Ajax loader
By using our website, you agree to our use of cookies as described in Cookie Policy.

Can't find what you're looking for?

 

Be sure to Sign in to see all available content.

 

If you don't have an account, Register here.

Search results for: Pigment

AUCTION-SOTHEBYS/GEORGIA OKEEFFE
RTS33MFN
February 25, 2020
Paint pigments with labels written by artist Georgia O'Keeffe are displayed on a stand as part of a Sotheby's...
New York, UNITED STATES
Paint pigments with labels written by Georgia O'Keeffe are displayed in New York City
Paint pigments with labels written by artist Georgia O'Keeffe are displayed on a stand as part of a Sotheby's sale of items related to her estate in New York City, New York, U.S., February 25, 2020. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
AUCTION-SOTHEBYS/GEORGIA OKEEFFE
RTS33MEH
February 25, 2020
Paint pigments with labels written by the artist Georgia O'Keeffe are displayed on a stand as part of...
New York, UNITED STATES
Paint pigments with labels written by O'Keeffe are displayed as part of a Sotheby's sale of items related...
Paint pigments with labels written by the artist Georgia O'Keeffe are displayed on a stand as part of a Sotheby's sale of items related to her estate in New York City, New York, U.S. February 25, 2020. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
FRANCE-LIGHTS/LYON
RTS297X9
December 07, 2018
View of Pigments de lumiere, installation by artists Nuno Maya & Carole Purnelle / OCUBO during the festival...
Lyon, France
View of Pigments de lumiere, installation by artists Nuno Maya & Carole Purnelle / OCUBO during the festival...
View of Pigments de lumiere, installation by artists Nuno Maya & Carole Purnelle / OCUBO during the festival of lights (Fetes des Lumieres) in Lyon France, December 6, 2018. REUTERS/Emmanuel Foudrot?
FRANCE-LIGHTS/LYON
RTS297X5
December 07, 2018
View of Pigments de lumiere, installation by artists Nuno Maya & Carole Purnelle / OCUBO during the festival...
Lyon, France
View of Pigments de lumiere, installation by artists Nuno Maya & Carole Purnelle / OCUBO during the festival...
View of Pigments de lumiere, installation by artists Nuno Maya & Carole Purnelle / OCUBO during the festival of lights (Fetes des Lumieres) in Lyon France, December 6, 2018. REUTERS/Emmanuel Foudrot?
FRANCE-LIGHTS/LYON
RTS297X4
December 07, 2018
View of Pigments de lumiere, installation by artists Nuno Maya & Carole Purnelle / OCUBO during the festival...
Lyon, France
View of Pigments de lumiere, installation by artists Nuno Maya & Carole Purnelle / OCUBO during the festival...
View of Pigments de lumiere, installation by artists Nuno Maya & Carole Purnelle / OCUBO during the festival of lights (Fetes des Lumieres) in Lyon France, December 6, 2018. REUTERS/Emmanuel Foudrot?
FRANCE-LIGHTS/LYON
RTS297X3
December 07, 2018
View of Pigments de lumiere, installation by artists Nuno Maya & Carole Purnelle / OCUBO during the festival...
Lyon, France
View of Pigments de lumiere, installation by artists Nuno Maya & Carole Purnelle / OCUBO during the festival...
View of Pigments de lumiere, installation by artists Nuno Maya & Carole Purnelle / OCUBO during the festival of lights (Fetes des Lumieres) in Lyon France, December 6, 2018. REUTERS/Emmanuel Foudrot?
KENYA-MAASAI/
RTS1YL35
August 24, 2018
A Maasai man uses a phone to paint himself with a red ochre pigment during an initiation into an age...
BISIL, Kenya
A Maasai man uses a phone to paint himself with a red ochre pigment during an initiation into an age...
A Maasai man uses a phone to paint himself with a red ochre pigment during an initiation into an age group ceremony near the town of Bisil, Kajiado county, Kenya, August 23, 2018. Picture taken August 23, 2018. REUTERS/Baz Ratner
KENYA-MAASAI/
RTS1YL2Q
August 24, 2018
A Maasai boy is painted with red ochre pigment during an initiation into an age group ceremony near the...
BISIL, Kenya
A Maasai boy is painted with red ochre pigment during an initiation into an age group ceremony near the...
A Maasai boy is painted with red ochre pigment during an initiation into an age group ceremony near the town of Bisil, Kajiado county, Kenya, August 23, 2018. Picture taken August 23, 2018. REUTERS/Baz Ratner
KENYA-MAASAI/
RTS1YL2J
August 24, 2018
A Maasai woman painted with a red ochre pigment dances during an initiation into an age group ceremony...
BISIL, Kenya
A Maasai woman painted with a red ochre pigment dances during an initiation into an age group ceremony...
A Maasai woman painted with a red ochre pigment dances during an initiation into an age group ceremony near the town of Bisil, Kajiado county, Kenya, August 23, 2018. Picture taken August 23, 2018. REUTERS/Baz Ratner
KENYA-MAASAI/
RTS1YL22
August 24, 2018
A Maasai holds a bowl of red ochre pigment during an initiation into an age group ceremony near the town...
BISIL, Kenya
A Maasai holds a bowl of red ochre pigment during an initiation into an age group ceremony near the town...
A Maasai holds a bowl of red ochre pigment during an initiation into an age group ceremony near the town of Bisil, Kajiado county, Kenya, August 23, 2018. Picture taken August 23, 2018. REUTERS/Baz Ratner
KENYA-MAASAI/
RTS1YL19
August 24, 2018
A Maasai master of ceremony painted with red ochre pigment takes part in an initiation into an age group...
BISIL, Kenya
A Maasai master of ceremony painted with red ochre pigment takes part in an initiation into an age group...
A Maasai master of ceremony painted with red ochre pigment takes part in an initiation into an age group ceremony near the town of Bisil, Kajiado county, Kenya, August 23, 2018. Picture taken August 23, 2018. REUTERS/Baz Ratner
FRANCE-WINE/
RTS1WVUO
August 10, 2018
Rene Le Bail, commercial director of Vindigo, Mediterranean chardonnay wine, poses with bottles of the...
Sete, France
Rene Le Bail, commercial director of Vindigo, Mediterranean chardonnay wine, poses with bottles on the...
Rene Le Bail, commercial director of Vindigo, Mediterranean chardonnay wine, poses with bottles of the wine on the beach in Sete, France, August 9, 2018. The wine is filtered through a pulp of red grape skins which contain a natural pigment, anthocyanin, and gives the wine its blue colour. Picture taken August 9, 2018. REUTERS/Antony Paone
FRANCE-WINE/
RTS1WVUK
August 10, 2018
A glass of Vindigo, Mediterranean chardonnay wine, is seen at a beachfront restaurant in Sete, France,...
Sete, France
A glass of Vindigo, Mediterranean chardonnay wine, is seen at a beachfront restaurant in Sete
A glass of Vindigo, Mediterranean chardonnay wine, is seen at a beachfront restaurant in Sete, France, August 9, 2018. The wine is filtered through a pulp of red grape skins which contain a natural pigment, anthocyanin, and gives the wine its blue colour. Picture taken August 9, 2018. REUTERS/Antony Paone
FRANCE-WINE/
RTS1WVTX
August 10, 2018
A glass of Vindigo, Mediterranean chardonnay wine, is seen at a beachfront restaurant in Sete, France,...
Sete, France
A glass of Vindigo, Mediterranean chardonnay wine, is seen at a beachfront restaurant in Sete
A glass of Vindigo, Mediterranean chardonnay wine, is seen at a beachfront restaurant in Sete, France, August 9, 2018. The wine is filtered through a pulp of red grape skins which contain a natural pigment, anthocyanin, and gives the wine its blue colour. Picture taken August 9, 2018. REUTERS/Antony Paone
FRANCE-WINE/
RTS1WVTF
August 10, 2018
Rene Le Bail, commercial director of Vindigo Mediterranean chardonnay wine, poses with bottles on the...
Sete, France
Rene Le Bail, commercial director of Vindigo Mediterranean chardonnay wine, poses with bottles on the...
Rene Le Bail, commercial director of Vindigo Mediterranean chardonnay wine, poses with bottles on the beach in Sete, France, August 9, 2018. The wine is filtered through a pulp of red grape skins which contain a natural pigment, anthocyanin, and gives the wine its blue colour. Picture taken August 9, 2018. REUTERS/Antony Paone
GERMANY-FISH LEATHER/
RTX4J74S
January 24, 2018
Florian Koppitz, shoemaker in the fifth generation, works on pigmented fish leather (sturgeon leather...
GRAFING, Germany
Shoemaker Koppitz works on pigmented fish leather in workshop in Grafing
Florian Koppitz, shoemaker in the fifth generation, works on pigmented fish leather (sturgeon leather (L-R), parrot fish leather, salmon leather and skate fish leather) in their workshop in Grafing, Germany January 24, 2018. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle
INDIA-DAILYLIFE/
RTX3JQDV
November 23, 2017
A worker applies colour to strings which will be used to fly kites, by a roadside in Ahmedabad, India,...
Ahmedabad, India
A worker applies colour to strings which will be used to fly kites, by a roadside in Ahmedabad
A worker applies colour to strings which will be used to fly kites, by a roadside in Ahmedabad, India, November 23, 2017. REUTERS/Amit Dave TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
PAKISTAN-HINDUISM/
RTSPMH7
September 27, 2016
A groom receives a dot on his forehead with Sindoor (red pigment) during a mass marriage ceremony in...
Karachi, Pakistan
A groom receives a dot on his forehead with Sindoor (red pigment) during a mass marriage ceremony in...
A groom receives a dot on his forehead with Sindoor (red pigment) during a mass marriage ceremony in Karachi, Pakistan, January 24, 2016. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro/File Photo
PAKISTAN-RELIGION/
RTX23T5O
January 24, 2016
A groom receives a dot on his forehead with Sindoor (red pigment) during a mass marriage ceremony in...
Karachi, Pakistan
A groom receives a dot on his forhead with Sindoor (red pigment) during a mass marriage ceremony in Karachi...
A groom receives a dot on his forehead with Sindoor (red pigment) during a mass marriage ceremony in Karachi, Pakistan, January 24, 2016. The Pakistan Hindu Council organized a mass marriage ceremony where a total of 60 couples from the Hindu community residing in Pakistan's Sindh province took wedding vows, according to the council. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
INDUSTRY-EMISSIONS/
RTX1ZA4C
December 18, 2015
Picture shows algae grown in waste water from companies Novo Nordisk and Novozymes in a facility in Kalundborg,...
Kalundborg, Denmark
Algae grown in waste water from companies Novo Nordisk and Novozymes in a facility in Kalundborg
Picture shows algae grown in waste water from companies Novo Nordisk and Novozymes in a facility in Kalundborg, Denmark, November 20, 2015. The Algae can be used to clean water by eating pollutants, for fish feed or its pigments extracted for the pharmaceutical industry. As pioneers of so-called industrial symbiosis, these companies swap waste and byproducts to cut costs and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions profitably -- an approach that offers big business a financial incentive that could be crucial to nations striving to meet targets agreed at this month's global climate summit. Their success has attracted attention globally, with more than 30 corporate and municipal delegations from 20 countries visiting the town this year, including mayors from China's fast-growing Guandong province. To match story INDUSTRY-EMISSIONS/ REUTERS/Sabina Zawadzki
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I7K
September 30, 2015
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo (R) from Tanzania holds hands with Elissa Montanati of the Global Medical...
New York, UNITED STATES
Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania holds hands with Elissa Montanati of the Global Medical Relief Fund in the...
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo (R) from Tanzania holds hands with Elissa Montanati of the Global Medical Relief Fund in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I7J
September 30, 2015
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania talks with Elissa Montanati of the Global Medical Relief...
New York, UNITED STATES
Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania talks with Montanati of the Global Medical Relief Fund in his bedroom in...
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania talks with Elissa Montanati of the Global Medical Relief Fund in his bedroom in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I7I
September 30, 2015
12-year-old Mwigulu Matonage Magesa from Tanzania looks at a book as he does homework in the Staten Island...
New York, UNITED STATES
Magesa from Tanzania looks at a book as he does homework in the Staten Island borough of New York
12-year-old Mwigulu Matonage Magesa from Tanzania looks at a book as he does homework in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I7H
September 30, 2015
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania looks out the window in the Staten Island borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Lusambo from Tanzania looks out the window in the Staten Island borough of New York
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania looks out the window in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I7G
September 30, 2015
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo (R) from Tanzania sits on the lap of Elissa Montanati of the Global...
New York, UNITED STATES
Lusambo from Tanzania sits on the lap of Montanati of the Global Medical Relief Fund in the Staten Island...
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo (R) from Tanzania sits on the lap of Elissa Montanati of the Global Medical Relief Fund in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I7F
September 30, 2015
Children from Tanzania sit on a sofa in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino...
New York, UNITED STATES
Children from Tanzania sit on a sofa in the Staten Island borough of New York
Children from Tanzania sit on a sofa in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I7D
September 30, 2015
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania looks out of the window in the Staten Island borough of...
New York, UNITED STATES
Lusambo from Tanzania looks out of the window in the Staten Island borough of New York
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania looks out of the window in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I7B
September 30, 2015
12-year-old Mwigulu Matonage Magesa from Tanzania walks into his bedroom in the Staten Island borough...
New York, UNITED STATES
Magesa from Tanzania walks into his bedroom in the Staten Island borough of New York
12-year-old Mwigulu Matonage Magesa from Tanzania walks into his bedroom in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I7A
September 30, 2015
Mwigulu Matonage Magesa (L), Pendo Sengerema Noni (C) and Emmanuel Festo Rutema (R) sit on a sofa in...
New York, UNITED STATES
Magesa, Noni and Rutema sit on a sofa in the Staten Island borough of New York
Mwigulu Matonage Magesa (L), Pendo Sengerema Noni (C) and Emmanuel Festo Rutema (R) sit on a sofa in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I79
September 30, 2015
12-year-old Mwigulu Matonage Magesa from Tanzania eats an apple as he does homework in the Staten Island...
New York, UNITED STATES
Magesa from Tanzania eats an apple as he does homework in the Staten Island borough of New York
12-year-old Mwigulu Matonage Magesa from Tanzania eats an apple as he does homework in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I78
September 30, 2015
13-year-old Emmanuel Festo Rutema from Tanzania eats an orange as he does homework in the Staten Island...
New York, UNITED STATES
Rutema from Tanzania eats an orange as he does homework in the Staten Island borough of New York in the...
13-year-old Emmanuel Festo Rutema from Tanzania eats an orange as he does homework in the Staten Island borough of New York in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I75
September 30, 2015
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania dances along as a video plays on a computer in the Staten...
New York, UNITED STATES
Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania dances along as a video plays on a computer in the Staten Island borough...
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania dances along as a video plays on a computer in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I74
September 30, 2015
Mwigulu Matonage Magesa (L) and Emmanuel Festo Rutema (R) put on their prosthetic arms as Baraka Cosmas...
New York, UNITED STATES
Matonage and Festo put on their prosthetic arms as Cosmas looks on in their bedroom in the Staten Island...
Mwigulu Matonage Magesa (L) and Emmanuel Festo Rutema (R) put on their prosthetic arms as Baraka Cosmas Lusambo (C) looks on in their bedroom in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I73
September 30, 2015
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania eats an apple as he does homework in the Staten Island...
New York, UNITED STATES
Lusambo from Tanzania eats an apple as he does homework in the Staten Island borough of New York in the...
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania eats an apple as he does homework in the Staten Island borough of New York in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I6X
September 30, 2015
15-year-old Pendo Sengerema Noni from Tanzania puts on her prosthetic arm in her bedroom in the Staten...
New York, UNITED STATES
Sengerema Noni from Tanzania puts on her prosthetic arm in her bedroom in the Staten Island borough of...
15-year-old Pendo Sengerema Noni from Tanzania puts on her prosthetic arm in her bedroom in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I6W
September 30, 2015
Children from Tanzania play soccer in the backyard in the Staten Island borough of New York, September...
New York, UNITED STATES
Children from Tanzania play soccer in the backyard in the Staten Island borough of New York
Children from Tanzania play soccer in the backyard in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I6V
September 30, 2015
Children from Tanzania play cards in the living room in the Staten Island borough of New York, September...
New York, UNITED STATES
Children from Tanzania play cards in the living room in the Staten Island borough of New York,
Children from Tanzania play cards in the living room in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I6U
September 30, 2015
12-year-old Mwigulu Matonage Magesa from Tanzania poses for a portrait with a stuffed animal that he...
New York, UNITED STATES
Magesa from Tanzania poses for a portrait with a stuffed animal that he says makes him feel safe at night...
12-year-old Mwigulu Matonage Magesa from Tanzania poses for a portrait with a stuffed animal that he says makes him feel safe at night and that he sleeps with, in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I6S
September 30, 2015
12-year-old Mwigulu Matonage Magesa from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of...
New York, UNITED STATES
Magesa from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York
12-year-old Mwigulu Matonage Magesa from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I6R
September 30, 2015
5-year old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo (L) and 12-year-old Mwigulu Matonage Magesa from Tanzania play soccer...
New York, UNITED STATES
Cosmas and Matonage from Tanzania play soccer in the backyard in the Staten Island borough of New York...
5-year old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo (L) and 12-year-old Mwigulu Matonage Magesa from Tanzania play soccer in the backyard in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I6Q
September 30, 2015
13-year-old Emmanuel Festo Rutema from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of...
New York, UNITED STATES
Rutema from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York in the Staten Island...
13-year-old Emmanuel Festo Rutema from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I6P
September 30, 2015
15-year-old Pendo Sengerema Noni from Tanzania poses for a portrait with a stuffed animal she says she...
New York, UNITED STATES
Noni from Tanzania poses for a portrait with a stuffed animal she says she sleeps with at night to make...
15-year-old Pendo Sengerema Noni from Tanzania poses for a portrait with a stuffed animal she says she sleeps with at night to make her feel safe in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I6N
September 30, 2015
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Lusambo from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York in the Staten Island...
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I6L
September 30, 2015
13-year-old Emmanuel Festo Rutema from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of...
New York, UNITED STATES
Rutema from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York in the Staten Island...
13-year-old Emmanuel Festo Rutema from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I6H
September 30, 2015
12-year-old Mwigulu Matonage Magesa from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of...
New York, UNITED STATES
Magesa from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York
12-year-old Mwigulu Matonage Magesa from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I6G
September 30, 2015
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania poses for a portrait with a plush heart that he says makes...
New York, UNITED STATES
Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania poses for a portrait with a plush heart that he says makes him feel safe...
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania poses for a portrait with a plush heart that he says makes him feel safe at night and that he sleeps with, in the Staten Island borough of New York in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I6F
September 30, 2015
15-year-old Pendo Sengerema Noni from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Sengerema Noni from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York
15-year-old Pendo Sengerema Noni from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I6C
September 30, 2015
15-year-old Pendo Sengerema Noni from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Sengerema Noni from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York
15-year-old Pendo Sengerema Noni from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
USA-TANZANIA-ALBINISM
RTS2I6A
September 30, 2015
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York in the Staten...
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA-ALBINISM
RTS2I69
September 30, 2015
13-year-old Emmanuel Festo Rutema from Tanzania poses for a portrait with a plush toy that he says makes...
New York, UNITED STATES
Festo Rutema from Tanzania poses for a portrait with a plush toy that he says makes him feel safe at...
13-year-old Emmanuel Festo Rutema from Tanzania poses for a portrait with a plush toy that he says makes him feel safe at night and that he sleeps with, in the Staten Island borough of New York in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I68
September 30, 2015
Mwigulu Matonage Magesa (L) and Emmanuel Festo Rutema (R) put on their prosthetic arms as Baraka Cosmas...
New York, UNITED STATES
Magesa and Rutema put on their prosthetic arms as Cosmas looks on in their bedroom in the Staten Island...
Mwigulu Matonage Magesa (L) and Emmanuel Festo Rutema (R) put on their prosthetic arms as Baraka Cosmas (C) looks on in their bedroom in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
USA-ART/
RTR4SONF
March 09, 2015
Preparatory pigment and charcoal drawings by Mexican muralist Diego Rivera are viewed by staff from the...
Detroit, UNITED STATES
Preparatory pigment and charcoal drawings by Mexican muralist Diego Rivera are viewed by staff from the...
Preparatory pigment and charcoal drawings by Mexican muralist Diego Rivera are viewed by staff from the Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA) during a preview of an exhibit by Rivera and painter Frida Kahlo in Detroit, Michigan March 6, 2015. The exhibit featuring the famous artist couple is scheduled to run from March 15 to July 12. It is the largest undertaking for the DIA since the museum and its assets were under threat during the city's historic bankruptcy, and officials hope to attract hundreds of thousands of visitors, according to the museum. Picture taken March 6, 2015. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY)
USA-ART/
RTR4SONB
March 09, 2015
Preparatory pigment and charcoal drawings by Mexican muralist Diego Rivera are viewed by staff from the...
Detroit, UNITED STATES
Preparatory pigment and charcoal drawings by Mexican muralist Diego Rivera are viewed by staff from the...
Preparatory pigment and charcoal drawings by Mexican muralist Diego Rivera are viewed by staff from the Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA) during a preview of an exhibit by Rivera and painter Frida Kahlo in Detroit, Michigan March 6, 2015. The exhibit featuring the famous artist couple is scheduled to run from March 15 to July 12. It is the largest undertaking for the DIA since the museum and its assets were under threat during the city's historic bankruptcy, and officials hope to attract hundreds of thousands of visitors, according to the museum. Picture taken March 6, 2015. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY)
MOROCCO-RABAT/WIDERIMAGE
RTR497WB
October 07, 2014
Colour pigments are offered for sale in Medina, Rabat's old city September 24, 2014. UNESCO made Rabat...
Rabat, Morocco
Colour pigments are offered for sale in Medina, Rabat's old city
Colour pigments are offered for sale in Medina, Rabat's old city September 24, 2014. UNESCO made Rabat a World Heritage Site two years ago and media and tour operators call it a "must-see destination." But it seems the tourist hordes have yet to find out. While visitors are getting squeezed through the better-known sites of Marrakesh and Fez, the old part of Rabat - with its beautiful Medina and Kasbah of the Udayas - remains an almost unspoiled oasis of calm. Smaller and more compact, its labyrinths of streets, passages and dead ends are a treasure trove of shapes and colours, of moments begging to be caught by the photographer's lens. Picture taken September 24, 2014. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj (MOROCCO - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 12 OF 24 FOR WIDER IMAGE PACKAGE 'RABAT'S TREASURE TROVE OF COLOURS'
TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'RABAT DAMIR'
MEXICO-AGRICULTURE/RED
RTR48UGN
October 03, 2014
Pigment extracted from the cochineal insects are displayed at a Cochineal Campaign lab in Nopaltepec,...
Nopaltepec, Mexico
Pigment extracted from the cochineal insects are displayed at a Cochineal Campaign lab in Nopaltepec
Pigment extracted from the cochineal insects are displayed at a Cochineal Campaign lab in Nopaltepec, state of Mexico September 30, 2014. In the shadow of the massive El Popo volcano, cactus growers in Mexico are helping to revive an ancient dying tradition with the help of a tiny bug that feeds off the country's prickly pears. The humble cochineal insect once occupied a proud place in pre-Hispanic culture as a natural dye for clothes and art. But over the years synthetic colours and the bug's parasitic nature saw it lose favour with local farmers. But amidst worldwide demand for the bug that has come from unlikely sources such as Starbucks and fashionistas, growers of the bug are cashing in. Picture taken September 30, 2014. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS TEXTILE)
MEXICO-ART/
RTR48KZ9
October 01, 2014
A visitor takes photos at University Museum of Contemporary Art (MUAC) in Mexico City October 1, 2014....
Mexico City, Mexico
A visitor takes photos at University Museum of Contemporary Art in Mexico City
A visitor takes photos at University Museum of Contemporary Art (MUAC) in Mexico City October 1, 2014. The exhibition "Teoria del color" (in english "Theory of Color") is a sample of contemporary art about racism, that sarcastically exposes the social distribution based on the exclusion from the skin pigmentation. The exhibition curated by Mexican artists selected works from artists from Africa and America, mainly. The poster (L) reads, "Now, we are all black". REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY)
MEXICO-ART/
RTR48KZ6
October 01, 2014
Visitors walk in front of pictures showing the backsides of people from the various social backgrounds...
Mexico City, Mexico
Visitors walk in front of pictures showing backsides of people from the various social backgrounds at...
Visitors walk in front of pictures showing the backsides of people from the various social backgrounds at University Museum of Contemporary Art (MUAC) in Mexico City October 1, 2014. The exhibition "Teoria del color" (in english "Theory of Color") is a sample of contemporary art about racism, that sarcastically exposes the social distribution based on the exclusion from the skin pigmentation. The exhibition curated by Mexican artists selected works from artists from Africa and America, mainly. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY)
MEXICO-ART/
RTR48KYY
October 01, 2014
A security guard sits next a sculpture at the University Museum of Contemporary Art (MUAC) in Mexico...
Mexico City, Mexico
A security guard sits next a sculpture at the University Museum of Contemporary Art in Mexico City
A security guard sits next a sculpture at the University Museum of Contemporary Art (MUAC) in Mexico City October 1, 2014. The exhibition "Teoria del color" (in english "Theory of Color") is a sample of contemporary art about racism, that sarcastically exposes the social distribution based on the exclusion from the skin pigmentation. The exhibition curated by Mexican artists selected works from artists from Africa and America, mainly. The words read, "No race". REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY)
MEXICO-ART/
RTR48KVU
October 01, 2014
A visitor looks through lenses with the images of boys at University Museum of Contemporary Art (MUAC)...
Mexico City, Mexico
A visitor looks through lenses with the images of boys at MUAC in Mexico City
A visitor looks through lenses with the images of boys at University Museum of Contemporary Art (MUAC) in Mexico City, October 1, 2014. The exhibition "Teoria del color" (Theory of Color) is a sample of contemporary art about racism, that sarcastically exposes social distribution based on the exclusion from skin pigmentation. The exhibition is curated by Mexican artists and features selected works mainly from artists from Africa and America. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY)
MEXICO-ART/
RTR48KVL
October 01, 2014
A visitor stands next to a screen showing a woman with her face covered at University Museum of Contemporary...
Mexico City, Mexico
A visitor stands next to a screen showing a woman with her face covered at MUAC in Mexico City
A visitor stands next to a screen showing a woman with her face covered at University Museum of Contemporary Art (MUAC) in Mexico City, October 1, 2014. The exhibition "Teoria del color" (Theory of Color) is a sample of contemporary art about racism, that sarcastically exposes social distribution based on the exclusion from skin pigmentation. The exhibition is curated by Mexican artists and features selected works mainly from artists from Africa and America. The letters form the word: "return". REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY)
Sort by
Display
Items per page
Page
of 3