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USA-ELECTION/CRUZ
RTX21C9R 
January 07, 2016 
A private security contractor (R) for U.S. Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz watches the crowd... 
Spencer, UNITED STATES 
A private security contractor for Cruz watches the crowd as Cruz greets supporters at the Clay County... 
A private security contractor (R) for U.S. Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz watches the crowd as Cruz greets supporters at the Clay County Regional Event Center Ballroom in Spencer, Iowa January 6, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Kauzlarich 
USA-MILITARY/DRONES
RTX1MMRI 
August 01, 2015 
A contractor looks inside a Griffon Aerospace Outlaw G2 during "Black Dart", a live-fly, live fire demonstration... 
Oxnard, UNITED STATES 
A contractor looks inside a Griffon Aerospace Outlaw G2 during "Black Dart" at Naval Base Ventura County... 
A contractor looks inside a Griffon Aerospace Outlaw G2 during "Black Dart", a live-fly, live fire demonstration of 55 unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones, at Naval Base Ventura County Sea Range, Point Mugu, near Oxnard, California July 31, 2015. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon 
MYANMAR-HEALTH/
RTX161HS 
December 02, 2013 
A man lies on the floor in Yangon General Hospital in Yangon October 15, 2013. Myanmar's reformist government... 
Yangon, Myanmar 
A man lies on the floor in Yangon General Hospital in Yangon 
A man lies on the floor in Yangon General Hospital in Yangon October 15, 2013. Myanmar's reformist government is seeking foreign investment to revive one of Asia's sickest healthcare systems. Several leading regional healthcare companies are already operating in Myanmar and others plan to enter soon, seeing huge potential in the country's underserved population of about 60 million people. Attracting foreign investment is part of an overhaul of the healthcare system by the quasi-civilian government that took over from the army in 2011. The administration of President Thein Sein has cut military spending and raised healthcare funding to 3 percent of government spending this fiscal year to March 31, from 1 percent the previous year. As with many sectors, however, private firms say they are being held back by uncertainty over rules for foreign investors. Picture taken October 15, 2013. REUTERS/Jared Ferrie (MYANMAR - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY POLITICS) 
MYANMAR-HEALTH/
RTX161HQ 
December 02, 2013 
People walk on stairs in Yangon General Hospital in Yangon October 15, 2013. Myanmar's reformist government... 
Yangon, Myanmar 
People walk on stairs in Yangon General Hospital in Yangon 
People walk on stairs in Yangon General Hospital in Yangon October 15, 2013. Myanmar's reformist government is seeking foreign investment to revive one of Asia's sickest healthcare systems. Several leading regional healthcare companies are already operating in Myanmar and others plan to enter soon, seeing huge potential in the country's underserved population of about 60 million people. Attracting foreign investment is part of an overhaul of the healthcare system by the quasi-civilian government that took over from the army in 2011. The administration of President Thein Sein has cut military spending and raised healthcare funding to 3 percent of government spending this fiscal year to March 31, from 1 percent the previous year. As with many sectors, however, private firms say they are being held back by uncertainty over rules for foreign investors. Picture taken October 15, 2013. REUTERS/Jared Ferrie (MYANMAR - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY POLITICS) 
MYANMAR-HEALTH/
RTX161HO 
December 02, 2013 
Patients are seen in Yangon General Hospital in Yangon October 15, 2013. Myanmar's reformist government... 
Yangon, Myanmar 
Patients are seen in Yangon General Hospital in Yangon 
Patients are seen in Yangon General Hospital in Yangon October 15, 2013. Myanmar's reformist government is seeking foreign investment to revive one of Asia's sickest healthcare systems. Several leading regional healthcare companies are already operating in Myanmar and others plan to enter soon, seeing huge potential in the country's underserved population of about 60 million people. Attracting foreign investment is part of an overhaul of the healthcare system by the quasi-civilian government that took over from the army in 2011. The administration of President Thein Sein has cut military spending and raised healthcare funding to 3 percent of government spending this fiscal year to March 31, from 1 percent the previous year. As with many sectors, however, private firms say they are being held back by uncertainty over rules for foreign investors. The poster says, "Photos and videos are not allowed". Picture taken October 15, 2013. REUTERS/Jared Ferrie (MYANMAR - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY POLITICS) 
MYANMAR-HEALTH/
RTX161HN 
December 02, 2013 
Relatives of patients sit in a corridor in Yangon General Hospital in Yangon October 15, 2013. Myanmar's... 
Yangon, Myanmar 
Relatives of patients sit in a corridor in Yangon General Hospital in Yangon 
Relatives of patients sit in a corridor in Yangon General Hospital in Yangon October 15, 2013. Myanmar's reformist government is seeking foreign investment to revive one of Asia's sickest healthcare systems. Several leading regional healthcare companies are already operating in Myanmar and others plan to enter soon, seeing huge potential in the country's underserved population of about 60 million people. Attracting foreign investment is part of an overhaul of the healthcare system by the quasi-civilian government that took over from the army in 2011. The administration of President Thein Sein has cut military spending and raised healthcare funding to 3 percent of government spending this fiscal year to March 31, from 1 percent the previous year. As with many sectors, however, private firms say they are being held back by uncertainty over rules for foreign investors. Picture taken October 15, 2013. REUTERS/Jared Ferrie (MYANMAR - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY POLITICS) 
MYANMAR-HEALTH/
RTX161HK 
December 02, 2013 
Medical staff wheel out a patient from a surgical theatre in Yangon General Hospital in Yangon October... 
Yangon, Myanmar 
Medical staff wheel out a patient from a surgical theatre in Yangon General Hospital in Yangon 
Medical staff wheel out a patient from a surgical theatre in Yangon General Hospital in Yangon October 15, 2013. Myanmar's reformist government is seeking foreign investment to revive one of Asia's sickest healthcare systems. Several leading regional healthcare companies are already operating in Myanmar and others plan to enter soon, seeing huge potential in the country's underserved population of about 60 million people. Attracting foreign investment is part of an overhaul of the healthcare system by the quasi-civilian government that took over from the army in 2011. The administration of President Thein Sein has cut military spending and raised healthcare funding to 3 percent of government spending this fiscal year to March 31, from 1 percent the previous year. As with many sectors, however, private firms say they are being held back by uncertainty over rules for foreign investors. Picture taken October 15, 2013. REUTERS/Jared Ferrie (MYANMAR - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY POLITICS) 
MYANMAR-HEALTH/
RTX161HJ 
December 02, 2013 
A Buddhist nun gets an injection in the Healthy Farm charity clinic at a monastery outside Yangon November... 
Yangon, Myanmar 
A Buddhist nun gets an injection in the Healthy Farm charity clinic at a monastery outside Yangon 
A Buddhist nun gets an injection in the Healthy Farm charity clinic at a monastery outside Yangon November 2, 2013. Myanmar's reformist government is seeking foreign investment to revive one of Asia's sickest healthcare systems. Several leading regional healthcare companies are already operating in Myanmar and others plan to enter soon, seeing huge potential in the country's underserved population of about 60 million people. Attracting foreign investment is part of an overhaul of the healthcare system by the quasi-civilian government that took over from the army in 2011. The administration of President Thein Sein has cut military spending and raised healthcare funding to 3 percent of government spending this fiscal year to March 31, from 1 percent the previous year. As with many sectors, however, private firms say they are being held back by uncertainty over rules for foreign investors. Picture taken November 2, 2013. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun (MYANMAR - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY POLITICS) 
MYANMAR-HEALTH/
RTX161HI 
December 02, 2013 
Women sit at a staircase they wait to see a doctor at Muslim Charity hospital in Yangon November 1, 2013.... 
Yangon, Myanmar 
Women sit at a staircase they wait to see a doctor at Muslim Charity hospital in Yangon 
Women sit at a staircase they wait to see a doctor at Muslim Charity hospital in Yangon November 1, 2013. Myanmar's reformist government is seeking foreign investment to revive one of Asia's sickest healthcare systems. Several leading regional healthcare companies are already operating in Myanmar and others plan to enter soon, seeing huge potential in the country's underserved population of about 60 million people. Attracting foreign investment is part of an overhaul of the healthcare system by the quasi-civilian government that took over from the army in 2011. The administration of President Thein Sein has cut military spending and raised healthcare funding to 3 percent of government spending this fiscal year to March 31, from 1 percent the previous year. As with many sectors, however, private firms say they are being held back by uncertainty over rules for foreign investors. Picture taken November 1, 2013. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun (MYANMAR - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY POLITICS) 
MYANMAR-HEALTH/
RTX161HF 
December 02, 2013 
Doctors examine patients in the Healthy Farm charity clinic at a monastery outside Yangon November 2,... 
Yangon, Myanmar 
Doctors examine patients in the Healthy Farm charity clinic at a monastery outside Yangon 
Doctors examine patients in the Healthy Farm charity clinic at a monastery outside Yangon November 2, 2013. Myanmar's reformist government is seeking foreign investment to revive one of Asia's sickest healthcare systems. Several leading regional healthcare companies are already operating in Myanmar and others plan to enter soon, seeing huge potential in the country's underserved population of about 60 million people. Attracting foreign investment is part of an overhaul of the healthcare system by the quasi-civilian government that took over from the army in 2011. The administration of President Thein Sein has cut military spending and raised healthcare funding to 3 percent of government spending this fiscal year to March 31, from 1 percent the previous year. As with many sectors, however, private firms say they are being held back by uncertainty over rules for foreign investors. Picture taken November 2, 2013. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun (MYANMAR - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY POLITICS) 
MYANMAR-HEALTH/
RTX161HE 
December 02, 2013 
Doctors examine patients in the Healthy Farm charity clinic at a monastery outside Yangon November 2,... 
Yangon, Myanmar 
Doctors examine patients in the Healthy Farm charity clinic at a monastery outside Yangon 
Doctors examine patients in the Healthy Farm charity clinic at a monastery outside Yangon November 2, 2013. Myanmar's reformist government is seeking foreign investment to revive one of Asia's sickest healthcare systems. Several leading regional healthcare companies are already operating in Myanmar and others plan to enter soon, seeing huge potential in the country's underserved population of about 60 million people. Attracting foreign investment is part of an overhaul of the healthcare system by the quasi-civilian government that took over from the army in 2011. The administration of President Thein Sein has cut military spending and raised healthcare funding to 3 percent of government spending this fiscal year to March 31, from 1 percent the previous year. As with many sectors, however, private firms say they are being held back by uncertainty over rules for foreign investors. Picture taken November 2, 2013. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun (MYANMAR - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY POLITICS) 
MYANMAR-HEALTH/
RTX161HA 
December 02, 2013 
Doctor Ye Thiha Htwe (L) examines a Buddhist novice nun in the Healthy Farm charity clinic at a monastery... 
Yangon, Myanmar 
Doctor Ye Thiha Htwe examines a Buddhist novice nun in the Healthy Farm charity clinic at a monastery... 
Doctor Ye Thiha Htwe (L) examines a Buddhist novice nun in the Healthy Farm charity clinic at a monastery outside Yangon November 2, 2013. Myanmar's reformist government is seeking foreign investment to revive one of Asia's sickest healthcare systems. Several leading regional healthcare companies are already operating in Myanmar and others plan to enter soon, seeing huge potential in the country's underserved population of about 60 million people. Attracting foreign investment is part of an overhaul of the healthcare system by the quasi-civilian government that took over from the army in 2011. The administration of President Thein Sein has cut military spending and raised healthcare funding to 3 percent of government spending this fiscal year to March 31, from 1 percent the previous year. As with many sectors, however, private firms say they are being held back by uncertainty over rules for foreign investors. Picture taken November 2, 2013. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun (MYANMAR - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY POLITICS) 
MYANMAR-HEALTH/
RTX161H9 
December 02, 2013 
Doctor Ye Thiha Htwe (L) looks at a Buddhist novice nun in the Healthy Farm charity clinic at a monastery... 
Yangon, Myanmar 
Doctor Ye Thiha Htwe looks at a Buddhist novice nun in the Healthy Farm charity clinic at a monastery... 
Doctor Ye Thiha Htwe (L) looks at a Buddhist novice nun in the Healthy Farm charity clinic at a monastery outside Yangon November 2, 2013. Myanmar's reformist government is seeking foreign investment to revive one of Asia's sickest healthcare systems. Several leading regional healthcare companies are already operating in Myanmar and others plan to enter soon, seeing huge potential in the country's underserved population of about 60 million people. Attracting foreign investment is part of an overhaul of the healthcare system by the quasi-civilian government that took over from the army in 2011. The administration of President Thein Sein has cut military spending and raised healthcare funding to 3 percent of government spending this fiscal year to March 31, from 1 percent the previous year. As with many sectors, however, private firms say they are being held back by uncertainty over rules for foreign investors. Picture taken November 2, 2013. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun (MYANMAR - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY POLITICS) 
MYANMAR-HEALTH/
RTX161H6 
December 02, 2013 

People wait to see a doctor at the Healthy Farm charity clinic at a monastery outside Yangon November... 
Yangon, Myanmar 
People wait to see a doctor at the Healthy Farm charity clinic at a monastery outside Yangon 

People wait to see a doctor at the Healthy Farm charity clinic at a monastery outside Yangon November 2, 2013. Myanmar's reformist government is seeking foreign investment to revive one of Asia's sickest healthcare systems. Several leading regional healthcare companies are already operating in Myanmar and others plan to enter soon, seeing huge potential in the country's underserved population of about 60 million people. Attracting foreign investment is part of an overhaul of the healthcare system by the quasi-civilian government that took over from the army in 2011. The administration of President Thein Sein has cut military spending and raised healthcare funding to 3 percent of government spending this fiscal year to March 31, from 1 percent the previous year. As with many sectors, however, private firms say they are being held back by uncertainty over rules for foreign investors. Picture taken November 2, 2013. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun (MYANMAR - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY POLITICS) 
MYANMAR-HEALTH/
RTX161H4 
December 02, 2013 

People wait to see a doctor at the Healthy Farm charity clinic at a monastery outside Yangon November... 
Yangon, Myanmar 
People wait to see a doctor at the Healthy Farm charity clinic at a monastery outside Yangon 

People wait to see a doctor at the Healthy Farm charity clinic at a monastery outside Yangon November 2, 2013. Myanmar's reformist government is seeking foreign investment to revive one of Asia's sickest healthcare systems. Several leading regional healthcare companies are already operating in Myanmar and others plan to enter soon, seeing huge potential in the country's underserved population of about 60 million people. Attracting foreign investment is part of an overhaul of the healthcare system by the quasi-civilian government that took over from the army in 2011. The administration of President Thein Sein has cut military spending and raised healthcare funding to 3 percent of government spending this fiscal year to March 31, from 1 percent the previous year. As with many sectors, however, private firms say they are being held back by uncertainty over rules for foreign investors. Picture taken November 2, 2013. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun (MYANMAR - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY POLITICS) 
MYANMAR-HEALTH/
RTX161H1 
December 02, 2013 
A Buddhist nun is pictured in the Muslim Charity Hospital in Yangon November 1, 2013. Myanmar's reformist... 
Yangon, Myanmar 
A Buddhist nun is pictured in the Muslim Charity Hospital in Yangon 
A Buddhist nun is pictured in the Muslim Charity Hospital in Yangon November 1, 2013. Myanmar's reformist government is seeking foreign investment to revive one of Asia's sickest healthcare systems. Several leading regional healthcare companies are already operating in Myanmar and others plan to enter soon, seeing huge potential in the country's underserved population of about 60 million people. Attracting foreign investment is part of an overhaul of the healthcare system by the quasi-civilian government that took over from the army in 2011. The administration of President Thein Sein has cut military spending and raised healthcare funding to 3 percent of government spending this fiscal year to March 31, from 1 percent the previous year. As with many sectors, however, private firms say they are being held back by uncertainty over rules for foreign investors. Picture taken November 1, 2013. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun (MYANMAR - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY POLITICS) 
MYANMAR-HEALTH/
RTX161GX 
December 02, 2013 
Patients are pictured in Muslims Charity Hospital in Yangon November 1, 2013. Myanmar's reformist government... 
Yangon, Myanmar 
Patients are pictured in Muslims Charity Hospital in Yangon 
Patients are pictured in Muslims Charity Hospital in Yangon November 1, 2013. Myanmar's reformist government is seeking foreign investment to revive one of Asia's sickest healthcare systems. Several leading regional healthcare companies are already operating in Myanmar and others plan to enter soon, seeing huge potential in the country's underserved population of about 60 million people. Attracting foreign investment is part of an overhaul of the healthcare system by the quasi-civilian government that took over from the army in 2011. The administration of President Thein Sein has cut military spending and raised healthcare funding to 3 percent of government spending this fiscal year to March 31, from 1 percent the previous year. As with many sectors, however, private firms say they are being held back by uncertainty over rules for foreign investors. Picture taken November 1, 2013. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun (MYANMAR - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY POLITICS) 
MYANMAR-HEALTH/
RTX161GV 
December 02, 2013 
A patient is pictured in Muslims Charity Hospital in Yangon November 1, 2013. Myanmar's reformist government... 
Yangon, Myanmar 
A patient is pictured in Muslims Charity Hospital in Yangon 
A patient is pictured in Muslims Charity Hospital in Yangon November 1, 2013. Myanmar's reformist government is seeking foreign investment to revive one of Asia's sickest healthcare systems. Several leading regional healthcare companies are already operating in Myanmar and others plan to enter soon, seeing huge potential in the country's underserved population of about 60 million people. Attracting foreign investment is part of an overhaul of the healthcare system by the quasi-civilian government that took over from the army in 2011. The administration of President Thein Sein has cut military spending and raised healthcare funding to 3 percent of government spending this fiscal year to March 31, from 1 percent the previous year. As with many sectors, however, private firms say they are being held back by uncertainty over rules for foreign investors. Picture taken November 1, 2013. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun (MYANMAR - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY POLITICS) 
MYANMAR-HEALTH/
RTX161GT 
December 02, 2013 
A newborn baby is pictured in Muslims Charity Hospital in Yangon November 1, 2013. Myanmar's reformist... 
Yangon, Myanmar 
A newborn baby is pictured in Muslims Charity Hospital in Yangon 
A newborn baby is pictured in Muslims Charity Hospital in Yangon November 1, 2013. Myanmar's reformist government is seeking foreign investment to revive one of Asia's sickest healthcare systems. Several leading regional healthcare companies are already operating in Myanmar and others plan to enter soon, seeing huge potential in the country's underserved population of about 60 million people. Attracting foreign investment is part of an overhaul of the healthcare system by the quasi-civilian government that took over from the army in 2011. The administration of President Thein Sein has cut military spending and raised healthcare funding to 3 percent of government spending this fiscal year to March 31, from 1 percent the previous year. As with many sectors, however, private firms say they are being held back by uncertainty over rules for foreign investors. Picture taken November 1, 2013. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun (MYANMAR - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY POLITICS) 
MYANMAR-HEALTH/
RTX161GS 
December 02, 2013 
A woman and her newborn baby are pictured in Muslims Charity Hospital in Yangon November 1, 2013. Myanmar's... 
Yangon, Myanmar 
A woman and her newborn baby are pictured in Muslims Charity Hospital in Yangon 
A woman and her newborn baby are pictured in Muslims Charity Hospital in Yangon November 1, 2013. Myanmar's reformist government is seeking foreign investment to revive one of Asia's sickest healthcare systems. Several leading regional healthcare companies are already operating in Myanmar and others plan to enter soon, seeing huge potential in the country's underserved population of about 60 million people. Attracting foreign investment is part of an overhaul of the healthcare system by the quasi-civilian government that took over from the army in 2011. The administration of President Thein Sein has cut military spending and raised healthcare funding to 3 percent of government spending this fiscal year to March 31, from 1 percent the previous year. As with many sectors, however, private firms say they are being held back by uncertainty over rules for foreign investors. Picture taken November 1, 2013. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun (MYANMAR - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY POLITICS) 
MYANMAR-HEALTH/
RTX161GQ 
December 02, 2013 
A woman breastfeeds her newborn baby in Muslims Charity Hospital in Yangon November 1, 2013. Myanmar's... 
Yangon, Myanmar 
A woman breastfeeds her newborn baby in Muslims Charity Hospital in Yangon 
A woman breastfeeds her newborn baby in Muslims Charity Hospital in Yangon November 1, 2013. Myanmar's reformist government is seeking foreign investment to revive one of Asia's sickest healthcare systems. Several leading regional healthcare companies are already operating in Myanmar and others plan to enter soon, seeing huge potential in the country's underserved population of about 60 million people. Attracting foreign investment is part of an overhaul of the healthcare system by the quasi-civilian government that took over from the army in 2011. The administration of President Thein Sein has cut military spending and raised healthcare funding to 3 percent of government spending this fiscal year to March 31, from 1 percent the previous year. As with many sectors, however, private firms say they are being held back by uncertainty over rules for foreign investors. Picture taken November 1, 2013. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun (MYANMAR - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY POLITICS) 
MYANMAR-HEALTH/
RTX161GO 
December 02, 2013 
Pregnant women sit as they wait to see a doctor at Muslims Charity hospital in Yangon November 1, 2013.... 
Yangon, Myanmar 
Pregnant women sit as they wait to see a doctor at Muslims Charity hospital in Yangon 
Pregnant women sit as they wait to see a doctor at Muslims Charity hospital in Yangon November 1, 2013. Myanmar's reformist government is seeking foreign investment to revive one of Asia's sickest healthcare systems. Several leading regional healthcare companies are already operating in Myanmar and others plan to enter soon, seeing huge potential in the country's underserved population of about 60 million people. Attracting foreign investment is part of an overhaul of the healthcare system by the quasi-civilian government that took over from the army in 2011. The administration of President Thein Sein has cut military spending and raised healthcare funding to 3 percent of government spending this fiscal year to March 31, from 1 percent the previous year. As with many sectors, however, private firms say they are being held back by uncertainty over rules for foreign investors. Picture taken November 1, 2013. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun (MYANMAR - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY POLITICS) 
MYANMAR-HEALTH/
RTX161GL 
December 02, 2013 
Women lie in a ward as they get treatment in Muslims Charity hospital in Yangon November 1, 2013. Myanmar's... 
Yangon, Myanmar 
Women lie in a ward as they get treatment in Muslims Charity hospital in Yangon 
Women lie in a ward as they get treatment in Muslims Charity hospital in Yangon November 1, 2013. Myanmar's reformist government is seeking foreign investment to revive one of Asia's sickest healthcare systems. Several leading regional healthcare companies are already operating in Myanmar and others plan to enter soon, seeing huge potential in the country's underserved population of about 60 million people. Attracting foreign investment is part of an overhaul of the healthcare system by the quasi-civilian government that took over from the army in 2011. The administration of President Thein Sein has cut military spending and raised healthcare funding to 3 percent of government spending this fiscal year to March 31, from 1 percent the previous year. As with many sectors, however, private firms say they are being held back by uncertainty over rules for foreign investors. Picture taken November 1, 2013. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun (MYANMAR - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY POLITICS) 
NEPAL-CRASH/
RTR38IRR 
September 28, 2012 
A Nepalese police officer stands in front of the wreckage of a Dornier aircraft, owned by private firm... 
Kathmandu, Nepal 
Nepalese police officer stands in front of the wreckage of a Dornier aircraft in Kathmandu 
A Nepalese police officer stands in front of the wreckage of a Dornier aircraft, owned by private firm Sita Air, at the crash site in Kathmandu September 28, 2012. A small plane crashed shortly after takeoff from the Nepali capital of Kathmandu on Friday, killing 19 people, including seven British and five Chinese passengers, an airline official said. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: TRANSPORT DISASTER TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) 
OLY-SECURITY-G4S/
RTR34YKF 
July 15, 2012 
A members of the armed forces takes a photograph at the Olympic Park in Stratford, the location of the... 
London, United Kingdom 
A members of the armed forces takes a photograph at the Olympic Park in Stratford, east London 
A members of the armed forces takes a photograph at the Olympic Park in Stratford, the location of the London 2012 Olympic Games, in east London July 15, 2012. The head of private security firm G4S said on Saturday his firm only realised just over a week ago it would not be able to supply enough venue guards for this month's London Olympics, as he publicly apologised for the embarrassing failure. On Thursday, the government said it would deploy additional troops after it became clear G4S was unlikely to provide the expected 10,400 guards it was contracted to do because of problems processing applicants. REUTERS/Andrew Winning (BRITAIN - Tags: MILITARY POLITICS SOCIETY SPORT OLYMPICS) 
OLY-SECURITY-G4S/
RTR34YKD 
July 15, 2012 
Two police officers stand on duty on the footbridge to the shopping centre adjacent to the Olympic Park... 
London, United Kingdom 
Two police officers stand on duty on the footbridge to the shopping centre adjacent to the Olympic Park... 
Two police officers stand on duty on the footbridge to the shopping centre adjacent to the Olympic Park in Stratford, the location of the London 2012 Olympic Games, in east London July 15, 2012. The head of private security firm G4S said on Saturday his firm only realised just over a week ago it would not be able to supply enough venue guards for this month's London Olympics, as he publicly apologised for the embarrassing failure. On Thursday, the government said it would deploy additional troops after it became clear G4S was unlikely to provide the expected 10,400 guards it was contracted to do because of problems processing applicants. REUTERS/Andrew Winning (BRITAIN - Tags: MILITARY POLITICS SOCIETY SPORT OLYMPICS) 
OLY-SECURITY-G4S/
RTR34YKC 
July 15, 2012 
A member of the RAF stands on duty at an exit to the Olympic Park in Stratford, the location of the London... 
London, United Kingdom 
A member of the RAF stands on duty at an exit to the Olympic Park in Stratford, east London 
A member of the RAF stands on duty at an exit to the Olympic Park in Stratford, the location of the London 2012 Olympic Games, in east London July 15, 2012. The head of private security firm G4S said on Saturday his firm only realised just over a week ago it would not be able to supply enough venue guards for this month's London Olympics, as he publicly apologised for the embarrassing failure. On Thursday, the government said it would deploy additional troops after it became clear G4S was unlikely to provide the expected 10,400 guards it was contracted to do because of problems processing applicants. REUTERS/Andrew Winning (BRITAIN - Tags: MILITARY POLITICS SOCIETY SPORT OLYMPICS) 
OLY-SECURITY-G4S/
RTR34YK8 
July 15, 2012 
A member of the RAF stands on duty at an exit to the Olympic Park in Stratford, the location of the London... 
London, United Kingdom 
A member of the RAF stands on duty at an exit to the Olympic Park in Stratford, east London 
A member of the RAF stands on duty at an exit to the Olympic Park in Stratford, the location of the London 2012 Olympic Games, in east London July 15, 2012. The head of private security firm G4S said on Saturday his firm only realised just over a week ago it would not be able to supply enough venue guards for this month's London Olympics, as he publicly apologised for the embarrassing failure. On Thursday, the government said it would deploy additional troops after it became clear G4S was unlikely to provide the expected 10,400 guards it was contracted to do because of problems processing applicants. REUTERS/Andrew Winning (BRITAIN - Tags: MILITARY POLITICS SOCIETY SPORT OLYMPICS) 
OLY-SECURITY-G4S/
RTR34YK1 
July 15, 2012 
A member of the RAF checks the identifications of two G4S security guards at an exit to the Olympic Park... 
London, United Kingdom 
A member of the RAF checks the identifications of two G4S security guards at an exit to the Olympic Park... 
A member of the RAF checks the identifications of two G4S security guards at an exit to the Olympic Park in Stratford, the location of the London 2012 Olympic Games, in east London July 15, 2012. The head of private security firm G4S said on Saturday his firm only realised just over a week ago it would not be able to supply enough venue guards for this month's London Olympics, as he publicly apologised for the embarrassing failure. On Thursday, the government said it would deploy additional troops after it became clear G4S was unlikely to provide the expected 10,400 guards it was contracted to do because of problems processing applicants. REUTERS/Andrew Winning (BRITAIN - Tags: MILITARY POLITICS SOCIETY SPORT OLYMPICS) 
OLY-SECURITY-G4S/
RTR34YJV 
July 15, 2012 
Members of the armed forces walk past the Olympic rings on the perimeter of the Olympic Park in Stratford,... 
London, United Kingdom 
Members of the armed forces walk past the Olympic rings on the perimeter of the Olympic Park in Stratford,... 
Members of the armed forces walk past the Olympic rings on the perimeter of the Olympic Park in Stratford, the location of the London 2012 Olympic Games, in east London July 15, 2012. The head of private security firm G4S said on Saturday his firm only realised just over a week ago it would not be able to supply enough venue guards for this month's London Olympics, as he publicly apologised for the embarrassing failure. On Thursday, the government said it would deploy additional troops after it became clear G4S was unlikely to provide the expected 10,400 guards it was contracted to do because of problems processing applicants. REUTERS/Andrew Winning (BRITAIN - Tags: MILITARY POLITICS SOCIETY SPORT OLYMPICS) 
OLY-SECURITY-G4S/
RTR34XLV 
July 14, 2012 
Security guards employed by G4S eat their lunch near the Olympics Stadium at the Olympic Park in Stratford,... 
London, United Kingdom 
Security guards employed by G4S eat their lunch near the Olympics Stadium at the Olympic Park in Stratford... 
Security guards employed by G4S eat their lunch near the Olympics Stadium at the Olympic Park in Stratford, east London, July 14, 2012. The day after private security firm G4S said it would incur a loss of up to 50 million pounds ($77.7 million), its chief executive Nick Buckles hit the airwaves and TV studios to express remorse for the problem which has forced the British government to put 3,500 extra troops on standby to fill the gap. REUTERS/Andrew Winning (BRITAIN - Tags: SPORT OLYMPICS MILITARY POLITICS) 
OLY-SECURITY-G4S/
RTR34XLI 
July 14, 2012 
A soldier eats his lunch next to two security guards employed by G4S at the Olympic Park in Stratford,... 
London, United Kingdom 
A soldier eats his lunch next to two security guards employed by G4S at the Olympic Park in Stratford,... 
A soldier eats his lunch next to two security guards employed by G4S at the Olympic Park in Stratford, east London, July 14, 2012. The day after private security firm G4S said it would incur a loss of up to 50 million pounds ($77.7 million), its chief executive Nick Buckles hit the airwaves and TV studios to express remorse for the problem which has forced the British government to put 3,500 extra troops on standby to fill the gap. REUTERS/Andrew Winning (BRITAIN - Tags: SPORT OLYMPICS MILITARY POLITICS) 
OLY-SECURITY-G4S/
RTR34XIF 
July 14, 2012 
Two soldiers walk through the Olympic Park past the Olympic Stadium and Orbit Tower (L) in Stratford,... 
London, United Kingdom 
Two soldiers walk through the Olympic Park with the Olympic Stadium behind them in Stratford, east London... 
Two soldiers walk through the Olympic Park past the Olympic Stadium and Orbit Tower (L) in Stratford, east London, July 14, 2012. The day after private security firm G4S said it would incur a loss of up to 50 million pounds ($77.7 million), its chief executive Nick Buckles hit the airwaves and TV studios to express remorse for the problem which has forced the British government to put 3,500 extra troops on standby to fill the gap. REUTERS/Andrew Winning (BRITAIN - Tags: SPORT OLYMPICS MILITARY POLITICS) 
OLY-SECURITY-G4S/
RTR34XID 
July 14, 2012 
Two soldiers walk through the Olympic Park past the Olympic Stadium and Orbit Tower (L) in Stratford,... 
London, United Kingdom 
Two soldiers walk through the Olympic Park with the Olympic Stadium behind them in Stratford, east London... 
Two soldiers walk through the Olympic Park past the Olympic Stadium and Orbit Tower (L) in Stratford, east London, July 14, 2012. The day after private security firm G4S said it would incur a loss of up to 50 million pounds ($77.7 million), its chief executive Nick Buckles hit the airwaves and TV studios to express remorse for the problem which has forced the British government to put 3,500 extra troops on standby to fill the gap. REUTERS/Andrew Winning (BRITAIN - Tags: SPORT OLYMPICS MILITARY POLITICS) 
OLY-SECURITY-G4S/
RTR34XIC 
July 14, 2012 
Two soldiers walk through the Olympic Park with the Olympic Stadium behind them in Stratford, east London,... 
London, United Kingdom 
Two soldiers walk through the Olympic Park with the Olympic Stadium behind them in Stratford, east London... 
Two soldiers walk through the Olympic Park with the Olympic Stadium behind them in Stratford, east London, July 14, 2012. The day after private security firm G4S said it would incur a loss of up to 50 million pounds ($77.7 million), its chief executive Nick Buckles hit the airwaves and TV studios to express remorse for the problem which has forced the British government to put 3,500 extra troops on standby to fill the gap. REUTERS/Andrew Winning (BRITAIN - Tags: SPORT OLYMPICS MILITARY POLITICS) 
RTR2C3MI 
March 26, 2010 
SPACE-BUSINESS/ROCKET - Illustrated factbox on Lockheed Martin and Alliant Techsystems' rocket booster... 
SPACE-BUSINESS/ROCKET 
SPACE-BUSINESS/ROCKET - Illustrated factbox on Lockheed Martin and Alliant Techsystems' rocket booster Athena, one of the rockets to compete with private space firms that will support NASA's future launch missions. RNGS. (SIN03) 
RTR2C3MH 
March 26, 2010 
SPACE-BUSINESS/ROCKET - Illustrated factbox on Lockheed Martin and Alliant Techsystems' rocket booster... 
SPACE-BUSINESS/ROCKET C 
SPACE-BUSINESS/ROCKET - Illustrated factbox on Lockheed Martin and Alliant Techsystems' rocket booster Athena, one of the rockets to compete with private space firms that will support NASA's future launch missions. RNGS. (SIN03) 
IRAQ BLACKWATER/
RTR28I8E 
January 03, 2010 
Iraqi government spokesman Ali al-Dabbagh speaks during an interview with Reuters in Baghdad January... 
Baghdad, Iraq 
Iraqi government spokesman Ali al-Dabbagh speaks during an interview with Reuters in Baghdad 
Iraqi government spokesman Ali al-Dabbagh speaks during an interview with Reuters in Baghdad January 3, 2010. Iraq will help victims of the 2007 shooting of civilians in Baghdad to file a U.S. lawsuit against employees of security firm Blackwater, an incident that turned a spotlight on the United States' use of private contractors in war zones. "The government will facilitate a lawsuit from Iraqi citizens to sue the guards and the company in a U.S. court," Dabbagh said. REUTERS/Saad Shalash (IRAQ - Tags: CONFLICT POLITICS CRIME LAW HEADSHOT) 
IRAQ BLACKWATER/
RTR28I8C 
January 03, 2010 
Iraqi government spokesman Ali al-Dabbagh speaks during an interview with Reuters in Baghdad January... 
Baghdad, Iraq 
Iraqi government spokesman Ali al-Dabbagh speaks during an interview with Reuters in Baghdad 
Iraqi government spokesman Ali al-Dabbagh speaks during an interview with Reuters in Baghdad January 3, 2010. Iraq will help victims of the 2007 shooting of civilians in Baghdad to file a U.S. lawsuit against employees of security firm Blackwater, an incident that turned a spotlight on the United States' use of private contractors in war zones. "The government will facilitate a lawsuit from Iraqi citizens to sue the guards and the company in a U.S. court," Dabbagh said. REUTERS/Saad Shalash (IRAQ - Tags: CONFLICT POLITICS CRIME LAW) 
PALESTINIANS-ISRAEL/GUNRANGE
RTR26YP5 
August 21, 2009 
Sharon Gat (R), owner of the "Caliber 3 Company", supervises as a tourist from the U. S. takes part in... 
Efrat, Palestinian Territories 
An instructor supervises as a tourist from the U. S. takes part in a tourist "anti-terrorism" shooting... 
Sharon Gat (R), owner of the "Caliber 3 Company", supervises as a tourist from the U. S. takes part in a tourist "anti-terrorism" shooting course at his company near the West Bank Jewish settlement of Efrat August 10, 2009. The company normally specialises in counter-terrorism and defense training for private security firms and the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF). The two-hour course for security-conscious tourists is a recent addition to its product line. Picture taken August 10, 2009. REUTERS/Baz Ratner (WEST BANK POLITICS CONFLICT MILITARY) 
PALESTINIANS-ISRAEL/GUNRANGE
RTR26YP0 
August 21, 2009 
Tourists from the U.S take part in a tourist "anti-terrorism" shooting course in the "Caliber 3 Company"... 
Efrat, Palestinian Territories 
Tourists from the U.S take part in a tourist "anti-terrorism" shooting course near Efrat 
Tourists from the U.S take part in a tourist "anti-terrorism" shooting course in the "Caliber 3 Company" near the West Bank Jewish settlement of Efrat August 10, 2009. The company normally specialises in counter-terrorism and defense training for private security firms and the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF). The two-hour course for security-conscious tourists is a recent addition to its product line. Picture taken August 10, 2009. REUTERS/Baz Ratner (WEST BANK POLITICS CONFLICT MILITARY) 
PALESTINIANS-ISRAEL/GUNRANGE
RTR26YOX 
August 21, 2009 
An instructor supervises as a tourist from the U. S. takes part in a tourist "anti-terrorism" shooting... 
Efrat, Palestinian Territories 
An instructor supervises as a tourist from the U. S. takes part in a tourist "anti-terrorism" shooting... 
An instructor supervises as a tourist from the U. S. takes part in a tourist "anti-terrorism" shooting course at the "Caliber 3 Company" near the West Bank Jewish settlement of Efrat August 10, 2009. The company normally specialises in counter-terrorism and defense training for private security firms and the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF). The two-hour course for security-conscious tourists is a recent addition to its product line. Picture taken August 10, 2009. REUTERS/Baz Ratner (WEST BANK POLITICS CONFLICT MILITARY) 
PALESTINIANS-ISRAEL/GUNRANGE
RTR26YOO 
August 21, 2009 
Tourists from the U.S watch as an instructor holds a gun during a tourist "anti-terrorism" shooting course... 
Efrat, Palestinian Territories 
Tourists from the U.S watch as an instructor holds a gun during a tourist "anti-terrorism" shooting course... 
Tourists from the U.S watch as an instructor holds a gun during a tourist "anti-terrorism" shooting course at the "Caliber 3 Company" near the West Bank Jewish settlement of Efrat August 10, 2009. The company normally specialises in counter-terrorism and defense training for private security firms and the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF). The two-hour course for security-conscious tourists is a recent addition to its product line. Picture taken August 10, 2009. REUTERS/Baz Ratner (WEST BANK
POLITICS CONFLICT MILITARY) 
PALESTINIANS-ISRAEL/GUNRANGE
RTR26YOJ 
August 21, 2009 
Instructors demonstrate their shooting skills during a tourist "anti-terrorism" shooting course at the... 
None, Palestinian Territories 
Instructors demonstrate their shooting skills during a tourist "anti-terrorism" shooting course near... 
Instructors demonstrate their shooting skills during a tourist "anti-terrorism" shooting course at the "Caliber 3 Company" near the West Bank Jewish settlement of Efrat August 10, 2009. The company normally specialises in counter-terrorism and defense training for private security firms and the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF). The two-hour course for security-conscious tourists is a recent addition to its product line. Picture taken August 10, 2009. REUTERS/Baz Ratner (WEST BANK)
POLITICS CONFLICT MILITARY) 
INDONESIA-MILITARY/BUSINESS
RTX5QIV 
May 15, 2008 
A plane belonging to Mandala Airlines takes off from Sukarno-Hatta airport on the outskirts of Jakarta... 
Jakarta, Indonesia 
Plane belonging to Mandala Airlines takes off from Sukarno-Hatta airport on outskirts of Jakarta 
A plane belonging to Mandala Airlines takes off from Sukarno-Hatta airport on the outskirts of Jakarta May 7, 2008. Mandala was one of the businesses formerly owned by Indonesia's military and subsequently sold to a private company. Indonesia's powerful military, pushed out of politics a decade ago when Indonesians embraced democracy, must soon give up control of many more of its businesses including golf courses, offices and taxi firms as part of its overhaul. Picture taken May 7, 2008. REUTERS/Supri (INDONESIA) 
INDONESIA-MILITARY/BUSINESS
RTX5QIH 
May 15, 2008 
A plane belonging to Mandala Airlines is parked at Sukarno-Hatta airport on the outskirts of Jakarta... 
Jakarta, Indonesia 
Plane belonging to Mandala Airlines is parked at Sukarno-Hatta airport on outskirts of Jakarta 
A plane belonging to Mandala Airlines is parked at Sukarno-Hatta airport on the outskirts of Jakarta May 7, 2008. Mandala was one of the businesses formerly owned by Indonesia's military and subsequently sold to a private company. Indonesia's powerful military, pushed out of politics a decade ago when Indonesians embraced democracy, must soon give up control of many more of its businesses including golf courses, offices and taxi firms as part of its overhaul. REUTERS/Supri (INDONESIA) 
AFGHAN-SECURITY/PATCHWORK
RTR20B6B 
May 08, 2008 
U.S. soldiers search for weapons on an Afghan man, who works for a private security firm escorting truck... 
Kandahar, Afghanistan 
To match feature AFGHAN-SECURITY/PATCHWORK 
U.S. soldiers search for weapons on an Afghan man, who works for a private security firm escorting truck convoys, after they found illegal weapons in his vehicle, in a village near Kandahar in this April 27, 2008 file photo. Forty countries are now contributing to the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) which has around 47,000 troops, but drawing up a strategy that unifies their work has proved elusive. In addition, the United States has some 14,000 troops serving in a separate force. To match feature AFGHAN-SECURITY/PATCHWORK REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic/Files (AFGHANISTAN) 
AFGHANISTAN/
RTR1ZZ04 
April 28, 2008 
U.S. soldiers search for weapons on Afghan men, who work for a private security firm escorting truck... 
Kandahar, Afghanistan 
U.S. soldiers search for weapons on Afghan men in a village near Kandahar 
U.S. soldiers search for weapons on Afghan men, who work for a private security firm escorting truck convoys, after they found illegal weapons in their vehicle, in a village near Kandahar April 27, 2008. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic (AFGHANISTAN) BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE 
AFGHANISTAN/
RTR1ZYH1 
April 27, 2008 
U.S. Army First Lieutenant Jean Leimkuhler (R) and Staff Sergeant Troy Mechanic (L) search for weapons... 
Kandahar, Afghanistan 
U.S. soldiers search for weapons on Afghan men in a village near Kandahar 
U.S. Army First Lieutenant Jean Leimkuhler (R) and Staff Sergeant Troy Mechanic (L) search for weapons on Afghan men, who work for a private security firm escorting truck convoys, after soldiers found illegal weapons in their vehicle, in a village near Kandahar April 27, 2008. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic (AFGHANISTAN) 
AFGHANISTAN/
RTR1ZYGY 
April 27, 2008 
U.S. soldiers search for weapons on Afghan men, who work for a private security firm escorting truck... 
Kandahar, Afghanistan 
U.S. soldiers search for weapons on Afghan men in a village near Kandahar 
U.S. soldiers search for weapons on Afghan men, who work for a private security firm escorting truck convoys, after they found illegal weapons in their vehicle, in a village near Kandahar April 27, 2008. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic (AFGHANISTAN) 
AFGHANISTAN/
RTR1ZYGK 
April 27, 2008 
U.S. soldiers search for weapons on Afghan men, who work for a private security firm escorting truck... 
Kandahar, Afghanistan 
U.S. soldiers search for weapons on Afghan men in a village near Kandahar 
U.S. soldiers search for weapons on Afghan men, who work for a private security firm escorting truck convoys, after they found illegal weapons in their vehicle, in a village near Kandahar April 27, 2008. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic (AFGHANISTAN) 
AFGHANISTAN/
RTR1ZYGG 
April 27, 2008 
U.S. soldiers search for weapons on an Afghan man, who works for a private security firm escorting truck... 
Kandahar, Afghanistan 
U.S. soldiers search for weapons on an Afghan man in a village near Kandahar 
U.S. soldiers search for weapons on an Afghan man, who works for a private security firm escorting truck convoys, after they found illegal weapons in his vehicle, in a village near Kandahar April 27, 2008. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic (AFGHANISTAN) 
AFGHANISTAN/
RTR1ZYGC 
April 27, 2008 
U.S. Army First Lieutenant Jean Leimkuhler (R) and Staff Sergeant Troy Mechanic (L) search for weapons... 
Kandahar, Afghanistan 
U.S. soldiers search Afghan men for weapons in a village near Kandahar 
U.S. Army First Lieutenant Jean Leimkuhler (R) and Staff Sergeant Troy Mechanic (L) search for weapons on Afghan men, who work for a private security firm escorting truck convoys, after U.S. soldiers found illegal weapons in their vehicle, in a village near Kandahar April 27, 2008. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic (AFGHANISTAN) 
AFGHANISTAN/
RTR1ZYG5 
April 27, 2008 
A U.S. soldier guards an Afghan man, who works for a private security firm escorting truck convoys, after... 
Kandahar, Afghanistan 
U.S. soldiers guard an Afghan man after illegal weapons were found in his vehicle, in a village near... 
A U.S. soldier guards an Afghan man, who works for a private security firm escorting truck convoys, after illegal weapons were found in his vehicle, in a village near Kandahar April 27, 2008. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic (AFGHANISTAN) 
AFGHANISTAN/
RTR1ZYG1 
April 27, 2008 
U.S. Army Staff Sergeant Troy Mechanic (L) and Sergeant Steven Campbell (C) carry an 82mm rocket launcher... 
Kandahar, Afghanistan 
U.S Army SSG Troy Mechanic (L) and SGT Steven Campbell (C) carry an 82 mm rocket louncher find in a... 
U.S. Army Staff Sergeant Troy Mechanic (L) and Sergeant Steven Campbell (C) carry an 82mm rocket launcher found in the vehicle of an Afghan man who works for a private security firm, in a village near Kandahar April 27, 2008. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic (AFGHANISTAN) 
AFGHANISTAN/
RTR1ZYF3 
April 27, 2008 
U.S. Army 1LT Jean Leimkuhler searches for weapons on an Afghan man, who works for a private security... 
Kandahar, Afghanistan 
U.S. Army 1LT Leimkuhler searches an Afghan man for weapons in a village near Kandahar 
U.S. Army 1LT Jean Leimkuhler searches for weapons on an Afghan man, who works for a private security firm escorting truck convoys, after U.S. soldiers found illegal weapons in his vehicle, in a village near Kandahar April 27, 2008. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic (AFGHANISTAN) 
AFGHANISTAN/
RTR1ZYF0 
April 27, 2008 
U.S. Army 1LT Jean Leimkuhler searches for weapons on an Afghan man, who works for a private security... 
Kandahar, Afghanistan 
U.S. Army 1LT Leimkuhler searches an Afghan man for weapons in a village near Kandahar 
U.S. Army 1LT Jean Leimkuhler searches for weapons on an Afghan man, who works for a private security firm escorting truck convoys, after U.S. soldiers found illegal weapons in his vehicle, in a village near Kandahar April 27, 2008. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic (AFGHANISTAN) 
AFGHANISTAN/
RTR1ZYEX 
April 27, 2008 
U.S. Army 1LT Jean Leimkuhler searches for weapons on an Afghan man, who works for a private security... 
Kandahar, Afghanistan 
U.S. Army 1LT Leimkuhler searches an Afghan man for weapons in a village near Kandahar 
U.S. Army 1LT Jean Leimkuhler searches for weapons on an Afghan man, who works for a private security firm escorting truck convoys, after U.S. soldiers found illegal weapons in his vehicle, in a village near Kandahar April 27, 2008. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic (AFGHANISTAN) 
AFGHANISTAN/
RTR1ZYES 
April 27, 2008 
U.S. Army 1LT Jean Leimkuhler searches for weapons on an Afghan man, who works for a private security... 
Kandahar, Afghanistan 
U.S. Army 1LT Jean Leimkuhler searches an Afghan man for weapons in a village near Kandahar 
U.S. Army 1LT Jean Leimkuhler searches for weapons on an Afghan man, who works for a private security firm escorting truck convoys, after U.S. soldiers found illegal weapons in his vehicle, in a village near Kandahar April 27, 2008. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic (AFGHANISTAN) 
AFGHANISTAN/
RTR1ZYEP 
April 27, 2008 
U.S. Army 1LT Jean Leimkuhler searches for weapons on an Afghan man who works for a private security... 
Kandahar, Afghanistan 
U.S. Army 1LT Leimkuhler searches an Afghan man for weapons in a village near Kandahar 
U.S. Army 1LT Jean Leimkuhler searches for weapons on an Afghan man who works for a private security firm escorting truck convoys after U.S. soldiers found illegal weapons in his vehicle, in a village near Kandahar April 27, 2008. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic (AFGHANISTAN) 
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