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Search results for: Prickly-pear

HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4ZB
April 18, 2020
Men work in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the...
Mexico City, Mexico
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico
Men work in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 17, 2020. Picture taken April 17, 2020.REUTERS/Carlos Jasso
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4T1
April 18, 2020
People arrive with boxes containing nopal (prickly pear) cactus, one of the national staple foods, to...
Mexico City, Mexico
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico
People arrive with boxes containing nopal (prickly pear) cactus, one of the national staple foods, to sell at the local market as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 16, 2020. Picture taken April 16, 2020.REUTERS/Carlos Jasso
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4SX
April 18, 2020
Local vendors sell nopal (prickly pear) cactus, one of the national staple foods and other products at...
Mexico City, Mexico
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico
Local vendors sell nopal (prickly pear) cactus, one of the national staple foods and other products at the local market as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 17, 2020. Picture taken April 17, 2020.REUTERS/Carlos Jasso
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4RP
April 18, 2020
Local vendors clean the nopal (prickly pear) cactus, one of the national staple foods, to sell at the...
Mexico City, Mexico
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico
Local vendors clean the nopal (prickly pear) cactus, one of the national staple foods, to sell at the local market as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 16, 2020. Picture taken April 16, 2020.REUTERS/Carlos Jasso
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4RO
April 18, 2020
A local vendor wearing a protective mask holds a couple of nopal (prickly pear) cactus, one of the national...
Mexico City, Mexico
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico
A local vendor wearing a protective mask holds a couple of nopal (prickly pear) cactus, one of the national staple foods, while she sells them at the local market as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 16, 2020. Picture taken April 16, 2020. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4RE
April 18, 2020
Men put nopal (prickly pear) cactus, one of the national staple foods, in boxes at the local market as...
Mexico City, Mexico
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico
Men put nopal (prickly pear) cactus, one of the national staple foods, in boxes at the local market as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 16, 2020. Picture taken April 16, 2020.REUTERS/Carlos Jasso
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4R0
April 18, 2020
Farmer Guillermo Pineda works in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods,...
Mexico City, Mexico
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico
Farmer Guillermo Pineda works in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 17, 2020. Picture taken April 17, 2020.REUTERS/Carlos Jasso
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4QY
April 18, 2020
A farmer works in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread...
Mexico City, Mexico
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico
A farmer works in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 16, 2020. Picture taken April 16, 2020.REUTERS/Carlos Jasso
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4QT
April 18, 2020
A farmer works in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread...
Mexico City, Mexico
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico
A farmer works in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 17, 2020. Picture taken April 17, 2020.REUTERS/Carlos Jasso
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4PK
April 18, 2020
Women exercise near a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread...
Mexico City, Mexico
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico
Women exercise near a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 17, 2020. Picture taken April 17, 2020. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4PJ
April 18, 2020
A farmer works in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread...
Mexico City, Mexico
Nopal farmers are finding themselves in an ever more precarious situation as the coronavirus pandemic...
A farmer works in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 16, 2020. Picture taken April 16, 2020.REUTERS/Carlos Jasso
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4O7
April 18, 2020
Farmer Alejandro Rivera works in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods,...
Mexico City, Mexico
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico
Farmer Alejandro Rivera works in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 17, 2020. Picture taken April 17, 2020.REUTERS/Carlos Jasso
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4N1
April 18, 2020
A child is seen in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread...
Mexico City, Mexico
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico
A child is seen in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 17, 2020. Picture taken April 17, 2020.REUTERS/Carlos Jasso TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4LG
April 18, 2020
A youth works in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread...
Mexico City, Mexico
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico
A youth works in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 16, 2020. Picture taken April 16, 2020.REUTERS/Carlos Jasso
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4LF
April 18, 2020
Men work in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the...
Mexico City, Mexico
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico
Men work in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 16, 2020. Picture taken April 16, 2020.REUTERS/Carlos Jasso
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4LA
April 18, 2020
Men work in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the...
Mexico City, Mexico
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico
Men work in a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 17, 2020. Picture taken April 17, 2020. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-CACTUS
RTX7E4IX
April 18, 2020
The sun rises over a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread...
Mexico City, Mexico
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico
The sun rises over a nopal (prickly pear) cactus field, one of the national staple foods, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, at Milpa Alta municipality in Mexico City, Mexico April 16, 2020. Picture taken April 16, 2020. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso
CLIMATE-CHANGE/MEXICO
RTS32WE1
February 21, 2020
Prickly pear cactus plantation is seen in Tepeteopan, state of Puebla, Mexico January 16, 2020. Picture...
TEPETEOPAN, Mexico
Prickly pear cactus plantation is seen in Tepeteopan
Prickly pear cactus plantation is seen in Tepeteopan, state of Puebla, Mexico January 16, 2020. Picture taken January 16, 2020. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso
CLIMATE-CHANGE/MEXICO
RTS32WCG
February 21, 2020
Prickly pear cactus plantation is seen in Tepeteopan, state of Puebla, Mexico February 18, 2020. Picture...
TEPETEOPAN, Mexico
Prickly pear cactus plantation is seen in Tepeteopan
Prickly pear cactus plantation is seen in Tepeteopan, state of Puebla, Mexico February 18, 2020. Picture taken February 18, 2020. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso
PALESTINIANS-EXHIBITION/CACTUS
RTX72DYW
August 06, 2019
A Palestinian man picks up prickly pears at a farm in the village of Nilin near Ramallah, in the Israeli-occupied...
Ramallah, Palestinian Territories
Palestinian man picks up prickly pears at a farm in the village of Nilin near Ramallah, in the Israeli-occupied...
A Palestinian man picks up prickly pears at a farm in the village of Nilin near Ramallah, in the Israeli-occupied West Bank August 5, 2019. Picture taken August 5, 2019. REUTERS/Mohamad Torokman
PALESTINIANS-EXHIBITION/CACTUS
RTX72DYS
August 06, 2019
A Palestinian man peels a prickly pear during a cactus fruits exhibition in the village of Nilin near...
Ramallah, Palestinian Territories
Palestinian man peels a prickly pear during a cactus fruits exhibition in the village of Nilin near Ramallah,...
A Palestinian man peels a prickly pear during a cactus fruits exhibition in the village of Nilin near Ramallah, in the Israeli-occupied West Bank August 5, 2019. Picture taken August 5, 2019. REUTERS/Mohamad Torokman
PALESTINIANS-EXHIBITION/CACTUS
RTX72DYR
August 06, 2019
A Palestinian man picks up prickly pears at a farm in the village of Nilin near Ramallah, in the Israeli-occupied...
Ramallah, Palestinian Territories
Palestinian man picks up prickly pears at a farm in the village of Nilin near Ramallah, in the Israeli-occupied...
A Palestinian man picks up prickly pears at a farm in the village of Nilin near Ramallah, in the Israeli-occupied West Bank August 5, 2019. Picture taken August 5, 2019. REUTERS/Mohamad Torokman
PALESTINIANS-EXHIBITION/CACTUS
RTX72DYQ
August 06, 2019
A Palestinian man collects freshly picked prickly pears at a farm in the village of Nilin near Ramallah,...
Ramallah, Palestinian Territories
Palestinian man collects freshly picked prickly pears at a farm in the village of Nilin near Ramallah,...
A Palestinian man collects freshly picked prickly pears at a farm in the village of Nilin near Ramallah, in the Israeli-occupied West Bank August 5, 2019. Picture taken August 5, 2019. REUTERS/Mohamad Torokman
PALESTINIANS-EXHIBITION/CACTUS
RTX72DYP
August 06, 2019
A Palestinian man picks up prickly pears at a farm in the village of Nilin near Ramallah, in the Israeli-occupied...
Ramallah, Palestinian Territories
Palestinian man picks up prickly pears at a farm in the village of Nilin near Ramallah, in the Israeli-occupied...
A Palestinian man picks up prickly pears at a farm in the village of Nilin near Ramallah, in the Israeli-occupied West Bank August 5, 2019. Picture taken August 5, 2019. REUTERS/Mohamad Torokman
PALESTINIANS-EXHIBITION/CACTUS
RTX72DYL
August 06, 2019
Peeled prickly pears are displayed for people to taste during a cactus fruits exhibition in the village...
Ramallah, Palestinian Territories
Peeled prickly pears are displayed for people to taste during a cactus fruits exhibition in the village...
Peeled prickly pears are displayed for people to taste during a cactus fruits exhibition in the village of Nilin near Ramallah, in the Israeli-occupied West Bank August 5, 2019. Picture taken August 5, 2019. REUTERS/Mohamad Torokman
PALESTINIANS-EXHIBITION/CACTUS
RTX72DYJ
August 06, 2019
A Palestinian man displays freshly picked prickly pears during a cactus fruits exhibition in the village...
Ramallah, Palestinian Territories
Palestinian man displays freshly picked prickly pears during a cactus fruits exhibition in the village...
A Palestinian man displays freshly picked prickly pears during a cactus fruits exhibition in the village of Nilin near Ramallah, in the Israeli-occupied West Bank August 5, 2019. Picture taken August 5, 2019. REUTERS/Mohamad Torokman
PALESTINIANS-EXHIBITION/CACTUS
RTX72DYI
August 06, 2019
Freshly picked prickly pears are displayed during a cactus fruits exhibition in the village of Nilin...
Ramallah, Palestinian Territories
Freshly picked prickly pears are displayed during a cactus fruits exhibition in the village of Nilin...
Freshly picked prickly pears are displayed during a cactus fruits exhibition in the village of Nilin near Ramallah, in the Israeli-occupied West Bank August 5, 2019. Picture taken August 5, 2019. REUTERS/Mohamad Torokman
BOLIVIA-FRUITS/
RTX6MKTB
February 13, 2019
Opuntia plants also known as prickly pears are seen near Mallasa in La Paz, Bolivia, February 13, 2019....
La Paz, Bolivia
Opuntia plants also known as prickly pears are seen near Mallasa in La Paz
Opuntia plants also known as prickly pears are seen near Mallasa in La Paz, Bolivia, February 13, 2019. REUTERS/David Mercado
BOLIVIA-FRUITS/
RTX6MKTA
February 13, 2019
An opuntia plant also known as prickly pear is seen near Mallasa in La Paz, Bolivia, February 13, 2019....
La Paz, Bolivia
An opuntia plant also known as prickly pear is seen near Mallasa in La Paz
An opuntia plant also known as prickly pear is seen near Mallasa in La Paz, Bolivia, February 13, 2019. REUTERS/David Mercado
CHILE-ENVIRONMENT/TRASH
RTS1PK53
May 02, 2018
Prickly pears are placed on a "cancha" during harvest time in Til Til, Chile, February 16, 2018. REUTERS/Ivan...
Santiago, Chile
Prickly pears are placed on a "cancha" during harvest time in Til Til, Chile
Prickly pears are placed on a "cancha" during harvest time in Til Til, Chile, February 16, 2018. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
CHILE-ENVIRONMENT/TRASH
RTX5D2D1
March 26, 2018
Farmer and psychologist Gonzalo Herrera takes a break at his prickly pears and olives plantation in Til...
Santiago, Chile
The Wider Image: Chile's tiny Til Til faces big trash problem
Farmer and psychologist Gonzalo Herrera takes a break at his prickly pears and olives plantation in Til Til, Chile, October 6, 2017. "A landfill will change our self-esteem. It will make us feel dirty," Gonzalo said of a new industrial waste processing facility that is being constructed in Til Til. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado SEARCH "TIL TIL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
CHILE-ENVIRONMENT/TRASH
RTX5D2CR
March 26, 2018
A farmer uses rubber gloves to pick up prickly pears during harvest time in Til Til, Chile, February...
Santiago, Chile
The Wider Image: Chile's tiny Til Til faces big trash problem
A farmer uses rubber gloves to pick up prickly pears during harvest time in Til Til, Chile, February 16, 2018. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado SEARCH "TIL TIL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
CHILE-ENVIRONMENT/TRASH
RTX5D2C1
March 26, 2018
A prickly pear plantation located next to a rail line used by a train to transport garbage, is seen in...
Santiago, Chile
The Wider Image: Chile's tiny Til Til faces big trash problem
A prickly pear plantation located next to a rail line used by a train to transport garbage, is seen in a valley of Til Til, Chile, October 5, 2017. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado SEARCH "TIL TIL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
CHILE-ENVIRONMENT/TRASH
RTX5D2AQ
March 26, 2018
Javier, a farmer, climbs a ladder after inspecting the water level at an old well in Til Til, Chile,...
Santiago, Chile
The Wider Image: Chile's tiny Til Til faces big trash problem
Javier, a farmer, climbs a ladder after inspecting the water level at an old well in Til Til, Chile, February 16, 2018. This year Javier has only been able to irrigate the prickly pear plantation, where he works, once due to lack of water. "When it (the land) is not irrigated, the quality of the fruit is lower," Javier said. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado SEARCH "TIL TIL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
PERU-AGRICULTURE/
RTR4EZ4W
November 21, 2014
Maria Poma cleans prickly pear cacti irrigated with water collected by nets that trap moisture from fog,...
Lima, Peru
Maria Poma cleans prickly pear cacti irrigated with water collected by nets that trap moisture from fog,...
Maria Poma cleans prickly pear cacti irrigated with water collected by nets that trap moisture from fog, on the hillside of Villa Maria Del Triunfo in Lima, November 20, 2014. The net-like structures that trap moisture from fog and mist were an initiative by a group of community leaders called "Peruvians Without Water", who said that the nets in total collect around 150 cubic meters of water per month during the winter season. They built a total of about 100 nets, and the water collected is distributed to the community for agricultural purposes. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo (PERU - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE)
Environment
Environment
Cochineal Insect Cultivation - 05 Oct 2014
15 PICTURES
MEXICO-AGRICULTURE/RED
RTR48UHD
October 03, 2014
Cochineal insects are seen on a nopal cactus leaf in Nopaltepec, state of Mexico September 30, 2014....
Nopaltepec, Mexico
Cochineal insects are seen on a nopal cactus leaf in Nopaltepec
Cochineal insects are seen on a nopal cactus leaf in Nopaltepec, state of Mexico September 30, 2014. In the shadow of the massive El Popo volcano, cactus growers in Mexico are helping to revive an ancient dying tradition with the help of a tiny bug that feeds off the country's prickly pears. The humble cochineal insect once occupied a proud place in pre-Hispanic culture as a natural dye for clothes and art. But over the years synthetic colours and the bug's parasitic nature saw it lose favour with local farmers. But amidst worldwide demand for the bug that has come from unlikely sources such as Starbucks and fashionistas, growers of the bug are cashing in. Picture taken September 30, 2014. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS TEXTILE)
MEXICO-AGRICULTURE/RED
RTR48UH8
October 03, 2014
Cochineal insects are seen on a nopal cactus leaf at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects...
Nopaltepec, Mexico
Cochineal insects are seen on a nopal cactus leaf at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects...
Cochineal insects are seen on a nopal cactus leaf at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects in Nopaltepec, Mexican state of Puebla September 30, 2014. In the shadow of the massive El Popo volcano, cactus growers in Mexico are helping to revive an ancient dying tradition with the help of a tiny bug that feeds off the country's prickly pears. The humble cochineal insect once occupied a proud place in pre-Hispanic culture as a natural dye for clothes and art. But over the years synthetic colours and the bug's parasitic nature saw it lose favour with local farmers. But amidst worldwide demand for the bug that has come from unlikely sources such as Starbucks and fashionistas, growers of the bug are cashing in. Picture taken September 30, 2014. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS TEXTILE TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
MEXICO-AGRICULTURE/RED
RTR48UH5
October 03, 2014
Cochineal insects are seen through a microscope at a lab of the Cochineal Campaign in Nopaltepec, state...
Nopaltepec, Mexico
Cochineal insects are seen through a microscope at a lab of the Cochineal Campaign in Nopaltepec
Cochineal insects are seen through a microscope at a lab of the Cochineal Campaign in Nopaltepec, state of Mexico September 30, 2014. In the shadow of the massive El Popo volcano, cactus growers in Mexico are helping to revive an ancient dying tradition with the help of a tiny bug that feeds off the country's prickly pears. The humble cochineal insect once occupied a proud place in pre-Hispanic culture as a natural dye for clothes and art. But over the years synthetic colours and the bug's parasitic nature saw it lose favour with local farmers. But amidst worldwide demand for the bug that has come from unlikely sources such as Starbucks and fashionistas, growers of the bug are cashing in. Picture taken September 30, 2014. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS TEXTILE)
MEXICO-AGRICULTURE/RED
RTR48UH4
October 03, 2014
Cochineal insect eggs are seen through a microscope at a lab of the Cochineal Campaign in Nopaltepec,...
Nopaltepec, Mexico
Cochineal insect eggs are seen through a microscope at a lab of the Cochineal Campaign in Nopaltepec
Cochineal insect eggs are seen through a microscope at a lab of the Cochineal Campaign in Nopaltepec, state of Mexico September 30, 2014. In the shadow of the massive El Popo volcano, cactus growers in Mexico are helping to revive an ancient dying tradition with the help of a tiny bug that feeds off the country's prickly pears. The humble cochineal insect once occupied a proud place in pre-Hispanic culture as a natural dye for clothes and art. But over the years synthetic colours and the bug's parasitic nature saw it lose favour with local farmers. But amidst worldwide demand for the bug that has come from unlikely sources such as Starbucks and fashionistas, growers of the bug are cashing in. Picture taken September 30, 2014. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS TEXTILE)
MEXICO-AGRICULTURE/RED
RTR48UGU
October 03, 2014
Cochineal insects are seen in a box at a lab of the Cochineal Campaign in Nopaltepec, state of Mexico...
Nopaltepec, Mexico
Cochineal insects are seen in a box at a lab of the Cochineal Campaign in Nopaltepec
Cochineal insects are seen in a box at a lab of the Cochineal Campaign in Nopaltepec, state of Mexico September 30, 2014. In the shadow of the massive El Popo volcano, cactus growers in Mexico are helping to revive an ancient dying tradition with the help of a tiny bug that feeds off the country's prickly pears. The humble cochineal insect once occupied a proud place in pre-Hispanic culture as a natural dye for clothes and art. But over the years synthetic colours and the bug's parasitic nature saw it lose favour with local farmers. But amidst worldwide demand for the bug that has come from unlikely sources such as Starbucks and fashionistas, growers of the bug are cashing in. Picture taken September 30, 2014. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS TEXTILE)
MEXICO-AGRICULTURE/RED
RTR48UGP
October 03, 2014
Nopal cactus leafs, infested with cochineal insects, are seen hanging at a greenhouse in Huejotzingo,...
Huejotzingo, Mexico
Nopal cactus leafs, infested with cochineal insects, are seen hanging at a greenhouse in Huejotzingo
Nopal cactus leafs, infested with cochineal insects, are seen hanging at a greenhouse in Huejotzingo, Mexican state of Puebla September 25, 2014. In the shadow of the massive El Popo volcano, cactus growers in Mexico are helping to revive an ancient dying tradition with the help of a tiny bug that feeds off the country's prickly pears. The humble cochineal insect once occupied a proud place in pre-Hispanic culture as a natural dye for clothes and art. But over the years synthetic colours and the bug's parasitic nature saw it lose favour with local farmers. But amidst worldwide demand for the bug that has come from unlikely sources such as Starbucks and fashionistas, growers of the bug are cashing in. Picture taken September 25, 2014. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS TEXTILE)
MEXICO-AGRICULTURE/RED
RTR48UGN
October 03, 2014
Pigment extracted from the cochineal insects are displayed at a Cochineal Campaign lab in Nopaltepec,...
Nopaltepec, Mexico
Pigment extracted from the cochineal insects are displayed at a Cochineal Campaign lab in Nopaltepec
Pigment extracted from the cochineal insects are displayed at a Cochineal Campaign lab in Nopaltepec, state of Mexico September 30, 2014. In the shadow of the massive El Popo volcano, cactus growers in Mexico are helping to revive an ancient dying tradition with the help of a tiny bug that feeds off the country's prickly pears. The humble cochineal insect once occupied a proud place in pre-Hispanic culture as a natural dye for clothes and art. But over the years synthetic colours and the bug's parasitic nature saw it lose favour with local farmers. But amidst worldwide demand for the bug that has come from unlikely sources such as Starbucks and fashionistas, growers of the bug are cashing in. Picture taken September 30, 2014. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS TEXTILE)
MEXICO-AGRICULTURE/RED
RTR48UGJ
October 03, 2014
A man arranges nopal cactus leafs at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects in Huejotzingo,...
Huejotzingo, Mexico
Man arranges nopal cactus leafs at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects in Huejotzingo
A man arranges nopal cactus leafs at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects in Huejotzingo, Mexican state of Puebla September 25, 2014. In the shadow of the massive El Popo volcano, cactus growers in Mexico are helping to revive an ancient dying tradition with the help of a tiny bug that feeds off the country's prickly pears. The humble cochineal insect once occupied a proud place in pre-Hispanic culture as a natural dye for clothes and art. But over the years synthetic colours and the bug's parasitic nature saw it lose favour with local farmers. But amidst worldwide demand for the bug that has come from unlikely sources such as Starbucks and fashionistas, growers of the bug are cashing in. Picture taken September 25, 2014. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS TEXTILE EMPLOYMENT)
MEXICO-AGRICULTURE/RED
RTR48UGH
October 03, 2014
A man works at his nopal cactus field in Nopaltepec, state of Mexico September 30, 2014. In the shadow...
Nopaltepec, Mexico
Man works at his nopal cactus field in Nopaltepec
A man works at his nopal cactus field in Nopaltepec, state of Mexico September 30, 2014. In the shadow of the massive El Popo volcano, cactus growers in Mexico are helping to revive an ancient dying tradition with the help of a tiny bug that feeds off the country's prickly pears. The humble cochineal insect once occupied a proud place in pre-Hispanic culture as a natural dye for clothes and art. But over the years synthetic colours and the bug's parasitic nature saw it lose favour with local farmers. But amidst worldwide demand for the bug that has come from unlikely sources such as Starbucks and fashionistas, growers of the bug are cashing in. Picture taken September 30, 2014. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS TEXTILE EMPLOYMENT)
MEXICO-AGRICULTURE/RED
RTR48UGG
October 03, 2014
A man crushes a cochineal insect to show its red color, at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects...
Huejotzingo, Mexico
Man crushes a cochineal insect to show its red color, at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects...
A man crushes a cochineal insect to show its red color, at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects in Huejotzingo, Mexican state of Puebla September 25, 2014. In the shadow of the massive El Popo volcano, cactus growers in Mexico are helping to revive an ancient dying tradition with the help of a tiny bug that feeds off the country's prickly pears. The humble cochineal insect once occupied a proud place in pre-Hispanic culture as a natural dye for clothes and art. But over the years synthetic colours and the bug's parasitic nature saw it lose favour with local farmers. But amidst worldwide demand for the bug that has come from unlikely sources such as Starbucks and fashionistas, growers of the bug are cashing in. Picture taken September 25, 2014. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS TEXTILE)
MEXICO-AGRICULTURE/RED
RTR48UGE
October 03, 2014
A man arranges nopal cactus leafs before hanging them at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects...
Huejotzingo, Mexico
Man arranges nopal cactus leafs before hanging them at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects...
A man arranges nopal cactus leafs before hanging them at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects in Huejotzingo, Mexican state of Puebla September 25, 2014. In the shadow of the massive El Popo volcano, cactus growers in Mexico are helping to revive an ancient dying tradition with the help of a tiny bug that feeds off the country's prickly pears. The humble cochineal insect once occupied a proud place in pre-Hispanic culture as a natural dye for clothes and art. But over the years synthetic colours and the bug's parasitic nature saw it lose favour with local farmers. But amidst worldwide demand for the bug that has come from unlikely sources such as Starbucks and fashionistas, growers of the bug are cashing in. Picture taken September 25, 2014. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS TEXTILE EMPLOYMENT)
MEXICO-AGRICULTURE/RED
RTR48UGD
October 03, 2014
A man selects cochineal insects at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects in Huejotzingo, Mexican...
Huejotzingo, Mexico
Man selects cochineal insects at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects in Huejotzingo
A man selects cochineal insects at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects in Huejotzingo, Mexican state of Puebla September 25, 2014. In the shadow of the massive El Popo volcano, cactus growers in Mexico are helping to revive an ancient dying tradition with the help of a tiny bug that feeds off the country's prickly pears. The humble cochineal insect once occupied a proud place in pre-Hispanic culture as a natural dye for clothes and art. But over the years synthetic colours and the bug's parasitic nature saw it lose favour with local farmers. But amidst worldwide demand for the bug that has come from unlikely sources such as Starbucks and fashionistas, growers of the bug are cashing in. Picture taken September 25, 2014. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS TEXTILE EMPLOYMENT)
MEXICO-AGRICULTURE/RED
RTR48UGA
October 03, 2014
A man looks for a place to hang nopal cactus leafs at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects...
Huejotzingo, Mexico
Man looks for a place to hang nopal cactus leafs at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects...
A man looks for a place to hang nopal cactus leafs at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects in Huejotzingo, Mexican state of Puebla September 25, 2014. In the shadow of the massive El Popo volcano, cactus growers in Mexico are helping to revive an ancient dying tradition with the help of a tiny bug that feeds off the country's prickly pears. The humble cochineal insect once occupied a proud place in pre-Hispanic culture as a natural dye for clothes and art. But over the years synthetic colours and the bug's parasitic nature saw it lose favour with local farmers. But amidst worldwide demand for the bug that has come from unlikely sources such as Starbucks and fashionistas, growers of the bug are cashing in. Picture taken September 25, 2014. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS TEXTILE EMPLOYMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
MEXICO-AGRICULTURE/RED
RTR48UG9
October 03, 2014
Florencio Campos walks out from a greenhouse where he cultivates cochineal insects in Huejotzingo, Mexican...
Huejotzingo, Mexico
Florencio Campos walks out from a greenhouse where he cultivates cochineal insects in Huejotzingo
Florencio Campos walks out from a greenhouse where he cultivates cochineal insects in Huejotzingo, Mexican state of Puebla September 25, 2014. In the shadow of the massive El Popo volcano, cactus growers in Mexico are helping to revive an ancient dying tradition with the help of a tiny bug that feeds off the country's prickly pears. The humble cochineal insect once occupied a proud place in pre-Hispanic culture as a natural dye for clothes and art. But over the years synthetic colours and the bug's parasitic nature saw it lose favour with local farmers. But amidst worldwide demand for the bug that has come from unlikely sources such as Starbucks and fashionistas, growers of the bug are cashing in. Picture taken September 25, 2014. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS TEXTILE EMPLOYMENT)
MEXICO-AGRICULTURE/RED
RTR48UFE
October 03, 2014
A man brushes cochineal insects off a nopal cactus leaf at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects...
Huejotzingo, Mexico
A man brushes cochineal insects off a nopal cactus leaf at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects...
A man brushes cochineal insects off a nopal cactus leaf at a greenhouse used to cultivate cochineal insects in Huejotzingo, Mexican state of Puebla September 25, 2014. In the shadow of the massive El Popo volcano, cactus growers in Mexico are helping to revive an ancient dying tradition with the help of a tiny bug that feeds off the country's prickly pears. The humble cochineal insect once occupied a proud place in pre-Hispanic culture as a natural dye for clothes and art. But over the years synthetic colours and the bug's parasitic nature saw it lose favour with local farmers. But amidst worldwide demand for the bug that has come from unlikely sources such as Starbucks and fashionistas, growers of the bug are cashing in. Picture taken September 25, 2014. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE BUSINESS TEXTILE EMPLOYMENT)
LEBANON-FOOD/
RTR3ZNRQ
July 22, 2014
Prickly pears are displayed for sale at a stall in Beirut July 22, 2014. A dozen prickly pears are sold...
Beirut, Lebanon
Prickly pears are displayed for sale at a stall in Beirut
Prickly pears are displayed for sale at a stall in Beirut July 22, 2014. A dozen prickly pears are sold for approximately $4 in the Lebanese market. REUTERS/Jamal Saidi (LEBANON - Tags: FOOD)
LEBANON-FOOD/
RTR3ZNR1
July 22, 2014
Prickly pears are displayed for sale at a stall in Beirut July 22, 2014. A dozen prickly pears are sold...
Beirut, Lebanon
Prickly pears are displayed for sale at a stall in Beirut
Prickly pears are displayed for sale at a stall in Beirut July 22, 2014. A dozen prickly pears are sold for approximately $4 in the Lebanese market. REUTERS/ Jamal Saidi (LEBANON - Tags: FOOD)
MEXICO/
RTX14GAA
October 18, 2013
A tourist tries a tuna (prickly pear) during an Eat Mexico tour at a market in Mexico City October 18,...
Mexico City, Mexico
Tourist tries a tuna fruit (prickly pear) during an Eat Mexico tour at a market in Mexico City
A tourist tries a tuna (prickly pear) during an Eat Mexico tour at a market in Mexico City October 18, 2013. Founded in 2010, Eat Mexico is the only culinary tour operator that focuses exclusively on street food and markets providing an opportunity for tourists to approach dishes ranging from traditional tamales to tacos. Organised in small groups, the tourists have the chance to learn more from local culture and culinary traditions in the city, according to organisers. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: TRAVEL FOOD)
ITALY-MUSEUM/BANK
RTR39NDM
October 27, 2012
A visitor looks at the Renato Guttuso painting " Prickly Pears" at Palazzo Beltrami in downtown Milan...
Milan, Italy
A visitor looks at the Renato Guttuso painting " Prickly Pears" at Palazzo Beltrami in downtown Milan...
A visitor looks at the Renato Guttuso painting " Prickly Pears" at Palazzo Beltrami in downtown Milan October 26, 2012. Italy's biggest retail bank has turned its historic headquarters in Milan's central La Scala square into a majestic modern art museum displaying Italian post-war works from the likes of Lucio Fontana and Renato Guttuso. Picture taken on October 26, 2012. REUTERS/Stefano Rellandini ( ITALY - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS)
TUNISIA/
RTR36MM3
August 10, 2012
A Tunisian vendor prepares prickly pears for sale during the holy month of Ramadan in downtown Tunisia...
Tunis, Tunisia
Tunisian vendor prepares prickly pears for sale during the holy month of Ramadan in downtown Tunisia
A Tunisian vendor prepares prickly pears for sale during the holy month of Ramadan in downtown Tunisia August 10, 2012. REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi (TUNISIA - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY FOOD)
PALESTINIANS/
RTR34YGU
July 15, 2012
A Palestinian woman peels a freshly picked prickly pear in the West Bank village of Budrus near Ramallah...
Budrus, Palestinian Territories
A Palestinian woman peels a freshly picked prickly pear near Ramallah
A Palestinian woman peels a freshly picked prickly pear in the West Bank village of Budrus near Ramallah July 15, 2012. REUTERS/Mohamad Torokman (WEST BANK - Tags: FOOD SOCIETY)
PALESTINIANS/
RTR34YGM
July 15, 2012
A Palestinian woman picks prickly pears in the West Bank village of Budrus near Ramallah July 15, 2012....
Budrus, Palestinian Territories
A Palestinian woman picks prickly pears near Ramallah
A Palestinian woman picks prickly pears in the West Bank village of Budrus near Ramallah July 15, 2012. REUTERS/Mohamad Torokman (WEST BANK - Tags: FOOD SOCIETY)
PALESTINIANS/
RTR34YGK
July 15, 2012
Palestinian women sort freshly picked prickly pears in the West Bank village of Budrus near Ramallah...
Budrus, Palestinian Territories
Palestinian women sort freshly picked prickly pears near Ramallah
Palestinian women sort freshly picked prickly pears in the West Bank village of Budrus near Ramallah July 15, 2012. REUTERS/Mohamad Torokman (WEST BANK - Tags: FOOD SOCIETY)
PALESTINIANS/
RTR34YGI
July 15, 2012
A Palestinian woman pours freshly picked prickly pears out of a bucket before removing the thorns in...
Budrus, Palestinian Territories
A Palestinian woman pours freshly picked prickly pears out of a bucket near Ramallah
A Palestinian woman pours freshly picked prickly pears out of a bucket before removing the thorns in the West Bank village of Budrus near Ramallah July 15, 2012. REUTERS/Mohamad Torokman (WEST BANK - Tags: FOOD SOCIETY)
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