Ajax loader

Can't find what you're looking for?

 

Be sure to Sign in to see all available content.

 

If you don't have an account, Register here.

Search results for: Power-tool

MYANMAR-CHINA/JADE
RTX1YVEO 
December 16, 2015 
Miners search for jade stones at a mine dump at a Hpakant jade mine in Kachin state, Myanmar November... 
Yangon, Myanmar 
Miners search for jade stones at a mine dump at a Hpakant jade mine in Kachin state 
Miners search for jade stones at a mine dump at a Hpakant jade mine in Kachin state, Myanmar November 27, 2015. Using heavy earth-excavators and explosives, miners have been tearing into Myanmar's northern hills in recent months, in a rush to excavate more jade from the world's richest deposits of the gemstone before a new government takes office next year. Picture taken November 27, 2015. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun 
MYANMAR-CHINA/JADE
RTX1YVEL 
December 16, 2015 
Miners search for jade stones at a mine dump at a Hpakant jade mine in Kachin state, Myanmar November... 
Yangon, Myanmar 
Miners search for jade stones at a mine dump at a Hpakant jade mine in Kachin state 
Miners search for jade stones at a mine dump at a Hpakant jade mine in Kachin state, Myanmar November 27, 2015. Using heavy earth-excavators and explosives, miners have been tearing into Myanmar's northern hills in recent months, in a rush to excavate more jade from the world's richest deposits of the gemstone before a new government takes office next year. Picture taken November 27, 2015. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun 
INDIA-ECONOMY-GDP-GROWTH
RTX1WIWH 
November 30, 2015 
Labourers work at the construction site of a bridge being built for metro rail in New Delhi, India, November... 
New Delhi, India 
Labourers work at the construction site of a bridge being built for metro rail in New Delhi 
Labourers work at the construction site of a bridge being built for metro rail in New Delhi, India, November 30, 2015. REUTERS/Anindito Mukherjee 
INDIA-ECONOMY-GDP-GROWTH
RTX1WIWG 
November 30, 2015 
Labourers work at the construction site of a bridge being built for metro rail in New Delhi, India, November... 
New Delhi, India 
Labourers work at the construction site of a bridge being built for metro rail in New Delhi 
Labourers work at the construction site of a bridge being built for metro rail in New Delhi, India, November 30, 2015. REUTERS/Anindito Mukherjee TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
CANADA-CFL/
RTX1WEP9 
November 29, 2015 
Members of the Ottawa Redblack's "Chainsaw Squad," pose on the sidelines prior to the the CFL's 103rd... 
Winnipeg, Canada 
Members of the Ottawa Redblack's "Chainsaw Squad," pose on the sidelines prior to the the CFL's 103rd... 
Members of the Ottawa Redblack's "Chainsaw Squad," pose on the sidelines prior to the the CFL's 103rd Grey Cup championship football game between the Redblacks and the Edmonton Eskimos in Winnipeg, Manitoba, November 29, 2015. REUTERS/Mark Blinch 
CANADA-CFL/
RTX1WEP7 
November 29, 2015 
Nikki Domingo, a member of the Ottawa Redblack's "Chainsaw Squad," poses on the sidelines prior to the... 
Winnipeg, Canada 
A member of the Ottawa Redblack's "Chainsaw Squad," poses on the sidelines prior to the the CFL's 103rd... 
Nikki Domingo, a member of the Ottawa Redblack's "Chainsaw Squad," poses on the sidelines prior to the the CFL's 103rd Grey Cup championship football game between the Redblacks and the Edmonton Eskimos in Winnipeg, Manitoba, November 29, 2015. REUTERS/Mark Blinch 
CLIMATECHANGE-SUMMIT/FRANCE
RTX1VXH2 
November 26, 2015 
Meteorology measuring instruments are pictured at Meteo-France Toulouse site, called Meteopole, outside... 
Toulouse, France 
Meteorology measuring instruments are pictured at Meteo-France Toulouse site, called Meteopole, outside... 
Meteorology measuring instruments are pictured at Meteo-France Toulouse site, called Meteopole, outside the city of Toulouse, France, November 3, 2015. With two of the most powerful supercomputers in the world, French national meteorological service Meteo France participates in the international scientific work on climate change, on which is based the negotiations of the Climate Conference (COP21). Paris will host the World Climate Change Conference 2015 (COP21) from November 30 to December 11. Picture taken November 3, 2015. REUTERS/Fred Lancelot
CLIMATECHANGE-SUMMIT/FRANCE
RTX1VXGG 
November 26, 2015 
Meteorology measuring instruments are pictured at Meteo-France Toulouse site, called Meteopole, outside... 
Toulouse, France 
Meteorology measuring instruments are pictured at Meteo-France Toulouse site, called Meteopole, outside... 
Meteorology measuring instruments are pictured at Meteo-France Toulouse site, called Meteopole, outside the city of Toulouse, France, November 3, 2015. With two of the most powerful supercomputers in the world, French national meteorological service Meteo France participates in the international scientific work on climate change, on which is based the negotiations of the Climate Conference (COP21). Paris will host the World Climate Change Conference 2015 (COP21) from November 30 to December 11. Picture taken November 3, 2015. REUTERS/Fred Lancelot
CHINA-COAL/JIXI
RTX1USJC 
November 04, 2015 
A worker cleans the carriage of a coal train outside a coal mine of the state-owned Longmay Group on... 
JIXI, China 
A worker cleans the carriage of a coal train outside a coal mine of the state-owned Longmay Group on... 
A worker cleans the carriage of a coal train outside a coal mine of the state-owned Longmay Group on the outskirts of Jixi, in Heilongjiang province, China, October 22, 2015. To match story CHINA-COAL/JIXI Picture taken on October 22, 2015. REUTERS/Jason Lee 
CHINA-COAL/JIXI
RTX1USJ9 
November 04, 2015 
A villager is pictured as she selects coal at local businessman Sun Meng's small coal depot near a coal... 
JIXI, China 
A villager is pictured as she selects coal at local businessman Sun Meng's small coal depot on the outskirts... 
A villager is pictured as she selects coal at local businessman Sun Meng's small coal depot near a coal mine of the state-owned Longmay Group on the outskirts of Jixi, in Heilongjiang province, China, October 23, 2015. To match story CHINA-COAL/JIXI Picture taken on October 23, 2015. REUTERS/Jason Lee 
CHINA-COAL/JIXI
RTX1USHT 
November 04, 2015 
A worker speaks as he loads coal on a truck at a depot near a coal mine from the state-owned Longmay... 
JIXI, China 
A worker speaks as he loads coal on a truck at a depot near a coal mine from the state-owned Longmay... 
A worker speaks as he loads coal on a truck at a depot near a coal mine from the state-owned Longmay Group on the outskirts of Jixi, in Heilongjiang province, China, October 24, 2015. To match story CHINA-COAL/JIXI Picture taken on October 24, 2015. REUTERS/Jason Lee 
CHINA-COAL/JIXI
RTX1USH7 
November 04, 2015 
A villager moves coal at local businessman Sun Meng's small coal depot near a coal mine of the state-owned... 
JIXI, China 
A villager moves coal at a local businessman Sun Meng's small coal depot near a coal mine on the outskirts... 
A villager moves coal at local businessman Sun Meng's small coal depot near a coal mine of the state-owned Longmay Group on the outskirts of Jixi, in Heilongjiang province, China, October 23, 2015. To match story CHINA-COAL/JIXI Picture taken on October 23, 2015. REUTERS/Jason Lee 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTX64RUB 
October 21, 2015 
Members of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) play a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Members of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) play a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds in Mathare valley slums in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 9, 2015. FIFA selected the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA), a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFAââ¬â¢s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurichââ¬â¢s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccerââ¬â¢s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFAââ¬â¢s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 21 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES
Picture Supplied by Action Images 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTX5MLAY 
October 21, 2015 
A goalkeeper attempts to stop a ball during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A goalkeeper attempts to stop a ball during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds in Mathare valley slums in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 9, 2015. FIFA selected the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA), a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFAââ¬â¢s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurichââ¬â¢s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccerââ¬â¢s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFAââ¬â¢s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 23 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES
Picture Supplied by Action Images 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTX5ML6V 
October 21, 2015 
A girl stands as a goalkeeper during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A girl stands as a goalkeeper during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds in Mathare valley slums in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 9, 2015. FIFA selected the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA), a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFAââ¬â¢s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurichââ¬â¢s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccerââ¬â¢s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFAââ¬â¢s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya TPX IMAGES OF THE DAYPICTURE 25 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES
Picture Supplied by Action Images 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTX5H31T 
October 21, 2015 
A goalkeeper holds a ball during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds in Mathare... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A goalkeeper holds a ball during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds in Mathare valley slums in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 9, 2015. FIFA selected the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA), a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFAââ¬â¢s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurichââ¬â¢s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccerââ¬â¢s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFAââ¬â¢s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 20 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES
Picture Supplied by Action Images 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTX5D7LV 
October 21, 2015 
A goalkeeper attempts to stop a ball during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A goalkeeper attempts to stop a ball during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds in Mathare valley slums in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 9, 2015. FIFA selected the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA), a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFAââ¬â¢s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurichââ¬â¢s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccerââ¬â¢s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFAââ¬â¢s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 23 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES
Picture Supplied by Action Images 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTX4WEF3 
October 21, 2015 
A member of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) works out at the Mathare Football for Hope Centre... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A member of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) works out at the Mathare Football for Hope Centre in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 10, 2015. FIFA selected the MYSA, a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFAââ¬â¢s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurichââ¬â¢s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccerââ¬â¢s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFAââ¬â¢s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 22 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES
Picture Supplied by Action Images 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTX4SIF3 
October 21, 2015 
A member of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) runs at the Mathare Football for Hope Centre... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A member of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) runs at the Mathare Football for Hope Centre in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 10, 2015. FIFA selected the MYSA, a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFAââ¬â¢s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurichââ¬â¢s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccerââ¬â¢s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFAââ¬â¢s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 26 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES
Picture Supplied by Action Images 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTX4EAZ8 
October 21, 2015 
Members of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) play a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Members of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) play a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA sponsored grounds in Mathare valley slums in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 9, 2015. FIFA selected the MYSA, a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFAââ¬â¢s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurichââ¬â¢s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccerââ¬â¢s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFAââ¬â¢s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 27 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES
Picture Supplied by Action Images 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTX45TWZ 
October 21, 2015 
A boy attempts to score between makeshift goalposts during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A boy attempts to score between makeshift goalposts during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds in Mathare valley slums in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 9, 2015. FIFA selected the Mathare Youth Sports Association, a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFAââ¬â¢s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurichââ¬â¢s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccerââ¬â¢s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFAââ¬â¢s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 24 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES
Picture Supplied by Action Images 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTX3X1IF 
October 21, 2015 
A boy attempts to score between makeshift goalposts during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A boy attempts to score between makeshift goalposts during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds in Mathare valley slums in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 9, 2015. FIFA selected the Mathare Youth Sports Association, a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFAââ¬â¢s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurichââ¬â¢s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccerââ¬â¢s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFAââ¬â¢s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 24 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES
Picture Supplied by Action Images 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTX3J0YY 
October 21, 2015 
A member of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) works out at the Mathare Football for Hope Centre... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A member of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) works out at the Mathare Football for Hope Centre in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 10, 2015. FIFA selected the MYSA, a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFAââ¬â¢s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurichââ¬â¢s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccerââ¬â¢s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFAââ¬â¢s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 22 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES
Picture Supplied by Action Images 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5F05 
October 21, 2015 
A girl stands as a goalkeeper during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A girl stands as a goalkeeper during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds in Mathare valley slums in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 9, 2015. FIFA selected the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA), a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya TPX IMAGES OF THE DAYPICTURE 25 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5F04 
October 21, 2015 
Members of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) play a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Members of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) play a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA sponsored grounds in Mathare valley slums in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 9, 2015. FIFA selected the MYSA, a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 27 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5F01 
October 21, 2015 
A member of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) runs at the Mathare Football for Hope Centre... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A member of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) runs at the Mathare Football for Hope Centre in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 10, 2015. FIFA selected the MYSA, a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 26 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5F00 
October 21, 2015 
Amateur footballers take part in a training session at the FIFA-funded pitch in Abuja, Nigeria, September... 
Abuja, Nigeria 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Amateur footballers take part in a training session at the FIFA-funded pitch in Abuja, Nigeria, September 17, 2015. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Afolabi SotundePICTURE 30 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZY 
October 21, 2015 
Amateur footballers are seen through the goal netting during a training session at the FIFA-funded pitch... 
Abuja, Nigeria 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Amateur footballers are seen through the goal netting during a training session at the FIFA-funded pitch in Abuja September 17, 2015. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde TPX IMAGES OF THE DAYPICTURE 31 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZU 
October 21, 2015 
A newly trained female football coach speaks with children during the launch of a community grassroots... 
Jinja, Uganda 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A newly trained female football coach speaks with children during the launch of a community grassroots football training session September 22, 2015 at the technical training centre built with funding from FIFA in conjunction with local football governing body, Federation of Uganda Football Association (FUFA), in Njeru, Jinja district, eastern Uganda. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/James AkenaPICTURE 17 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZR 
October 21, 2015 
A man displays sport merchandise on a car bonnet near the FIFA-funded training pitch in Abuja, Nigeria,... 
Abuja, Nigeria 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A man displays sport merchandise on a car bonnet near the FIFA-funded training pitch in Abuja, Nigeria, September 17, 2015. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Afolabi SotundePICTURE 29 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZQ 
October 21, 2015 
A goalkeeper holds a ball during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds in Mathare... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A goalkeeper holds a ball during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds in Mathare valley slums in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 9, 2015. FIFA selected the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA), a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 20 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZN 
October 21, 2015 
A training facility built with FIFA funding is seen at the national stadium complex in Abuja, Nigeria... 
Abuja, Nigeria 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A training facility built with FIFA funding is seen at the national stadium complex in Abuja, Nigeria September 17, 2015. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Afolabi SotundePICTURE 28 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZI 
October 21, 2015 
A goalkeeper attempts to stop a ball during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A goalkeeper attempts to stop a ball during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds in Mathare valley slums in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 9, 2015. FIFA selected the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA), a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 23 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZH 
October 21, 2015 
Members of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) play a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Members of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) play a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds in Mathare valley slums in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 9, 2015. FIFA selected the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA), a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 21 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZE 
October 21, 2015 
A boy attempts to score between makeshift goalposts during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A boy attempts to score between makeshift goalposts during a soccer match at a dusty pitch near the FIFA-sponsored grounds in Mathare valley slums in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 9, 2015. FIFA selected the Mathare Youth Sports Association, a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 24 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZD 
October 21, 2015 
The administrative building of the CNTF (Football National Technical Centre) is seen in Bingerville,... 
BINGERVILLE, Ivory Coast 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
The administrative building of the CNTF (Football National Technical Centre) is seen in Bingerville, Ivory Coast, June 10, 2015. CNTF's synthetic turf was funded in part by FIFA through its Goal Project 5. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thierry Gouegnon PICTURE 18 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZC 
October 21, 2015 
Ivory Coast's national soccer team player Eric Bahi takes a break from training at the CNTF (Football... 
BINGERVILLE, Ivory Coast 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Ivory Coast's national soccer team player Eric Bahi takes a break from training at the CNTF (Football National Technical Centre) in Bingerville, Ivory Coast, June 10, 2015. CNTF's synthetic turf was funded in part by FIFA through its Goal Project 5. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thierry Gouegnon PICTURE 19 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZA 
October 21, 2015 
A member of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) works out at the Mathare Football for Hope Centre... 
Nairobi, Kenya 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A member of the Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA) works out at the Mathare Football for Hope Centre in Kenya's capital Nairobi, July 10, 2015. FIFA selected the MYSA, a local youth programme that connects sports with community activities including environmental development, AIDS prevention and leadership training, to be in charge of the FIFA sporting centre of excellence. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaPICTURE 22 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZ7 
October 21, 2015 
Footballs are seen on the edge of the training field September 22, 2015 at the technical training centre... 
Jinja, Uganda 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Footballs are seen on the edge of the training field September 22, 2015 at the technical training centre built with funding from FIFA in conjunction with local football governing body, Federation of Uganda Football Association (FUFA), in Njeru, Jinja district, eastern Uganda. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/James AkenaPICTURE 13 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZ6 
October 21, 2015 
A view of a dining a room at the football technical training centre, September 22, 2015, built with funding... 
NJERU, Uganda 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A view of a dining a room at the football technical training centre, September 22, 2015, built with funding from FIFA in conjunction with local football governing body, Federation of Uganda Football Association (FUFA) in Njeru, Jinja district, eastern Uganda. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/James AkenaPICTURE 11 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZ5 
October 21, 2015 
A young boy plays with a ball during a training session before a soccer match at Rufaro Stadium in Harare,... 
Harare, Zimbabwe 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A young boy plays with a ball during a training session before a soccer match at Rufaro Stadium in Harare, September 26, 2015. Rufaro is Zimbabwe's oldest stadium and the only one with artificial turf. The turf was installed by FIFA as part of its development programme in 2011. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Philimon Bulawayo PICTURE 9 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EZ3 
October 21, 2015 
Young Zimbawean boys practise their soocer skills during a training session at Rufaro Football Stadium... 
Harare, Zimbabwe 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Young Zimbawean boys practise their soocer skills during a training session at Rufaro Football Stadium in Harare, September 26, 2015. Rufaro is Zimbabwe's oldest stadium and the only one with artificial turf. The turf was installed by FIFA as part of its development programme in 2011. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Philimon BulawayoPICTURE 10 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EYZ 
October 21, 2015 
Youths play soccer on an artificial pitch at the Football Centre for Hope in Cape Town's Khayelitsha... 
Cape Town, South Africa 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Youths play soccer on an artificial pitch at the Football Centre for Hope in Cape Town's Khayelitsha township, June 26, 2015. The centre, one of several built by FIFA in South Africa in the run-up to the 2010 Soccer World Cup, aims to develop the sport and tackle youth issues in the impoverished township. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Mike HutchingsPICTURE 1 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EYY 
October 21, 2015 
Newly trained football coaches have lunch as they watch soccer on television September 22, 2015 at the... 
Jinja, Uganda 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Newly trained football coaches have lunch as they watch soccer on television September 22, 2015 at the technical training centre built with funding from FIFA in conjunction with local football governing body, Federation of Uganda Football Association (FUFA), in Njeru, Jinja district, eastern Uganda. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/James AkenaPICTURE 12 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EYX 
October 21, 2015 
Children walk across a football field wearing FIFA bibs during the launch of a grassroots football training... 
Jinja, Uganda 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Children walk across a football field wearing FIFA bibs during the launch of a grassroots football training session September 22, 2015 at the technical training centre built with fund from FIFA in conjunction with local football governing body, Federation of Uganda Football Association (FUFA), in Njeru, Jinja district, eastern Uganda. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/James Akena TPX IMAGES OF THE DAYPICTURE 14 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EYO 
October 21, 2015 
Children gather on the football field during the launch of a grassroots football training session September... 
Jinja, Uganda 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Children gather on the football field during the launch of a grassroots football training session September 22, 2015 at the technical training centre built with funding from FIFA in conjunction with local football governing body, Federation of Uganda Football Association (FUFA), in Njeru, Jinja district, eastern Uganda. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/James AkenaPICTURE 16 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EYM 
October 21, 2015 
Children play football during the launch of grassroots football project September 22, 2015 at the technical... 
Jinja, Uganda 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Children play football during the launch of grassroots football project September 22, 2015 at the technical training centre built with funding from FIFA in conjunction with local football governing body, Federation of Uganda Football Association (FUFA), in Njeru, Jinja district, eastern Uganda. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/James AkenaPICTURE 15 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EYH 
October 21, 2015 
A child collects a ball beside an artificial pitch at the Football Centre for Hope in Cape Town's Khayelitsha... 
Cape Town, South Africa 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A child collects a ball beside an artificial pitch at the Football Centre for Hope in Cape Town's Khayelitsha township, June 29, 2015. The centre, one of several built by FIFA in South Africa in the run-up to the 2010 Soccer World Cup, aims to develop the sport and tackle youth issues in the impoverished township. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY PICTURE 2 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EYG 
October 21, 2015 
Youths play soccer on an artificial pitch at the Football Centre for Hope in Cape Town's Khayelitsha... 
Cape Town, South Africa 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Youths play soccer on an artificial pitch at the Football Centre for Hope in Cape Town's Khayelitsha township, June 29, 2015. The centre, one of several built by FIFA in South Africa in the run-up to the 2010 Soccer World Cup, aims to develop the sport and tackle youth issues in the impoverished township. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Mike HutchingsPICTURE 3 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EYD 
October 21, 2015 
Youths play soccer on an artificial pitch at the Football Centre for Hope in Cape Town's Khayelitsha... 
Cape Town, South Africa 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Youths play soccer on an artificial pitch at the Football Centre for Hope in Cape Town's Khayelitsha township, June 29, 2015. The centre, one of several built by FIFA in South Africa in the run-up to the 2010 Soccer World Cup, aims to develop the sport and tackle youth issues in the impoverished township. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Mike HutchingsPICTURE 5 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EY9 
October 21, 2015 
A boy keeps goal as he plays soccer on an artificial pitch at the Football Centre for Hope in Cape Town's... 
Cape Town, South Africa 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A boy keeps goal as he plays soccer on an artificial pitch at the Football Centre for Hope in Cape Town's Khayelitsha township, June 29, 2015. The centre, one of several built by FIFA in South Africa in the run-up to the 2010 Soccer World Cup, aims to develop the sport and tackle youth issues in the impoverished township. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Mike HutchingsPICTURE 6 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EY8 
October 21, 2015 
A young girl practises soccer skills beside an artificial pitch at the Football Centre for Hope in Cape... 
Cape Town, South Africa 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
A young girl practises soccer skills beside an artificial pitch at the Football Centre for Hope in Cape Town's Khayelitsha township, June 29, 2015. The centre, one of several built by FIFA in South Africa in the run-up to the 2010 Soccer World Cup, aims to develop the sport and tackle youth issues in the impoverished township. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Mike HutchingsPICTURE 4 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EY7 
October 21, 2015 
Children play soccer at the Edendale Football for Hope Centre in Pietermaritzburg, June 18, 2015. While... 
Pietermaritzburg, South Africa 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Children play soccer at the Edendale Football for Hope Centre in Pietermaritzburg, June 18, 2015. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Rogan WardPICTURE 7 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EY5 
October 21, 2015 
Children play soccer at the Edendale Football for Hope Centre in Pietermaritzburg, June 18, 2015. While... 
Pietermaritzburg, South Africa 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
Children play soccer at the Edendale Football for Hope Centre in Pietermaritzburg, June 18, 2015. While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Rogan WardPICTURE 8 OF 31 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS". SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL IMAGES 
SOCCER-FIFA/DEVELOPMENT
RTS5EY3 
October 21, 2015 
While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing... 
Cape Town, South Africa 
The Wider Image: FIFA's African Grassroots 
While some criticise FIFA’s flow of cash to Africa and other developing regions as a tool that departing leader Sepp Blatter used to build his electoral power base, many nations depend on that cash from Zurich’s coffers to help fund national soccer facilities in the absence of sponsors or government support. And as soccer’s world governing body, engulfed in the worst crisis in its 111-year history, focuses on cleaning up its house, there are those within the sport who fear the emphasis on internal reform could undermine FIFA’s commitment to international development programmes. That, they say, must not happen. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY ATTENTION EDITORS - WIDER IMAGE STORY "FIFA'S AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOLLOWS THIS ADVISORY. SEARCH "AFRICAN GRASSROOTS" FOR ALL 31 IMAGES 
BOSNIA-ACCIDENT-MINE/
RTS49LK 
October 13, 2015 
A miner leaves coal mine Haljinici in Kakanj, Bosnia and Herzegovina October 13, 2015. Four miners were... 
Kakanj, Bosnia and Herzegovina 
A miner leaves coal mine Haljinici in Kakanj 
A miner leaves coal mine Haljinici in Kakanj, Bosnia and Herzegovina October 13, 2015. Four miners were killed and two injured early on Tuesday when a platform holding up the roof caved in on them in a mine in central Bosnia. The accident occurred at around 1 a.m. at a depth of 105 meters as a group of 28 miners were installing electric equipment in the Kakanj coal mine, outside the digging area, mining inspector Ferid Osmanovic told a news conference. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic 
BOSNIA-ACCIDENT-MINE/
RTS49LE 
October 13, 2015 
Miners leave coal mine Haljinici in Kakanj, Bosnia and Herzegovina, October 13, 2015. Four miners were... 
Kakanj, Bosnia and Herzegovina 
Miners leave coal mine Haljinici in Kakanj 
Miners leave coal mine Haljinici in Kakanj, Bosnia and Herzegovina, October 13, 2015. Four miners were killed and two injured early on Tuesday when a platform holding up the roof caved in on them in a mine in central Bosnia. The accident occurred at around 1 a.m. at a depth of 105 meters as a group of 28 miners were installing electric equipment in the Kakanj coal mine, outside the digging area, mining inspector Ferid Osmanovic told a news conference. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic 
CANADA-ELECTION
RTSVO2 
September 13, 2015 
Conservative leader and Canada's Prime Minister Stephen Harper uses a tool during a campaign event at... 
Ottawa, Canada 
Conservative leader and Canada's PM Harper uses a tool during a campaign event at a factory in Stittsville... 
Conservative leader and Canada's Prime Minister Stephen Harper uses a tool during a campaign event at a factory in Stittsville, Ontario September 13, 2015. Canadians go to the polls in a national election on October 19, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Wattie 
CANADA-ELECTION/
RTSVLJ 
September 13, 2015 
Conservative leader and Canada's Prime Minister Stephen Harper uses a tool during a campaign event at... 
Ottawa, Canada 
Conservative leader and Canada's PM Harper uses a tool during a campaign event at a factory in Stittsville,... 
Conservative leader and Canada's Prime Minister Stephen Harper uses a tool during a campaign event at a factory in Stittsville, Ontario September 13, 2015. Canadians go to the polls in a national election on October 19, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Wattie 
UKRAINE-CRISIS/
RTSCL0 
September 09, 2015 
Workers use an auger to drill a hole for a stake to build a fence at a construction site for Russia's... 
BELGOROD REGION, Russia 
Workers use auger to drill hole for stake to build fence at construction site for Russia's new military... 
Workers use an auger to drill a hole for a stake to build a fence at a construction site for Russia's new military base near the Russian-Ukrainian border in the village of Soloti, southeast of Belgorod, Russia, September 7, 2015. Russia has started to build a huge military base housing ammunition depots and barracks for several thousand soldiers near the Ukrainian border, a project that suggests the Kremlin is digging in for a prolonged stand-off with Kiev. The base, when completed, will even have its own swimming pool, skating rink and barber shop, according to public documents. Picture taken September 7, 2015. REUTERS/Anton Zverev 
Sort by 
Display 
Items per page 
Page 
of 14