Ajax loader
By using our website, you agree to our use of cookies as described in Cookie Policy.

Can't find what you're looking for?

 

Be sure to Sign in to see all available content.

 

If you don't have an account, Register here.

Search results for: Public-housing

PEOPLE-JOHN LEWIS/CAPITOL
RTX7M793
July 28, 2020
Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) join members of the...
Washington, UNITED STATES
Members of the public pay their respects at the casket of civil rights pioneer and longtime U.S. Representative...
Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) join members of the public to pay their respects at the casket of civil rights pioneer and longtime U.S. Representative John Lewis (D-GA), as it sits at the top of the East Front Steps of the U.S. Capitol for a public viewing in Washington, U.S., July 27, 2020. Picture taken July 27, 2020. REUTERS/Leah Millis
PEOPLE-JOHN LEWIS/CAPITOL
RTX7M66X
July 27, 2020
White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows and U.S. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, pay their respects...
Washington, UNITED STATES
The casket of civil rights pioneer and longtime U.S. Representative John Lewis as it sits at the top...
White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows and U.S. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, pay their respects at the casket of civil rights pioneer and longtime U.S. Representative John Lewis (D-GA), as it sits at the top of the East Front Steps of the U.S. Capitol for a public viewing in Washington, U.S., July 27, 2020. REUTERS/Al Drago
PEOPLE-JOHN LEWIS/CAPITOL
RTX7M66V
July 27, 2020
White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows and U.S. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, pay their respects...
Washington, UNITED STATES
The casket of civil rights pioneer and longtime U.S. Representative John Lewis as it sits at the top...
White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows and U.S. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, pay their respects at the casket of civil rights pioneer and longtime U.S. Representative John Lewis (D-GA), as it sits at the top of the East Front Steps of the U.S. Capitol for a public viewing in Washington, U.S., July 27, 2020. REUTERS/Al Drago
PEOPLE-JOHN LEWIS/CAPITOL
RTX7M65G
July 27, 2020
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Ben Carson pays his respects at the casket of civil rights...
Washington, UNITED STATES
The casket of civil rights pioneer and longtime U.S. Representative John Lewis as it sits at the top...
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Ben Carson pays his respects at the casket of civil rights pioneer and longtime U.S. Representative John Lewis (D-GA), as it sits at the top of the East Front Steps of the U.S. Capitol for a public viewing in Washington, U.S., July 27, 2020. REUTERS/Al Drago
PEOPLE-JOHN LEWIS/CAPITOL
RTX7M65C
July 27, 2020
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Ben Carson pays his respects at the casket of civil rights...
Washington, UNITED STATES
The casket of civil rights pioneer and longtime U.S. Representative John Lewis as it sits at the top...
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Ben Carson pays his respects at the casket of civil rights pioneer and longtime U.S. Representative John Lewis (D-GA), as it sits at the top of the East Front Steps of the U.S. Capitol for a public viewing in Washington, U.S., July 27, 2020. REUTERS/Al Drago
SOCCER-ENGLAND-LEE-BRS/REPORT
RTS3K5UZ
July 16, 2020
Soccer Football - Championship - Leeds United v Barnsley - Elland Road, Leeds, Britain - July 16, 2020...
Leeds, United Kingdom
Championship - Leeds United v Barnsley
Soccer Football - Championship - Leeds United v Barnsley - Elland Road, Leeds, Britain - July 16, 2020 General view of a mural of the Leeds United crest on the side of a house near the stadium before the match, as play resumes behind closed doors following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) Action Images/Lee Smith EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXR7
July 10, 2020
Egilda Orrico, an activist, sits in the window of 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Egilda Orrico, an activist, sits in the window of 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. "This place changed my life. This house chose me, then I chose it" said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXQK
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim who since the end of April has been living in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim who since the end of April has been living in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, opens a window in her room, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. "I escaped from my home and an anti-violence centre put me in a hotel for 3 weeks. I didn't leave the room and I had a lot of panic attacks. I felt so lonely, even though my son was with me. When I arrived at Lucha I felt for the first time that I was not alone. After a short time here, the panic attacks were over," said the woman. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXOS
July 10, 2020
Milva Pistoni, an activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Milva Pistoni, an activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, prepares bread at the house, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. "Lucha is a house of mothers, made by women for women" said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXMK
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim who since the end of April has been living in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim who since the end of April has been living in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, sleeps on the sofa, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. ?Maybe I loved too much and this love was never returned to me. When I saw Lucha?s door for the first time, it was like seeing paradise after dying? said the woman. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXKY
July 10, 2020
A portrait of Simona Ammerata, the activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A portrait of Simona Ammerata, the activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. "I had the idea for Lucha with my sisters, and we made it happen. For me, it's the possibility that the world can change. Women who enter Lucha teach me what it means to suffer from domestic violence and how to escape from it. I have the tools to help, but they have the experience" said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXKX
July 10, 2020
Barbara Tarantino, an activist and seamstress from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Barbara Tarantino, an activist and seamstress from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, is seen at work, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. "There should be 1,000 places like Lucha. Here I found a place of humanity that made me fall in love with my job again" said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXH9
July 10, 2020
Rachele Damiani, an activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Rachele Damiani, an activist from 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, attends the screening of a film at the house, in Rome, Italy, July 7, 2020. "Lucha pushes me to ask myself a lot of questions. It makes possible difficult but wonderful ways to grow as a person", said the activist. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXFR
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen due to anonymity, attends her personal consultation...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen due to anonymity, attends her personal consultation with an activist at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The woman has been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXDN
July 10, 2020
Domestic abuse victims, whose faces cannot be seen to protect their identities, attend a weekly meeting...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
Domestic abuse victims, whose faces cannot be seen to protect their identities, attend a weekly meeting with activists at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The women have been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXDA
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, chats to an activist at Rome's...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, chats to an activist at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The woman has been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXC1
July 10, 2020
People attend a screening of a film at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
People attend a screening of a film at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 7, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 7, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXBR
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, chats to activists at Rome's...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, chats to activists at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The woman has been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXBF
July 10, 2020
An activist talks to a child of a domestic abuse victim who used to live in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
An activist talks to a child of a domestic abuse victim who used to live in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXA0
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, attends a personal consultation...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, whose face cannot be seen to protect her identity, attends a personal consultation with an activist at Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city. The woman has been living at Lucha since the end of April, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IX8E
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim, with her face obscured to protect her identity, hugs one of the activists during...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim, with her face obscured to protect her identity, hugs one of the activists during a visit back to 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women’s house run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence, in Rome, Italy, July 9, 2020. “Lucha will always be my home” said the victim who lived in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' for two years.'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women’s rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city’s heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence – and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 9, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IX8D
July 10, 2020
A child is reflected on a mirror inside a tailoring room at 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A child is reflected on a mirror inside a tailoring room at 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
Coronavirus
Coronavirus
Australia to ease high-rise lockdown
35 PICTURES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA
RTS3IGP2
July 08, 2020
Emergency workers prepare to help residents on day four of a lockdown, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Melbourne, Australia
Emergency workers prepare to help residents on day four of a lockdown, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Emergency workers prepare to help residents on day four of a lockdown, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, at the public housing tower blocks in Flemington, Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Melanie Burton
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA
RTS3IGP0
July 08, 2020
Emergency workers prepare to help residents on day four of a lockdown, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Melbourne, Australia
Emergency workers prepare to help residents on day four of a lockdown, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Emergency workers prepare to help residents on day four of a lockdown, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, at the public housing tower blocks in Flemington, Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Melanie Burton
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA
RTS3IGNO
July 08, 2020
Emergency workers prepare to help residents on day four of a lockdown, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Melbourne, Australia
Emergency workers prepare to help residents on day four of a lockdown, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Emergency workers prepare to help residents on day four of a lockdown, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, at the public housing tower blocks in Flemington, Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Melanie Burton
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IGAE
July 08, 2020
General view of a public housing tower locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease...
Melbourne, Australia
General view of a public housing tower locked down in response to an outbreak of COVID-19 is seen in...
General view of a public housing tower locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is seen in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IG96
July 08, 2020
A sign reading "jail" is seen in the window of a public housing tower locked down in response to an outbreak...
Melbourne, Australia
A sign reading "jail" is seen in the window of a public housing tower locked down in response to an outbreak...
A sign reading "jail" is seen in the window of a public housing tower locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IG8Q
July 08, 2020
A police officer patrols a hallway next to a window sign reading "Guantanamo Jail" in a public housing...
Melbourne, Australia
A window sign reading "Guantanamo Jail" is seen in a public housing tower locked down in response to...
A police officer patrols a hallway next to a window sign reading "Guantanamo Jail" in a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IG8P
July 08, 2020
A resident looks out a window of a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak of the...
Melbourne, Australia
A resident looks out the window of a public housing tower locked down in response to an outbreak of COVID-19...
A resident looks out a window of a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IG8M
July 08, 2020
A healthcare worker signals to her colleagues from a window of a public housing tower, locked down in...
Melbourne, Australia
A healthcare worker signals to her colleagues from a window of a public housing tower locked down in...
A healthcare worker signals to her colleagues from a window of a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IG79
July 08, 2020
Police officers look out the windows of a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak...
Melbourne, Australia
Police officers look out the windows of a public housing tower locked down in response to an outbreak...
Police officers look out the windows of a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IG78
July 08, 2020
A sign for an urgent care centre set up to care for infected residents of nearby public housing towers...
Melbourne, Australia
An urgent care centre sign is seen near public housing towers locked down in response to an outbreak...
A sign for an urgent care centre set up to care for infected residents of nearby public housing towers locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is seen in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IG71
July 08, 2020
Workers carry food supplies into a tent set up outside a public housing tower locked down in response...
Melbourne, Australia
Workers carry food supplies into a tent outside a public housing tower locked down in response to an...
Workers carry food supplies into a tent set up outside a public housing tower locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IG6Y
July 08, 2020
Healthcare workers wait to test residents inside a public housing tower, locked down in response to an...
Melbourne, Australia
Healthcare workers wait to test residents inside a public housing tower locked down in response to an...
Healthcare workers wait to test residents inside a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IG6T
July 08, 2020
Healthcare workers walk with testing supplies into a public housing tower, locked down in response to...
Melbourne, Australia
Healthcare workers walk with testing supplies into a public housing tower locked down in response to...
Healthcare workers walk with testing supplies into a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IFT1
July 08, 2020
A playground is cordoned off with caution tape in front of a public housing tower, locked down in response...
Melbourne, Australia
A playground is cordoned off with caution tape in response to a COVID-19 outbreak, in Melbourne
A playground is cordoned off with caution tape in front of a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IFSZ
July 08, 2020
A playground is cordoned off with caution tape in front of a public housing tower, locked down in response...
Melbourne, Australia
A playground is cordoned off with caution tape in response to a COVID-19 outbreak, in Melbourne
A playground is cordoned off with caution tape in front of a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IFSS
July 08, 2020
Fire Services Victoria members write each other's names on their hazmat suits as they prepare to enter...
Melbourne, Australia
Response personnel prepare to enter a public housing tower, locked down in response to a COVID-19 outbreak,...
Fire Services Victoria members write each other's names on their hazmat suits as they prepare to enter a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IFSG
July 08, 2020
Fire Services Victoria members walk toward a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak...
Melbourne, Australia
Response personnel walk toward a public housing tower, locked down in response to a COVID-19 outbreak,...
Fire Services Victoria members walk toward a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IFSB
July 08, 2020
Fire Services Victoria members write each other's names on their hazmat suits as they prepare to enter...
Melbourne, Australia
Response personnel prepare to enter a public housing tower, locked down in response to a COVID-19 outbreak,...
Fire Services Victoria members write each other's names on their hazmat suits as they prepare to enter a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IFS6
July 08, 2020
Fire Services Victoria personnel meet outside a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak...
Melbourne, Australia
Response personnel prepare to enter a public housing tower, locked down in response to a COVID-19 outbreak,...
Fire Services Victoria personnel meet outside a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IFRZ
July 08, 2020
Fire Services Victoria personnel wearing hazmat suits meet in a restricted area outside a public housing...
Melbourne, Australia
Response personnel prepare to enter a public housing tower, locked down in response to a COVID-19 outbreak,...
Fire Services Victoria personnel wearing hazmat suits meet in a restricted area outside a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IFRT
July 08, 2020
Victoria Police officers meet outside a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak...
Melbourne, Australia
Police meet outside a public housing tower, locked down in response to a COVID-19 outbreak, in Melbourne...
Victoria Police officers meet outside a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IFRR
July 08, 2020
A public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19),...
Melbourne, Australia
A public housing tower, locked down in response to a COVID-19 outbreak, is seen in Melbourne
A public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), is seen in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IFRK
July 08, 2020
A resident looks out from a window in a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak...
Melbourne, Australia
A resident looks out from a window in a public housing tower, locked down in response to a COVID-19 outbreak,...
A resident looks out from a window in a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IFRD
July 08, 2020
Response personnel participate in a briefing outside a public housing tower, locked down in response...
Melbourne, Australia
Personnel participate in a briefing outside a public housing tower, locked down in response to a COVID-19...
Response personnel participate in a briefing outside a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IFR6
July 08, 2020
A Victoria Police chaplain and fellow officers meet outside a public housing tower, locked down in response...
Melbourne, Australia
Police meet outside a public housing tower, locked down in response to a COVID-19 outbreak, in Melbourne...
A Victoria Police chaplain and fellow officers meet outside a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IFR5
July 08, 2020
A support worker stands with a young child after he was separated from his mother outside a public housing...
Melbourne, Australia
A support worker stands with a child outside a public housing tower, locked down in response to a COVID-19...
A support worker stands with a young child after he was separated from his mother outside a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IFQQ
July 08, 2020
A police officer and a support worker speak to a woman and a child outside a public housing tower, locked...
Melbourne, Australia
A police officer and a support worker speak to a woman and a child outside a public housing tower, locked...
A police officer and a support worker speak to a woman and a child outside a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IFPF
July 08, 2020
Members of Surf Life Saving Victoria remove food trays from a public housing tower, locked down in response...
Melbourne, Australia
Personnel remove food trays from a public housing tower, locked down in response to a COVID-19 outbreak,...
Members of Surf Life Saving Victoria remove food trays from a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IFP9
July 08, 2020
A "Refugee Welcome Zone" sign is seen outside a public housing tower locked down in response to an outbreak...
Melbourne, Australia
A "Refugee Welcome Zone" sign is seen outside a public housing tower locked down in response to a COVID-19...
A "Refugee Welcome Zone" sign is seen outside a public housing tower locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IFP1
July 08, 2020
A message is seen next to pot plants left by community members as a sign of solidarity outside of public...
Melbourne, Australia
A message is seen next to pot plants left by community members as a sign of solidarity outside of public...
A message is seen next to pot plants left by community members as a sign of solidarity outside of public housing towers locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IFNV
July 08, 2020
Pot plants left by community members as a showing of solidarity outside of public housing towers locked...
Melbourne, Australia
Plants left in solidarity outside public housing towers locked down in response to a COVID-19 outbreak,...
Pot plants left by community members as a showing of solidarity outside of public housing towers locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) are seen in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IF23
July 08, 2020
Police officers meet inside an emergency relief centre outside a public housing tower, locked down in...
Melbourne, Australia
Police officers meet inside an emergency relief centre outside a locked down public housing tower in...
Police officers meet inside an emergency relief centre outside a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IF1Y
July 08, 2020
Vehicles drive past public housing towers, locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus...
Melbourne, Australia
Vehicles drive past public housing towers locked down in response to a COVID-19 outbreak in Melbourne...
Vehicles drive past public housing towers, locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IF0U
July 08, 2020
An emergency relief centre outside a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak of...
Melbourne, Australia
An emergency relief centre outside a locked down public housing tower in response to a COVID-19 outbreak...
An emergency relief centre outside a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), is seen in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IEZI
July 08, 2020
A handmade sign is seen in a window of a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak...
Melbourne, Australia
A handmade sign is seen in a window of a public housing tower locked down in response to a COVID-19 outbreak...
A handmade sign is seen in a window of a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IEZF
July 08, 2020
Members of the Victoria State Emergency Service meet outside a public housing tower, locked down in response...
Melbourne, Australia
Emergency service personnel meet outside a public housing tower locked down in response to a COVID-19...
Members of the Victoria State Emergency Service meet outside a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-TOWERS
RTS3IEZE
July 08, 2020
Handmade signs are seen in a window of a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak...
Melbourne, Australia
Handmade signs are seen in a window of a public housing tower locked down in response to a COVID-19 outbreak...
Handmade signs are seen in a window of a public housing tower, locked down in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Melbourne, Australia, July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Sandra Sanders
Sort by
Display
Items per page
Page
of 185