields. The Reuters image of the night of Oct. 16, when police tried to use force to disperse protesters, has become one of the most widely published of months of demonstrations to call for the ousting of the government and reforms to the powerful monarchy. For the man in the picture, Anurak Jeantawanich, 52, it was the moment when he tried to stop them. "I could sense danger coming," said Jeantawanich. "I looked each of them in the eye and told them not to come any closer, that there were a lot of young students and girls here." REUTERS/Jorge Silva TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SEARCH "SILVA ANURAK" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES Matching Text: THAILAND-PROTESTS/PROTESTER
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/WHITE HOUSE
RTX84U49
October 25, 2020
Marc Short, Chief of Staff for Vice President Mike Pence, attends U.S. President Donald Trump's first...
Tulsa, UNITED STATES
Marc Short, Chief of Staff for Vice President Mike Pence, attends U.S. President Trump's first re-election...
Marc Short, Chief of Staff for Vice President Mike Pence, attends U.S. President Donald Trump's first re-election campaign rally in several months in the midst of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, at the BOK Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma, U.S., June 20, 2020. Picture taken June 20, 2020. REUTERS/Leah Millis
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO
RTX83L3Z
October 20, 2020
People take a picture on the Zaragoza-Ysleta border bridge crossing towards El Paso, Texas, U.S., as...
Ciudad Juarez, Mexico
People take a picture on the Zaragoza-Ysleta border bridge crossing towards El Paso, Texas, U.S., in...
People take a picture on the Zaragoza-Ysleta border bridge crossing towards El Paso, Texas, U.S., as Mexico's Department of Foreign Relations requested another month-long extension on land-crossing restrictions at the U.S.-Mexico border due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico October 19, 2020. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO
RTX83L2A
October 20, 2020
A U.S. Customs and Border Protection police officer is pictured at the Zaragoza-Ysleta border bridge...
Ciudad Juarez, Mexico
U.S. Customs and Border Protection police officer is pictured at the Zaragoza-Ysleta border bridge crossing...
A U.S. Customs and Border Protection police officer is pictured at the Zaragoza-Ysleta border bridge crossing towards El Paso, Texas, U.S., as Mexico's Department of Foreign Relations requested another month-long extension on land-crossing restrictions at the U.S.-Mexico border due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico October 19, 2020. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SANTA
RTX82OZI
October 16, 2020
A general view shows the main square of the Santa Claus Village in the Arctic Circle near Rovaniemi,...
Rovaniemi, Finland
Elves left idle as pandemic strikes Santa's Lapland village
A general view shows the main square of the Santa Claus Village in the Arctic Circle near Rovaniemi, Finland October 11, 2020. Normally Santa's village in northern Finland is bustling with visitors in the months before Christmas but this year the pandemic has made them stay away, plunging the tourist attraction into crisis. Picture taken October 11, 2020. REUTERS/Attila Cser
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SANTA
RTX82OZH
October 16, 2020
A general view shows the main square of the Santa Claus Village in the Arctic Circle near Rovaniemi,...
Rovaniemi, Finland
Elves left idle as pandemic strikes Santa's Lapland village
A general view shows the main square of the Santa Claus Village in the Arctic Circle near Rovaniemi, Finland October 11, 2020. Normally Santa's village in northern Finland is bustling with visitors in the months before Christmas but this year the pandemic has made them stay away, plunging the tourist attraction into crisis. Picture taken October 11, 2020. REUTERS/Attila Cser
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E9B
October 15, 2020
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E9A
October 15, 2020
Cravats and bow ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Cravats and bow ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Cravats and bow ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E99
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E98
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury looks at silk ties displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury looks at silk ties displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury looks at silk ties displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E97
October 15, 2020
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
London, United Kingdom
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E96
October 15, 2020
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E95
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E94
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E92
October 15, 2020
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E91
October 15, 2020
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E90
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8Z
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury holds a bespoke tailcoat in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row,...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury holds a bespoke tailcoat in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row,...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury holds a bespoke tailcoat in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8Y
October 15, 2020
Bunches of swatches are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Bunches of swatches are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Bunches of swatches are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8X
October 15, 2020
Handkerchiefs are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Handkerchiefs are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Handkerchiefs are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8W
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8V
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8U
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8T
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8S
October 15, 2020
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8R
October 15, 2020
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8Q
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8P
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8O
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8N
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City,...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8M
October 15, 2020
A general view of Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak,...
London, United Kingdom
General view of Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak,...
A general view of Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8L
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8K
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8E
October 15, 2020
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8F
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8D
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8C
October 15, 2020
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New...
New York, UNITED STATES
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E89
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRAZIL
RTX821UX
October 13, 2020
A woman wearing a face mask poses for a picture during the reopening of Sao Paulo Art Museum (MASP) which...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Sao Paulo
A woman wearing a face mask poses for a picture during the reopening of Sao Paulo Art Museum (MASP) which was closed for months due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Sao Paulo, Brazil October 13, 2020. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli
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