Ajax loader
By using our website, you agree to our use of cookies as described in Cookie Policy.

Can't find what you're looking for?

 

Be sure to Sign in to see all available content.

 

If you don't have an account, Register here.

Search results for: Poorly-paid-work

BRAZIL/
RTR2RYZ6
September 28, 2011
A Haitian man cleans a car window in Manaus September 21, 2011. Since the January 12, 2010 earthquake...
Manaus, Brazil
A Haitian man cleans a car window in Manaus
A Haitian man cleans a car window in Manaus September 21, 2011. Since the January 12, 2010 earthquake that killed around 250,000 people in Haiti, hundreds of Haitians have been migrating to Brazil via Peru and Ecuador. According to the Pastoral do Migrante, a Catholic entity that helps Haitians seeking refugee status in Brazil, there are more than 2,000 Haitians in the Amazonas State region of Brazil, with only around 400 having managed to acquire resident visas from the government. Most work in construction and in factories, earning little more than the minimum wage of $300 monthly, leaving them little or no money to send home to family in Haiti, according to the Association of Haitian Workers in Manaus. Picture taken on September 21, 2011. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: DISASTER SOCIETY IMMIGRATION TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
PAKISTAN-GUARDS/
RTX8TPN
September 23, 2008
Jamshed Akhtar, husband of Shabnam Jamshed who died in a suicide bomb blast at Marriott Hotel, is seen...
Islamabad, Pakistan
Akhtar, husband of Shabnam Jamshed who died in suicide bomb blast at Marriott Hotel, is seen in Islamabad...
Jamshed Akhtar, husband of Shabnam Jamshed who died in a suicide bomb blast at Marriott Hotel, is seen in Islamabad September 23, 2008. Shabnam was one of 53 people killed when a suicide truck bomber attacked Islamabad's Marriott Hotel, where she worked as a guard. The killing of Shabnam, and all of her colleagues who stopped the bomber getting right up to the hotel, has highlighted the danger facing Pakistan's poorly paid and barely trained private security guards. REUTERS/Faisal Mahmood (PAKISTAN)
MEXICO/
RTR1Q28Y
May 24, 2007
Police officers stand outside the police headquarters in the suburb of Santa Catarina, Monterrey May...
Monterrey, Mexico
Police officers stand outside police headquarters after refusing to work in Monterrey
Police officers stand outside the police headquarters in the suburb of Santa Catarina, Monterrey May 24, 2007 after refusing to work, demanding more pay and protection due to increased attacks by drug hitmen. Mexico's poorly paid and undertrained police are often accused of working for wealthy drug traffickers, who corrupt them with offers of "money or death" cash backed by threats of violence. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO)
MEXICO/
RTR1Q28I
May 24, 2007
Police officers stand outside the police headquarters in the suburb of Santa Catarina, Monterrey May...
Monterrey, Mexico
Police officers stand outside police headquarters after refusing to work in Monterrey
Police officers stand outside the police headquarters in the suburb of Santa Catarina, Monterrey May 24, 2007 after refusing to work, demanding more pay and protection due to increased attacks by drug hitmen. Mexico's poorly paid and undertrained police are often accused of working for wealthy drug traffickers, who corrupt them with offers of "money or death" cash backed by threats of violence. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO)
MEXICO/
RTR1Q28A
May 24, 2007
Police officers stand outside the police headquarters in the suburb of Santa Catarina, Monterrey May...
Monterrey, Mexico
Police officers stand outside police headquarters after refusing to work in Monterrey
Police officers stand outside the police headquarters in the suburb of Santa Catarina, Monterrey May 24, 2007 after refusing to work, demanding more pay and protection due to increased attacks by drug hitmen. Mexico's poorly paid and undertrained police are often accused of working for wealthy drug traffickers, who corrupt them with offers of "money or death" cash backed by threats of violence. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO)
RTRTWZ
October 10, 1996
Brazilian President Fernando Henrique Cardoso and his wife Ruth are handed October 10 a symbolic machete...
Brazil
CARDOSO AND HIS WIFE ARE HANDED A SYMBOLIC MACHETE BY TWO CHILD WORKERS
Brazilian President Fernando Henrique Cardoso and his wife Ruth are handed October 10 a symbolic machete by two child workers, Jose Carlos Bezerra (L) and Debora Alves da Silva. Cardoso sent a bill to Congress that would ban the employment of children up to the age of 14. Human rights groups say some 3.5 million Brazilian children work in sugar cane fields, coal factories and other poorly-paid industries.

RIGHTS BRAZIL
Sort by
Display
Items per page
Page
of 1