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Search results for: Pictures-of-the-Year

POLAND-POLITICS/
RTX7NVBW
August 06, 2020
Poland's incumbent President Andrzej Duda and his wife Agata Kornhauser-Duda are pictured during the...
Warsaw, Poland
Poland's President Andrzej Duda swearing-in ceremony in Warsaw
Poland's incumbent President Andrzej Duda and his wife Agata Kornhauser-Duda are pictured during the swearing-in ceremony as Poland's president for the second five-year term in front of the Parliament in Warsaw, Poland August 6, 2020. REUTERS/Kacper Pempel
POLAND-POLITICS/
RTX7NV6P
August 06, 2020
Poland's incumbent President Andrzej Duda and his wife Agata Kornhauser-Duda are pictured during the...
Warsaw, Poland
Poland's President Andrzej Duda swearing-in ceremony in Warsaw
Poland's incumbent President Andrzej Duda and his wife Agata Kornhauser-Duda are pictured during the swearing-in ceremony as Poland's president for the second five-year term in front of the Parliament in Warsaw, Poland August 6, 2020. REUTERS/Kacper Pempel
POLAND-POLITICS/
RTX7NV6C
August 06, 2020
Poland's incumbent President Andrzej Duda and his wife Agata Kornhauser-Duda are pictured during the...
Warsaw, Poland
Poland's President Andrzej Duda swearing-in ceremony in Warsaw
Poland's incumbent President Andrzej Duda and his wife Agata Kornhauser-Duda are pictured during the swearing-in ceremony as Poland's president for the second five-year term in front of the Parliament in Warsaw, Poland August 6, 2020. REUTERS/Kacper Pempel
MALTA-QUEEN/RESIDENCE
RTX7MLVI
July 30, 2020
Taps are pictured above a kitchen sink at Villa Guardamangia, a former residence of then-Princess Elizabeth...
Pieta, Malta
The Wider Image: Step inside the crumbling villa where Queen Elizabeth spent her 20s
Taps are pictured above a kitchen sink at Villa Guardamangia, a former residence of then-Princess Elizabeth and Prince Philip, in Pieta, Malta, June 23, 2020. The then-Princess Elizabeth and Prince Philip were in the first years of their marriage at the time and moved to Malta when Prince Philip was based there in command of a Royal Navy frigate. The Maltese government agency Heritage Malta acquired the Villa Guardamangia for some five million euros and hopes not just to restore the villa to the way it looked several decades ago, but also to turn it into a museum of Malta's history as a British colony until independence in 1964, and the links with the British royal family. REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi SEARCH "QUEEN ELIZABETH VILLA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
MALTA-QUEEN/RESIDENCE
RTX7MLVH
July 30, 2020
The remains of a toilet are pictured inside the ensuite bathroom of what was once Prince Philip's bedroom...
Pieta, Malta
The Wider Image: Step inside the crumbling villa where Queen Elizabeth spent her 20s
The remains of a toilet are pictured inside the ensuite bathroom of what was once Prince Philip's bedroom at Villa Guardamangia, a former residence of Britain's Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip, in Pieta, Malta, July 1, 2020. The then-Princess Elizabeth and Prince Philip were in the first years of their marriage at the time and moved to Malta when Prince Philip was based there in command of a Royal Navy frigate. The Maltese government agency Heritage Malta acquired the Villa Guardamangia for some five million euros and hopes not just to restore the villa to the way it looked several decades ago, but also to turn it into a museum of Malta's history as a British colony until independence in 1964, and the links with the British royal family. REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi SEARCH "QUEEN ELIZABETH VILLA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
GLOBAL-RACE/PROTESTS-CHICAGO
RTX7M2FI
July 27, 2020
Chicago Police shell casing markers are seen, where a 37-year-old man riding a bicycle was shot and pronounced...
Chicago, UNITED STATES
Chicago Police shell casing markers are seen, where a 37-year-old man riding a bicycle was shot and pronounced...
Chicago Police shell casing markers are seen, where a 37-year-old man riding a bicycle was shot and pronounced dead at the hospital according to local media reports, at the West Side of Chicago, Illinois, U.S., July 26, 2020. Picture taken July 26, 2020. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
GLOBAL-RACE/PROTESTS-CHICAGO
RTX7M2FH
July 27, 2020
Chicago Police shell casing markers are seen, where a 37-year-old man riding a bicycle was shot and pronounced...
Chicago, UNITED STATES
Chicago Police shell casing markers are seen, where a 37-year-old man riding a bicycle was shot and pronounced...
Chicago Police shell casing markers are seen, where a 37-year-old man riding a bicycle was shot and pronounced dead at the hospital according to local media reports, on the West Side of Chicago, Illinois, U.S., July 26, 2020. Picture taken July 26, 2020. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
GLOBAL-RACE/PROTESTS-CHICAGO
RTX7M2F8
July 27, 2020
A man with a protective face mask stands with a law enforcement investigator at a crime scene, where...
Chicago, UNITED STATES
A man with a protective face mask stands with a law enforcement investigator at a crime scene, where...
A man with a protective face mask stands with a law enforcement investigator at a crime scene, where a 37-year-old man riding a bicycle was shot and pronounced dead at the hospital according to local media reports, on the West Side of Chicago, Illinois, U.S., July 26, 2020. Picture taken July 26, 2020. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDIA-MEDICAL WASTE
RTX7LMG6
July 24, 2020
Mansoor Khan and his wife Latifa Bibi (pictured below) have been collecting scraps of plastic and other...
New Delhi, India
The Wider Image: "Fear will not fill our bellies": why Indian scavengers risk their lives amid coronavirus...
Mansoor Khan and his wife Latifa Bibi (pictured below) have been collecting scraps of plastic and other items at an enormous landfill site on the outskirts of New Delhi for nearly 20 years. The $5 daily earnings enable their three children to go to school, in search of a better future than their parents' lives amid the stench of rotting garbage. But over the past few months, increasing amounts of biomedical waste have been arriving at the dump - a result, experts say, of the novel coronavirus pandemic and a huge risk for those who work there. Spread over 52 acres and rising more than 60 metres, the site is littered with used, plastic coronavirus test kits, protective gear and cotton stained with blood and pus - among hundreds of tonnes of waste coming daily from across the Indian capital, including small hospitals and nursing homes. Sifting with bare hands, hundreds of scavengers including children expose themselves to a disease that has infected more than 15 million people globally and claimed over 600,000 lives. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi SEARCH "COVID-19 MEDICAL WASTE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
TURKEY-HAGIASOPHIA/
RTX7LJV3
July 24, 2020
A man wearing a protective mask with the picture of the Hagia Sophia Grand Mosque attends Friday prayers...
Istanbul, Turkey
Friday prayers at Hagia Sophia Grand Mosque for the first time in 86 years, in Istanbul
A man wearing a protective mask with the picture of the Hagia Sophia Grand Mosque attends Friday prayers outside Hagia Sophia Grand Mosque, for the first time after it was once again declared a mosque after 86 years, in Istanbul, Turkey, July 24, 2020. REUTERS/Umit Bektas
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDIA-MEDICAL WASTE
RTX7LIBJ
July 24, 2020
Mansoor Khan and his wife Latifa Bibi (pictured below) have been collecting scraps of plastic and other...
New Delhi, India
The Wider Image: "Fear will not fill our bellies": why Indian scavengers risk their lives amid coronavirus...
Mansoor Khan and his wife Latifa Bibi (pictured below) have been collecting scraps of plastic and other items at an enormous landfill site on the outskirts of New Delhi for nearly 20 years. The $5 daily earnings enable their three children to go to school, in search of a better future than their parents' lives amid the stench of rotting garbage. But over the past few months, increasing amounts of biomedical waste have been arriving at the dump - a result, experts say, of the novel coronavirus pandemic and a huge risk for those who work there. Spread over 52 acres and rising more than 60 metres, the site is littered with used, plastic coronavirus test kits, protective gear and cotton stained with blood and pus ? among hundreds of tonnes of waste coming daily from across the Indian capital, including small hospitals and nursing homes. Sifting with bare hands, hundreds of scavengers including children expose themselves to a disease that has infected more than 15 million people globally and claimed over 600,000 lives. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi SEARCH "COVID-19 MEDICAL WASTE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
MEKONG-RIVER/DIPLOMACY
RTX7LIB1
July 24, 2020
A view of the Mekong river bordering Thailand and Laos is seen from the Thai side in Nong Khai, Thailand,...
NONG KHAI, Thailand
A view of the Mekong river bordering Thailand and Laos is seen from the Thai side in Nong Khai
A view of the Mekong river bordering Thailand and Laos is seen from the Thai side in Nong Khai, Thailand, October 29, 2019. Picture taken October 29, 2019. To match Insight MEKONG-RIVER/DIPLOMACY REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun REFILE - CORRECTING YEAR
HEALTH–CORONAVIRUS/SAUDI-HAJ
RTX7L9GM
July 22, 2020
Mahmoud Ali 55 years old, a man whose pilgrimage trip was canceled due to the outbreak of the coronavirus...
Cairo, Egypt
Mahmoud Ali 55 years old, a man whose pilgrimage trip was canceled due to the outbreak of the coronavirus...
Mahmoud Ali 55 years old, a man whose pilgrimage trip was canceled due to the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), holds his haj clothes at his home, in Cairo, Egypt, July 15, 2020. Picture taken July 15, 2020. REUTERS/Sayed Sheasha
HEALTH?CORONAVIRUS/SAUDI-HAJ
RTX7L9G5
July 22, 2020
Mahmoud Ali 55 years old, a man whose pilgrimage trip was canceled due to the outbreak of the coronavirus...
Cairo, Egypt
Mahmoud Ali 55 years old, a man whose pilgrimage trip was canceled due to the outbreak of the coronavirus...
Mahmoud Ali 55 years old, a man whose pilgrimage trip was canceled due to the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), reads the holy Koran at his home, in Cairo, Egypt, July 15, 2020. Picture taken July 15, 2020. REUTERS/Sayed Sheasha
OLYMPICS-2020/MUTO
RTX7L41L
July 22, 2020
Toshiro Muto, Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee Chief Executive Officer, poses for a photograph during...
Tokyo, Japan
Toshiro Muto, Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee Chief Executive Officer, poses for a photograph during...
Toshiro Muto, Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee Chief Executive Officer, poses for a photograph during an interview with Reuters ahead of the one-year countdown to the Tokyo Olympics that have been postponed to 2021 due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Tokyo, Japan July 21, 2020. Picture taken July 21, 2020. REUTERS/Issei Kato
OLYMPICS-2020/MUTO
RTX7L41K
July 22, 2020
Toshiro Muto, Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee Chief Executive Officer, speaks in front of Tokyo 2020...
Tokyo, Japan
Toshiro Muto, Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee Chief Executive Officer, speaks during an interview with...
Toshiro Muto, Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee Chief Executive Officer, speaks in front of Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games mascot Miraitowa and Paralympic mascot Someity during an interview with Reuters, ahead of the one-year countdown to the Tokyo Olympics that have been postponed to 2021 due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Tokyo, Japan July 21, 2020. Picture taken July 21, 2020. REUTERS/Issei Kato
OLYMPICS-2020/MUTO
RTX7L41B
July 22, 2020
Toshiro Muto, Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee Chief Executive Officer, speaks during an interview with...
Tokyo, Japan
Toshiro Muto, Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee Chief Executive Officer, speaks during an interview with...
Toshiro Muto, Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee Chief Executive Officer, speaks during an interview with Reuters, ahead of the one-year countdown to the Tokyo Olympics that have been postponed to 2021 due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Tokyo, Japan July 21, 2020. Picture taken July 21, 2020. REUTERS/Issei Kato
OLYMPICS-2020/MUTO
RTX7L41D
July 22, 2020
Toshiro Muto, Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee Chief Executive Officer, poses for a photograph during...
Tokyo, Japan
Toshiro Muto, Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee Chief Executive Officer, poses for a photograph during...
Toshiro Muto, Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee Chief Executive Officer, poses for a photograph during an interview with Reuters ahead of the one-year countdown to the Tokyo Olympics that have been postponed to 2021 due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Tokyo, Japan July 21, 2020. Picture taken July 21, 2020. REUTERS/Issei Kato
OLYMPICS-2020/MUTO
RTX7L41A
July 22, 2020
Toshiro Muto, Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee Chief Executive Officer, speaks in front of Tokyo 2020...
Tokyo, Japan
Toshiro Muto, Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee Chief Executive Officer, speaks during an interview with...
Toshiro Muto, Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee Chief Executive Officer, speaks in front of Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games mascot Miraitowa and Paralympic mascot Someity during an interview with Reuters, ahead of the one-year countdown to the Tokyo Olympics that have been postponed to 2021 due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Tokyo, Japan July 21, 2020. Picture taken July 21, 2020. REUTERS/Issei Kato
OLYMPICS-2020/MUTO
RTX7L41C
July 22, 2020
Toshiro Muto, Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee Chief Executive Officer, speaks during an interview with...
Tokyo, Japan
Toshiro Muto, Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee Chief Executive Officer, speaks during an interview with...
Toshiro Muto, Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee Chief Executive Officer, speaks during an interview with Reuters, ahead of the one-year countdown to the Tokyo Olympics that have been postponed to 2021 due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Tokyo, Japan July 21, 2020. Picture taken July 21, 2020. REUTERS/Issei Kato
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CUBA-BIRTHDAYS
RTX7KZJR
July 21, 2020
Estefani Linares poses during a photo session for her quinceanera (coming of age of 15-year-olds) celebration...
Havana, Cuba
Quinceanera celebration amid COVID-19 concerns in Havana
Estefani Linares poses during a photo session for her quinceanera (coming of age of 15-year-olds) celebration amid coronavirus disease (COVID-19) spread concerns, in Havana, Cuba, July 15, 2020. Picture taken July 15, 2020. REUTERS/Alexandre Meneghini TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
OLYMPICS-2020/1YTG
RTX7KYQ7
July 21, 2020
The giant Olympic rings are pictured two days before the start of the one-year countdown to the Tokyo...
Tokyo, Japan
The giant Olympic rings are pictured, in Tokyo
The giant Olympic rings are pictured two days before the start of the one-year countdown to the Tokyo Olympics that have been postponed to 2021 due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, at the waterfront area at Odaiba Marine Park in Tokyo, Japan July 21, 2020. REUTERS/Issei Kato
OLYMPICS-2020/1YTG
RTX7KYPP
July 21, 2020
The giant Olympic rings are pictured two days before the start of the one-year countdown to the Tokyo...
Tokyo, Japan
The giant Olympic rings are pictured, in Tokyo
The giant Olympic rings are pictured two days before the start of the one-year countdown to the Tokyo Olympics that have been postponed to 2021 due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, at the waterfront area at Odaiba Marine Park in Tokyo, Japan July 21, 2020. REUTERS/Issei Kato
OLYMPICS-2020/1YTG
RTX7KYPO
July 21, 2020
The giant Olympic rings are pictured two days before the start of the one-year countdown to the Tokyo...
Tokyo, Japan
The giant Olympic rings are pictured, in Tokyo
The giant Olympic rings are pictured two days before the start of the one-year countdown to the Tokyo Olympics that have been postponed to 2021 due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, at the waterfront area at Odaiba Marine Park in Tokyo, Japan July 21, 2020. REUTERS/Issei Kato
OLYMPICS-2020/1YTG
RTX7KYO1
July 21, 2020
The giant Olympic rings are pictured two days before the start of the one-year countdown to the Tokyo...
Tokyo, Japan
The giant Olympic rings are pictured, in Tokyo
The giant Olympic rings are pictured two days before the start of the one-year countdown to the Tokyo Olympics that have been postponed to 2021 due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, at the waterfront area at Odaiba Marine Park in Tokyo, Japan July 21, 2020. REUTERS/Issei Kato
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/JORDAN-ROBOTICS
RTX7KQDD
July 20, 2020
A 16-year-old Syrian refugee, Mais Abu Dabous, traines to create robots as a part of the camp's UNHCR-led...
Mafraq, Jordan
Teenagers at the Syrian refugee Zaatari camp develop lego-based robots
A 16-year-old Syrian refugee, Mais Abu Dabous, traines to create robots as a part of the camp's UNHCR-led Innovation Lab program, at the Zaatari refugee camp in the Jordanian city of Mafraq, near the border with Syria, July 14, 2020. Picture taken July 14, 2020. REUTERS/ Muhammad Hamed
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ECUADOR-EDUCATION
RTS3JRIO
July 14, 2020
Keyla Vera tries to solve a math problem during classes with Denisse Toala (not pictured), a 16-year-old...
Guayaquil, Ecuador
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil
Keyla Vera tries to solve a math problem during classes with Denisse Toala (not pictured), a 16-year-old student, who teaches children in an improvised school she has set up under a tree since they have been unable to attend virtual classes in the low-income neighbourhood Realidad de Dios, during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil, Ecuador July 2, 2020. Picture taken July 2, 2020. REUTERS/Santiago Arcos
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ECUADOR-EDUCATION
RTS3JRIN
July 14, 2020
Marlon Ruiz arrives for class with Denisse Toala (not pictured), a 16-year-old student, who teaches children...
Guayaquil, Ecuador
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil
Marlon Ruiz arrives for class with Denisse Toala (not pictured), a 16-year-old student, who teaches children in an improvised school she has set up under a tree since they have been unable to attend virtual classes in the low-income neighbourhood Realidad de Dios, during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil, Ecuador July 2, 2020. Picture taken July 2, 2020. REUTERS/Santiago Arcos
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ECUADOR-EDUCATION
RTS3JRIM
July 14, 2020
Denisse Toala (3rd R), a 16-year-old student, teaches children in an improvised school she has set up...
Guayaquil, Ecuador
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil
Denisse Toala (3rd R), a 16-year-old student, teaches children in an improvised school she has set up under a tree since they have been unable to attend virtual classes in the low-income neighbourhood Realidad de Dios, during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil, Ecuador July 2, 2020. Picture taken July 2, 2020. REUTERS/Santiago Arcos
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ECUADOR-EDUCATION
RTS3JRIH
July 14, 2020
Girls play during a break from classes with Denisse Toala (not pictured), a 16-year-old student, who...
Guayaquil, Ecuador
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil
Girls play during a break from classes with Denisse Toala (not pictured), a 16-year-old student, who teaches children in an improvised school she has set up under a tree since they have been unable to attend virtual classes in the low-income neighbourhood Realidad de Dios, during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil, Ecuador July 2, 2020. Picture taken July 2, 2020. REUTERS/Santiago Arcos
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ECUADOR-EDUCATION
RTS3JRIG
July 14, 2020
Denisse Toala (C), a 16-year-old student, teaches children in an improvised school she has set up under...
Guayaquil, Ecuador
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil
Denisse Toala (C), a 16-year-old student, teaches children in an improvised school she has set up under a tree since they have been unable to attend virtual classes in the low-income neighbourhood Realidad de Dios, during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil, Ecuador July 2, 2020. Picture taken July 2, 2020. REUTERS/Santiago Arcos
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ECUADOR-EDUCATION
RTS3JRIC
July 14, 2020
Children clean the playground during a break from classes with Denisse Toala (not pictured), a 16-year-old...
Guayaquil, Ecuador
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil
Children clean the playground during a break from classes with Denisse Toala (not pictured), a 16-year-old student, who teaches children in an improvised school she has set up under a tree since they have been unable to attend virtual classes in the low-income neighbourhood Realidad de Dios, during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil, Ecuador July 2, 2020. Picture taken July 2, 2020. REUTERS/Santiago Arcos
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ECUADOR-EDUCATION
RTS3JRIB
July 14, 2020
Ariana Rodriguez walks back to class with Denisse Toala (not pictured), a 16-year-old student, who teaches...
Guayaquil, Ecuador
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil
Ariana Rodriguez walks back to class with Denisse Toala (not pictured), a 16-year-old student, who teaches children in an improvised school she has set up under a tree since they have been unable to attend virtual classes in the low-income neighbourhood Realidad de Dios, during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil, Ecuador July 2, 2020. Picture taken July 2, 2020. REUTERS/Santiago Arcos
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ECUADOR-EDUCATION
RTS3JRIA
July 14, 2020
Victor Farias uses a face mask while studying with Denisse Toala (not pictured), a 16-year-old student,...
Guayaquil, Ecuador
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil
Victor Farias uses a face mask while studying with Denisse Toala (not pictured), a 16-year-old student, who teaches children in an improvised school she has set up under a tree since they have been unable to attend virtual classes in the low-income neighbourhood Realidad de Dios, during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil, Ecuador July 2, 2020. Picture taken July 2, 2020. REUTERS/Santiago Arcos
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ECUADOR-EDUCATION
RTS3JRI6
July 14, 2020
Denisse Toala, a 16-year-old student, who teaches children in an improvised school she has set up under...
Guayaquil, Ecuador
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil
Denisse Toala, a 16-year-old student, who teaches children in an improvised school she has set up under a tree since they have been unable to attend virtual classes in the low-income neighbourhood Realidad de Dios, poses for a photograph during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil, Ecuador July 2, 2020. Picture taken July 2, 2020. REUTERS/Santiago Arcos
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ECUADOR-EDUCATION
RTS3JRI5
July 14, 2020
Denisse Toala (2nd L), a 16-year-old student, follows a youth carrying a whiteboard for the improvised...
Guayaquil, Ecuador
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil
Denisse Toala (2nd L), a 16-year-old student, follows a youth carrying a whiteboard for the improvised school she has set up under a tree for children who have been unable to attend classes in the low-income neighbourhood Realidad de Dios, during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil, Ecuador July 2, 2020. Picture taken July 2, 2020. REUTERS/Santiago Arcos
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ECUADOR-EDUCATION
RTS3JRI3
July 14, 2020
Denisse Toala (2nd R), a 16-year-old student, teaches children in an improvised school she has set up...
Guayaquil, Ecuador
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil
Denisse Toala (2nd R), a 16-year-old student, teaches children in an improvised school she has set up under a tree since they have been unable to attend virtual classes in the low-income neighbourhood Realidad de Dios, during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil, Ecuador July 2, 2020. Picture taken July 2, 2020. REUTERS/Santiago Arcos
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ECUADOR-EDUCATION
RTS3JRHX
July 14, 2020
Boys sit underneath tables built by parents for the improvised school 16-year-old Denisse Toala (not...
Guayaquil, Ecuador
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil
Boys sit underneath tables built by parents for the improvised school 16-year-old Denisse Toala (not pictured) has set up under a tree since children have been unable to attend virtual classes in the low-income neighbourhood Realidad de Dios, during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil, Ecuador July 2, 2020. Picture taken July 2, 2020. REUTERS/Santiago Arcos
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ECUADOR-EDUCATION
RTS3JRGS
July 14, 2020
Denisse Toala (C), a 16-year-old student, teaches children in an improvised school she has set up under...
Guayaquil, Ecuador
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil
Denisse Toala (C), a 16-year-old student, teaches children in an improvised school she has set up under a tree since they have been unable to attend virtual classes in the low-income neighbourhood Realidad de Dios, during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil, Ecuador July 2, 2020. Picture taken July 2, 2020. REUTERS/Santiago Arcos
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ECUADOR-EDUCATION
RTS3JRGR
July 14, 2020
Denisse Toala (3rd R, green shirt), a 16-year-old student, teaches children in an improvised school she...
Guayaquil, Ecuador
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil
Denisse Toala (3rd R, green shirt), a 16-year-old student, teaches children in an improvised school she has set up under a tree since they have been unable to attend virtual classes in the low-income neighbourhood Realidad de Dios, during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil, Ecuador July 2, 2020. Picture taken July 2, 2020. REUTERS/Santiago Arcos
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ECUADOR-EDUCATION
RTS3JRGO
July 14, 2020
Keyla Vera (L) shows Ariana Rodriguez basic math during classes with Denisse Toala (not pictured), a...
Guayaquil, Ecuador
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil
Keyla Vera (L) shows Ariana Rodriguez basic math during classes with Denisse Toala (not pictured), a 16-year-old student, who teaches children in an improvised school she has set up under a tree since they have been unable to attend virtual classes in the low-income neighbourhood Realidad de Dios, during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Guayaquil, Ecuador July 2, 2020. Picture taken July 2, 2020. REUTERS/Santiago Arcos
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXR7
July 10, 2020
Egilda Orrico, an activist, sits in the window of 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Egilda Orrico, an activist, sits in the window of 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. "This place changed my life. This house chose me, then I chose it" said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXQK
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim who since the end of April has been living in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim who since the end of April has been living in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, opens a window in her room, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. "I escaped from my home and an anti-violence centre put me in a hotel for 3 weeks. I didn't leave the room and I had a lot of panic attacks. I felt so lonely, even though my son was with me. When I arrived at Lucha I felt for the first time that I was not alone. After a short time here, the panic attacks were over," said the woman. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXOS
July 10, 2020
Milva Pistoni, an activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Milva Pistoni, an activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, prepares bread at the house, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. "Lucha is a house of mothers, made by women for women" said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXMK
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim who since the end of April has been living in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim who since the end of April has been living in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, sleeps on the sofa, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. ?Maybe I loved too much and this love was never returned to me. When I saw Lucha?s door for the first time, it was like seeing paradise after dying? said the woman. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXKY
July 10, 2020
A portrait of Simona Ammerata, the activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A portrait of Simona Ammerata, the activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. "I had the idea for Lucha with my sisters, and we made it happen. For me, it's the possibility that the world can change. Women who enter Lucha teach me what it means to suffer from domestic violence and how to escape from it. I have the tools to help, but they have the experience" said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXKX
July 10, 2020
Barbara Tarantino, an activist and seamstress from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Barbara Tarantino, an activist and seamstress from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, is seen at work, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. "There should be 1,000 places like Lucha. Here I found a place of humanity that made me fall in love with my job again" said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXH9
July 10, 2020
Rachele Damiani, an activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Rachele Damiani, an activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, attends the screening of a film at the house, in Rome, Italy, July 7, 2020. "Lucha pushes me to ask myself a lot of questions. It makes possible difficult but wonderful ways to grow as a person", said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXFR
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen due to anonymity, attends her personal consultation...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen due to anonymity, attends her personal consultation with an activist at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The woman has been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXDN
July 10, 2020
Domestic abuse victims, whose faces cannot be seen to protect their identities, attend a weekly meeting...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Domestic abuse victims, whose faces cannot be seen to protect their identities, attend a weekly meeting with activists at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The women have been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXDA
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, chats to an activist at Rome's...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, chats to an activist at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The woman has been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXC1
July 10, 2020
People attend a screening of a film at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
People attend a screening of a film at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 7, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXBR
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, chats to activists at Rome's...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, chats to activists at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The woman has been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXBF
July 10, 2020
An activist talks to a child of a domestic abuse victim who used to live in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
An activist talks to a child of a domestic abuse victim who used to live in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXA0
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, attends a personal consultation...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, attends a personal consultation with an activist at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The woman has been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IX8E
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, with her face obscured to protect her identity, hugs one of the activists during...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, with her face obscured to protect her identity, hugs one of the activists during a visit back to 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women’s house run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. “Lucha will always be my home” said the victim who lived in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' for two years.'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women’s rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city’s heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence – and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IX8D
July 10, 2020
A child is reflected on a mirror inside a tailoring room at 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A child is reflected on a mirror inside a tailoring room at 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHILE
RTS3ISLA
July 09, 2020
The shadows of a letter 'C' and the granddaughter of 92-year-old Jose, who passed away from complications...
Santiago, Chile
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Santiago
The shadows of a letter 'C' and the granddaughter of 92-year-old Jose, who passed away from complications related to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), are reflected in a glass while she uses a mobile phone, at the hospital where Jose died in Santiago, Chile July 1, 2020. Picture taken with the camera turned up side down. Picture taken July 1, 2020. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHILE
RTS3ISKV
July 09, 2020
A pump used to disinfect is seen next to the coffin containing the body of 92-year-old Jose, who passed...
Santiago, Chile
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Santiago
A pump used to disinfect is seen next to the coffin containing the body of 92-year-old Jose, who passed away of complications related to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), as relatives gather during his funeral in Santiago, Chile July 2, 2020. Picture taken July 2, 2020. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHILE
RTS3ISKB
July 09, 2020
Cemetery workers bury the casket (not pictured) containing the body of 92-year-old Jose, who passed away...
Santiago, Chile
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Santiago
Cemetery workers bury the casket (not pictured) containing the body of 92-year-old Jose, who passed away of complications related to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), during his funeral in Santiago, Chile July 2, 2020. Picture taken July 2, 2020. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
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