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Search results for: Radioactive-contamination

UKRAINE-CHERNOBYL/UNESCO
RTXBP6MF 
April 22, 2021 
An employee undergoes a radioactive contamination check near the damaged fourth reactor at the Chernobyl... 
Chernobyl, Ukraine 
An employee undergoes a radioactive contamination check near the damaged fourth reactor at the Chernobyl... 
An employee undergoes a radioactive contamination check near the damaged fourth reactor at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Chernobyl, Ukraine March 25, 2021. Picture taken March 25, 2021. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich 
Spotlight
Spotlight 
Soviet waste dump a landslide away from poisoning millions 
24 PICTURES 
CHERNOBYL-ANNIVERSARY/
RTX2BDUW 
April 24, 2016 
A tree grows out of the door of an abandoned barn in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl... 
KRASNOSELIE, Belarus 
Tree grows out of the door of an abandoned barn in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl... 
A tree grows out of the door of an abandoned barn in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, in the abandoned village of Krasnoselie, Belarus, February 17, 2016. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
CHERNOBYL-ANNIVERSARY/STALKER
RTX2B20O 
April 21, 2016 
A participant demonstrates a hand-made prop of a radioactive detector during a S.T.A.L.K.E.R. convention... 
Moscow, Russia 
The Wider Image: In the shadow of Chernobyl: S.T.A.L.K.E.R 
A participant demonstrates a hand-made prop of a radioactive detector during a S.T.A.L.K.E.R. convention in Moscow, Russia, April 2, 2016. A game known as S.T.A.L.K.E.R., named after a popular computer shooter, is fast winning the minds of intellectuals across the former Soviet Union who take on roles of mutants, zombies and warriors on unfinished construction sites. As the 30th anniversary of the nuclear disaster in Chernobyl is marked on April 26, enacting a post-apocalyptic world is a philosophy that warns of the perils of uncontrolled use of nuclear power, the game's enthusiasts claim. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov SEARCH "S.T.A.L.K.E.R MAX" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/IVAN
RTX29WQH 
April 14, 2016 
Ivan Shamyanok, 90, sits in front of his house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone... 
TULGOVICHI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - living in the exclusion zone 
Ivan Shamyanok, 90, sits in front of his house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, Belarus April 2, 2016. Shamyanok says the secret to a long life is not leaving your birthplace even when it is a Belarusian village poisoned with radioactive fallout from a nuclear disaster. In April 1986, a botched test at a nuclear plant in Chernobyl, Ukraine, sent clouds of smouldering nuclear material across swathes of Europe and forced more than 100,000 people to leave a permanently contaminated "exclusion zone". April 26, 2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the worst nuclear meltdown in history. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "EXCLUSION IVAN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/IVAN
RTX29WQG 
April 14, 2016 
Dog called Bosy lies on an empty road in front of Ivan Shamyanok's house in the village of Tulgovichi,... 
TULGOVICHI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - living in the exclusion zone 
Dog called Bosy lies on an empty road in front of Ivan Shamyanok's house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, Belarus April 2, 2016. Shamyanok, 90, says the secret to a long life is not leaving your birthplace even when it is a Belarusian village poisoned with radioactive fallout from a nuclear disaster. In April 1986, a botched test at a nuclear plant in Chernobyl, Ukraine, sent clouds of smouldering nuclear material across swathes of Europe and forced more than 100,000 people to leave a permanently contaminated "exclusion zone". April 26, 2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the worst nuclear meltdown in history. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "EXCLUSION IVAN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/IVAN
RTX29WQF 
April 14, 2016 
Ivan Shamyanok, 90, washes his face after he shaved in his house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the... 
TULGOVICHI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - living in the exclusion zone 
Ivan Shamyanok, 90, washes his face after he shaved in his house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, Belarus March 15, 2016. Shamyanok says the secret to a long life is not leaving your birthplace even when it is a Belarusian village poisoned with radioactive fallout from a nuclear disaster. In April 1986, a botched test at a nuclear plant in Chernobyl, Ukraine, sent clouds of smouldering nuclear material across swathes of Europe and forced more than 100,000 people to leave a permanently contaminated "exclusion zone". April 26, 2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the worst nuclear meltdown in history. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "EXCLUSION IVAN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/IVAN
RTX29WQC 
April 14, 2016 
A kettle stands on a stove in Ivan Shamyanok's house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion... 
TULGOVICHI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - living in the exclusion zone 
A kettle stands on a stove in Ivan Shamyanok's house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, Belarus April 2, 2016. Shamyanok, 90, says the secret to a long life is not leaving your birthplace even when it is a Belarusian village poisoned with radioactive fallout from a nuclear disaster. In April 1986, a botched test at a nuclear plant in Chernobyl, Ukraine, sent clouds of smouldering nuclear material across swathes of Europe and forced more than 100,000 people to leave a permanently contaminated "exclusion zone". April 26, 2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the worst nuclear meltdown in history. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "EXCLUSION IVAN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/IVAN
RTX29WQB 
April 14, 2016 
Ivan Shamyanok, 90, drinks tea in his house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around... 
TULGOVICHI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - living in the exclusion zone 
Ivan Shamyanok, 90, drinks tea in his house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, Belarus April 2, 2016. Shamyanok says the secret to a long life is not leaving your birthplace even when it is a Belarusian village poisoned with radioactive fallout from a nuclear disaster. In April 1986, a botched test at a nuclear plant in Chernobyl, Ukraine, sent clouds of smouldering nuclear material across swathes of Europe and forced more than 100,000 people to leave a permanently contaminated "exclusion zone". April 26, 2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the worst nuclear meltdown in history. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "EXCLUSION IVAN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/IVAN
RTX29WQ9 
April 14, 2016 
Ivan Shamyanok, 90, is seen in his house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around... 
TULGOVICHI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - living in the exclusion zone 
Ivan Shamyanok, 90, is seen in his house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, Belarus March 15, 2016. Shamyanok says the secret to a long life is not leaving your birthplace even when it is a Belarusian village poisoned with radioactive fallout from a nuclear disaster. In April 1986, a botched test at a nuclear plant in Chernobyl, Ukraine, sent clouds of smouldering nuclear material across swathes of Europe and forced more than 100,000 people to leave a permanently contaminated "exclusion zone". April 26, 2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the worst nuclear meltdown in history. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "EXCLUSION IVAN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/IVAN
RTX29WQ8 
April 14, 2016 
Abandoned and ruined house is seen near Ivan Shamyanok's house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the... 
TULGOVICHI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - living in the exclusion zone 
Abandoned and ruined house is seen near Ivan Shamyanok's house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, Belarus April 1, 2016. Shamyanok, 90, says the secret to a long life is not leaving your birthplace even when it is a Belarusian village poisoned with radioactive fallout from a nuclear disaster. In April 1986, a botched test at a nuclear plant in Chernobyl, Ukraine, sent clouds of smouldering nuclear material across swathes of Europe and forced more than 100,000 people to leave a permanently contaminated "exclusion zone". April 26, 2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the worst nuclear meltdown in history. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "EXCLUSION IVAN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/IVAN
RTX29WQ7 
April 14, 2016 
Abandoned and ruined house is seen near Ivan Shamyanok's house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the... 
TULGOVICHI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - living in the exclusion zone 
Abandoned and ruined house is seen near Ivan Shamyanok's house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, Belarus April 1, 2016. Shamyanok, 90, says the secret to a long life is not leaving your birthplace even when it is a Belarusian village poisoned with radioactive fallout from a nuclear disaster. In April 1986, a botched test at a nuclear plant in Chernobyl, Ukraine, sent clouds of smouldering nuclear material across swathes of Europe and forced more than 100,000 people to leave a permanently contaminated "exclusion zone". April 26, 2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the worst nuclear meltdown in history. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "EXCLUSION IVAN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/IVAN
RTX29WQ6 
April 14, 2016 
Abandoned and ruined house is seen near Ivan Shamyanok's house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the... 
TULGOVICHI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - living in the exclusion zone 
Abandoned and ruined house is seen near Ivan Shamyanok's house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, Belarus April 1, 2016. Shamyanok, 90, says the secret to a long life is not leaving your birthplace even when it is a Belarusian village poisoned with radioactive fallout from a nuclear disaster. In April 1986, a botched test at a nuclear plant in Chernobyl, Ukraine, sent clouds of smouldering nuclear material across swathes of Europe and forced more than 100,000 people to leave a permanently contaminated "exclusion zone". April 26, 2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the worst nuclear meltdown in history. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "EXCLUSION IVAN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/IVAN
RTX29WQ5 
April 14, 2016 
Ivan Shamyanok, 90, shaves in his house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around... 
TULGOVICHI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - living in the exclusion zone 
Ivan Shamyanok, 90, shaves in his house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, Belarus March 15, 2016. Shamyanok says the secret to a long life is not leaving your birthplace even when it is a Belarusian village poisoned with radioactive fallout from a nuclear disaster. In April 1986, a botched test at a nuclear plant in Chernobyl, Ukraine, sent clouds of smouldering nuclear material across swathes of Europe and forced more than 100,000 people to leave a permanently contaminated "exclusion zone". April 26, 2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the worst nuclear meltdown in history. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "EXCLUSION IVAN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/IVAN
RTX29WQ1 
April 14, 2016 
Ivan Shamyanok, 90, checks on his pigs near his house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion... 
TULGOVICHI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - living in the exclusion zone 
Ivan Shamyanok, 90, checks on his pigs near his house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, Belarus April 2, 2016. Shamyanok says the secret to a long life is not leaving your birthplace even when it is a Belarusian village poisoned with radioactive fallout from a nuclear disaster. In April 1986, a botched test at a nuclear plant in Chernobyl, Ukraine, sent clouds of smouldering nuclear material across swathes of Europe and forced more than 100,000 people to leave a permanently contaminated "exclusion zone". April 26, 2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the worst nuclear meltdown in history. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "EXCLUSION IVAN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/IVAN
RTX29WQ0 
April 14, 2016 
An icon hangs in a corner of Ivan Shamyanok's house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion... 
TULGOVICHI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - living in the exclusion zone 
An icon hangs in a corner of Ivan Shamyanok's house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, Belarus April 2, 2016. Shamyanok, 90, says the secret to a long life is not leaving your birthplace even when it is a Belarusian village poisoned with radioactive fallout from a nuclear disaster. In April 1986, a botched test at a nuclear plant in Chernobyl, Ukraine, sent clouds of smouldering nuclear material across swathes of Europe and forced more than 100,000 people to leave a permanently contaminated "exclusion zone". April 26, 2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the worst nuclear meltdown in history. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "EXCLUSION IVAN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/IVAN
RTX29WPZ 
April 14, 2016 
Ivan Shamyanok, 90, sweeps inside a pigsty near his house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion... 
TULGOVICHI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - living in the exclusion zone 
Ivan Shamyanok, 90, sweeps inside a pigsty near his house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, Belarus April 2, 2016. Shamyanok says the secret to a long life is not leaving your birthplace even when it is a Belarusian village poisoned with radioactive fallout from a nuclear disaster. In April 1986, a botched test at a nuclear plant in Chernobyl, Ukraine, sent clouds of smouldering nuclear material across swathes of Europe and forced more than 100,000 people to leave a permanently contaminated "exclusion zone". April 26, 2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the worst nuclear meltdown in history. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "EXCLUSION IVAN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/IVAN
RTX29WPY 
April 14, 2016 
Photographs of Ivan Shamyanok's relatives are seen in his house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the... 
TULGOVICHI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - living in the exclusion zone 
Photographs of Ivan Shamyanok's relatives are seen in his house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, Belarus April 2, 2016. Shamyanok, 90, says the secret to a long life is not leaving your birthplace even when it is a Belarusian village poisoned with radioactive fallout from a nuclear disaster. In April 1986, a botched test at a nuclear plant in Chernobyl, Ukraine, sent clouds of smouldering nuclear material across swathes of Europe and forced more than 100,000 people to leave a permanently contaminated "exclusion zone". April 26, 2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the worst nuclear meltdown in history. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "EXCLUSION IVAN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/IVAN
RTX29WPW 
April 14, 2016 
Ivan Shamyanok, 90, visits his brother's grave at a cemetery in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion... 
TULGOVICHI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - living in the exclusion zone 
Ivan Shamyanok, 90, visits his brother's grave at a cemetery in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, Belarus April 3, 2016. Shamyanok says the secret to a long life is not leaving your birthplace even when it is a Belarusian village poisoned with radioactive fallout from a nuclear disaster. In April 1986, a botched test at a nuclear plant in Chernobyl, Ukraine, sent clouds of smouldering nuclear material across swathes of Europe and forced more than 100,000 people to leave a permanently contaminated "exclusion zone". April 26, 2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the worst nuclear meltdown in history. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "EXCLUSION IVAN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/IVAN
RTX29WPV 
April 14, 2016 
Ivan Shamyanok, 90, takes water from a well at his house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion... 
TULGOVICHI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - living in the exclusion zone 
Ivan Shamyanok, 90, takes water from a well at his house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, Belarus April 2, 2016. Shamyanok says the secret to a long life is not leaving your birthplace even when it is a Belarusian village poisoned with radioactive fallout from a nuclear disaster. In April 1986, a botched test at a nuclear plant in Chernobyl, Ukraine, sent clouds of smouldering nuclear material across swathes of Europe and forced more than 100,000 people to leave a permanently contaminated "exclusion zone". April 26, 2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the worst nuclear meltdown in history. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "EXCLUSION IVAN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/IVAN
RTX29WPU 
April 14, 2016 
Ivan Shamyanok, 90, leaves his house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the... 
TULGOVICHI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - living in the exclusion zone 
Ivan Shamyanok, 90, leaves his house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, Belarus March 15, 2016. Shamyanok says the secret to a long life is not leaving your birthplace even when it is a Belarusian village poisoned with radioactive fallout from a nuclear disaster. In April 1986, a botched test at a nuclear plant in Chernobyl, Ukraine, sent clouds of smouldering nuclear material across swathes of Europe and forced more than 100,000 people to leave a permanently contaminated "exclusion zone". April 26, 2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the worst nuclear meltdown in history. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "EXCLUSION IVAN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/IVAN
RTX29WPS 
April 14, 2016 
Ivan Shamyanok, 90, eats lunch in his house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around... 
TULGOVICHI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - living in the exclusion zone 
Ivan Shamyanok, 90, eats lunch in his house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, Belarus April 2, 2016. Shamyanok says the secret to a long life is not leaving your birthplace even when it is a Belarusian village poisoned with radioactive fallout from a nuclear disaster. In April 1986, a botched test at a nuclear plant in Chernobyl, Ukraine, sent clouds of smouldering nuclear material across swathes of Europe and forced more than 100,000 people to leave a permanently contaminated "exclusion zone". April 26, 2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the worst nuclear meltdown in history. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "EXCLUSION IVAN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/IVAN
RTX29WPR 
April 14, 2016 
Ivan Shamyanok, 90, rests at his house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the... 
TULGOVICHI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - living in the exclusion zone 
Ivan Shamyanok, 90, rests at his house in the village of Tulgovichi, near the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, Belarus March 15, 2016. Shamyanok says the secret to a long life is not leaving your birthplace even when it is a Belarusian village poisoned with radioactive fallout from a nuclear disaster. In April 1986, a botched test at a nuclear plant in Chernobyl, Ukraine, sent clouds of smouldering nuclear material across swathes of Europe and forced more than 100,000 people to leave a permanently contaminated "exclusion zone". April 26, 2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the worst nuclear meltdown in history. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "EXCLUSION IVAN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTM4 
April 06, 2016 
A white-tailed eagle sits on the roof of an abandoned school near the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone... 
TULGOVICHI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
A white-tailed eagle sits on the roof of an abandoned school near the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, in the abandoned village of Tulgovichi, Belarus, January 29, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone", roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTM1 
April 06, 2016 
A yellowhammer is seen on the remains of a house at the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl... 
OREVICHI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
A yellowhammer is seen on the remains of a house at the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor in the abandoned village of Orevichi, Belarus, March 12, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTM0 
April 06, 2016 
A fox walks through the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor near the... 
BABCHIN, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
A fox walks through the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor near the abandoned village of Babchin, Belarus, March 5, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTLZ 
April 06, 2016 
An abandoned house is seen in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor... 
POGONNOE, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
An abandoned house is seen in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor in the abandoned village of Dronki, Belarus, January 28, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTLV 
April 06, 2016 
A woodpecker looks out of a hollow in a tree in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl... 
BABCHIN, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
A woodpecker looks out of a hollow in a tree in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor near the abandoned village of Babchin, Belarus, April 3, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTLU 
April 06, 2016 
An otter swims in a river in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor... 
POGONNOE, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
An otter swims in a river in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor in the abandoned village of Pogonnoe, Belarus, March 13, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTLR 
April 06, 2016 
A golden eagle approaches the remains of an elk in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl... 
BABCHIN, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
A golden eagle approaches the remains of an elk in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor near the abandoned village of Babchin, Belarus, March 16, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTLQ 
April 06, 2016 
A black stork flies through the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor... 
DRONKI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
A black stork flies through the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor near the abandoned village of Dronki, Belarus, April 2, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTLP 
April 06, 2016 
A wolf crosses a road in a forest in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear... 
DRONKI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
A wolf crosses a road in a forest in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor near the abandoned village of Dronki, Belarus, April 2, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTLO 
April 06, 2016 
A tawny owl leaves a chimney in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor... 
KAZHUSHKI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
A tawny owl leaves a chimney in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor in the abandoned village of Kazhushki, Belarus, March 16, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTLH 
April 06, 2016 
Elks are seen in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor near the abandoned... 
DRONKI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
Elks are seen in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor near the abandoned village of Dronki, Belarus, January 28, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTLA 
April 06, 2016 
Ruined farm's buildings are seen in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear... 
POGONNOE, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
Ruined farm's buildings are seen in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor in the abandoned village of Pogonnoe, Belarus, March 13, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTL9 
April 06, 2016 
A wolf looks into the camera at the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor... 
OREVICHI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
A wolf looks into the camera at the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor in the abandoned village of Orevichi, Belarus, March 2, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. Photo taken with trail camera. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTL8 
April 06, 2016 
A magpie flies over a barbed wire fence at the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear... 
BABCHIN, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
A magpie flies over a barbed wire fence at the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor near the abandoned village of Babchin, Belarus, February 18, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTL6 
April 06, 2016 
Hunters drag wolves killed in a field outside of the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl... 
KHRAPKOV, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
Hunters drag wolves killed in a field outside of the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, near the village of Khrapkov, Belarus, January 27, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTL4 
April 06, 2016 
Wolves walk in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor in the abandoned... 
OREVICHI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
Wolves walk in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor in the abandoned village of Orevichi, Belarus, February 25, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. Photo taken with trail camera. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTL3 
April 06, 2016 
Bisons are seen at a bison nursery in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear... 
DRONKI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
Bisons are seen at a bison nursery in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor near the abandoned village of Dronki, Belarus, January 28, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTL2 
April 06, 2016 
Bisons are seen at a bison nursery in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear... 
DRONKI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
Bisons are seen at a bison nursery in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor near the abandoned village of Dronki, Belarus, January 28, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTL1 
April 06, 2016 
A white-tailed eagle lands on a wolf's carcass in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl... 
DRONKI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
A white-tailed eagle lands on a wolf's carcass in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, in the abandoned village of Dronki, Belarus, February 15, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTKZ 
April 06, 2016 
An elk runs in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, near the village... 
BABCHIN, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
An elk runs in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, near the village of Babchin, Belarus, January 27, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTKY 
April 06, 2016 
A radiation sign is seen in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor... 
DRONKI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
A radiation sign is seen in the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor in the abandoned village of Dronki, Belarus, February 11, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
BELARUS-CHERNOBYL/WILDLIFE
RTSDTKW 
April 06, 2016 
A World War Two monument is seen near the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear... 
TULGOVICHI, Belarus 
The Wider Image: Chernobyl - wilderness regained
A World War Two monument is seen near the 30 km (19 miles) exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, near the village of Babchin, Belarus, January 26, 2016. What happens to the environment when humans disappear? Thirty years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, booming populations of wolf, elk and other wildlife in the vast contaminated zone in Belarus and Ukraine provide a clue. On April 26, 1986, a botched test at the nuclear plant in Ukraine, then a Soviet republic, sent clouds of smouldering radioactive material across large swathes of Europe. Over 100,000 people had to abandon the area permanently, leaving native animals the sole occupants of a cross-border "exclusion zone" roughly the size of Luxembourg. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko SEARCH "WILD CHERNOBYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
UKRAINE-CHERNOBYL/
RTSCKBD 
March 28, 2016 
A doll is seen amongst beds at a kindergarten in the abandoned city of Pripyat near the Chernobyl nuclear... 
Pripyat, Ukraine 
A doll is seen amongst beds at a kindergarten in the abandoned city of Pripyat near the Chernobyl nuclear... 
A doll is seen amongst beds at a kindergarten in the abandoned city of Pripyat near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 28, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
UKRAINE-CHERNOBYL/ARCH
RTSBZGD 
March 24, 2016 
A cross with a crucifix is seen in the deserted town of Pripyat near Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in... 
Pripyat, Ukraine 
A cross with a crucifix is seen in the deserted town of Pripyat 
A cross with a crucifix is seen in the deserted town of Pripyat near Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine March 23, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
UKRAINE-CHERNOBYL/ARCH
RTSBZG8 
March 24, 2016 
Employees work in a lab at a plant for processing liquid radioactive waste at the Chernobyl nuclear power... 
Chernobyl, Ukraine 
Employees work in a lab at a plant for processing liquid radioactive waste at the Chernobyl nuclear power... 
Employees work in a lab at a plant for processing liquid radioactive waste at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 23, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich 
UKRAINE-CHERNOBYL/ARCH
RTSBZG0 
March 24, 2016 
An employee measures the radiation level at a plant for processing liquid radioactive waste at the Chernobyl... 
Chernobyl, Ukraine 
An employee measures the radiation level at a plant for processing liquid radioactive waste at the Chernobyl... 
An employee measures the radiation level at a plant for processing liquid radioactive waste at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 23, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich 
UKRAINE-CHERNOBYL/ARCH
RTSBZFW 
March 24, 2016 
An employee is seen at a plant for processing liquid radioactive waste at the Chernobyl nuclear power... 
Chernobyl, Ukraine 
An employee is seen at a plant for processing liquid radioactive waste at the Chernobyl nuclear power... 
An employee is seen at a plant for processing liquid radioactive waste at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 23, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich 
UKRAINE-CHERNOBYL/ARCH
RTSBZFV 
March 24, 2016 
An employee measures the radiation level at a plant for processing liquid radioactive waste at the Chernobyl... 
Chernobyl, Ukraine 
An employee measures the radiation level at a plant for processing liquid radioactive waste at the Chernobyl... 
An employee measures the radiation level at a plant for processing liquid radioactive waste at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 23, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich 
UKRAINE-CHERNOBYL/ARCH
RTSBZFU 
March 24, 2016 
An employee is seen at a plant for processing liquid radioactive waste at the Chernobyl nuclear power... 
Chernobyl, Ukraine 
An employee is seen at a plant for processing liquid radioactive waste at the Chernobyl nuclear power... 
An employee is seen at a plant for processing liquid radioactive waste at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine March 23, 2016. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich 
MIDEAST CRISIS/IRAQ-RADIOACTIVE
RTX27XR3 
February 21, 2016 
A member of a counter-radiation team uses a Geiger counter to search for missing radioactive material... 
Basra, Iraq 
A member of a counter-radiation team uses a Geiger counter to search for missing radioactive material... 
A member of a counter-radiation team uses a Geiger counter to search for missing radioactive material in Basra, Iraq, February 21, 2016. Radioactive material that went missing in Iraq has been found dumped near a petrol station in the southern town of Zubair, officials said on Sunday, ending speculation it could be acquired by Islamic State and used as a weapon. The officials told Reuters the material, stored in a protective case the size of a laptop computer, was undamaged and there were no concerns about radiation. REUTERS/Essam Al-Sudani 
MIDEAST CRISIS/IRAQ-RADIOACTIVE
RTX27XR0 
February 21, 2016 
A member of a counter-radiation team uses a Geiger counter to search for missing radioactive material... 
Basra, Iraq 
A member of a counter-radiation team uses a Geiger counter to search for missing radioactive material... 
A member of a counter-radiation team uses a Geiger counter to search for missing radioactive material in Basra, Iraq, February 21, 2016. Radioactive material that went missing in Iraq has been found dumped near a petrol station in the southern town of Zubair, officials said on Sunday, ending speculation it could be acquired by Islamic State and used as a weapon. The officials told Reuters the material, stored in a protective case the size of a laptop computer, was undamaged and there were no concerns about radiation. REUTERS/Essam Al-Sudani 
MIDEAST CRISIS/IRAQ-RADIOACTIVE
RTX27XQY 
February 21, 2016 
A member of a counter-radiation team uses a Geiger counter to search for missing radioactive material... 
Basra, Iraq 
A member of a counter-radiation team uses a Geiger counter to search for missing radioactive material... 
A member of a counter-radiation team uses a Geiger counter to search for missing radioactive material in Basra, Iraq, February 21, 2016. Radioactive material that went missing in Iraq has been found dumped near a petrol station in the southern town of Zubair, officials said on Sunday, ending speculation it could be acquired by Islamic State and used as a weapon. The officials told Reuters the material, stored in a protective case the size of a laptop computer, was undamaged and there were no concerns about radiation. REUTERS/Essam Al-Sudani 
MIDEAST CRISIS/IRAQ-RADIOACTIVE
RTX27XQX 
February 21, 2016 
A member of a counter-radiation team uses a Geiger counter to search for missing radioactive material... 
Basra, Iraq 
A member of a counter-radiation team uses a Geiger counter to search for missing radioactive material... 
A member of a counter-radiation team uses a Geiger counter to search for missing radioactive material in Basra, Iraq, February 21, 2016. Radioactive material that went missing in Iraq has been found dumped near a petrol station in the southern town of Zubair, officials said on Sunday, ending speculation it could be acquired by Islamic State and used as a weapon. The officials told Reuters the material, stored in a protective case the size of a laptop computer, was undamaged and there were no concerns about radiation. REUTERS/Essam Al-Sudani 
MIDEAST CRISIS/IRAQ-RADIOACTIVE
RTX27XQW 
February 21, 2016 
A member of a counter-radiation team uses a Geiger counter to search for missing radioactive material... 
Basra, Iraq 
A member of a counter-radiation team uses a Geiger counter to search for missing radioactive material... 
A member of a counter-radiation team uses a Geiger counter to search for missing radioactive material in Basra, Iraq, February 21, 2016. Radioactive material that went missing in Iraq has been found dumped near a petrol station in the southern town of Zubair, officials said on Sunday, ending speculation it could be acquired by Islamic State and used as a weapon. The officials told Reuters the material, stored in a protective case the size of a laptop computer, was undamaged and there were no concerns about radiation. REUTERS/Essam Al-Sudani 
MIDEAST CRISIS/IRAQ-RADIOACTIVE
RTX27XQP 
February 21, 2016 
A member of a counter-radiation team uses a Geiger counter to search for missing radioactive material... 
Basra, Iraq 
A member of a counter-radiation team uses a Geiger counter to search for missing radioactive material... 
A member of a counter-radiation team uses a Geiger counter to search for missing radioactive material in Basra, Iraq, February 21, 2016. Radioactive material that went missing in Iraq has been found dumped near a petrol station in the southern town of Zubair, officials said on Sunday, ending speculation it could be acquired by Islamic State and used as a weapon. The officials told Reuters the material, stored in a protective case the size of a laptop computer, was undamaged and there were no concerns about radiation. REUTERS/Essam Al-Sudani TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
JAPAN-DISASTER/
RTX26APQ 
February 10, 2016 
A Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) employee measures radiation level of 213 microsievert per hour in... 
OKUMA TOWN, Japan 
A Tokyo Electric Power Co. employee measures radiation level of 213 microsievert per hour in front of... 
A Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) employee measures radiation level of 213 microsievert per hour in front of the No. 2 (L) and No.3 reactor buildings at TEPCO's tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Okuma town, Fukushima prefecture, Japan February 10, 2016. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
JAPAN-NUCLEAR/RESTARTS
RTX1NTQR 
August 11, 2015 
79-year-old Shouhei Nomura checks radiation levels close to the protesters' campsite near Kyushu Electric... 
SATSUMASENDAI, Japan 
Wider Image: Protesting Japan’s Nuclear Restart 
79-year-old Shouhei Nomura checks radiation levels close to the protesters' campsite near Kyushu Electric Power's Sendai nuclear power station in Satsumasendai, Kagoshima prefecture, Japan, August 8, 2015. Japan is due to switch on a nuclear reactor for the first time in nearly two years as Prime Minister Shinzo Abe seeks to reassure a nervous public that tougher standards mean the sector is now safe after the Fukushima disaster in 2011. The head of Japan's atomic watchdog has said that the new safety regime meant a repeat of the Fukushima disaster would not happen, but protesters outside the Sendai plant are not convinced. REUTERS/Issei KatoPICTURE 6 OF 30 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "PROTESTING JAPAN'S NUCLEAR RESTART".SEARCH "KATO SENDAI" FOR ALL PICTURES. 
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