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Search results for: Racial-oppression

MINNEAPOLIS-POLICE/PROTESTS-AURORA
RTS3GBOQ
June 28, 2020
DonQuenick Beasley demands "reparations for centuries of racial oppression" while addressing the crowd...
Aurora, UNITED STATES
People protest the death of Elijah McClain
DonQuenick Beasley demands "reparations for centuries of racial oppression" while addressing the crowd on a bullhorn at a protest against the death of Elijah McClain and police injustice outside the Aurora Municipal Center in Aurora, Colorado, U.S., June 27, 2020. REUTERS/Kevin Mohatt
COLORADO-POLICE/MCCLAIN PROTEST
RTS3GBN5
June 28, 2020
DonQuenick Beasley demands "reparations for centuries of racial oppression" while addressing the crowd...
Aurora, UNITED STATES
People protest the death of Elijah McClain
DonQuenick Beasley demands "reparations for centuries of racial oppression" while addressing the crowd on a bullhorn at a protest against the death of Elijah McClain and police injustice outside the Aurora Municipal Center in Aurora, Colorado, U.S., June 27, 2020. REUTERS/Kevin Mohatt
AFRICA-SLAVERY/TOURISM
RTS2N5GQ
August 20, 2019
U.S. professor Joyce Hope Scott, from Boston, stands at the 'Door of No Return' as she visits the 'Maison...
Dakar, Senegal
U.S. professor Joyce Hope Scott stands at the 'Door of No Return' as she visits the 'Maison Des Esclaves'...
U.S. professor Joyce Hope Scott, from Boston, stands at the 'Door of No Return' as she visits the 'Maison Des Esclaves' slaves house, a gathering point where slaves were shipped west in the 1700s and 1800s, at Goree Island off the coast of Dakar, Senegal July 7, 2019. Joyce said: "The legacy of slavery has not yet ended. Racism, racial discrimination, poverty, dispossession, oppression have not ended with the actual event of slavery (ending) itself. So even if we didnÕt want to remember, we are forced to because it is around us every day." The 400-year anniversary of the first slave boat to arrive in America from Africa has caused a rush of interest in heritage tourism in West Africa, as ancestors go back to ancient sites to delve into a dark and often hidden past.ÊPicture taken July 7, 2019. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Wider Image
Wider Image
Bridging the divide in Cape Town
19 PICTURES
SAFRICA-RACE/
RTST2M7
November 24, 2016
A city surrounded by ocean and divided in two by the naked rock of Table Mountain, Cape Town's incredible...
Cape Town, South Africa
The Wider Image: Bridging the divide in Cape Town
A city surrounded by ocean and divided in two by the naked rock of Table Mountain, Cape Town's incredible natural beauty belies a past of hundreds of years of slavery and racial oppression. Now a generation of artists, musicians, poets, and filmmakers is trying to overcome this legacy, and in South Africa, a country with 11 official languages, it is not just significant what they say, but how they say it.REUTERS/Joe Penney TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SEARCH "LANGUAGE CAPE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
USA-SHOOTING/SOUTH CAROLINA
RTX1JQ8E
July 09, 2015
Brittany "Bree" Newsome is arrested after the Confederate flag was removed from a pole at the Statehouse...
Columbia, UNITED STATES
Brittany "Bree" Newsome is arrested after the Confederate flag was removed from a pole at the Statehouse...
Brittany "Bree" Newsome is arrested after the Confederate flag was removed from a pole at the Statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina, June 27, 2015. An activist climbed a flagpole outside the South Carolina state capitol early on Saturday and took down the Confederate flag, state officials said, a day after U.S. President Barack Obama called the banner a symbol of racial oppression. Two people were arrested and charged with defacing a monument, the South Carolina Department of Public Safety said in a statement. The banner was replaced within an hour, it said. Brittany Newsome climbed the flag pole and James Ian Tyson stood inside a fence and assisted her, police said. They are both 30 years old and from North Carolina. REUTERS/Adam Anderson
USA-SHOOTING/SOUTH CAROLINA
RTX1JQ8B
July 09, 2015
Brittany "Bree" Newsome is arrested after the Confederate flag was removed from a pole at the Statehouse...
Columbia, UNITED STATES
Brittany "Bree" Newsome is arrested after the Confederate flag was removed from a pole at the Statehouse...
Brittany "Bree" Newsome is arrested after the Confederate flag was removed from a pole at the Statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina, June 27, 2015. An activist climbed a flagpole outside the South Carolina state capitol early on Saturday and took down the Confederate flag, state officials said, a day after U.S. President Barack Obama called the banner a symbol of racial oppression. Two people were arrested and charged with defacing a monument, the South Carolina Department of Public Safety said in a statement. The banner was replaced within an hour, it said. Brittany Newsome climbed the flag pole and James Ian Tyson stood inside a fence and assisted her, police said. They are both 30 years old and from North Carolina. REUTERS/Adam Anderson
USA-SHOOTING/SOUTH CAROLINA
RTX1JQ81
July 09, 2015
Brittany "Bree" Newsome removes the Confederate flag from a pole at the Statehouse in Columbia, South...
Columbia, UNITED STATES
Brittany "Bree" Newsome removes the Confederate flag from a pole at the Statehouse in Columbia
Brittany "Bree" Newsome removes the Confederate flag from a pole at the Statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina, June 27, 2015. An activist climbed a flagpole outside the South Carolina state capitol early on Saturday and took down the Confederate flag, state officials said, a day after U.S. President Barack Obama called the banner a symbol of racial oppression. Two people were arrested and charged with defacing a monument, the South Carolina Department of Public Safety said in a statement. The banner was replaced within an hour, it said. Brittany Newsome climbed the flag pole and James Ian Tyson stood inside a fence and assisted her, police said. They are both 30 years old and from North Carolina. REUTERS/Adam Anderson TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
USA-SHOOTING/SOUTH CAROLINA
RTX1JQ7Q
July 09, 2015
Brittany "Bree" Newsome removes the Confederate flag from a pole at the Statehouse in Columbia, South...
Columbia, UNITED STATES
Brittany "Bree" Newsome removes the Confederate flag from a pole at the Statehouse in Columbia
Brittany "Bree" Newsome removes the Confederate flag from a pole at the Statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina, June 27, 2015. An activist climbed a flagpole outside the South Carolina state capitol early on Saturday and took down the Confederate flag, state officials said, a day after U.S. President Barack Obama called the banner a symbol of racial oppression. Two people were arrested and charged with defacing a monument, the South Carolina Department of Public Safety said in a statement. The banner was replaced within an hour, it said. Brittany Newsome climbed the flag pole and James Ian Tyson stood inside a fence and assisted her, police said. They are both 30 years old and from North Carolina. REUTERS/Adam Anderson TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
USA-SHOOTING/SOUTH CAROLINA
RTX1JQ7N
July 09, 2015
James Tyson is arrested after Brittany "Bree" Newsome removed the Confederate flag from a pole at the...
Columbia, UNITED STATES
James Tyson is arrested after Bree Newsome removed the Confederate flag from a pole at the Statehouse...
James Tyson is arrested after Brittany "Bree" Newsome removed the Confederate flag from a pole at the Statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina, June 27, 2015. An activist climbed a flagpole outside the South Carolina state capitol early on Saturday and took down the Confederate flag, state officials said, a day after U.S. President Barack Obama called the banner a symbol of racial oppression. Two people were arrested and charged with defacing a monument, the South Carolina Department of Public Safety said in a statement. The banner was replaced within an hour, it said. Brittany Newsome climbed the flag pole and James Ian Tyson stood inside a fence and assisted her, police said. They are both 30 years old and from North Carolina. REUTERS/Adam Anderson
USA-SHOOTING/SOUTH CAROLINA
RTX1JQ7C
July 09, 2015
James Tyson and Brittany "Bree" Newsome are arrested after the Confederate flag was removed from a pole...
Columbia, UNITED STATES
James Tyson and Brittany "Bree" Newsome are arrested after the Confederate flag was removed from a pole...
James Tyson and Brittany "Bree" Newsome are arrested after the Confederate flag was removed from a pole at the Statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina, June 27, 2015. An activist climbed a flagpole outside the South Carolina state capitol early on Saturday and took down the Confederate flag, state officials said, a day after U.S. President Barack Obama called the banner a symbol of racial oppression. Two people were arrested and charged with defacing a monument, the South Carolina Department of Public Safety said in a statement. The banner was replaced within an hour, it said. Brittany Newsome climbed the flag pole and James Ian Tyson stood inside a fence and assisted her, police said. They are both 30 years old and from North Carolina. REUTERS/Adam Anderson
USA-SHOOTING/SOUTH CAROLINA
RTX1JQ76
July 09, 2015
James Tyson is arrested after Brittany "Bree" Newsome removed the Confederate flag from a pole at the...
Columbia, UNITED STATES
James Tyson is arrested after Bree Newsome removed the Confederate flag from a pole at the Statehouse...
James Tyson is arrested after Brittany "Bree" Newsome removed the Confederate flag from a pole at the Statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina, June 27, 2015. An activist climbed a flagpole outside the South Carolina state capitol early on Saturday and took down the Confederate flag, state officials said, a day after U.S. President Barack Obama called the banner a symbol of racial oppression. Two people were arrested and charged with defacing a monument, the South Carolina Department of Public Safety said in a statement. The banner was replaced within an hour, it said. Brittany Newsome climbed the flag pole and James Ian Tyson stood inside a fence and assisted her, police said. They are both 30 years old and from North Carolina. REUTERS/Adam Anderson
USA-SHOOTING/SOUTH CAROLINA
RTX1JQ75
July 09, 2015
Brittany "Bree" Newsome climbs down after removing a Confederate flag from a flagpole at the Statehouse...
Columbia, UNITED STATES
Brittany "Bree" Newsome climbs down after removing the Confederate flag from a pole at the Statehouse...
Brittany "Bree" Newsome climbs down after removing a Confederate flag from a flagpole at the Statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina, June 27, 2015. An activist climbed a flagpole outside the South Carolina state capitol early on Saturday and took down the Confederate flag, state officials said, a day after U.S. President Barack Obama called the banner a symbol of racial oppression. Two people were arrested and charged with defacing a monument, the South Carolina Department of Public Safety said in a statement. The banner was replaced within an hour, it said. Brittany Newsome climbed the flag pole and James Ian Tyson stood inside a fence and assisted her, police said. They are both 30 years old and from North Carolina. REUTERS/Adam Anderson
USA-SHOOTING/SOUTH CAROLINA
RTX1JQ6X
July 09, 2015
Brittany "Bree" Newsome removes the Confederate flag from a pole at the Statehouse in Columbia, South...
Columbia, UNITED STATES
Brittany "Bree" Newsome removes the Confederate flag from a pole at the Statehouse in Columbia
Brittany "Bree" Newsome removes the Confederate flag from a pole at the Statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina, June 27, 2015. An activist climbed a flagpole outside the South Carolina state capitol early on Saturday and took down the Confederate flag, state officials said, a day after U.S. President Barack Obama called the banner a symbol of racial oppression. Two people were arrested and charged with defacing a monument, the South Carolina Department of Public Safety said in a statement. The banner was replaced within an hour, it said. Brittany Newsome climbed the flag pole and James Ian Tyson stood inside a fence and assisted her, police said. They are both 30 years old and from North Carolina. REUTERS/Adam Anderson TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
SAFRICA-YOUTH/
RTR3MAB1
April 23, 2014
Second-year civil engineering student and first-time voter Nkululeko Simelane poses for a picture at...
Johannesburg, South Africa
Second-year civil engineering student and first-time voter Nkululeko Simelane poses for a picture at...
Second-year civil engineering student and first-time voter Nkululeko Simelane poses for a picture at Wits University in Johannesburg, April 22, 2014. Nkululeko said "For me voting for the first time... I don't want to lie I don't have the energy. The only thing that is pushing me to vote is that it is for the first time I don't want to miss it". Around 20 million South Africans - or some 40 percent of the population - are so-called "Born Frees," the term bestowed on the first generation to grow up with no memory of apartheid. April 27 this year marks the 20th anniversary of South Africa's first multi-racial elections, which ended three centuries of white domination and 46 years of formalised oppression of the black majority under the apartheid system. Picture taken April 22, 2014. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS SOCIETY ANNIVERSARY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 12 OF 12 FOR PACKAGE 'SOUTH AFRICA - BORN FREE'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'BORN FREES'
SAFRICA-YOUTH/
RTR3MAAZ
April 23, 2014
Potential first-time voter Luyanda Malinga, 20, stands outside her home in Marianhill, near Durban April...
Durban, South Africa
Potential first-time voter Luyanda Malinga, 20, stands outside her home in Marianhill, near Durban
Potential first-time voter Luyanda Malinga, 20, stands outside her home in Marianhill, near Durban April 10, 2014. Luyanda said, "I am not voting. I don't see there's a need for me to vote because there is nothing that has changed ever since people started to voting". She added "The main issue for me is education. I finished grade 12 in 2011. Ever since I did not receive any bursaries, nothing. I couldn't go to varsity at all yet I had passed very well. In those political parties you have to be involved in their stuff, you have to be a youth member to get all these things." Around 20 million South Africans - or some 40 percent of the population - are so-called "Born Frees," the term bestowed on the first generation to grow up with no memory of apartheid. Some will soon be voting for the first time in their country's upcoming general election. April 27 this year marks the 20th anniversary of South Africa's first multi-racial elections, which ended three centuries of white domination and 46 years of formalised oppression of the black majority under the apartheid system. Picture taken April 10, 2014. REUTERS/Rogan Ward (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS SOCIETY ANNIVERSARY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 09 OF 12 FOR PACKAGE 'SOUTH AFRICA - BORN FREE'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'BORN FREES'
SAFRICA-YOUTH/
RTR3MAAY
April 23, 2014
First-time voter Shaniel Naidoo, 20, stands outside his home in Northdale, near Pietermaritzburg April...
Pietermaritzburg, South Africa
First-time voter Shaniel Naidoo stands outside his home in Northdale, near Pietermaritzburg
First-time voter Shaniel Naidoo, 20, stands outside his home in Northdale, near Pietermaritzburg April 16, 2014. Shaniel said, "When the young people are voting now it's because they want the South Africa to change, to be a better South Africa. They want things to go in the right way, especially with the youngster's education. Most of the youngsters finishing school now are still without jobs. So that's one thing the political parties need to turn around, to create more jobs in South Africa". Around 20 million South Africans - or some 40 percent of the population - are so-called "Born Frees," the term bestowed on the first generation to grow up with no memory of apartheid. Some will soon be voting for the first time in their country's upcoming general election. April 27 this year marks the 20th anniversary of South Africa's first multi-racial elections, which ended three centuries of white domination and 46 years of formalised oppression of the black majority under the apartheid system. Picture taken April 16, 2014. REUTERS/Rogan Ward (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS SOCIETY ANNIVERSARY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 10 OF 12 FOR PACKAGE 'SOUTH AFRICA - BORN FREE'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'BORN FREES'
SAFRICA-YOUTH/
RTR3MAAW
April 23, 2014
First-time voter Sanele Chileze looks though the window of his home in Embo township outside Durban,...
Durban, South Africa
First-time voter Sanele Chileze looks though the window of his home in Embo township outside Durban
First-time voter Sanele Chileze looks though the window of his home in Embo township outside Durban, April 10, 2014. "We have to secure the legacy of Mandela," Sanele said. "That's why it is very important for us to vote, for this nation to be straight and everyone can be free. If I don't vote I can't say anything, if I vote I can say something." Around 20 million South Africans - or some 40 percent of the population - are so-called "Born Frees," the term bestowed on the first generation to grow up with no memory of apartheid. Some will soon be voting for the first time in their country's upcoming general election. April 27 this year marks the 20th anniversary of South Africa's first multi-racial elections, which ended three centuries of white domination and 46 years of formalised oppression of the black majority under the apartheid system. Picture taken April 10, 2014. REUTERS/Rogan Ward (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS SOCIETY ANNIVERSARY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 11 OF 12 FOR PACKAGE 'SOUTH AFRICA - BORN FREE'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'BORN FREES'
SAFRICA-YOUTH/
RTR3MAAV
April 23, 2014
First-time voter Sanele Gasa, 19, sits in the living room of his home in Inanda near Durban April 10,...
Durban, South Africa
First-time voter Sanele Gasa sits in the living room of his home in Inanda near Durban
First-time voter Sanele Gasa, 19, sits in the living room of his home in Inanda near Durban April 10, 2014. Sanele said "I don't see, to be honest, the importance of voting. It seems like when you vote and when you don't vote it's all the same. Because I know people who have voted for years and nothing has changed for them. Like my Dad, he still lives in a mud house. He was born in 1961 and he is still living in a mud house. He has been registered for plenty time for the RDP houses in the local community. There's no change. His house can fall on him during the night, no-one knows when it's raining hard. But I did register for voting. This is my first time voting, because I am a born free, I was born in 1994. It will be hard and I'll be honest for me to choose a party." Around 20 million South Africans - or some 40 percent of the population - are so-called "Born Frees," the term bestowed on the first generation to grow up with no memory of apartheid. Some will soon be voting for the first time in their country's upcoming general election. April 27 this year marks the 20th anniversary of South Africa's first multi-racial elections, which ended three centuries of white domination and 46 years of formalised oppression of the black majority under the apartheid system. Picture taken April 10, 2014. REUTERS/Rogan Ward (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS SOCIETY ANNIVERSARY)

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SAFRICA-YOUTH/
RTR3MAAU
April 23, 2014
First-time voter Mphakamisi Zali,18, stands in the kitchen of his mother's home in Cape Town's Langa...
Cape Town, South Africa
First-time voter Mphakamisi Zali stands in the kitchen of his mother's home in Cape Town's Langa township...
First-time voter Mphakamisi Zali,18, stands in the kitchen of his mother's home in Cape Town's Langa township, February 8, 2014. Mphakamisi said "The born frees can make their voices count. We need parties to concentrate on education and creating more internships and job opportunities for young people". Around 20 million South Africans - or some 40 percent of the population - are so-called "Born Frees," the term bestowed on the first generation to grow up with no memory of apartheid. Some will soon be voting for the first time in their country's upcoming general election. April 27 this year marks the 20th anniversary of South Africa's first multi-racial elections, which ended three centuries of white domination and 46 years of formalised oppression of the black majority under the apartheid system. Picture taken February 8, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS SOCIETY ANNIVERSARY)

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SAFRICA-YOUTH/
RTR3MAAT
April 23, 2014
Potential first-time voter Sandile Mabizela, 21, looks through the window of his home in Embo township...
Durban, South Africa
Potential first-time voter Sandile Mabizela looks through the window of his home in Embo township outside...
Potential first-time voter Sandile Mabizela, 21, looks through the window of his home in Embo township outside Durban April 10, 2014. Sandile said, "I don't see any importance in voting, the main people who are ruling this country are doing their own stuff. Like spending millions on just building a house. I don't see why I should vote on this thing honestly." Around 20 million South Africans - or some 40 percent of the population - are so-called "Born Frees," the term bestowed on the first generation to grow up with no memory of apartheid. Some will soon be voting for the first time in their country's upcoming general election. April 27 this year marks the 20th anniversary of South Africa's first multi-racial elections, which ended three centuries of white domination and 46 years of formalised oppression of the black majority under the apartheid system. Picture taken April 10, 2014. REUTERS/Rogan Ward (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS SOCIETY ANNIVERSARY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 02 OF 12 FOR PACKAGE 'SOUTH AFRICA - BORN FREE'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'BORN FREES'
SAFRICA-YOUTH/
RTR3MAAS
April 23, 2014
First-time voter Thandi Mamacos, 18, sits in the lounge of her shared apartment in Cape Town April 19,...
Cape Town, South Africa
First-time voter Thandi Mamacos sits in the lounge of her shared apartment in Cape Town
First-time voter Thandi Mamacos, 18, sits in the lounge of her shared apartment in Cape Town April 19, 2014. Thandi said that it is "definitely important for young people to vote because they are the ones who will have to live with the outcome the longest. It's more our country than the older generation who may not want to change things that need to be changed because of what has happened in the past." Around 20 million South Africans - or some 40 percent of the population - are so-called "Born Frees," the term bestowed on the first generation to grow up with no memory of apartheid. Some will soon be voting for the first time in their country's upcoming general election. April 27 this year marks the 20th anniversary of South Africa's first multi-racial elections, which ended three centuries of white domination and 46 years of formalised oppression of the black majority under the apartheid system. Picture taken April 19, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS SOCIETY ANNIVERSARY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 03 OF 12 FOR PACKAGE 'SOUTH AFRICA - BORN FREE'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'BORN FREES'
SAFRICA-YOUTH/
RTR3MAAR
April 23, 2014
Youth worker Nathaniel Groep, 19, stands in front of flats outside his home in Mannenberg, a gang-ravaged...
Cape Town, South Africa
Youth worker Nathaniel Groep stands in front of flats outside his home in Mannenberg, a gang-ravaged...
Youth worker Nathaniel Groep, 19, stands in front of flats outside his home in Mannenberg, a gang-ravaged township, in Cape Town April 18, 2014. Nathaniel said, "Every vote counts, particularly for young people. For our generation there are new possibilities and maybe we can build a brighter future. The issues I would like to see addressed are gangsterism, peer pressure and the lack of work opportunities". Around 20 million South Africans - or some 40 percent of the population - are so-called "Born Frees," the term bestowed on the first generation to grow up with no memory of apartheid. Some will soon be voting for the first time in their country's upcoming general election. April 27 this year marks the 20th anniversary of South Africa's first multi-racial elections, which ended three centuries of white domination and 46 years of formalised oppression of the black majority under the apartheid system. Picture taken April 18, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS SOCIETY ANNIVERSARY)

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SAFRICA-YOUTH/
RTR3MAAP
April 23, 2014
First-time voter Rethabile Moso, 19, stands outside her home in Embo township outside Durban April 10,...
Durban, South Africa
First-time voter Rethabile Moso, 19, stands outside her home in Embo township outside Durban
First-time voter Rethabile Moso, 19, stands outside her home in Embo township outside Durban April 10, 2014. Rethabile said "Most of the youth are smoking tik and drugs. They take the wrong things, drink, commit robbery. I want the political party that will lead to take care of that situation. I think my vote can make a difference". Around 20 million South Africans - or some 40 percent of the population - are so-called "Born Frees," the term bestowed on the first generation to grow up with no memory of apartheid. Some will soon be voting for the first time in their country's upcoming general election. April 27 this year marks the 20th anniversary of South Africa's first multi-racial elections, which ended three centuries of white domination and 46 years of formalised oppression of the black majority under the apartheid system. Picture taken April 10, 2014. REUTERS/Rogan Ward (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS SOCIETY ANNIVERSARY)

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SAFRICA-YOUTH/
RTR3MAAO
April 23, 2014
Mark Naidoo, 19, stands outside his parents' home in Chatsworth near Durban April 10, 2014. Mark said,...
Durban, South Africa
Mark Naidoo stands outside his parents' home in Chatsworth near Durban
Mark Naidoo, 19, stands outside his parents' home in Chatsworth near Durban April 10, 2014. Mark said, "I don't believe my vote will make a difference. My parents went through apartheid and I didn't. They know about these things and know what will change". Around 20 million South Africans - or some 40 percent of the population - are so-called "Born Frees," the term bestowed on the first generation to grow up with no memory of apartheid. Some will soon be voting for the first time in their country's upcoming general election. April 27 this year marks the 20th anniversary of South Africa's first multi-racial elections, which ended three centuries of white domination and 46 years of formalised oppression of the black majority under the apartheid system. Picture taken April 10, 2014. REUTERS/Rogan Ward (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS SOCIETY ANNIVERSARY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 04 OF 12 FOR PACKAGE 'SOUTH AFRICA - BORN FREE'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'BORN FREES'
SAFRICA-YOUTH/
RTR3MAAM
April 23, 2014
Khulasande Matabese, 18, prepares to register for elections scheduled for May 7, at a friend's home in...
Cape Town, South Africa
Khulasande Matabese prepares to register for elections scheduled for May 7 in Cape Town's Langa township...
Khulasande Matabese, 18, prepares to register for elections scheduled for May 7, at a friend's home in Langa township, Cape Town February 8, 2014. He said: "It is important for us as young people to go and vote for political parties the give us something to do, they should all create jobs and educational opportunities. If we all are positive, as I am, combined we can make a difference". Around 20 million South Africans - or some 40 percent of the population - are so-called "Born Frees," the term bestowed on the first generation to grow up with no memory of apartheid. They will soon have the chance to vote in their country's upcoming general election. April 27 this year marks the 20th anniversary of South Africa's first multi-racial elections, which ended three centuries of white domination and 46 years of formalised oppression of the black majority under the apartheid system. Picture taken February 8, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS SOCIETY ANNIVERSARY)

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Society
Society
South Africa - Born Free - 23 Apr 2014
12 PICTURES
MANDELA/
RTX169PP
December 08, 2013
Father Michael Lapsley, an Anglican clergyman and himself a victim of apartheid who lost both his hands...
Cape Town, South Africa
Father Michael Lapsley holds a prayer sheet while attending a special Sunday morning service dedicated...
Father Michael Lapsley, an Anglican clergyman and himself a victim of apartheid who lost both his hands and one eye in a letter bomb in 1990, holds a prayer sheet with the image of Nelson Mandela as he prays along with others attending a special Sunday morning service dedicated to Nelson Mandela at St. George's Cathedral in Cape Town December 8, 2013. South African anti-apartheid hero Mandela died aged 95 at his Johannesburg home on December 5 after a prolonged lung infection. REUTERS/Mark Wessels (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: OBITUARY POLITICS SOCIETY RELIGION)
SAFRICA-ZUMA/
RTR32KER
May 24, 2012
A supporter of the ruling African National Congress (ANC) party demonstrate against the showing of a...
Johannesburg, South Africa
A supporter of the ruling ANC party demonstrate against the showing of a painting, in Johannesburg
A supporter of the ruling African National Congress (ANC) party demonstrate against the showing of a painting by artist Brett Murray, outside a court in Johannesburg May 24, 2012. South Africa 's ruling ANC went to court on Thursday seeking to remove from public display a painting of President Jacob Zuma with his genitals exposed, saying the work is symbolic of the lingering racial oppression of apartheid. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)
SAFRICA-ZUMA/
RTR32KEM
May 24, 2012
Supporters of the ruling African National Congress (ANC) party demonstrate against the showing of a painting...
Johannesburg, South Africa
Supporters of the ruling ANC party demonstrate against the showing of a painting, in Johannesburg
Supporters of the ruling African National Congress (ANC) party demonstrate against the showing of a painting by artist Brett Murray, outside a court in Johannesburg May 24 2012. South Africa's ruling ANC went to court on Thursday seeking to remove from public display a painting of President Jacob Zuma with his genitals exposed, saying the work is symbolic of the lingering racial oppression of apartheid. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)
SAFRICA-ZUMA/
RTR32KEK
May 24, 2012
Supporters of the ruling African National Congress (ANC) party demonstrate against the showing of a painting...
Johannesburg, South Africa
Supporters of the ruling ANC party demonstrate against the showing of a painting, in Johannesburg
Supporters of the ruling African National Congress (ANC) party demonstrate against the showing of a painting by artist Brett Murray, outside a court in Johannesburg May 24 2012. South Africa's ruling ANC went to court on Thursday seeking to remove from public display a painting of President Jacob Zuma with his genitals exposed, saying the work is symbolic of the lingering racial oppression of apartheid. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)
SAFRICA-ZUMA
RTR32KEH
May 24, 2012
Supporters of the ruling African National Congress (ANC) party carry posters with pictures of South African...
Johannesburg, South Africa
Supporters of the ruling ANC party carry posters of South African President Zuma as they demonstrate...
Supporters of the ruling African National Congress (ANC) party carry posters with pictures of South African President Jacob Zuma as they demonstrate against the showing of a painting by artist Brett Murray, outside a court in Johannesburg May 24 2012. South Africa 's ruling ANC went to court on Thursday seeking to remove from public display a painting of Zuma with his genitals exposed, saying the work is symbolic of the lingering racial oppression of apartheid.
REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)
SAFRICA-ELECTION/POVERTY
RTR2M9EL
May 11, 2011
A woman walks past election posters of the African National Congress (ANC) and the official opposition...
Soweto, South Africa
A woman walks past election posters of the African National Congress and the official opposition party...
A woman walks past election posters of the African National Congress (ANC) and the official opposition party Democratic Alliance (DA) in Soweto May 9, 2011. Many voters believe the liberation African National Congress party has failed to make good on its promise to help the black poor who suffered racial oppression throughout much of the 20th century. Picture taken May 9. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS)
SOUTHAFRICA/
RTR2FG3P
June 20, 2010
A boy sits in a park surrounded by razor wire in Pretoria June 20, 2010. REUTERS/Brian Snyder (SOUTH...
Pretoria, South Africa
A boy sits in a park surrounded by razor wire in Pretoria
A boy sits in a park surrounded by razor wire in Pretoria June 20, 2010. REUTERS/Brian Snyder (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: SOCIETY)
World Cup 2010
World Cup 2010
South Africa's Journey - 03 Jun 2010
20 PICTURES
USA/
RTXAP8R
November 18, 2008
Courthouse workers look out the window as a member of the New Black Panthers addresses a rally outside...
Paris, UNITED STATES
Courthouse workers look out the window as a member of the New Black Panthers addresses a rally outside...
Courthouse workers look out the window as a member of the New Black Panthers addresses a rally outside the Lamar County Courthouse in Paris, Texas November 17, 2008. Protesters gathered to show support for the mother of Brandon McClelland, who was run over and dragged beneath a pickup truck in East Texas, at an organized event to draw attention to what they describe as a racially charged death reminiscent of the death of James Byrd ten years ago. REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi (UNITED STATES)
CZECH-RIOTS/
RTXAP10
November 17, 2008
A riot policeman kicks a smoke grenade at ultra-right wing protesters after some 500 of them clashed...
Litvinov, Czech Republic
A riot policeman kicks a smoke grenade at ultra-right wing protesters in Litvinov
A riot policeman kicks a smoke grenade at ultra-right wing protesters after some 500 of them clashed with police as they tried to reach a Roma settlement during their demonstration against "positive discrimination" in the north Bohemian town of Litvinov November 17, 2008. REUTERS/Petr Josek (CZECH REPUBLIC)
MALAYSIA-EDUCATION/
RTX8SCB
September 22, 2008
Malaysian students walk in a hallway during their semester break at Universiti Teknologi Mara (UiTM)...
Shah Alam, Malaysia
To match feature MALAYSIA-EDUCATION/
Malaysian students walk in a hallway during their semester break at Universiti Teknologi Mara (UiTM) in Shah Alam, outside Kuala Lumpur, August 23, 2008. UiTM accepts only ethnic Malay students as part of an affirmative action policy that Malaysia adopted in 1971 to help the economically disadvantaged Malay majority compete against the Chinese and Indian minorities. Yet that policy of affirmative action is now under fire by government critics who say the lack of competition and preferential treatment towards Malays has hurt the country's economic competitiveness in the region. Photo taken on August 23, 2008. To match feature MALAYSIA-EDUCATION/ REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad (MALAYSIA)
MEMPHIS-KING-ANNIVERSARY/
RTR1Z4I5
April 05, 2008
A man watches the "Recommitment March" to the Lorraine Motel, now the National Civil Rights Museum in...
Memphis, UNITED STATES
Man at march marking 40th anniversary of death of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in Memphis
A man watches the "Recommitment March" to the Lorraine Motel, now the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tennessee, April 4th, 2008, marking the 40th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King there in 1968. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES)
MEMPHIS-KING-ANNIVERSARY/
RTR1Z4I2
April 05, 2008
People join hands at the Lorraine Motel, now the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tennessee,...
Memphis, UNITED STATES
People hold hands at Lorraine Motel on 40th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King's assassination in...
People join hands at the Lorraine Motel, now the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tennessee, April 4, 2008, during the singing of "We Shall Overcome" at a ceremony marking the 40th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King there in 1968. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES)
MEMPHIS-KING-ANNIVERSARY/
RTR1Z4HG
April 05, 2008
A woman holds a bust of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. as she marches with thousands of others on Main Street...
Memphis, UNITED STATES
Woman holds Martin Luther King Jr. bust in March to Lorraine Motel on 40th anniversary of King's assassination...
A woman holds a bust of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. as she marches with thousands of others on Main Street in Memphis, Tennessee, April 4, 2008 in the "Recommitment March" to the Lorraine Motel, now the National Civil Rights Museum, marking the 40th anniversary of when King assassinated there in 1968. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES)
MEMPHIS-KING-ANNIVERSARY/
RTR1Z4GF
April 04, 2008
Children of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Bernice (L) and Martin Luther King III release a dove from...
Memphis, UNITED STATES
Children of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. release dove at Lorraine Motel site of assassination of King on...
Children of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Bernice (L) and Martin Luther King III release a dove from the balcony of the Lorraine Motel, now the National Civil Rights Museum, where their father was assassinated in 1968 in Memphis, April 4, 2008. April 4th marks the 40th anniversary of the assassination of the civil rights leader. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES)
MEMPHIS-KING-ANNIVERSARY/
RTR1Z4DG
April 03, 2008
Flowers lie on the plaque that lays at Lorraine Motel, now part of the National Civil Rights Museum,...
Memphis, UNITED STATES
Flowers on plaque at Lorraine Motel site of assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King on 40th anniversary...
Flowers lie on the plaque that lays at Lorraine Motel, now part of the National Civil Rights Museum, where Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in 1968 in Memphis, April 4, 2008. April 4th marks the 40th anniversary of the assassination of the civil rights leader who was shot as he stood on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES)
SAFRICA-HUMAN RIGHTS/IONS LEAGUE/
RTR1NQ5N
March 21, 2007
A protester holding a placard stands behind a Zimbabwean flag during a march in Johannesburg March 21,2007....
Johannesburg, South Africa
Protester holding a placard stands behind a Zimbabwean flag during a march in Johannesburg
A protester holding a placard stands behind a Zimbabwean flag during a march in Johannesburg March 21,2007. Scores of demonstrators marched through the city's downtown on South Africa's Human Rights Day, marking the 47th anniversary of the Sharpeville Massacre in which 69 anti-apartheid activists were killed. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko (SOUTH AFRICA)
SAFRICA AIRPORT NAME-CHANGE
RTR1IQNK
October 27, 2006
Former South African president Nelson Mandela (L) congratulates Adelaide Tambo, widow of the late Oliver...
Johannesburg, South Africa
Former South African president Nelson Mandela congratulates Adelaide Tambo in Johannesburg
Former South African president Nelson Mandela (L) congratulates Adelaide Tambo, widow of the late Oliver Tambo, during the renaming ceremony of the Johannesburg international airport to O.R Tambo international airport in Johannesburg, South Africa, October 27, 2006. Oliver Reginald Tambo was president of the African National Congress at the height of the anti-apartheid struggle in South Africa. The ceremony coincided with his birthday on October 27. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko (SOUTH AFRICA)
PEOPLE PARKS
RTR19RAN
October 31, 2005
Cicely Tyson walks by a portrait of civil rights hero Rosa Parks at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African...
multiple cities, UNITED STATES
Tyson attends walks by a portrait of civil rights hero Park's body in Detroit
Cicely Tyson walks by a portrait of civil rights hero Rosa Parks at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit, Michigan, October 31, 2005. Parks' refusal to give up her seat on a Montgomery bus to a white man 50 years ago helped break racial segregation in America. Parks died on October 24, 2005 at her home in Detroit at age 92. Her funeral is scheduled to take place in Detroit on Wednesday. REUTERS/Susan Tusa/ Pool Pictures of the month October 2005
SAFRICA WOMEN DAY
RTR73WI
August 09, 2000
A South African policeman descends stairs from a memorial to black women who marched against apartheid...
Pretoria, South Africa
SOUTH AFRICAN POLICEMAN DESCENDS STAIRS FROM NEWLY INAUGURATED MONUMENT IN PRETORIA.
A South African policeman descends stairs from a memorial to black women who marched against apartheid and the anti-black "Pass Laws" in 1956. The stairs carry as an inscription the text of a message delivered to Pretoria 44 years ago on the day now celebrated as Women's Day. The stairs lead to a monument opened on August 9, 2000, by President Thabo Mbeki.

JN/JRE
RECONCILIATION
RTR1I15
January 28, 1997
Monica Godolozi (L) and Elizabeth Hashe (R), widows of activists known as the Pebco three who were alledgedly...
South Africa
WIDOWS OF ACTIVISTS LEAVE A PRESS CONFERENCE IN ELIZABETH
Monica Godolozi (L) and Elizabeth Hashe (R), widows of activists known as the Pebco three who were alledgedly killed by security police, leave a Truth and Reconciliation Commission press conference, January 28. At the Press conference Commissioners announced that a breakthough had been made in investigations into several politically motivated assassinations, including the murder of Steve Biko during the Apartheid era, following amnesty applications made by former policemen.

SAFRICA TRUTH
SOUTH AFRICA
RTXGB52
January 25, 1995
Women who fought as guerrillas against the apartheid government undergo weapons training at 5 Signal...
Women who fought as guerrillas against the apartheid government undergo weapons training at 5 Signal.....
Women who fought as guerrillas against the apartheid government undergo weapons training at 5 Signal Regiment military base north of Pretoria January 24
SOUTH AFRICA
RTXF3E1
February 01, 1993
A taxi driver is pulled out of his car and attacked by a police dog during demonstrations in the business...
A taxi driver is pulled out of his car and attacked by a police dog during demonstrations in the bus.....
A taxi driver is pulled out of his car and attacked by a police dog during demonstrations in the business district of Johannesburg February 1. At least 11 people including six policemen were injuredand three killed during rioting which broke out between taxi owners and police
MDF1674982.TIF
RTR1B52R
August 31, 1989
Student demonstrators at Johannesburg's Witwatersrand University flee as police fire tear gas at them...
Johannesburg, South Africa
Student demonstrators at Johannesburg's Witwatersrand University flee as police fire tear gas at them...
Student demonstrators at Johannesburg's Witwatersrand University flee as police fire tear gas at them during an anti-apartheid protest rally in Johannesburg, South Africa August 31, 1989. Police banned the rally in terms of emergency laws as part of a nationwide crackdown on dissent. REUTERS/Ulli Michel
South Africa
RTXDS85
June 14, 1988
A sign reading "Beach and sea; whites only" prior to the end of Apartheid in Strand, South Africa 1988....
None, South Africa
Black South African Passing Whites Only Beach Sign
A sign reading "Beach and sea; whites only" prior to the end of Apartheid in Strand, South Africa 1988. Reuters/Ulli Michel BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE
JOHANNESBURGH
RTR5T
December 02, 1986
A witness to the murder of South African black doctor Fabian Ribiero covers himself to protect his identity...
Johannesburgh, South Africa - Republic of South Africa
WITNESS TO MURDER COVERED UNDER JACKET DISPLAYS SPENT CARTRIDGES IN JOHANNESBURG LAW OFFICE.
A witness to the murder of South African black doctor Fabian Ribiero covers himself to protect his identity and displays spent cartridges in a Johannesburgh law office, December 2, 1986, where he went to give information about the shooting. Ribiero and his wife were shot down last night at their home in Mamelodi township outside Pretoria. SCANNED FROM NEGATIVE REUTERS/Wendy Schwegmann CMC
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