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Search results for: Polygamy

INDONESIA-POLYGAMY/
RTS1EPRR 
October 02, 2017 
The AyoPoligami dating app is seen on a download screen on an android phone in Jakarta, Indonesia, in... 
Jakarta, Indonesia 
Illustration of the AyoPoligami dating app on a download screen on an android phone in Jakarta 
The AyoPoligami dating app is seen on a download screen on an android phone in Jakarta, Indonesia, in this picture illustration taken September 14, 2017. Picture taken September 14, 2017. REUTERS/Beawiharta/Illustration 
INDONESIA-POLYGAMY
RTS1EPRB 
October 02, 2017 
Indonesian factory worker Iyus Yusuf Fasyiya attends an interview with Reuters in Bogor, Indonesia, in... 
Bogor, Indonesia 
Video grab of Indonesian factory worker Iyus Yusuf Fasyiya attending an interview with Reuters in Bogor,... 
Indonesian factory worker Iyus Yusuf Fasyiya attends an interview with Reuters in Bogor, Indonesia, in this still image taken from video September 2, 2017. Video taken September 2, 2017. REUTERS/Zahra Matarani 
INDONESIA-POLYGAMY/
RTS1EPRA 
October 02, 2017 
Indonesian factory worker Iyus Yusuf Fasyiya points to pictures of his two wives and children during... 
Bogor, Indonesia 
Video grab of Iyus Yusuf Fasyiya pointing to pictures of his two wives and children during an interview... 
Indonesian factory worker Iyus Yusuf Fasyiya points to pictures of his two wives and children during an interview with Reuters in Bogor, Indonesia, in this still image taken from video September 2, 2017. Video taken September 2, 2017. REUTERS/Zahra Matarani 
CANADA-COURT/POLYGAMY
RTX3CRC6 
July 24, 2017 
James Oler leaves the court house after a Canadian judge found the former member of a breakaway religious... 
CRANBROOK, Canada 
Oler leaves the court house after a Canadian judge found the former member of a breakaway religious sect... 
James Oler leaves the court house after a Canadian judge found the former member of a breakaway religious sect guilty of practicing polygamy, in Cranbrook, British Columbia, Canada July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Todd Korol 
CANADA-COURT/POLYGAMY
RTX3CRC4 
July 24, 2017 
Winston Blackmore speaks to reporters after a Canadian court found the former leader of a breakaway religious... 
CRANBROOK, Canada 
Blackmore speaks to reporters after a Canadian court found the former leader of a breakaway religious... 
Winston Blackmore speaks to reporters after a Canadian court found the former leader of a breakaway religious sect guilty of practicing polygamy, in Cranbrook, British Columbia, Canada July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Todd Korol 
CANADA-COURT/POLYGAMY
RTX3CRC2 
July 24, 2017 
Winston Blackmore speaks to reporters after a Canadian court found the former leader of a breakaway religious... 
CRANBROOK, Canada 
Blackmore speaks to reporters after a Canadian court found the former leader of a breakaway religious... 
Winston Blackmore speaks to reporters after a Canadian court found the former leader of a breakaway religious sect guilty of practicing polygamy, in Cranbrook, British Columbia, Canada July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Todd Korol 
CANADA-COURT/POLYGAMY
RTX3CR9W 
July 24, 2017 
Winston Blackmore speaks to reporters after a Canadian court found the former leader of a breakaway religious... 
CRANBROOK, Canada 
Blackmore speaks to reporters after a Canadian court found the former leader of a breakaway religious... 
Winston Blackmore speaks to reporters after a Canadian court found the former leader of a breakaway religious sect guilty of practicing polygamy, in Cranbrook, British Columbia, Canada July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Todd Korol 
CANADA-COURT/POLYGAMY
RTX3CR9V 
July 24, 2017 
Winston Blackmore speaks to reporters after a Canadian court found the former leader of a breakaway religious... 
CRANBROOK, Canada 
Blackmore speaks to reporters after a Canadian court found the former leader of a breakaway religious... 
Winston Blackmore speaks to reporters after a Canadian court found the former leader of a breakaway religious sect guilty of practicing polygamy, in Cranbrook, British Columbia, Canada July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Todd Korol 
CANADA-COURT/POLYGAMY
RTX3CR13 
July 24, 2017 
James Oler, who is accused of having five wives, at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook, British Columbia,... 
CRANBROOK, Canada 
James Oler, who is accused of having five wives, at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook, British Columbia,... 
James Oler, who is accused of having five wives, at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook, British Columbia, Canada July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Todd Korol 
CANADA-COURT/POLYGAMY
RTX3CQZR 
July 24, 2017 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook, British... 
CRANBROOK, Canada 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook, British... 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook, British Columbia, Canada July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Todd Korol 
CANADA-COURT/POLYGAMY
RTX3CQZQ 
July 24, 2017 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook, British... 
CRANBROOK, Canada 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook, British... 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook, British Columbia, Canada July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Todd Korol 
CANADA-COURT/POLYGAMY
RTX3CQXY 
July 24, 2017 
James Oler, who is accused of having five wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook, British... 
CRANBROOK, Canada 
James Oler, who is accused of having five wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook, British... 
James Oler, who is accused of having five wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook, British Columbia, Canada July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Todd Korol 
CANADA-COURT/POLYGAMY
RTX3CQXX 
July 24, 2017 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook,... 
CRANBROOK, Canada 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook,... 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook, British Columbia, Canada July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Todd Korol 
CANADA-COURT/POLYGAMY
RTX3CQ7H 
July 24, 2017 
James Oler, who is accused of having five wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook, British... 
CRANBROOK, Canada 
James Oler, who is accused of having five wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook, British... 
James Oler, who is accused of having five wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook, British Columbia, Canada July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Todd Korol 
CANADA-COURT/POLYGAMY
RTX3CQ79 
July 24, 2017 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook,... 
CRANBROOK, Canada 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook,... 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook, British Columbia, Canada July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Todd Korol 
CANADA-COURT/POLYGAMY
RTX3CQ77 
July 24, 2017 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook,... 
CRANBROOK, Canada 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook,... 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook, British Columbia, Canada July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Todd Korol 
CANADA-COURT/POLYGAMY
RTX3CQ5Q 
July 24, 2017 
James Oler, who is accused of having five wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook, British... 
CRANBROOK, Canada 
Oler who is accused of having five wives arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook. 
James Oler, who is accused of having five wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook, British Columbia, Canada July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Todd Korol 
CANADA-COURT/POLYGAMY
RTX3CQ4U 
July 24, 2017 
James Oler, who is accused of having five wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook, British... 
CRANBROOK, Canada 
Oler who is accused of having five wives arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook. 
James Oler, who is accused of having five wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook, British Columbia, Canada July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Todd Korol 
CANADA-COURT/POLYGAMY
RTX3CQ3Q 
July 24, 2017 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook,... 
CRANBROOK, Canada 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook,... 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook, British Columbia, Canada July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Todd Korol 
CANADA-COURT/POLYGAMY
RTX3CQ3O 
July 24, 2017 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook,... 
CRANBROOK, Canada 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook,... 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook, British Columbia, Canada July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Todd Korol 
CANADA-COURT/POLYGAMY
RTX3CQ3K 
July 24, 2017 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook,... 
CRANBROOK, Canada 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook,... 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook, British Columbia, Canada July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Todd Korol 
CANADA-COURT/POLYGAMY
RTX3CQ2M 
July 24, 2017 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook,... 
CRANBROOK, Canada 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook,... 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook, British Columbia, Canada July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Todd Korol 
CANADA-COURT/POLYGAMY
RTX3CQ2L 
July 24, 2017 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook,... 
CRANBROOK, Canada 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook,... 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook, British Columbia, Canada July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Todd Korol 
CANADA-COURT/POLYGAMY
RTX3CQ2J 
July 24, 2017 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, smiles at a reporter's phone as he arrives... 
CRANBROOK, Canada 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, smiles at a reporter's phone as he arrives... 
Winston Blackmore, who is accused of having two dozen wives, smiles at a reporter's phone as he arrives at the BC Supreme Court in Cranbrook, British Columbia, Canada July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Todd Korol 
SAFRICA-ELECTION/ZULUS
RTR3NO9R 
May 03, 2014 
Residents wait for taxi transport beneath election posters in Pietermaritzburg in South Africa's KwaZulu... 
Pietermaritzburg, South Africa 
Residents wait for taxi transport beneath election posters in Pietermaritzburg in South Africa's KwaZulu... 
Residents wait for taxi transport beneath election posters in Pietermaritzburg in South Africa's KwaZulu Nataal province, in this picture taken April 29, 2014. If the African National Congress (ANC) maintains its 65 percent majority in South Africa's May 7 election, it will be thanks in large part to rural Zulu voters. The ANC's drive to develop this corner of KwaZulu-Natal province, 700 km (450 miles) southeast of Johannesburg, has paid dividends, notably by undermining the rival Inkatha Freedom Party (IFP), once the regional political force. The IFP decline has accelerated under President Jacob Zuma, a 72-year-old Zulu with a rural upbringing and firm beliefs in traditional practices such as polygamy. Picture taken April 29, 2014. REUTERS/Rogan Ward (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS) 
USA-POLYGAMY/SISTERWIVES
RTR3CKY3 
January 18, 2013 
Utah Assistant Attorney General Jerrold Jensen arrives at the U.S. Federal Courthouse for a hearing in... 
Salt Lake City, UNITED STATES 
Utah Assistant Attorney General Jensen arrives at the U.S. Federal Courthouse for a hearing in Salt Lake... 
Utah Assistant Attorney General Jerrold Jensen arrives at the U.S. Federal Courthouse for a hearing in Salt Lake City, Utah January 17, 2013. Members of the Brown family, who are polygamists and were made famous by the television show "Sister Wives", are suing Utah on the grounds that the state's bigamy laws are unconstitutional. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW POLITICS) 
USA-POLYGAMY/SISTERWIVES
RTR3CKXE 
January 18, 2013 
Heidi Mattingly Foster, a polygamist, leaves the U.S. Federal Courthouse after observing a hearing in... 
Salt Lake City, UNITED STATES 
Foster, a polygamist, leaves the U.S. Federal Courthouse after observing a hearing in Salt Lake City,... 
Heidi Mattingly Foster, a polygamist, leaves the U.S. Federal Courthouse after observing a hearing in Salt Lake City, Utah, January 17, 2013. Members of the Brown family, who are polygamists and were made famous by the television show "Sister Wives", are suing Utah on the grounds that the state's bigamy laws are unconstitutional. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW POLITICS) 
USA-POLYGAMY/SISTERWIVES
RTR3CKXA 
January 18, 2013 
Former polygamists Jennifer Broadbent (L) and Kristyn Decker chat as they arrive at the U.S. Federal... 
Salt Lake City, UNITED STATES 
Former polygamists Broadbent and Decker chat as they arrive at the U.S. Federal Courthouse to observe... 
Former polygamists Jennifer Broadbent (L) and Kristyn Decker chat as they arrive at the U.S. Federal Courthouse to observe a hearing in Salt Lake City, Utah January 17, 2013. Members of the Brown family, who are polygamists and were made famous by the television show "Sister Wives", are suing Utah on the grounds that the state's bigamy laws are unconstitutional. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW POLITICS) 
USA-POLYGAMY/SISTERWIVES
RTR3CKX9 
January 18, 2013 
Kristyn Decker, a former polygamist wife, talks to the media as she arrives at the U.S. Federal Courthouse... 
Salt Lake City, UNITED STATES 
Decker, a former polygamist wife, talks to the media as she arrives at the U.S. Federal Courthouse to... 
Kristyn Decker, a former polygamist wife, talks to the media as she arrives at the U.S. Federal Courthouse to observe a hearing in Salt Lake City, Utah January 17, 2013. Members of the Brown family, who are polygamists and were made famous by the television show "Sister Wives", are suing Utah on the grounds that the state's bigamy laws are unconstitutional. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW POLITICS) 
USA-POLYGAMY/SISTERWIVES
RTR3CKX8 
January 18, 2013 
Kristyn Decker, a former polygamist wife, arrives at the U.S. Federal Courthouse to observe a hearing... 
Salt Lake City, UNITED STATES 
Decker, a former polygamist wife, arrives at the U.S. Federal Courthouse to observe a hearing in Salt... 
Kristyn Decker, a former polygamist wife, arrives at the U.S. Federal Courthouse to observe a hearing in Salt Lake City, Utah January 17, 2013. Members of the Brown family, who are polygamists and were made famous by the television show "Sister Wives", are suing Utah on the grounds that the state's bigamy laws are unconstitutional. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW POLITICS) 
USA-POLYGAMY/SISTERWIVES
RTR3CKX3 
January 18, 2013 
Attorney Jonathan Turley, attorney for the Brown family made famous by the television show "Sister Wives",... 
Salt Lake City, UNITED STATES 
Attorney Turley, attorney for the Brown family made famous by the television show "Sister Wives", exits... 
Attorney Jonathan Turley, attorney for the Brown family made famous by the television show "Sister Wives", exits the U.S. Federal Courthouse after a hearing in Salt Lake City, Utah January 17, 2013. The Brown's, who are polygamists, are suing Utah on the grounds that the state's bigamy laws are unconstitutional. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW POLITICS) 
USA-POLYGAMY/SISTERWIVES
RTR3CKX2 
January 18, 2013 
Attorney Jonathan Turley, attorney for the Brown family made famous by the television show "Sister Wives",... 
Salt Lake City, UNITED STATES 
Attorney Turley, attorney for the Brown family made famous by the television show "Sister Wives", talks... 
Attorney Jonathan Turley, attorney for the Brown family made famous by the television show "Sister Wives", talks to the media in front of the U.S. Federal Courthouse after a hearing in Salt Lake City, Utah January 17, 2013. The Brown's, who are polygamists, are suing Utah on the grounds that the state's bigamy laws are unconstitutional. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY CRIME LAW POLITICS) 
USA/
RTR3AG7Z 
November 15, 2012 
Homes emerge from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The... 
Moab, UNITED STATES 
Homes emerge from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab 
Homes emerge from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT) 
USA/
RTR3AG7W 
November 15, 2012 
Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, harvests a beet from the community garden... 
Moab, UNITED STATES 
Enoch Foster harvests a beet from the community garden at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab 
Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, harvests a beet from the community garden at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 3, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE FOOD) 
USA/
RTR3AG7V 
November 15, 2012 
Bradee Barlow, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, (L),shops with her sister-wife Betsy Barlow... 
Moab, UNITED STATES 
Bradee Barlow shops with her sister wife Betsy Barlow in the store room at the Rockland Ranch community... 
Bradee Barlow, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, (L),shops with her sister-wife Betsy Barlow in the store room at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT FOOD) 
USA/
RTR3AEYK 
November 14, 2012 
Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, prays before a meal with his first wife Catrina... 
Moab, UNITED STATES 
Enoch Foster prays before a meal with his first wife Catrina Foster in their home blasted from a rock... 
Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, prays before a meal with his first wife Catrina Foster, second from left, and several of his 13 children from two wives in their home blasted from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY) 
USA/
RTR3AEYJ 
November 14, 2012 
Evangelina Foster, whose parents are fundamentalist Mormons practicing polygamy, eats dinner at her home... 
Moab, UNITED STATES 
Evangelina Foster eats dinner at her home blasted from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside... 
Evangelina Foster, whose parents are fundamentalist Mormons practicing polygamy, eats dinner at her home blasted from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY) 
USA/
RTR3AEYH 
November 14, 2012 
A bible scripture hangs on the wall as Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, eats... 
Moab, UNITED STATES 
A bible scripture hangs on the wall as Enoch Foster eats dinner in their home blasted a rock wall at... 
A bible scripture hangs on the wall as Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, eats dinner in their home blasted from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY) 
USA/
RTR3AEYG 
November 14, 2012 
Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, left, prepares dinner with his first wife... 
Moab, UNITED STATES 
Enoch Foster prepares dinner with his first wife Catrina Foster in their home blasted from a rock wall... 
Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, left, prepares dinner with his first wife Catrina Foster and their daughter Evangelina, 1, the youngest of several of his 13 children from his two wives, in their home blasted from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) 
USA/
RTR3AEYF 
November 14, 2012 
Bradee Barlow, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, holds her newborn daughter Lucy while she... 
Moab, UNITED STATES 
Bradee Barlow holds her newborn daughter Lucy while she shops at the store room at the Rockland Ranch... 
Bradee Barlow, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, holds her newborn daughter Lucy while she shops at the store room at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY FOOD) 
USA/
RTR3AEYE 
November 14, 2012 
Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, visits with several of his 13 children from... 
Moab, UNITED STATES 
Enoch Foster visits with several of his 13 children from two wives in their home blasted from a rock... 
Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, visits with several of his 13 children from two wives in their home blasted from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY) 
USA/
RTR3AEYD 
November 14, 2012 
Catrina Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, brushes her daughter Christa Foster's hair,... 
Moab, UNITED STATES 
Catrina Foster brushes her daughter's hair in their home blasted from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch... 
Catrina Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, brushes her daughter Christa Foster's hair, 9, in their home blasted from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 3, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 3, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT) 
USA/
RTR3AEYC 
November 14, 2012 
Suzanne Morrison, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, sorts potatoes from the community garden... 
Moab, UNITED STATES 
Suzanne Morrison sorts potatoes from the community garden at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab... 
Suzanne Morrison, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, sorts potatoes from the community garden with her daughter Eve, 2, at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 3, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 3, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE FOOD) 
USA/
RTR3AEYB 
November 14, 2012 
Melinda Gilbert and her husband Brian Gilbert, fundamentalist Mormons who are monogamous, harvest potatoes... 
Moab, UNITED STATES 
Melinda Gilbert, left, and her husband Brian Gilbert harvests potatoes at the Rockland Ranch community... 
Melinda Gilbert and her husband Brian Gilbert, fundamentalist Mormons who are monogamous, harvest potatoes at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 3, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 3, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE FOOD) 
USA/
RTR3AEYA 
November 14, 2012 
Girls play on a trampoline near a home blasted from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside... 
Moab, UNITED STATES 
Girls play on a trampoline near a home blasted from a from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community... 
Girls play on a trampoline near a home blasted from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) 
USA/
RTR3AEY9 
November 14, 2012 
Fundamentalist Mormons, some of whom are monogamous and others who are practicing polygamy, harvest the... 
Moab, UNITED STATES 
Fundamentalist Mormons harvest the community garden along with their children at the Rockland Ranch community... 
Fundamentalist Mormons, some of whom are monogamous and others who are practicing polygamy, harvest the community garden along with their children at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 3, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 3, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE FOOD) 
USA/
RTR3AEY8 
November 14, 2012 
Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, walks with his first wife Catrina Foster and... 
Moab, UNITED STATES 
Enoch Foster walks with his first wife Catrina Foster and several of his 13 children at the Rockland... 
Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, walks with his first wife Catrina Foster and several of his 13 children from his two wives at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT) 
USA/
RTR3AEY7 
November 14, 2012 
Moroni Foster, 13, whose family are fundamentalist Mormons practicing polygamy, holds a beet he collected... 
Moab, UNITED STATES 
Moroni Foster holds a beet he collected from the community garden at the Rockland Ranch community outside... 
Moroni Foster, 13, whose family are fundamentalist Mormons practicing polygamy, holds a beet he collected from the community garden at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE FOOD) 
USA/
RTR3AEY5 
November 14, 2012 
Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, along with his first wife Catrina Foster and... 
Moab, UNITED STATES 
Enoch Foster along with his first wife Catrina Foster and several of his 13 children enters the Charity... 
Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, along with his first wife Catrina Foster and several of his 13 children from his two wives, enter the Charity House at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT) 
USA/
RTR3AEY4 
November 14, 2012 
Cary Knecht, a fundamentalist Mormon who is monogamous, (L), harvests potatoes with Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist... 
Moab, UNITED STATES 
Cary Knecht harvest potatoes with Enoch Foster at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab 
Cary Knecht, a fundamentalist Mormon who is monogamous, (L), harvests potatoes with Enoch Foster, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 3, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 3, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE FOOD) 
USA/
RTR3AEY0 
November 14, 2012 
Fundamentalist Mormons, some of whom are monogamous and others who practice polygamy, harvest the community... 
Moab, UNITED STATES 
Fundamentalist Mormons harvest the community garden at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab 
Fundamentalist Mormons, some of whom are monogamous and others who practice polygamy, harvest the community garden along with their children at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 3, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 3, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS AGRICULTURE) 
USA/
RTR3AEXX 
November 14, 2012 
Anna Knecht, a fundamentalist Mormon who is monogamous, tends to her newborn daughter Evahny Knecht,... 
Moab, UNITED STATES 
Anna Knecht tends to her newborn daughter at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab 
Anna Knecht, a fundamentalist Mormon who is monogamous, tends to her newborn daughter Evahny Knecht, at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 3, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 3, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) 
USA/
RTR3AEXU 
November 14, 2012 
Suzanne Morrison, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, (2nd L) harvests beets with her daughter... 
Moab, UNITED STATES 
Suzanne Morrison harvests beets at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab 
Suzanne Morrison, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, (2nd L) harvests beets with her daughter Sophia Morrison, 8, (L), and Melinda Gilbert, a fundamentalist Mormon who is monogamous, at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 3, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 3, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE FOOD) 
USA/
RTR3AEXT 
November 14, 2012 
Homes emerge from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The... 
Moab, UNITED STATES 
Homes emerge from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab 
Homes emerge from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT) 
USA/
RTR3AEXQ 
November 14, 2012 
Abel Morrison, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, tends to a community garden with several... 
Moab, UNITED STATES 
Abel Morrison tends to a community garden at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab 
Abel Morrison, a fundamentalist Mormon practicing polygamy, tends to a community garden with several of his children at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The "Rock" as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. Polygamy was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was brought to Utah by faithful Mormons in the late 1840s. The mainstream Mormon church abandoned the practice in 1890, but an estimated 37,000 Mormon fundamentalists continue the practice today and believe plural marriage brings exaltation in heaven. Picture taken November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT) 
CANADA-POLYGAMY/
RTR2UDXU 
November 23, 2011 
Lawyer John Ince, legal counsel for the Canadian Polyamory Advocacy Association, walks out of the B.C... 
Vancouver, Canada 
Lawyer Ince walks out of the B.C Supreme Court in Vancouver 
Lawyer John Ince, legal counsel for the Canadian Polyamory Advocacy Association, walks out of the B.C Supreme Court in Vancouver November 23, 2011. A Canadian provincial court on Wednesday upheld the country's ban on polygamy, saying that the harm that polygamy causes to women and children outweighed any infringement of religious freedoms. REUTERS/Ben Nelms (CANADA - Tags: POLITICS RELIGION SOCIETY) 
CANADA-POLYGAMY/
RTR2UDXS 
November 23, 2011 
Lawyer George Macintosh, court appointed lawyer for pro-polygamist groups, answers questions from the... 
Vancouver, Canada 
Lawyer Macintosh answers questions from the media outside the B.C Supreme Court in Vancouver 
Lawyer George Macintosh, court appointed lawyer for pro-polygamist groups, answers questions from the media outside the B.C Supreme Court in Vancouver November 23, 2011. A Canadian provincial court on Wednesday upheld the country's ban on polygamy, saying that the harm that polygamy causes to women and children outweighed any infringement of religious freedoms. REUTERS/Ben Nelms (CANADA - Tags: POLITICS RELIGION SOCIETY) 
CANADA-POLYGAMY/
RTR2UDXR 
November 23, 2011 
Lawyer George Macintosh (L), court appointed lawyer for pro-polygamist groups, stands outside the B.C... 
Vancouver, Canada 
Lawyer Macintosh stands outside the B.C Supreme Court in Vancouver 
Lawyer George Macintosh (L), court appointed lawyer for pro-polygamist groups, stands outside the B.C Supreme Court in Vancouver November 23, 2011. A Canadian provincial court on Wednesday upheld the country's ban on polygamy, saying that the harm that polygamy causes to women and children outweighed any infringement of religious freedoms. REUTERS/Ben Nelms (CANADA - Tags: POLITICS RELIGION SOCIETY) 
INDIA/
RTR2TQVE 
November 08, 2011 
Ziona, 67, poses for a picture at the construction site of a church in Baktawng village in the northeastern... 
BAKTAWNG, India 
Ziona poses for a picture in Baktawng village in the northeastern Indian state of Mizoram 
Ziona, 67, poses for a picture at the construction site of a church in Baktawng village in the northeastern Indian state of Mizoram October 5, 2011. Ziona is the head of a religious sect called "Chana," which allows polygamy and was founded by his father Chana in 1942. Ziona has 39 wives, 94 children and 33 grandchildren. He lives in his four storey 100-room house with 181 members of his family. The world's population will reach seven billion on 31 October 2011, according to projections by the United Nations. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY) 
INDIA
RTR2SW4H 
October 20, 2011 
ATTN EDITORS: IMAGE 51 OF 50 OF PICTURE PACKAGE '7 BILLION, 7 STORIES - THE WORLD'S LARGEST FAMILY'.... 
BAKTAWNG, India 
A combination picture shows 28 of 39 wives of Ziona the head of a religious sect called Chana in india... 
ATTN EDITORS: IMAGE 51 OF 50 OF PICTURE PACKAGE '7 BILLION, 7 STORIES - THE WORLD'S LARGEST FAMILY'. SEARCH 'BAKTAWNG' TO SEE ALL IMAGES
A combination picture shows 28 of the wives of Ziona at their residence in Baktawng village in the northeastern Indian state of Mizoram, October 7, 2011. Ziona is the head of a religious sect called "Chana," which allows polygamy and was founded by his father Chana in 1942. Ziona has 39 wives, 94 children and 33 grandchildren. He lives in his 4 storey 100-room house with 181 members of his family. The world's population will reach seven billion on 31 October 2011, according to projections by the United Nations. Picture taken October 7, 2011. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY) 
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