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Search results for: Psychiatry

TAIWAN-HEALTH/MEMORY
RTS2663C
November 16, 2018
Dr Lin Ming-teng, head of the psychiatry department at Taipei Veterans General Hospital, shows X-ray...
Hsinchu, Taiwan
The Wider Image: Taiwan's "notebook boy" commits his memories in writing
Dr Lin Ming-teng, head of the psychiatry department at Taipei Veterans General Hospital, shows X-ray images explaining the difference between a normal brain (L) and Chen Hong-zhi's brain during an appointment at the hospital, in Hsinchu, Taiwan, July 31, 2018. Chen Hong-zhi suffers from short-term memory loss after a traffic accident which left him with serious brain damage. Lin said Chen has made remarkable progress despite his extensive brain damage. "From the X-ray, we can see a large part of his brain in black - these are the sections that were operated on after the traffic accident," Lin said. "After losing such a substantial portion of his brain, it is quite amazing for him to achieve what he is doing now," Lin said, adding that Chen could only remember things he had done in the last five to 10 minutes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu SEARCH "SIU MEMORY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TAIWAN-HEALTH/MEMORY
RTS265W0
November 15, 2018
A combination picture shows a scanned copy of a note written by Chen Hong-zhi, 26, who suffers from short-term...
Hsinchu, Taiwan
The Wider Image: Taiwan's "notebook boy" commits his memories in writing
A combination picture shows a scanned copy of a note written by Chen Hong-zhi, 26, who suffers from short-term memory loss, detailing his day on July 31, where he removed 3898 weeds in the morning and 888 in the afternoon, went to the hospital on his own, and received T$100 ($3.2) for helping a friend (L), and Dr Lin Ming-teng, head of the psychiatry department at Taipei Veterans General Hospital, talking to Chen Hong-zhi after a medical appointment at the hospital, in Hsinchu, Taiwan, July 31, 2018. The note reads: "July 31 go to hospital alone Shao's home YA 100 3898 10:08". REUTERS/Tyrone Siu EUTERS/Tyrone Siu SEARCH "SIU MEMORY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TAIWAN-HEALTH/MEMORY
RTS265VI
November 15, 2018
Dr Lin Ming-teng, head of the psychiatry department at Taipei Veterans General Hospital, talks to Chen...
Hsinchu, Taiwan
The Wider Image: Taiwan's "notebook boy" commits his memories in writing
Dr Lin Ming-teng, head of the psychiatry department at Taipei Veterans General Hospital, talks to Chen Hong-zhi after a medical appointment at the hospital, in Hsinchu, Taiwan, July 31, 2018. Lin said Chen has made remarkable progress despite his extensive brain damage. "After losing such a substantial portion of his brain, it is quite amazing for him to achieve what he is doing now," Lin said, adding that Chen could only remember things he had done in the last five to 10 minutes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu SEARCH "SIU MEMORY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
USA-PENNSYLVANIA/TRANSGENDER
RTX1F2WQ
June 04, 2015
Dr. Rachel Levine, physician general nominee, is seen at the State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania...
Harrisburg, UNITED STATES
Dr. Rachel Levine, physician general nominee, at the State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
Dr. Rachel Levine, physician general nominee, is seen at the State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania May 4, 2015. Levine, a transgender woman who teaches pediatrics and psychiatry at Penn State College of Medicine, faces the Pennsylvania Senate for a confirmation hearing after being appointed physician-general. Picture taken May 4, 2015. REUTERS/Daniel Shanken
USA-PENNSYLVANIA/TRANSGENDER
RTX1F2WM
June 04, 2015
Dr. Rachel Levine, physician general nominee, is seen in her office in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania May...
Harrisburg, UNITED STATES
Dr. Rachel Levine, physician general nominee, in her office in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
Dr. Rachel Levine, physician general nominee, is seen in her office in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania May 4, 2015. Levine, a transgender woman who teaches pediatrics and psychiatry at Penn State College of Medicine, faces the Pennsylvania Senate for a confirmation hearing after being appointed physician-general. Picture taken May 4, 2015. REUTERS/Daniel Shanken
USA-PENNSYLVANIA/TRANSGENDER
RTX1F2WG
June 04, 2015
Dr. Rachel Levine, physician general nominee, at the State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania May 4,...
Harrisburg, UNITED STATES
Dr. Rachel Levine, physician general nominee, at the State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
Dr. Rachel Levine, physician general nominee, at the State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania May 4, 2015. Levine, a transgender woman who teaches pediatrics and psychiatry at Penn State College of Medicine, faces the Pennsylvania Senate for a confirmation hearing after being appointed physician-general. Picture taken May 4, 2015. REUTERS/Daniel Shanken
USA-PENNSYLVANIA/TRANSGENDER
RTX1F2WB
June 04, 2015
Dr. Rachel Levine, physician general nominee, is seen in her office in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania May...
Harrisburg, UNITED STATES
Dr. Rachel Levine, physician general nominee, in her office in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
Dr. Rachel Levine, physician general nominee, is seen in her office in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania May 4, 2015. Levine, a transgender woman who teaches pediatrics and psychiatry at Penn State College of Medicine, faces the Pennsylvania Senate for a confirmation hearing after being appointed physician-general. Picture taken May 4, 2015. REUTERS/Daniel Shanken
USA-PENNSYLVANIA/TRANSGENDER
RTX1F2WA
June 04, 2015
Dr. Rachel Levine, physician general nominee, is seen in her office in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania May...
Harrisburg, UNITED STATES
Dr. Rachel Levine, physician general nominee, in her office in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
Dr. Rachel Levine, physician general nominee, is seen in her office in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania May 4, 2015. Levine, a transgender woman who teaches pediatrics and psychiatry at Penn State College of Medicine, faces the Pennsylvania Senate for a confirmation hearing after being appointed physician-general. Picture taken May 4, 2015. REUTERS/Daniel Shanken
A Picture And Its Story
A Picture And Its Story
Protesting Through Art - 21 Oct 2014
5 PICTURES
RUSSIA-PROTEST/
RTR4AQC0
October 19, 2014
Artist Pyotr Pavlensky sits on the wall enclosing the Serbsky State Scientific Center for Social and...
Moscow, Russia
Artist Pyotr Pavlensky sits on the wall enclosing the Serbsky State Scientific Center for Social and...
Artist Pyotr Pavlensky sits on the wall enclosing the Serbsky State Scientific Center for Social and Forensic Psychiatry after cutting off part of his earlobe as part of his protest action entitled "Segregation" in Moscow October 19, 2014. Pavlensky protested against the usage of forensic psychiatry for politically motivated purposes. He cut off his earlobe to demonstrate how authorities could "cut off" an unwanted individual from society by using psychiatric and medical diagnosis to forcefully send a person to a penitentiary hospital, according to Pavlensky. REUTERS/Maxim Zmeyev (RUSSIA - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS HEALTH CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
RUSSIA-PROTEST/
RTR4AQBY
October 19, 2014
Artist Pyotr Pavlensky sits on the wall enclosing the Serbsky State Scientific Center for Social and...
Moscow, Russia
Artist Pyotr Pavlensky sits on the wall enclosing the Serbsky State Scientific Center for Social and...
Artist Pyotr Pavlensky sits on the wall enclosing the Serbsky State Scientific Center for Social and Forensic Psychiatry after cutting off part of his earlobe as part of his protest action entitled "Segregation" in Moscow October 19, 2014. Pavlensky protested against the usage of forensic psychiatry for politically motivated purposes. He cut off his earlobe to demonstrate how authorities could "cut off" an unwanted individual from society by using psychiatric and medical diagnosis to forcefully send a person to a penitentiary hospital, according to Pavlensky. REUTERS/Maxim Zmeyev (RUSSIA - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS HEALTH CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
RUSSIA-PROTEST/
RTR4AQ89
October 19, 2014
Artist Pyotr Pavlensky cuts off a part of his earlobe while sitting on the wall enclosing the Serbsky...
Moscow, Russia
Artist Pyotr Pavlensky cuts off a part of his earlobe during his protest action titled "Segregation"...
Artist Pyotr Pavlensky cuts off a part of his earlobe while sitting on the wall enclosing the Serbsky State Scientific Center for Social and Forensic Psychiatry during his protest action titled "Segregation" in Moscow October 19, 2014. Pavlensky protested against the usage of forensic psychiatry for politically motivated purposes. He cut off his earlobe to demonstrate how authorities could "cut off" an unwanted individual from society by using psychiatric and medical diagnosis to forcefully send a person to a penitentiary hospital, according to Pavlensky. REUTERS/Maxim Zmeyev (RUSSIA - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS HEALTH CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
RUSSIA-PROTEST/
RTR4AQ7D
October 19, 2014
Artist Pyotr Pavlensky cuts off a part of his earlobe while sitting on the wall enclosing the Serbsky...
Moscow, Russia
Artist Pyotr Pavlensky cuts off a part of his earlobe while sitting on the wall during his protest action...
Artist Pyotr Pavlensky cuts off a part of his earlobe while sitting on the wall enclosing the Serbsky State Scientific Center for Social and Forensic Psychiatry during his protest action titled "Segregation" in Moscow October 19, 2014. Pavlensky protested against the usage of forensic psychiatry for politically motivated purposes. He cut off his earlobe to demonstrate how authorities could "cut off" an unwanted individual from society by using psychiatric and medical diagnosis to forcefully send a person to a penitentiary hospital, according to Pavlensky. REUTERS/Maxim Zmeyev (RUSSIA - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS HEALTH CRIME LAW SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
USA-SHOOTING-FORTHOOD
RTR3JU6H
April 03, 2014
Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry Alex Thompson speaks about the condition of patients undergoing...
TEMPLE, UNITED STATES
Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry Thompson speaks about the condition of patients undergoing treatment...
Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry Alex Thompson speaks about the condition of patients undergoing treatment at the hospital following a shooting at Fort Hood Army Base, during a news conference at Scott & White Memorial Hospital in Temple, Texas April 3, 2014. Hospital officials said three patients were in critical condition, two were in fair condition and four were in good condition after Wednesday's shooting at Fort Hood. REUTERS/Erich Schlegel (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW MILITARY)
USA-SHOOTING-FORTHOOD
RTR3JU5R
April 03, 2014
Hospital officials attend a news conference about the condition of patients undergoing treatment at the...
TEMPLE, UNITED STATES
News conference about the condition of patients undergoing treatment at the hospital following a shooting...
Hospital officials attend a news conference about the condition of patients undergoing treatment at the hospital following a shooting at Fort Hood Army Base, at Scott & White Memorial Hospital in Temple, Texas April 3, 2014. Hospital officials said three patients were in critical condition, two were in fair condition and four were in good condition after Wednesday's shooting at Fort Hood. Pictured are (L-R) Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry Alex Thompson, Chief Medical Officer Stephen Sibbitt, Medical Director of Trauma Services Matthew Davis and Director of Pastoral Care Larry Smith. REUTERS/Erich Schlegel (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW MILITARY)
USA-SHOOTING-FORTHOOD
RTR3JU5E
April 03, 2014
Medical director of Trauma Services, Matthew Davis (2nd R) speaks about the condition of patients undergoing...
TEMPLE, UNITED STATES
News conference about the condition of patients undergoing treatment at the hospital following a shooting...
Medical director of Trauma Services, Matthew Davis (2nd R) speaks about the condition of patients undergoing treatment at the hospital following a shooting at Fort Hood Army Base, during a news conference at Scott & White Memorial Hospital in Temple, Texas April 3, 2014. Hospital officials said three patients were in critical condition, two were in fair condition and four were in good condition after Wednesday's shooting at Fort Hood. Also pictured are Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry Alex Thompson, Chief Medical Officer Stephen Sibbitt and Director of Pastoral Care Larry Smith. REUTERS/Erich Schlegel (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW MILITARY)
USA-SHOOTING-FORTHOOD
RTR3JU5D
April 03, 2014
Medical director of Trauma Services, Matthew Davis (2nd R) speaks about the condition of patients undergoing...
TEMPLE, UNITED STATES
News conference about the condition of patients undergoing treatment at the hospital following a shooting...
Medical director of Trauma Services, Matthew Davis (2nd R) speaks about the condition of patients undergoing treatment at the hospital following a shooting at Fort Hood Army Base, during a news conference at Scott & White Memorial Hospital in Temple, Texas April 3, 2014. Hospital officials said three patients were in critical condition, two were in fair condition and four were in good condition after Wednesday's shooting at Fort Hood. Also pictured are Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry Alex Thompson, Chief Medical Officer Stephen Sibbitt and Director of Pastoral Care Larry Smith. REUTERS/Erich Schlegel (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW MILITARY)
RUSSIA-PROTEST/
RTX143ZX
October 08, 2013
Mikhail Kosenko sits inside a defendants' cage during a court hearing in Moscow May 29, 2013. A Russian...
Moscow, Russia
Kosenko sits inside defendants' cage during court hearing in Moscow
Mikhail Kosenko sits inside a defendants' cage during a court hearing in Moscow May 29, 2013. A Russian court on Tuesday ordered Kosenko, a critic of President Vladimir Putin confined to a psychiatric ward indefinitely over clashes with police at a protest, a ruling likened by rights activists to abuses of psychiatry during the Soviet era to jail dissidents. Kosenko, who had undergone outpatient psychiatric treatment before his arrest, was among more than two dozen accused of rioting at a protest in Moscow on May 6, 2012, the eve of Putin's inauguration to a new six-year term. Picture taken May 29, 2013. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov (RUSSIA - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST CRIME LAW HEALTH)
RUSSIA-PROTEST/
RTX143ZV
October 08, 2013
Mikhail Kosenko sits inside a defendants' cage during a court hearing in Moscow May 29, 2013. A Russian...
Moscow, Russia
Kosenko sits inside defendants' cage during a court hearing in Moscow
Mikhail Kosenko sits inside a defendants' cage during a court hearing in Moscow May 29, 2013. A Russian court on Tuesday ordered Kosenko, a critic of President Vladimir Putin confined to a psychiatric ward indefinitely over clashes with police at a protest, a ruling likened by rights activists to abuses of psychiatry during the Soviet era to jail dissidents. Kosenko, who had undergone outpatient psychiatric treatment before his arrest, was among more than two dozen accused of rioting at a protest in Moscow on May 6, 2012, the eve of Putin's inauguration to a new six-year term. Picture taken May 29, 2013. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov (RUSSIA - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST CRIME LAW HEALTH)
USA-MARIJUANA/LEGALIZATION
RTR3CC3P
January 11, 2013
Dr. Paula Riggs, associate psychiatry professor at the University of Colorado speaks at a news conference...
Denver, UNITED STATES
Dr. Paula Riggs, associate psychiatry professor at the University of Colorado speaks at a news conference...
Dr. Paula Riggs, associate psychiatry professor at the University of Colorado speaks at a news conference announcing the launch of Project SAM in Denver, Colorado, January 10, 2013. Smart Approach to Marijuana (SAM), spearheaded by Congressman Patrick Kennedy (D-R.I., retired, at left), opposes marijuana legalization. Picture taken January 10, 2013. REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH DRUGS SOCIETY POLITICS)
NORWAY-BREIVIK/
RTR33A3T
June 08, 2012
Judge Wenche Elizabeth Arntzen who presides in the case against terror and murder charged Anders Behring...
Oslo, Norway
Judge Arntzen who presides in the case against terror and murder charged Breivik, is pictured in a court...
Judge Wenche Elizabeth Arntzen who presides in the case against terror and murder charged Anders Behring Breivik, is pictured in a court in Oslo Friday June 8, 2012. Arntzen overruled a request from Breivik's defence lawyer who protested part of the testimony of professor of psychiatry, Ulrik Fredrik Malt. REUTERS/Heiko Junge/NTB Scanpix/Pool (NORWAY - Tags: CRIME LAW)
NORWAY-BREIVIK/
RTR339S7
June 08, 2012
Ulrik Fredrik Malt, a professor of psychiatry, testifies in the case against terror and murder charged...
Oslo, Norway
Malt, a professor of psychiatry, testifies in the case against terror and murder charged Breivik at a...
Ulrik Fredrik Malt, a professor of psychiatry, testifies in the case against terror and murder charged Anders Behring Breivik at a court in Oslo June 8, 2012. Breivik killed 77 people on July 22, first detonating a car bomb outside government headquarters and killing eight, then gunning down 69 people, mostly teenagers, at the ruling Labour Party's summer camp on Utoeya Island. REUTERS/Heiko Junge/NTB Scanpix/Pool (NORWAY - Tags: CRIME LAW)
GREECE-ELECTION/SUICIDE
RTR31BX3
April 28, 2012
Nikiforos Angelopoulos, a professor of psychiatry, is seen in his office in Athens April 25, 2012. In...
Athens, Greece
To match Feature GREECE-ELECTION/SUICIDE
Nikiforos Angelopoulos, a professor of psychiatry, is seen in his office in Athens April 25, 2012. In a country that has had one of the lowest suicide rates in the world, a surge in the number of suicides in the wake of an economic crisis has shocked and gripped the Mediterranean nation - and its media - before a May 6 election. Experts say the numbers are relatively low - less than about 600 per year. But increases in suicides, attempted suicides, the use of anti-depressant medication and the need for psychiatric care are causing alarm in a nation unaccustomed to the problems. Angelopoulos, who has a busy psychotherapy practice in an upmarket Athens neighbourhood, said the crisis has exacerbated the problems for some already less stable people and estimates that about five percent of his patients have developed problems due to the crisis. Picture taken April 25, 2012. To match Feature GREECE-ELECTION/SUICIDE REUTERS/Erik Kirschbaum (GREECE - Tags: POLITICS HEALTH BUSINESS)
MEXICO-HEROIN/
RTR2YCED
February 24, 2012
National Institute of Psychiatry's Director Maria Elena Medina speaks about the patent of a new vaccine...
Mexico City, Mexico
National Institute of Psychiatry's Director Maria Elena Medina speaks about the patent of a new vaccine...
National Institute of Psychiatry's Director Maria Elena Medina speaks about the patent of a new vaccine that could reduce addiction to heroin, during a news conference at the institute in Mexico City February 23, 2012. Researchers at the institute say they have successfully tested the vaccine on mice and are preparing to test it on humans. The vaccine, which has been patented in the United States, works by making the body resistant to the effects of heroin, so users would no longer get a rush of pleasure when they smoke or inject it. REUTERS/Henry Romero (MEXICO - Tags: HEALTH DRUGS SOCIETY)
MEXICO-HEROIN/
RTR2YCEA
February 24, 2012
National Institute of Psychiatry's Director Maria Elena Medina speaks about the patent of a new vaccine...
Mexico City, Mexico
National Institute of Psychiatry's Director Maria Elena Medina speaks about the patent of a new vaccine...
National Institute of Psychiatry's Director Maria Elena Medina speaks about the patent of a new vaccine that could reduce addiction to heroin, during a news conference at the institute in Mexico City February 23, 2012. Researchers at the institute say they have successfully tested the vaccine on mice and are preparing to test it on humans. The vaccine, which has been patented in the United States, works by making the body resistant to the effects of heroin, so users would no longer get a rush of pleasure when they smoke or inject it. REUTERS/Henry Romero (MEXICO - Tags: HEALTH DRUGS SOCIETY)
MEXICO-HEROIN/
RTR2YCE8
February 24, 2012
National Institute of Psychiatry's Director Maria Elena Medina speaks about the patent of a new vaccine...
Mexico City, Mexico
National Institute of Psychiatry's Director Maria Elena Medina speaks about the patent of a new vaccine...
National Institute of Psychiatry's Director Maria Elena Medina speaks about the patent of a new vaccine that could reduce addiction to heroin, during a news conference at the institute in Mexico City February 23, 2012. Researchers at the institute say they have successfully tested the vaccine on mice and are preparing to test it on humans. The vaccine, which has been patented in the United States, works by making the body resistant to the effects of heroin, so users would no longer get a rush of pleasure when they smoke or inject it. REUTERS/Henry Romero (MEXICO - Tags: HEALTH DRUGS SOCIETY)
IRAQ/PSYCHIATRY
RTX6FNR
June 02, 2008
A doctor checks up on a patient in Baghdad's Ibn Rushud psychiatric hospital June 2, 2008. Peace of...
Baghdad, Iraq
To match feature IRAQ/PSYCHIATRY
A doctor checks up on a patient in Baghdad's Ibn Rushud psychiatric hospital June 2, 2008. Peace of mind is hard to come by in Iraq, both for the few psychiatrists who have not fled after their colleagues were killed, and for their patients. Scores of doctors and academics have been targeted by unknown gunmen seeking to spread fear and chaos in a multi-sided conflict that has killed tens of thousands of Iraqis. To match feature IRAQ/PSYCHIATRY REUTERS/Mahmoud Raouf Mahmoud (IRAQ)
IRAQ/PSYCHIATRY
RTX6FNO
June 02, 2008
A man stands next to his brother, a patient in Baghdad's Ibn Rushud psychiatric hospital, June 2, 2008....
Baghdad, Iraq
To match feature IRAQ/PSYCHIATRY
A man stands next to his brother, a patient in Baghdad's Ibn Rushud psychiatric hospital, June 2, 2008. Peace of mind is hard to come by in Iraq, both for the few psychiatrists who have not fled after their colleagues were killed, and for their patients. Scores of doctors and academics have been targeted by unknown gunmen seeking to spread fear and chaos in a multi-sided conflict that has killed tens of thousands of Iraqis. To match feature IRAQ/PSYCHIATRY REUTERS/Mahmoud Raouf Mahmoud (IRAQ)
IRAQ/PSYCHIATRY
RTX6FNC
June 02, 2008
Shaalan Jauda, the director of Baghdad's Ibn Rushud psychiatric hospital, poses for a picture inside...
Baghdad, Iraq
To match feature IRAQ/PSYCHIATRY
Shaalan Jauda, the director of Baghdad's Ibn Rushud psychiatric hospital, poses for a picture inside his office in Baghdad June 2, 2008. Every time Jauda receives a threatening text message on his mobile phone, he gets another glimpse of the terror ravaging his patients' minds. Peace of mind is hard to come by in Iraq, both for the few psychiatrists who have not fled after their colleagues were killed, and for their patients. Scores of doctors and academics have been targeted by unknown gunmen seeking to spread fear and chaos in a multi-sided conflict that has killed tens of thousands of Iraqis. To match feature IRAQ/PSYCHIATRY REUTERS/Mahmoud Raouf Mahmoud (IRAQ)
IRAQ/PSYCHIATRY
RTX6FN4
June 02, 2008
A doctor takes the blood pressure of a patient in Baghdad's Ibn Rushud psychiatric hospital June 2, 2008....
Baghdad, Iraq
To match feature IRAQ/PSYCHIATRY
A doctor takes the blood pressure of a patient in Baghdad's Ibn Rushud psychiatric hospital June 2, 2008. Peace of mind is hard to come by in Iraq, both for the few psychiatrists who have not fled after their colleagues were killed, and for their patients. Scores of doctors and academics have been targeted by unknown gunmen seeking to spread fear and chaos in a multi-sided conflict that has killed tens of thousands of Iraqis. To match feature IRAQ/PSYCHIATRY REUTERS/Mahmoud Raouf Mahmoud (IRAQ)
SERBIA/
RTXQV9
November 15, 2007
A child kneels down at the Kulina Center for the Disabled in southern Serbian village of Kulina some...
KULINA, Serbia
A child kneels down at the Kulina Center for the Disabled in southern Serbian village of Kulina some...
A child kneels down at the Kulina Center for the Disabled in southern Serbian village of Kulina some 200 km (124 miles) from Belgrade November 15, 2007. Serbian government officials on Thursday pledged to investigate allegations that disabled children were systematically abused in the country's psychiatric hospitals and social care institutions. REUTERS/Stevan Lazarevic (SERBIA)
INDIA-KASHMIR-SCARS/
RTR1PX7M
May 21, 2007
Kashmiris waits to receive counselling from a doctor (C) at Kashmir's psychiatry hospital in Srinagar...
Srinagar, India
To match feature INDIA-KASHMIR-SCARS/
Kashmiris waits to receive counselling from a doctor (C) at Kashmir's psychiatry hospital in Srinagar May 19, 2007. Officials say more than 42,000 people have been killed since Kashmir's 18-year-old separatist war against Indian rule . Rights groups put the toll at about 60,000 dead. But behind those headlines, doctors say thousands of people -- witnesses to killings, rape and torture by both sides in the dispute -- suffer traumas. Despite the stigma in Kashmir of entering a "mental hospital", in the psychiatric hospital in Srinagar, doctors had registered 63,000 patients last year, compared with 1,500 patients in 1989. Picture taken May 19, 2007. To match feature INDIA-KASHMIR-SCARS/ REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli (INDIAN ADMINISTERED KASHMIR)
INDIA-KASHMIR-SCARS/
RTR1PX7L
May 21, 2007
Majjid (R), a doctor at Kashmir's psychiatry hospital in Srinagar, checks the hands of a Kashmiri youth...
Srinagar, India
To match feature INDIA-KASHMIR-SCARS/
Majjid (R), a doctor at Kashmir's psychiatry hospital in Srinagar, checks the hands of a Kashmiri youth during a counselling session May 19, 2007. Officials say more than 42,000 people have been killed since Kashmir's 18-year-old separatist war against Indian rule . Rights groups put the toll at about 60,000 dead. But behind those headlines, doctors say thousands of people -- witnesses to killings, rape and torture by both sides in the dispute -- suffer traumas. Despite the stigma in Kashmir of entering a "mental hospital", in the psychiatric hospital in Srinagar, doctors had registered 63,000 patients last year, compared with 1,500 patients in 1989. Picture taken May 19, 2007. To match feature INDIA-KASHMIR-SCARS/ REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli (INDIAN ADMINISTERED KASHMIR)
INDIA-KASHMIR-SCARS/
RTR1PX7K
May 21, 2007
Majjid (R), a doctor at Kashmir's psychiatry hospital in Srinagar, talks to a Kashmiri youth during...
Srinagar, India
To match feature INDIA-KASHMIR-SCARS/
Majjid (R), a doctor at Kashmir's psychiatry hospital in Srinagar, talks to a Kashmiri youth during a counselling session May 19, 2007. Officials say more than 42,000 people have been killed since Kashmir's 18-year-old separatist war against Indian rule . Rights groups put the toll at about 60,000 dead. But behind those headlines, doctors say thousands of people -- witnesses to killings, rape and torture by both sides in the dispute -- suffer traumas. Despite the stigma in Kashmir of entering a "mental hospital", in the psychiatric hospital in Srinagar, doctors had registered 63,000 patients last year, compared with 1,500 patients in 1989. Picture taken May 19, 2007. To match feature INDIA-KASHMIR-SCARS/ REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli (INDIAN ADMINISTERED KASHMIR)
INDIA-KASHMIR-SCARS/
RTR1PX7J
May 21, 2007
A veiled Kashmiri woman waits to receive counselling from a doctor at Kashmir's psychiatry hospital in...
Srinagar, India
To match feature INDIA-KASHMIR-SCARS/
A veiled Kashmiri woman waits to receive counselling from a doctor at Kashmir's psychiatry hospital in Srinagar May 19, 2007. Officials say more than 42,000 people have been killed since Kashmir's 18-year-old separatist war against Indian rule . Rights groups put the toll at about 60,000 dead. But behind those headlines, doctors say thousands of people -- witnesses to killings, rape and torture by both sides in the dispute -- suffer traumas. Despite the stigma in Kashmir of entering a "mental hospital", in the psychiatric hospital in Srinagar, doctors had registered 63,000 patients last year, compared with 1,500 patients in 1989. Picture taken May 19, 2007. To match feature INDIA-KASHMIR-SCARS/ REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli (INDIAN ADMINISTERED KASHMIR)
INDIA-KASHMIR-SCARS/
RTR1PX7H
May 21, 2007
A doctor (R) checks the CAT scan report of a patient as a veiled Kashmiri woman waits to receive counselling...
Srinagar, India
To match feature INDIA-KASHMIR-SCARS/
A doctor (R) checks the CAT scan report of a patient as a veiled Kashmiri woman waits to receive counselling at Kashmir's psychiatry hospital in Srinagar May 19, 2007. Officials say more than 42,000 people have been killed since Kashmir's 18-year-old separatist war against Indian rule . Rights groups put the toll at about 60,000 dead. But behind those headlines, doctors say thousands of people -- witnesses to killings, rape and torture by both sides in the dispute -- suffer traumas. Despite the stigma in Kashmir of entering a "mental hospital", in the psychiatric hospital in Srinagar, doctors had registered 63,000 patients last year, compared with 1,500 patients in 1989. Picture taken May 19, 2007. To match feature INDIA-KASHMIR-SCARS/ REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli (INDIAN ADMINISTERED KASHMIR)
CHINA
RTXLKNR
October 21, 2002
A Chinese doctor stands by the doorway as he is surrounded by patients suffering psychiatric problems...
Beijing, China
A Chinese doctor stands by the doorway as he is surrounded by patients suffering psychiatric problem.....
A Chinese doctor stands by the doorway as he is surrounded by patients suffering psychiatric problems at the Beijing Mental Health Collaborating Centre in China's capital October 21, 2002. About 16 million people in China, or 1.23 percent of the country's population, suffer from schizophrenia, depression or other mental illnesses, according to the Ministry of Health. Patients on the mainland suffering serious psychiatric problems face a bleak future because of staff shortages and a lack of public awareness and legislation. China has only 575 mental health hospitals, and only 130,000 nurses and doctors specialising in psychiatry.
CHINA
RTXLKNQ
October 21, 2002
A Chinese patient stands next to a nurse at the Beijing Mental Health Collaborating Centre in China's...
Beijing, China
A Chinese patient stands next to a nurse at the Beijing Mental Health Collaborating Centre in China'.....
A Chinese patient stands next to a nurse at the Beijing Mental Health Collaborating Centre in China's capital October 21, 2002. About 16 million people in China, or 1.23 percent of the country's population, suffer schizophrenia, depression or other mental illnesses, according to the Ministry of Health. Patients on the mainland suffering serious psychiatric problems face a bleak future because of staff shortages and a lack of public awareness and legislation. China has only 575 mental health hospitals even though about 15 in every 1,000 mainlanders suffer from mental illness. The number of nurses and doctors specialising in psychiatry was only 130,000.
CHINA
RTRCG6M
October 21, 2002
A Chinese patient stands next to a nurse at the Beijing Mental Health
Collaborating Centre in China's...
Beijing, China - Peoples Republic of
A CHINESE PATIENT STANDS NEXT TO A NURSE AT THE BEIJING MENTAL HEALTH
COLLABORATING CENTRE IN BEIJING....
A Chinese patient stands next to a nurse at the Beijing Mental Health
Collaborating Centre in China's capital October 21, 2002. About 16
million people in China, or 1.23 percent of the country's population,
suffer schizophrenia, depression or other mental illnesses, according
to the Ministry of Health. Patients on the mainland suffering serious
psychiatric problems face a bleak future because of staff shortages and
a lack of public awareness and legislation. China has only 575 mental
health hospitals even though about 15 in every 1,000 mainlanders suffer
from mental illness. The number of nurses and doctors specialising in
psychiatry was only 130,000. REUTERS/Andrew Wong

ASW/DL
KANDEL
RTXK1PK
October 09, 2000
Dr. Eric Kandel, Columbia University Professor of Physiology and cell biophysics, psychiatry, biochemistry...
New York, USA
Dr. Eric Kandel, Columbia University Professor of Physiology and cell biophysics, psychiatry, bioche.....
Dr. Eric Kandel, Columbia University Professor of Physiology and cell biophysics, psychiatry, biochemistry and molecular biophysics waves during a news conference in New York, October 9, 2000, after being awarded the 2000 Nobel Prize for Medicine. Dr. Kandel, who was recognized for his pioneering work to understand the molecular basis of memory, shares the prize with [Arvid Carlsson of the University of Goteborg, Sweden and Paul Greengard of the Rockefeller University in New York for thieir contributions to the field of neuroscience.]
USA
RTXK1PJ
October 09, 2000
Dr. Eric Kandel (R) Columbia University Professor of Physiology and cell biophysics, psychiatry, biochemistry...
New York, USA
Dr. Eric Kandel (R) Columbia University Professor of Physiology and cell biophysics, psychiatry, bio.....
Dr. Eric Kandel (R) Columbia University Professor of Physiology and cell biophysics, psychiatry, biochemistry and molecular biophysics is congratulated by Columbia University President George Rupp at a news conference in New York, October 9, 2000, after he was awarded the 2000 Nobel Prize for Medicine. Kandel, who was recognized for his pioneering work to understand the molecular basis of memory, shares the prize with [Arvid Carlsson of the University of Goteborg, Sweden and Paul Greengard of the Rockefeller University in New York for thieir contributions to the field of neuroscience.]
KANDEL
RTXK1PI
October 09, 2000
Dr. Eric Kandel, Columbia University Professor of Physiology and cell biophysics, psychiatry, biochemistry...
New York, USA
Dr. Eric Kandel, Columbia University Professor of Physiology and cell biophysics, psychiatry, bioche.....
Dr. Eric Kandel, Columbia University Professor of Physiology and cell biophysics, psychiatry, biochemistry and molecular biophysics smiles during a news conference in New York, October 9, 2000, after being awarded the 2000 Nobel Prize for Medicine. Dr. Kandel, who was recognized for his pioneering work to understand the molecular basis of memory, shares the prize with [Arvid Carlsson of the University of Goteborg, Sweden and Paul Greengard of the Rockefeller University in New York for thieir contributions to the field of neuroscience.]
KANDEL
RTXK1PH
October 09, 2000
Dr. Eric Kandel, Columbia University Professor of Physiology and cell biophysics, psychiatry, biochemistry...
New York, USA
Dr. Eric Kandel, Columbia University Professor of Physiology and cell biophysics, psychiatry, bioche.....
Dr. Eric Kandel, Columbia University Professor of Physiology and cell biophysics, psychiatry, biochemistry and molecular biophysics smiles during a news conference in New York, October 9, 2000, after being awarded the 2000 Nobel Prize for Medicine. Dr. Kandel, who was recognized for his pioneering work to understand the molecular basis of memory, shares the prize with [Arvid Carlsson of the University of Goteborg, Sweden and Paul Greengard of the Rockefeller University in New York for thieir contributions to the field of neuroscience.
PRIZE NOBEL
RTR9A8A
October 09, 2000
Dr. Eric Kandel, Columbia University Professor of Physiology and cell biophysics, psychiatry, biochemistry...
New York, USA
DR ERIC KANDEL AFTER BEING AWARDED NOBEL PRIZE IN MEDICINE IN NEW YORK.
Dr. Eric Kandel, Columbia University Professor of Physiology and cell biophysics, psychiatry, biochemistry and molecular biophysics waves during a news conference in New York, October 9, 2000, after being awarded the 2000 Nobel Prize for Medicine. Dr. Kandel, who was recognized for his pioneering work to understand the molecular basis of memory, shares the prize with Arvid Carlsson of the University of Goteborg, Sweden and Paul Greengard of the Rockefeller University in New York for thieir contributions to the field of neuroscience.

MS
PRIZE NOBEL
RTR9A7Z
October 09, 2000
Dr. Eric Kandel (R) Columbia University Professor of Physiology and cell biophysics, psychiatry, biochemistry...
New York, USA
NOBEL WINNER DR ERIC KANDEL AND COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT RUPP.
Dr. Eric Kandel (R) Columbia University Professor of Physiology and cell biophysics, psychiatry, biochemistry and molecular biophysics is congratulated by Columbia University President George Rupp at a news conference in New York, October 9, 2000, after Kandel was awarded the 2000 Nobel Prize for Medicine. Dr. Kandel, who was recognized for his pioneering work to understand the molecular basis of memory, shares the prize with Arvid Carlsson of the University of Goteborg, Sweden and Paul Greengard of the Rockefeller University in New York for thieir contributions to the field of neuroscience.

MS/ME
PRIZE NOBEL
RTR9A7E
October 09, 2000
Dr. Eric Kandel, Columbia University Professor of Physiology and cell biophysics, psychiatry, biochemistry...
New York, USA
DR ERIC KANDEL AFTER BEING AWARDED NOBEL PRIZE IN MEDICINE.
Dr. Eric Kandel, Columbia University Professor of Physiology and cell biophysics, psychiatry, biochemistry and molecular biophysics smiles during a news conference in New York, October 9, 2000, after being awarded the 2000 Nobel Prize for Medicine. Dr. Kandel, who was recognized for his pioneering work to understand the molecular basis of memory, shares the prize with Arvid Carlsson of the University of Goteborg, Sweden and Paul Greengard of the Rockefeller University in New York for thieir contributions to the field of neuroscience.

MS/ME
PRIZE NOBEL
RTR9A77
October 09, 2000
Dr. Eric Kandel, Columbia University Professor of Physiology and cell biophysics, psychiatry, biochemistry...
New York, USA
DR ERIC KANDEL AFTER BEING AWARDED NOBEL PRIZE IN MEDICINE.
Dr. Eric Kandel, Columbia University Professor of Physiology and cell biophysics, psychiatry, biochemistry and molecular biophysics smiles during a news conference in New York, October 9, 2000, after being awarded the 2000 Nobel Prize for Medicine. Dr. Kandel, who was recognized for his pioneering work to understand the molecular basis of memory, shares the prize with Arvid Carlsson of the University of Goteborg, Sweden and Paul Greengard of the Rockefeller University in New York for thieir contributions to the field of neuroscience.

MS/ME
WAR PRISONER
RTR8CCD
September 18, 2000
KT/
Budapest, Hungary
HUNGARIAN PRISONER OF WAR ANDRAS TAMAS SITS IN PSYCHIATRY INSTITUTE IN BUDAPEST.
KT/
WAR PRISONER
RTR8CBB
September 18, 2000
KT/
Budapest, Hungary
HUNGARIAN PRISONER OF WAR ANDRAS TAMAS SITS IN PSYCHIATRY INSTITUTE IN BUDAPEST.
KT/
FEATURE
RTR1R7S
February 29, 2000
FOR RELEASE WITH STORY BC-LIFE-BRAZIL-CARNIVAL - Revelers from a mental institute parade in colorfully-dressed...
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
REVELERS FROM PSYCHIATRIC INSTITUTE AT CARNIVAL PARADE IN RIO.
FOR RELEASE WITH STORY BC-LIFE-BRAZIL-CARNIVAL - Revelers from a mental institute parade in colorfully-dressed carnival outfits through a Rio de Janeiro street. For many, Rio's famous Carnival is a chance to indulge in four days of drunken partying but some of the city's doctors see a relaxed samba parade as great therapy for their mentally-disturbed patients. Doctors at Rio state university's Psychiatry Institute (IPUB) say that Carnival, an essential part of Brazilian culture, should be for everyone and insist the group spirit of a street parade, with its music and dancing, really boost their patients' self confidence and social integration. Picture taken February 25.

GN/JP
FEATURE
RTR1R7M
February 29, 2000
FOR RELEASE WITH STORY BC-LIFE-BRAZIL-CARNIVAL - Revelers from a mental institute parade in colorfully-dressed...
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
CARNIVAL REVELERS FROM PSYCHIATRIC INSTITUTE PARADE IN RIO DE JANEIRO.
FOR RELEASE WITH STORY BC-LIFE-BRAZIL-CARNIVAL - Revelers from a mental institute parade in colorfully-dressed carnival outfits through a Rio de Janeiro street. For many, Rio's famous Carnival is a chance to indulge in four days of drunken partying but some of the city's doctors see a relaxed samba parade as great therapy for their mentally-disturbed patients. Doctors at Rio state university's Psychiatry Institute (IPUB) say that Carnival, an essential part of Brazilian culture, should be for everyone and insist the group spirit of a street parade, with its music and dancing, really boost their patients' self confidence and social integration. Picture taken February 25.

GN/JP
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