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OLYMPICS-2020/TOKYO-PORTRAITS
RTXCHB3L
May 02, 2021
Tomohiro Hirayama, 37, an office worker, poses with his wife Rio Matsumoto, an actress and yoga trainer,...
Tokyo, Japan
The Wider Image: From the streets of Tokyo, 22 residents weigh up the Olympic Games
Tomohiro Hirayama, 37, an office worker, poses with his wife Rio Matsumoto, an actress and yoga trainer, and his 11-month-old son for a portrait on their way to a restaurant in Tokyo, Japan, May 2, 2021. "As for the Olympics, we've been in favour of them for quite a long time. The Olympic village is only a short walk from where we live and then the venues in the area have been completed. So from the point of view of those of us who live there, a sense of excitement about the Olympics and a positive feeling have strengthened," said Hirayama. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon SEARCH "KYUNG-HOON PORTRAITS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/DAUGHTER-CANCER
RTXBI5PD
April 15, 2021
15-year-old Rebecca Zammit Lupi, a cancer patient, celebrates her birthday with her friends Luisa Zammit...
KAPPARA, Malta
The Wider Image: The first photo I ever took of my daughter, and the last
15-year-old Rebecca Zammit Lupi, a cancer patient, celebrates her birthday with her friends Luisa Zammit and Elea Broger, following almost five months of lockdown during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak whilst she received treatment for cancer in the Sir Anthony Mamo Oncology Centre in Mater Dei Hospital, at home in Kappara, Malta, August 3, 2020. "My 15th birthday was obviously quite a different experience for me since I couldn't see many friends or interact with them as I normally would and also had to spend most of the day in an N95 mask. However, I got to see some of my best friends whom I hadn't seen in months which felt great!" said Rebecca. REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi SEARCH "REBECCA LUPI" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES THE IMAGES SHOULD ONLY BE USED TOGETHER WITH THE STORY - NO STAND-ALONE USES
RUSSIA-ODDLY/TATTOO
RTXAY1IP
March 29, 2021
Pensioner Vladimir Sedakov, nicknamed Spartak, poses for a picture while sitting on his goat in Yekaterinburg,...
Yekaterinburg, Russia
Pensioner Vladimir Sedakov poses for a picture in Yekaterinburg
Pensioner Vladimir Sedakov, nicknamed Spartak, poses for a picture while sitting on his goat in Yekaterinburg, Russia March 28, 2021. The active lifestyle of a 74-year-old Vladimir Sedakov, who is on his way to cover himself in tattoos top to toe, is quite different from that of a typical pensioner - he creates poetry and paintings, wears incredibly crafted costumes and owns a pet goat called Marusya. Picture taken March 28, 2021. REUTERS/Alexei Kolchin
RUSSIA-ODDLY/TATTOO
RTXAY1E3
March 29, 2021
Pensioner Vladimir Sedakov, nicknamed Spartak, holds a cat at home in Yekaterinburg, Russia March 28,...
Yekaterinburg, Russia
Pensioner Vladimir Sedakov holds a cat at home in Yekaterinburg
Pensioner Vladimir Sedakov, nicknamed Spartak, holds a cat at home in Yekaterinburg, Russia March 28, 2021. The active lifestyle of 74-year-old Vladimir Sedakov, who is on his way to cover himself in tattoos top to toe, is quite different from that of a typical pensioner - he creates poetry and paintings, wears incredibly crafted costumes and owns a pet goat called Marusya. Picture taken March 28, 2021. REUTERS/Alexei Kolchin
RUSSIA-ODDLY/TATTOO
RTXAY1CX
March 29, 2021
Pensioner Vladimir Sedakov, nicknamed Spartak, poses for a picture at home in Yekaterinburg, Russia March...
Yekaterinburg, Russia
Pensioner Vladimir Sedakov poses for a picture at home in Yekaterinburg
Pensioner Vladimir Sedakov, nicknamed Spartak, poses for a picture at home in Yekaterinburg, Russia March 28, 2021. The active lifestyle of 74-year-old Vladimir Sedakov, who is on his way to cover himself in tattoos top to toe, is quite different from that of a typical pensioner - he creates poetry and paintings, wears incredibly crafted costumes and owns a pet goat called Marusya. Picture taken March 28, 2021. REUTERS/Alexei Kolchin
RUSSIA-ODDLY/TATTOO
RTXAY1CW
March 29, 2021
Pensioner Vladimir Sedakov, nicknamed Spartak, works on his creation at home in Yekaterinburg, Russia...
Yekaterinburg, Russia
Pensioner Vladimir Sedakov works at home in Yekaterinburg
Pensioner Vladimir Sedakov, nicknamed Spartak, works on his creation at home in Yekaterinburg, Russia March 28, 2021. The active lifestyle of 74-year-old Vladimir Sedakov, who is on his way to cover himself in tattoos top to toe, is quite different from that of a typical pensioner - he creates poetry and paintings, wears incredibly crafted costumes and owns a pet goat called Marusya. Picture taken March 28, 2021. REUTERS/Alexei Kolchin
RUSSIA-ODDLY/TATTOO
RTXAY1BK
March 29, 2021
Pensioner Vladimir Sedakov, nicknamed Spartak, works on his creation at home in Yekaterinburg, Russia...
Yekaterinburg, Russia
Pensioner Vladimir Sedakov works at home in Yekaterinburg
Pensioner Vladimir Sedakov, nicknamed Spartak, works on his creation at home in Yekaterinburg, Russia March 28, 2021. The active lifestyle of 74-year-old Vladimir Sedakov, who is on his way to cover himself in tattoos top to toe, is quite different from that of a typical pensioner - he creates poetry and paintings, wears incredibly crafted costumes and owns a pet goat called Marusya. Picture taken March 28, 2021. REUTERS/Alexei Kolchin
RUSSIA-ODDLY/TATTOO
RTXAY1BJ
March 29, 2021
Pensioner Vladimir Sedakov, nicknamed Spartak, poses for a picture at home in Yekaterinburg, Russia March...
Yekaterinburg, Russia
Pensioner Vladimir Sedakov poses for a picture at home in Yekaterinburg
Pensioner Vladimir Sedakov, nicknamed Spartak, poses for a picture at home in Yekaterinburg, Russia March 28, 2021. The active lifestyle of 74-year-old Vladimir Sedakov, who is on his way to cover himself in tattoos top to toe, is quite different from that of a typical pensioner - he creates poetry and paintings, wears incredibly crafted costumes and owns a pet goat called Marusya. Picture taken March 28, 2021. REUTERS/Alexei Kolchin TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
RUSSIA-ODDLY/TATTOO
RTXAY185
March 29, 2021
Pensioner Vladimir Sedakov, nicknamed Spartak, poses for a picture at home in Yekaterinburg, Russia March...
Yekaterinburg, Russia
Pensioner Vladimir Sedakov poses for a picture at home in Yekaterinburg
Pensioner Vladimir Sedakov, nicknamed Spartak, poses for a picture at home in Yekaterinburg, Russia March 28, 2021. The active lifestyle of a 74-year-old Vladimir Sedakov, who is on his way to cover himself in tattoos top to toe, is quite different from that of a typical pensioner - he creates poetry and paintings, wears incredibly crafted costumes and owns a pet goat called Marusya. Picture taken March 28, 2021. REUTERS/Alexei Kolchin
WOMENS-DAY/BRITAIN-NHS
RTXA5IVZ
March 07, 2021
Jacqui Jocelyn, 53, an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Nurse at East Lancashire NHS Trust poses for a portrait...
Blackburn, United Kingdom
International Women's Day NHS Portraits
Jacqui Jocelyn, 53, an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Nurse at East Lancashire NHS Trust poses for a portrait ahead of International Women's Day at The Royal Blackburn Teaching Hospital in north west England, Britain, March 2, 2021. Picture taken March 2, 2021. "We’re worried what it's going to be like after, actually, for the nurses, because it's been quite traumatic seeing the things we’ve seen on the unit." Jocelyn said. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
WOMENS-DAY/BRITAIN-NHS
RTXA5IRZ
March 07, 2021
Jacqui Jocelyn, 53, an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Nurse at East Lancashire NHS Trust poses for a portrait...
Blackburn, United Kingdom
International Women's Day NHS Portraits
Jacqui Jocelyn, 53, an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Nurse at East Lancashire NHS Trust poses for a portrait ahead of International Women's Day at The Royal Blackburn Teaching Hospital in north west England, Britain, March 2, 2021. Picture taken March 2, 2021. "We’re worried what it's going to be like after, actually, for the nurses, because it's been quite traumatic seeing the things we’ve seen on the unit." Jocelyn said. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/TEXAS-FUNERAL HOME
RTX9I11R
February 18, 2021
Chuck Pryor, the funeral director of Pryority Funeral Experience, wears a protective face-mask as he...
Houston, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: 'I just ask God to help me': Texas funeral home crushed by death as U.S. COVID toll...
Chuck Pryor, the funeral director of Pryority Funeral Experience, wears a protective face-mask as he poses for a portrait while making preparations ahead of a funeral, during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Houston, Texas, U.S., February 2, 2021. As the virus showed no sign of releasing its grip and deaths mounted over the summer and in the fall, exhausted workers at Pryority Funeral Experience fell ill while others quit. "People quit because they mentally can't handle it," Pryor said. "I pray God, - just give me strength... I want to run away right now, to be honest ... I'm concerned about myself breaking down so I just ask God to help me." REUTERS/Callaghan O'Hare SEARCH "FUNERALS O'HARE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/TEXAS-FUNERAL HOME
RTX9I11M
February 18, 2021
Chuck Pryor, the funeral director of Pryority Funeral Experience, wheels the casket of Dwight Morgan,...
Houston, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: 'I just ask God to help me': Texas funeral home crushed by death as U.S. COVID toll...
Chuck Pryor, the funeral director of Pryority Funeral Experience, wheels the casket of Dwight Morgan, 52, who died from complications from the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), to the plot where he will be buried at Earthman Resthaven Cemetery in Houston, Texas, U.S., February 2, 2021. As the virus showed no sign of releasing its grip and deaths mounted over the summer and in the fall, exhausted workers at Pryority Funeral Experience fell ill while others quit. "People quit because they mentally can't handle it," Pryor said. "I pray God, - just give me strength... I want to run away right now, to be honest ... I'm concerned about myself breaking down so I just ask God to help me." REUTERS/Callaghan O'Hare SEARCH "FUNERALS O'HARE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/TEXAS-FUNERAL HOME
RTX9I11I
February 18, 2021
Chuck Pryor, the funeral director of Pryority Funeral Experience, picks up an outfit that a person who...
SAN FELIPE, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: 'I just ask God to help me': Texas funeral home crushed by death as U.S. COVID toll...
Chuck Pryor, the funeral director of Pryority Funeral Experience, picks up an outfit that a person who died of causes unrelated to COVID-19, will wear to their funeral, during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in San Felipe, Texas, U.S., February 12, 2021. As the virus showed no sign of releasing its grip and deaths mounted over the summer and in the fall, exhausted workers at Pryority Funeral Experience fell ill while others quit. "People quit because they mentally can't handle it," Pryor said. "I pray God, - just give me strength... I want to run away right now, to be honest ... I'm concerned about myself breaking down so I just ask God to help me." REUTERS/Callaghan O'Hare SEARCH "FUNERALS O'HARE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/TEXAS-FUNERAL HOME
RTX9I11D
February 18, 2021
Chuck Pryor, the funeral director of Pryority Funeral Experience, wears a protective face mask as he...
Houston, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: 'I just ask God to help me': Texas funeral home crushed by death as U.S. COVID toll...
Chuck Pryor, the funeral director of Pryority Funeral Experience, wears a protective face mask as he picks up the body of a person who died of causes unrelated to COVID-19, during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Houston, Texas, U.S., February 12, 2021. As the virus showed no sign of releasing its grip and deaths mounted over the summer and in the fall, exhausted workers at Pryority Funeral Experience fell ill while others quit. "People quit because they mentally can't handle it," Pryor said. "I pray God, - just give me strength... I want to run away right now, to be honest ... I'm concerned about myself breaking down so I just ask God to help me." REUTERS/Callaghan O'Hare SEARCH "FUNERALS O'HARE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
USA-TRUMP/IMAGES
RTX8NFIO
January 19, 2021
Protesters rally at the White House against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd,...
Washington, UNITED STATES
A Picture and its Story: Protests, rallies and two impeachments: Trump's presidency in photographs
Protesters rally at the White House against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, in Washington, D.C., U.S. May 31, 2020. Jonathan Ernst: "On this night, protesters who had gathered near the White House in response to the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis were met by riot police firing tear gas and rubber ordnance. Protesters will frequently use the White House as a backdrop for their cause, but this was the first time I'd seen it quite like this – with maybe the world's most recognizable facade looming behind a cloud of smoke and the silhouetted figures of protesters dodging ... projectiles." REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst/File Photo SEARCH "PHOTOGRAPHERS TRUMP" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY.
SUMO-JAPAN/KID
RTX8NAWD
January 18, 2021
Kyuta Kumagai, 10, trains on a Dohyo, a traditional ring in which sumo wrestling bouts are held, at Komatsuryu...
Tokyo, Japan
The Wider Image: Meet Kyuta: the 10-year-old, 85-kilo sumo in training
Kyuta Kumagai, 10, trains on a Dohyo, a traditional ring in which sumo wrestling bouts are held, at Komatsuryu Sumo Club in Tokyo, Japan, December 6, 2020. "Sumo training is something you don't describe with words like 'enjoy'," Kyuta said. "When it became tough? I have thought about (quitting) sometimes." REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon SEARCH "KYUNG-HOON SUMO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
SUMO-JAPAN/KID
RTX8NAW3
January 18, 2021
Kyuta Kumagai, 10, practises sumo on a Dohyo, a traditional ring in which sumo wrestling bouts are held,...
Tokyo, Japan
The Wider Image: Meet Kyuta: the 10-year-old, 85-kilo sumo in training
Kyuta Kumagai, 10, practises sumo on a Dohyo, a traditional ring in which sumo wrestling bouts are held, at Komatsuryu Sumo Club in Tokyo, Japan, December 6, 2020. "Sumo training is something you don't describe with words like 'enjoy'," Kyuta said. "When it became tough? I have thought about (quitting) sometimes." REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon SEARCH "KYUNG-HOON SUMO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
CHILE-PROTEST/
RTX8DBXW
December 02, 2020
A demonstrator holds a sign that reads "We wish you an unhappy birthday, Pinera. Quit!" next to a barricade...
Santiago, Chile
Protest against Chile's President Sebastian Pinera and his government during his birthday, in Santiago...
A demonstrator holds a sign that reads "We wish you an unhappy birthday, Pinera. Quit!" next to a barricade during a protest against Chile's President Sebastian Pinera and his government, during Pinera's birthday, in Santiago, Chile December 1, 2020. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
USA-ELECTION/IMAGES
RTX87GMI
November 05, 2020
Voters wait in a long line to cast their ballots at Church of the Servant in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma...
OKLAHOMA, UNITED STATES
A Picture and its Story: The stories behind the standout images from the U.S. election
Voters wait in a long line to cast their ballots at Church of the Servant in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma U.S., November 3, 2020. Photographer Nick Oxford: "A seemingly endless line of socially distanced voters greeted me when I arrived at this polling place in Oklahoma City around 8 AM. With another 100 or so people inside, it was taking about two and a half to three hours to vote but people were quite relaxed standing or sitting in their unusual self-created pattern. The buildings facility manager kindly escorted me to the roof, where I could put the turnout into perspective." REUTERS/Nick Oxford/File photo SEARCH "ELECTIONS PHOTOGRAPHERS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E9B
October 15, 2020
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E9A
October 15, 2020
Cravats and bow ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Cravats and bow ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Cravats and bow ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E99
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E98
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury looks at silk ties displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury looks at silk ties displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury looks at silk ties displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E97
October 15, 2020
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
London, United Kingdom
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E96
October 15, 2020
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E95
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E94
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E92
October 15, 2020
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E91
October 15, 2020
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E90
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8Z
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury holds a bespoke tailcoat in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row,...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury holds a bespoke tailcoat in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row,...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury holds a bespoke tailcoat in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8Y
October 15, 2020
Bunches of swatches are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Bunches of swatches are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Bunches of swatches are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8X
October 15, 2020
Handkerchiefs are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Handkerchiefs are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Handkerchiefs are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8W
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8P
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8M
October 15, 2020
A general view of Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak,...
London, United Kingdom
General view of Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak,...
A general view of Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8L
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-GRANDAD
RTX80IU2
October 07, 2020
Ines Prandini, 85, ties her husband Gino Verani's, 87, shoelaces, at their home, during the coronavirus...
SAN FIORANO, Italy
The Wider Image: Losing my grandfather to dementia during the pandemic
Ines Prandini, 85, ties her husband Gino Verani's, 87, shoelaces, at their home, during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in San Fiorano, Italy, March 17, 2020. Marzio Toniolo, Prandini and Verani's grandson, who took the photo, said the picture was quite symbolic of what Prandini was for Verani in recent years: constant and total support. REUTERS/MarzioToniolo SEARCH "TONIOLO GRANDFATHER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDIA-VICTIMS
RTX7Z827
October 01, 2020
Dixit Vinodbhai Patel, 19, a student, shows a picture on his phone of his father Vinodbhai Maganbhai...
Ahmedabad, India
The Wider Image: Indians share the stories of loved ones they lost to the pandemic
Dixit Vinodbhai Patel, 19, a student, shows a picture on his phone of his father Vinodbhai Maganbhai Patel, 54, a shopkeeper, who died due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), as he poses for a photograph, in Ahmedabad, India, September 25, 2020. "After my father's death, all responsibility is on my head as my father was the only earning member in our family. Presently I try to fulfil all family requirements, I try to be a good son, a loving brother. My college is closed at the movement, but when it starts, I will quit my studies to take care of my family," Dixit said. REUTERS/Amit Dave SEARCH "COVID DEATHS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/PENNSYLVANIA-EDUCATION
RTX7YQKW
September 29, 2020
Cristina Lentz picks up her son Zachary from kindergarten at Yorkshire Elementary School in York, Pennsylvania,...
York, UNITED STATES
York Suburban schools resume with hybrid in-person and online classes
Cristina Lentz picks up her son Zachary from kindergarten at Yorkshire Elementary School in York, Pennsylvania, U.S., September 18, 2020. Lentz used to be a social worker for the York City schools, but quit in 2019 due to frustrations with the district. York Suburban school district is holding hybrid in-person and online classes this fall. Picture taken September 18, 2020. REUTERS/Rachel Wisniewski
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/PENNSYLVANIA-EDUCATION
RTX7YQKV
September 29, 2020
Cristina Lentz and her son Zachary say hello to Zachary's former swim teacher, Jillian, outside of Yorkshire...
York, UNITED STATES
York Suburban schools resume with hybrid in-person and online classes
Cristina Lentz and her son Zachary say hello to Zachary's former swim teacher, Jillian, outside of Yorkshire Elementary School in York, Pennsylvania, U.S., September 18, 2020. Lentz used to be a social worker for the York City schools, but quit in 2019 due to frustrations with the district. York Suburban school district is holding hybrid in-person and online classes this fall. Picture taken September 18, 2020. REUTERS/Rachel Wisniewski
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/PENNSYLVANIA-EDUCATION
RTX7YQKR
September 29, 2020
Cristina Lentz picks up her son Zachary from kindergarten at Yorkshire Elementary School in York, Pennsylvania,...
York, UNITED STATES
York Suburban schools resume with hybrid in-person and online classes
Cristina Lentz picks up her son Zachary from kindergarten at Yorkshire Elementary School in York, Pennsylvania, U.S., September 18, 2020. Lentz used to be a social worker for the York City schools, but quit in 2019 due to frustrations with the district. York Suburban school district is holding hybrid in-person and online classes this fall. Picture taken September 18, 2020. REUTERS/Rachel Wisniewski
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/PENNSYLVANIA-EDUCATION
RTX7YQKF
September 29, 2020
Cristina Lentz poses for a photo with her son Zachary at Yorkshire Elementary School in York, Pennsylvania,...
York, UNITED STATES
York Suburban schools resume with hybrid in-person and online classes
Cristina Lentz poses for a photo with her son Zachary at Yorkshire Elementary School in York, Pennsylvania, U.S., September 18, 2020. Lentz used to be a social worker for the York City schools, but quit in 2019 due to frustrations with the district. York Suburban school district is holding hybrid in-person and online classes this fall. Picture taken September 18, 2020. REUTERS/Rachel Wisniewski
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/DAUGHTER-CANCER
RTX7YIC8
September 28, 2020
Cancer patient Rebecca Zammit Lupi celebrates her 15th birthday with her friends Luisa Zammit and Elea...
KAPPARA, Malta
The Wider Image: The pandemic, a deadly cancer and my 14-year-old daughter
Cancer patient Rebecca Zammit Lupi celebrates her 15th birthday with her friends Luisa Zammit and Elea Broger, following almost five months of lockdown during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak whilst she received treatment for cancer in the Sir Anthony Mamo Oncology Centre in Mater Dei Hospital, at home in Kappara, Malta, August 3, 2020. "My 15th birthday was obviously quite a different experience for me since I couldn?t see many friends or interact with them as I normally would and also had to spend most of the day in an N95 mask. However, I got to see some of my best friends whom I hadn?t seen in months which felt great! For my birthday, I asked for donations to Puttinu Cares Foundation. I chose this charity because their mission means a lot to me, and I was thrilled that so many people contributed as a way of celebrating with me. Puttinu Cares has helped me throughout my whole experience and will continue to do so especially if I have to go to Oxford for an operation in the future, as well as helping other cancer patients," said Rebecca. REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi SEARCH "REBECCA LUPI" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES THE IMAGES SHOULD ONLY BE USED TOGETHER WITH THE STORY - NO STAND-ALONE USES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/DAUGHTER-CANCER
RTX7YIC6
September 28, 2020
Cancer patient Rebecca Zammit Lupi celebrates her 15th birthday with her friends Luisa Zammit and Elea...
KAPPARA, Malta
The Wider Image: The pandemic, a deadly cancer and my 14-year-old daughter
Cancer patient Rebecca Zammit Lupi celebrates her 15th birthday with her friends Luisa Zammit and Elea Broger, following almost five months of lockdown during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak whilst she received treatment for cancer in the Sir Anthony Mamo Oncology Centre in Mater Dei Hospital, at home in Kappara, Malta, August 3, 2020. "My 15th birthday was obviously quite a different experience for me since I couldn?t see many friends or interact with them as I normally would and also had to spend most of the day in an N95 mask. However, I got to see some of my best friends whom I hadn?t seen in months which felt great! For my birthday, I asked for donations to Puttinu Cares Foundation. I chose this charity because their mission means a lot to me, and I was thrilled that so many people contributed as a way of celebrating with me. Puttinu Cares has helped me throughout my whole experience and will continue to do so especially if I have to go to Oxford for an operation in the future, as well as helping other cancer patients," said Rebecca. REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi SEARCH "REBECCA LUPI" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES THE IMAGES SHOULD ONLY BE USED TOGETHER WITH THE STORY - NO STAND-ALONE USES
In the Headlines
In the Headlines
Weekend of mass protests in Belarus
31 PICTURES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHINA-TAOISM
RTX7UJ0L
September 10, 2020
Priest Zhang Zongyan, 27, a politics study graduate, arranges memorial tablets at Taoist temple Jiuyang...
Laiwu, China
The Wider Image: Taoist priest honours China's coronavirus dead with memorial tablets
Priest Zhang Zongyan, 27, a politics study graduate, arranges memorial tablets at Taoist temple Jiuyang Palace, in Laiwu of Jinan city, Shandong province, China, September 7, 2020. During her studies, Zongyan unexpectedly encountered a Taoist ceremony on her trip. She visited a Taoist temple where she first experienced Taoist music and dance. She was fascinated by the rhythm and costumes. After her graduation, Zongyan worked for a year but more she learned about the Taoism, the more she was drawn to it. She then made her mind to quit her job and focus on studying Taoism. Five years ago, Zongyan was converted to Taoism in her home town. REUTERS/Tingshu Wang SEARCH "TAOISM TINGSHU" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHINA-TAOISM
RTX7UIZZ
September 10, 2020
Priest Zhang Zongyan, 27, a politics study graduate, dances at a memorial ceremony during Hungry Ghost...
Laiwu, China
The Wider Image: Taoist priest honours China's coronavirus dead with memorial tablets
Priest Zhang Zongyan, 27, a politics study graduate, dances at a memorial ceremony during Hungry Ghost Festival celebrations, at Taoist temple Jiuyang Palace, in Laiwu of Jinan city, Shandong province, China, September 1, 2020. During her studies, Zongyan unexpectedly encountered a Taoist ceremony on her trip. She visited a Taoist temple where she first experienced Taoist music and dance. She was fascinated by the rhythm and costumes. After her graduation, Zongyan worked for a year but more she learned about the Taoism, the more she was drawn to it. She then made her mind to quit her job and focus on studying Taoism. Five years ago, Zongyan was converted to Taoism in her home town. REUTERS/Tingshu Wang SEARCH "TAOISM TINGSHU" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHINA-TAOISM
RTX7UIZY
September 10, 2020
Priest Zhang Zongyan, 27, a politics study graduate, plays dulcimer during at Taoist temple Jiuyang Palace,...
Laiwu, China
The Wider Image: Taoist priest honours China's coronavirus dead with memorial tablets
Priest Zhang Zongyan, 27, a politics study graduate, plays dulcimer during at Taoist temple Jiuyang Palace, in Laiwu of Jinan city, Shandong province, China, September 1, 2020. During her studies, Zongyan unexpectedly encountered a Taoist ceremony on her trip. She visited a Taoist temple where she first experienced Taoist music and dance. She was fascinated by the rhythm and costumes. After her graduation, Zongyan worked for a year but more she learned about the Taoism, the more she was drawn to it. She then made her mind to quit her job and focus on studying Taoism. Five years ago, Zongyan was converted to Taoism in her home town. REUTERS/Tingshu Wang SEARCH "TAOISM TINGSHU" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHINA-TAOISM
RTX7UIZW
September 10, 2020
Priest Zhang Zongyan, 27, a politics study graduate, points a thermometer at priest Xia Shiran, 25, for...
Laiwu, China
The Wider Image: Taoist priest honours China's coronavirus dead with memorial tablets
Priest Zhang Zongyan, 27, a politics study graduate, points a thermometer at priest Xia Shiran, 25, for fun at Taoist temple Jiuyang Palace, in Laiwu of Jinan city, Shandong province, China, September 7, 2020. During her studies, Zongyan unexpectedly encountered a Taoist ceremony on her trip. She visited a Taoist temple where she first experienced Taoist music and dance. She was fascinated by the rhythm and costumes. After her graduation, Zongyan worked for a year but more she learned about the Taoism, the more she was drawn to it. She then made her mind to quit her job and focus on studying Taoism. Five years ago, Zongyan was converted to Taoism in her home town. REUTERS/Tingshu Wang SEARCH "TAOISM TINGSHU" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HUNGARY-MEDIA/
RTX7LJWO
July 24, 2020
Deputy editor in chief Veronika Munk and employees of Hungary's main independent news website "Index"...
Budapest, Hungary
Employees of Hungary's main independent news website "Index" quit in Budapest
Deputy editor in chief Veronika Munk and employees of Hungary's main independent news website "Index" leave the newsroom after they quit over the recent ousting of editor in chief Szabolcs Dull, in Budapest, Hungary, July 24, 2020. REUTERS/Bernadett Szabo
HUNGARY-MEDIA/
RTX7LJWM
July 24, 2020
Deputy editor in chief Veronika Munk speaks next to employees of Hungary's main independent news website...
Budapest, Hungary
Employees of Hungary's main independent news website "Index" quit in Budapest
Deputy editor in chief Veronika Munk speaks next to employees of Hungary's main independent news website "Index" as they gather in the newsroom after they quit over the recent ousting of editor in chief Szabolcs Dull, in Budapest, Hungary, July 24, 2020. REUTERS/Bernadett Szabo
HUNGARY-MEDIA/
RTX7LJWP
July 24, 2020
Deputy editor in chief Veronika Munk and employees of Hungary's main independent news website "Index"...
Budapest, Hungary
Employees of Hungary's main independent news website "Index" quit in Budapest
Deputy editor in chief Veronika Munk and employees of Hungary's main independent news website "Index" leave the newsroom after they quit over the recent ousting of editor in chief Szabolcs Dull, in Budapest, Hungary, July 24, 2020. REUTERS/Bernadett Szabo
HUNGARY-MEDIA/
RTX7LJW1
July 24, 2020
Deputy editor in chief Veronika Munk speaks next to employees of Hungary's main independent news website...
Budapest, Hungary
Employees of Hungary's main independent news website "Index" quit in Budapest
Deputy editor in chief Veronika Munk speaks next to employees of Hungary's main independent news website "Index" as they gather in the newsroom after they quit over the recent ousting of editor in chief Szabolcs Dull, in Budapest, Hungary, July 24, 2020. REUTERS/Bernadett Szabo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/JAPAN-GEISHA
RTS3K2F2
July 16, 2020
Maki, Mayu, Koiku and Ikuko, who are geisha, wear protective face masks as they walk to a restaurant...
Tokyo, Japan
The Wider Image: "It'll take all of our body and soul" - geisha struggle to survive in the shadow of...
Maki, Mayu, Koiku and Ikuko, who are geisha, wear protective face masks as they walk to a restaurant after attending a dance class, during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Tokyo, Japan. July 13, 2020. Ikuko fears an extended pandemic could prompt some geisha to quit. "Now is the worst of the worst", she said. "How are we going to get through? It'll take all of our body and soul." REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon SEARCH "GEISHA COVID-19" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHILDREN-DRAWING
RTX7F7E7
April 23, 2020
A combination picture shows Li Congchen, 11, posing for a photograph while holding a picture that he...
Beijing, China
The Wider Image: Children's drawings from lockdown show the world what they miss most
A combination picture shows Li Congchen, 11, posing for a photograph while holding a picture that he drew during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, as he stands by a window at his grandparent's home in Beijing, China, April 19, 2020. "In first frame here, it shows that viruses are landing on from a bat aircraft and they are terrifying human beings. The second frame is the viruses are beating humans on a street. The third frame shows a scientist who invented an impressive weapon aiming at destroying those viruses. The fourth frame tells that human volunteers formed up a dare-to-die squad. The last frame in the middle shows that human beings have defeated and diminished the viruses with vaccine guns." said Li. "I feel that sometimes it?s quite difficult to go out. I?m getting more online courses. But in general, days at home is not that bad because I can eat ice cream." REUTERS/Tingshu Wang SEARCH "CORONAVIRUS DRAWING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHILDREN-DRAWING
RTX7F7C2
April 23, 2020
Li Congchen, 11, poses for a photograph while holding a picture that he drew during the coronavirus disease...
Beijing, China
The Wider Image: Children's drawings from lockdown show the world what they miss most
Li Congchen, 11, poses for a photograph while holding a picture that he drew during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, as he stands by a window at his grandparent's home in Beijing, China, April 19, 2020. "In first frame here, it shows that viruses are landing on from a bat aircraft and they are terrifying human beings. The second frame is the viruses are beating humans on a street. The third frame shows a scientist who invented an impressive weapon aiming at destroying those viruses. The fourth frame tells that human volunteers formed up a dare-to-die squad. The last frame in the middle shows that human beings have defeated and diminished the viruses with vaccine guns." said Li. "I feel that sometimes it?s quite difficult to go out. I?m getting more online courses. But in general, days at home is not that bad because I can eat ice cream." REUTERS/Tingshu Wang SEARCH "CORONAVIRUS DRAWING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHILDREN-DRAWING
RTX7F7BC
April 23, 2020
Li Congchen, 11, poses for a photograph while holding a picture that he drew during the coronavirus disease...
Beijing, China
The Wider Image: Children's drawings from lockdown show the world what they miss most
Li Congchen, 11, poses for a photograph while holding a picture that he drew during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, as he stands by a window at his grandparent's home in Beijing, China April 19, 2020. "In first frame here, it shows that viruses are landing on from a bat aircraft and they are terrifying human beings. The second frame is the viruses beating humans on a street. The third frame shows a scientist who invented an impressive weapon aiming at destroying those viruses. The fourth frame tells that human volunteers formed up a dare-to-die squad. The last frame in the middle shows that human beings have defeated and diminished the viruses with vaccine guns", said Li. "I feel that sometimes it's quite difficult to go out. I’m getting more online courses. But in general, days at home are not that bad because I can eat ice cream." REUTERS/Tingshu Wang SEARCH "CORONAVIRUS DRAWING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-MEDICS
RTX7D3F6
April 15, 2020
Julia Trainor, 23, a registered nurse who is caring for COVID-19 patients at a surgical intensive care...
UNITED STATES
Wider Image: A day fighting the coronavirus: US hospital staff share hardest moments on shift
Julia Trainor, 23, a registered nurse who is caring for COVID-19 patients at a surgical intensive care unit (ICU), poses for a photograph after a 14-hour shift, outside the hospital where she works, during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, Maryland, U.S., April 8, 2020. "The hardest moment was having to put a breathing tube in my patient who could no longer breathe for herself and after the breathing tube went in, we called her family and the husband, of course, couldn't visit her because of visitor restrictions at the hospital. So I had to put him on the phone and hold the phone to her ear, as he told her that he loved her so much and then I had to wipe away her tears as she was crying," said Trainor. "I'm used to seeing very sick patients and I'm used to patients dying but nothing quite like this. In the flip of a switch, without the support, they're completely isolated. They're very sick. Some of them recover and some of them don't. But the hardest part, I would think, is them having to go through this feeling like they are alone." REUTERS/Rosem Morton SEARCH "MARYLAND COVID-19 HEALTH WORKERS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
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